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    Nāʻālehu's Independence Day Parade for this year is canceled. Sponsored by ʻO Kaʻū Kākou and the Discovery Harbour
    family of Lee and Debra McIntosh, the program is paused during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    See more below. Photo by Leilani Esperanza

    A COVID-19 CONTACT TRACING PARTNERSHIP is bringing University of Hawaiʻi and the state Department of Health together. With funding of $2.5 million, they plan to train personnel and community health workers in contact tracing. Health experts say extensive contact tracing is a key component to prevent spread of the virus while relaxing stay-at-home-orders and restarting Hawaiʻi's economy.
         At the peak of the first COVID-19 wave, DOH trained more than 100 contact tracers, including some 30 volunteers from UH and DOH with backgrounds in public health, epidemiology, medicine, and nursing. The new one-year program will leverage UH faculty expertise and existing courses across the ten-campus system to quickly develop content for the contact tracing training.
         UH President David Lassner said, "This has been a brainchild of State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park and UH's own Dr. Aimee Grace, who leads our UHealthy Hawaiʻi Initiative at the UH System. We believe that these programs to expand the number of contract tracers and community health workers will really help protect all of Hawaiʻi's communities."
         The plan is to train approximately 300 contact tracers. Some with appropriate backgrounds could be ready in two to three days. Others, needing more training, could be ready in two to three months, depending on their backgrounds and the university's capacity for the training. DOH would activate the trained contact tracers, as needed. Some could become emergency hires in the event of a surge in COVID-19 cases.
    University of Hawaiʻi and state Department of Health will use $2.5 million in funding to train personnel and
    community health workers in contact tracing to stem coronavirus. Photo from University of Hawaiʻi
         At a May 13 news conference with Gov. David Ige, DOH Director Bruce Anderson said, "With 300 staff to extend the capacity for monitoring and investigation, we expect to build the capacity up to at least 1,000 cases a day. Hopefully, we will not be approaching anything close to that, but we are planning for the worst and building up our capacity, accordingly."
         UH will offer two tracks for contact tracing training: a course for clinical professionals - approximately two to three days to complete for those with at least an undergraduate degree and a clinical health background; and an intensive contact tracing program - approximately two to three months for those with undergraduate degrees, health sciences preferred. All training content and materials will be approved by the DOH.
         Support will be provided to trainees who complete the program and join the DOH's volunteer Medical Reserve Corps.
         UH Community Colleges will add capacity in the community health worker programs and update curricula so that community health worker graduates will be prepared to support COVID-19 contact tracing as needed.
         A statement from the Hawaiʻi COVID-19 Joint Information Center said, "Health workers are a critical component to contract tracing with their special community-based training and ties to work effectively with identified high-risk populations. Those populations include Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander communities, which are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, along with the unemployed and homeless."
         The course for clinical professionals will be led by Kristine Qureshi, Associate Dean for Research and Global Health and emergency preparedness expert at the UH Mānoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene. The intensive contact tracing program will be led by Ricardo Custodio, Associate Professor of Health Science at UH West Oʻahu.
         Anyone interested in the contact tracing or community health worker training can contact COVID19@HAWAII.EDU.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    REP. TULSI GABBARD AND LT. GOV. JOSH GREEN joined in a telephone town hall this week to update Hawaiʻi residents about the coronavirus crisis. Listen to the full tele-town hall.
         Gabbard stressed that "Opening Hawaiʻi safely will require vigilant testing and contact tracing. As an island state, we are in a unique position to do this effectively. This should have been implemented in full force from the start of the outbreak, and we can't responsibly move forward without it."
         Gabbard noted that she will be in Washington, D.C. on Friday to vote on a new emergency assistance bill, H.R.6800, the Heroes Act. It would provide financial resources to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments. Some $3.3 billion would go to Hawaiʻi, divided between the state, counties, and municipalities, over two years.
    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard during one of her telephone town halls. Photo from Tulsi Gabbard
         The Heroes Act also includes $200 billion to provide hazard pay to essential workers, nationwide. It provides funding to help those hit hardest by the crisis. It includes an employee retention credit, additional funding to small businesses through the Paycheck Protection Program and Economic Injury Disaster Loan programs, $175 billion in housing assistance, additional funding for nutrition programs that help families put food on the table, education, and an extension of the $600 weekly federal unemployment benefits payments until January 2021.
         The legislation would also provide a second $1,200 direct payment to all individuals, including dependents, up to $6,000 per household. Rep. Gabbard was the first in Congress to call for a monthly direct payment to continue as long as the crisis continues, and she will continue to fight for a monthly emergency basic payment to provide certainty for Americans during this crisis, said Gabbard.
         Gabbard expressed concern that the Heroes Act was crafted without Republican or White House negotiations. She predicted that Friday's vote will only be a starting point before a bipartisan consensus is achieved to pass a final bill, which would meet the critical needs of first responders, frontline workers, and families.
         The Lieutenant Governor gave an update on Hawaiʻi's success in flattening the curve. He noted that while the risk has gone down, it is still important to maintain social distancing, mask-wearing, and personal hygiene.
         Gabbard and Green answered questions on the call about the next steps, as Hawaiʻi begins to open back up. They emphasized the importance of testing and contact tracing as the keys to reopening.
         Gabbard also answered questions related to the safety of elections, noting the funding and language in the Heroes Act to ensure every voter can access voting by mail for the November 2020 election.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Thy Word Ministries and its patriotic float in the 2019 Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade. The 2020 event, sponsored
    by OKK and the McIntosh family, is canceled due to the pandemic. Photo by Peter Anderson
    NĀʻĀLEHU'S INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE is canceled for this year, according to Wayne Kawachi, President of ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, the major sponsoring organization. The annual event features floats, horses and riders, walking groups, and classic vehicles along the Hwy 11 route through Nāʻālehu. Most creative and most patriotic presentations are named.
         To put on the event, OKK works with the McIntosh family of Discovery Harbour.
         
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, THE FOOD BASKET, AND ACTIVATE HAWAIʻI AID will receive money from Hawaiian Electric and Hawaiian Electric Industries Charitable Foundation. The nonprofit organizations feed people impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic on this island, including residents of Kaʻū and Volcano. To each non-profit, the utility is donating $2,000 and the Foundation, $5,000.
         A statement from the utility says the biggest concern and priority on Hawai‘i Islandis food security. The donations to The Boys & Girls Club of the BigIsland, The Food Basket, and Activate Hawai‘i Aid are intended to "support their ongoing efforts to provide fresh produce, shelf-stable food, and prepared meals to Hawai‘i Islandfamilies."

         Sharon Suzuki, Hawaiian Electric's president of MauiCounty and Hawai‘i Island Utilities, said, "Communities count on us to provide reliable electric service to operate essential businesses and support new stay-at-home lifestyles. It's also important for us to do what we can to help those who are struggling with basic needs. I'm grateful these three organizations are working together to meet Hawai‘i Island's food security needs during this very tough time."

         Through its daily Community Meal Support Initiative, the Boys & Girls Club of the BigIsland provides nutritional hot meals to the island's most vulnerable populations including keiki, kūpuna, homeless, and struggling families. Their efforts help fill shortfalls and resource gaps, especially in very rural communities that are unable to benefit from school-based cafeteria meals due to lack of transportation. Last month, it provided more than 18,000 meals and it now provides up to 800 meals daily. Through this donation, BGCBI can provide 1,272 meals for the community.

         Chad Cabral, Chief Executive Officer of Boys & Girls Club Big Island, said "The continued support of Hawaiian Electric and the HEI Charitable Foundation has allowed the Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island to be able to quickly respond to the needs of those on Hawai‘i Island who are struggling as a result of the pandemic. Thank you for a true partnership that helps to support and strengthen our Hawai‘i Island communities."

         The Food Basket provides ʻOhana Drop boxes which include a multi-day supply of shelf-stable food and local fresh produce for individuals and families. It offers drive-thru food distribution at 16 sites around the island and home delivery for those with limited transportation or compromised health. Through this donation, The Food Basket is able to purchase 5,000 pounds of food for the community.

         Kristin Frost Albrecht, executive director of The Food Basket, said "We are so extremely grateful to HEI and Hawaiian Electric for their long-time partnership and generous support to provide food assistance to the most vulnerable residents on Hawai‘i Island. Given the skyrocketing number of families and individuals in need in our hard-hit communities across the island, this donation will provide critical food support during this unprecedented and challenging time."

         Activate Hawai‘i Aid is a collective of community and government, working together to activate an islandwide network of resilience. The $2,000 donation supported the Keiki Care Packs initiative by providing 2,712 packs to children in more than 30 Hawai‘i Island communities, including Miloliʻi, Nāʻālehu, and Volcano. Learn how to sign up to receive food, below. Each pack includes foodstuffs, curated activities, resources, and materials to help keiki and parents better understand and cope with the pandemic. The additional $5,000 will support the #FeedThePeopleHI - Puna project, a collaboration between Chef Hui and AHA to increase food security for Puna households. Beginning May 15, and every Friday for the next eight weeks, 500 meal kits with ingredients and recipe cards for one-to-two big batch meals will be distributed to communities in upper and lower Puna subdivisions.
         Ashley Kierkiewicz, lead organizer for Activate Hawai‘i Aid, said, "Many hands and many huis have come together to do something special for our keiki and community. So much thought, aloha, and planning goes into each project, and because it is a massive, ongoing give, working with community leaders is key. We rely on generous donations such as those from Hawaiian Electric, so we can activate our volunteer network and amplify our give."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    SIGN UP FOR KEIKI CARE PACKS by Friday, May 15, for distribution the week of May 25, through Activate Hawai‘i Aid. Specific pick-up days, times, and locations are posted to the calendar at activatehawaiiaid.org/keiki-care-packs. Those who sign up are notified via email and/or text to confirm pick-up date and location, at least 48 hours in advance.
         RSVP for keiki pack(s) by taking the Community Pulse Survey online or by calling the Food Access Hotline at 808-793-5703. For those who have already filled out the survey and just want to RSVP for the next distribution, the survey has been modified to ask only questions related to their RSVP.

    Volunteers don masks and gloves to distribute Keiki Care Packs
    in Miloliʻi. Photo from Activate Hawaiʻi Aid
         Care packs are distributed by drive-thru. Recipients are asked to stay in their vehicles to maintain safe social distancing. Home deliveries are generally not available; however, a few case-by-case exceptions may be made, when resources permit.

         The organization's website asks the public to "be understanding if we are unable to provide you the full number of Keiki Care Pack(s) for which you have RSVP'd. A limit per household may be implemented at the time of distribution if demand exceeds our supply. We are working diligently to make sure this does not occur, but please be patient with us if it does."

         Each pack contains approximately $15 worth of items for kids and young teens, including non-perishable foodstuffs (e.g. canned meats, packaged goods, snacks, cookies, fruit cups, juice, etc.) and curated coloring sheets, activities, and resources "to help children better understand the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as materials to support parents to engage their keiki and cope with the stresses of living through this pandemic." Each round of care packs is different; contents will vary based on what is available from local distributors and community partners.

         Activate Hawaiʻi Aid schedules islandwide distributions of Keiki Care Packs once per month. They started with 1,000 packs in 13 communities in March 2020; in April, it was 2,700 packs in two dozen communities. Packs are assembled in Hilo in an environment that mitigates COVID-19 exposure risk and trucked to distribution locations in every district on Hawaiʻi Island. 
    Keiki Care Packs, delivered to Volcano. Photo from Activate Hawaiʻi Aid
         Activate Hawaiʻi Aid is partnered with Connect Point Church in Hilo to purchase products and stage distribution. All volunteers are screened and vetted before being confirmed to serve. All involved in packing must wear masks and gloves, and each packing shift is limited to no more than 10 people. Captains ensure that proper social distancing, hand washing, and disinfecting protocols are being adhered to in both packing and distribution. Packs are organized so that they will be touched as little as possible to avoid contamination or cross-contamination.

         The Activate Hawaiʻi Aid website says, "We are constantly fundraising to support this program and would love for your kōkua. All coordination, packing, and distribution efforts are volunteered, which means all money donated to this program goes to care packs! You can either click here to donate via our fiscal partner or volunteer to help us with our hotline or packaging and distribution of packs by emailing us at aloha@activatehawaiiaid.org. Our goal is to provide a Keiki Care Pack to every child in need on Hawai‘i Island each month. We appreciate your help!​"

         Activate Hawaiʻi Aid started the Keiki Care Pack program during the pandemic: "Going to school means so much to our keiki. It's a place for socialization, structure, and extracurricular activities. For many, it's a source of support and a place where essential services, such as breakfast and lunch, can be accessed. Our schools provide a safety net, but COVID-19 has upended that. Due to extended school closures by the DOE, a hui of parents joined forces with Activate Hawai‘i Aid to figure out a way to support our keiki. We wanted to do something that served their physical and emotional well-being. Hence, the Keiki Care Packs program was born."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported in the entire state today. The state Department of Health reported that one case was removed, bringing down the total count during the pandemic to 637 in the Hawaiian Islands. No one died on this island and only one victim was hospitalized for one night. One victim was reported as being from the 96672 zip code. No other victims were confirmed in Kaʻū nor Volcano.
         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "There are no identified positive Coronavirus cases on Hawaiʻi Island at this date. All that was tested positive has been cleared as recovered.
         "To all the Health care organizations and supporting agencies, thank you for your good and hard work of developing and continuing a comprehensive testing network for the safety of Hawaiʻi's people.
    Civil Defense Director 
    Talmadge Magno.
    Photo from Big Island Video News
         "Know that early testing means early detection and early care. By your participation, you are helping develop a comprehensive database of information for Health Care officials to keep on top of things so they can respond appropriately and timely.
         "Please understand the good place that Hawaiʻi is in today just reflects the importance of following the policies of prevention. The virus is still out there and we need to get better to keep Hawaiʻi safe! Thank you for doing your part. Thank you for listening. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding. his is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."
         In the United States, more than 1.45 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 86,541.
         Worldwide, more than 4.44 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 302,376.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.


    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.



    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.


    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.



    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






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    Jaggar Museum and the USGS headquarters in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park in 2018 before earthquakes
    severely damaged the buildings. Give public input into reconstruction of the facilities. See story below. NPS Photo
    KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS HAS JOINED THE BUY ONE, FEED ONE campaign to help fund the Food Bank, support restaurants, and to encourage people going for takeout to purchase a second meal for someone affected by the fallout of COVID-19. Through restaurants that sign up, Kamehameha Schools donates to the Food Bank, the dollar per dollar cost of the second meal.
         A statement from KS says, "Mahalo to the many people and organizations who have collectively helped those in need during this crisis - a true testament to the aloha that we all share!
         "The COVID-19 pandemic has created a challenging situation for many across the globe. As a whole, we must find opportunities to ensure the health and well-being of our communities, especially for those families and individuals who don’t have the adequate resources to get through these uncertain and stressful times.
         "Kamehameha Schools is joining this kākou movement by supporting the Buy One, Feed One (#BOFOHawaii) campaign." The program runs through the month of May or "until the campaign threshold is met - further ensuring that no one will go hungry during this crisis." KS committed to donating up to $50,000.
         Here's how to participate: Purchase two takeout meals at a participating restaurant. "Take a photo of yourself with the meals you bought." Share a short description of the recipient of the additional meal, such as a kūpuna, neighbor, friend, teacher, or keiki. Tag the post with #BOFOHawaii. Tag or share with a friend who is eating out. "Together, we will come out of this situation stronger and better. I mua!" says the KS statement.
          See the full list of participating restaurants. Those signed up on Hawaiʻi Island are in Keauhou Shopping Center: Bianelliʻs Gourmet Pizza (808) 322-0377; Kenichi Bento Box (808) 339-7703; L&L Hawaiian BBQ (808) 322-9988; Los Habaneros (808) 324-6488; Peaberry and Galette (808) 322-6020; Royal Thai Café (808) 322-8424, and Subway (808) 322-1818.                     Kamehameha Schools encourages restaurants in Kaʻū and Volcano to join in.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A WEBINAR ON THE U.S. SUPREME COURT RULING ON THE CLEAN WATER ACT will be held next Tuesday, May 19 at 6 p.m. Speakers will include Hannah Bernard, Executive Director of Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, known for its beach cleanups and other conservation projects in Kaʻū. Also on the webinar will be Earthjustice attorney David Henkin and former EPA Coral Reef Ecologist Wendy Wiltse, PhD. It is co-sponsored by the Surfrider Foundation.
         The Supreme Court ruling in April broke with the view of the County of Maui and the Trump Administration and favored Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund. In a six to two ruling, the justices concluded that the Clean Water Act covers pollutants that reach the ocean indirectly, such as treated sewage injected into groundwater. If the effluent with pollutants reaches the ocean, the process violates the Clean Water Act, ruled the Supreme Court.
         The case involved a wastewater treatment plant on Maui that pumps four million gallons of treated sewage into injection wells, daily. Over time, some of it is carried by groundwater into the ocean. The Trump administration's brief sided with the county and argued that the Clean Water Act does not apply to the treated sewage that moves through groundwater before reaching protected waters.
         The Supreme Court sent the case back to the Ninth Circuit Court for application of new standards put forth in the ruling. See a New York Times story on the ruling for some of the questions posed by the justices.
         The webinar will be live-streamed via Facebook Live at bit.ly/cwa-0519. Megan Lamson, of Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, encourages public participation, saying that the case will impact water pollution laws and standards around the state and beyond.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt visited Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park last May to investigate the
    damage from the earthquakes, and to help launch a plan to rebuild and repair the Park and USGS facilities.
    See the concepts online at Disaster Recovery Project. Photo by Julia Neal
    HISTORIC JAGGAR MUSEUM WOULD BE DEMOLISHED on the edge of Kīlauea caldera at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, due to damage sustained in the 2018 earthquakes and eruption. The Reginald T. Okamura building would be torn down and most of the existing footprint would be restored to natural conditions. Some remnant elements from the buildings may be salvaged and incorporated into a viewing shelter located on-site.
         These are elements of concepts released this week by the National Park Service for public input into its Disaster Recovery Project.
         The Geochemistry Annex building would be repaired for interim use by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory and National Park Service administration until the new USGS field station is completed, at which time the Annex may be demolished. The existing restrooms would be repaired for continued visitor use. The existing paved and walled overlook in front of the restrooms, Annex, and Jaggar Museum, would be repaired and improved. Improvements would include enlarging the overlook to incorporate some of the footprint of the Jaggar Museum and adding an open-air viewing shelter.
    From HVNP Disaster Recovery – Concept Development (May 2020) Common to All | Uēkahuna Bluff.
    See the larger concept drawings online at Disaster Recovery Project.
         A second area, previously used by the public as an informal viewing area, would become a formalized overlook, with possible hard surface and perimeter walls, located along Crater Rim Trail south of the public parking area. The existing Crater Rim Trail would be maintained.
         The existing radio tower and radio room would remain. The existing water tanks may be replaced or removed, depending on if the Annex remains long-term. In the future and if needed, visitor parking capacity would be added by constructing a new parking lot on the other side of Crater Rim Drive. This would alleviate severe congestion and resource damage that occurs during summit eruptions. The Jaggar Museum to Nāmakanipaio Trail connection would be re-routed if this parking is constructed.
         Provide input to the National Park Service by choosing a concept and making comments.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FOUR CONCEPTS ARE OPEN FOR PUBLIC REVIEW in the planning for the future of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park facilities. According to Concept One, National Park Service would construct a new Kīlauea Visitor Center on the south side of Crater Rim Drive, near the Park entrance, in a forested area. It would include covered lanai, outdoor exhibits, theater, visitor parking, bus parking, NPS administrative parking, pedestrian circulation, and a new wastewater system, and a separate restroom building, built by NPS.
         "A new visitor center would be large enough to accommodate the visitor functions currently provided at Kīlauea Visitor Center and previously provided by Jaggar Museum," says the plan. "A new visitor center would allow a single, easy-to-find stop for the interpretation of the Park's defining features in a coordinated and consolidated manner. New covered picnic tables would be constructed in the existing picnic area, adjacent to the 1877 Volcano House."
         Visitor use in the KVC building would be relocated to the new visitor center. The existing KVC building would be repurposed as an education center with existing NPS office and auditorium uses maintained. The existing education center in the NPS administrative area would be repurposed for NPS administrative use.
    Concept One for improvements at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
     See the larger concept drawings online at Disaster Recovery Project.
         A new USGS HVO & PIERC-KFS Field Station, with parking and wastewater system, would be constructed to the east of the KVC building in a section of previously disturbed forest which is fragmented by utility corridors and an unpaved parking lot.
         An administrative bypass lane, additional fee booth, and replacement staff parking would be added to the existing entrance station. Crater Rim Drive would be realigned and a roundabout would be constructed to improve traffic flow, safety, and wayfinding at the Crater Rim Drive intersection.
    Existing water and communications lines would be utilized with minor relocation and connection spurs.
         See Concept Two in Saturday's Kaʻū News Briefs. See all four concepts and provide input to the National Park Service by choosing a concept and making comments.
         To be mailed design concepts, or to receive answers to questions, call (808) 460-6212, or email havo_planning@nps.gov. The comment period will end Monday, June 15. The National Park Service will use community feedback to determine which concept, or modified concept, will be the concept considered. NPS will evaluate the impacts of any proposed alternative.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    STACY HIGA FILED PAPERS TO RUN FOR MAYOR of Hawaiʻi County, this week. The Nā Leo TV CEO and former County Council member, Higa announced his candidacy on April 19. Former Hawaiʻi State Representative Cindy Evans and former Council Member Dennis "Fresh" Onishi endorsed his campaign.
         Said Onishi, "I know Stacy has the experience and leadership needed to guide Hawaiʻi County through these times. It will take a combination of government, business, and nonprofit experience to help lead our island to brighter days, and Stacy checks all of the boxes when comparing each Mayoral candidate."
    Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate Stacy Higa.
         Evans said, "I believe there is no better person to address the issues we face than Stacy Higa. I trust his leadership, I trust his awareness, I trust his values, and I trust his commitment to the people of Hawaiʻi Island."
         Higa expressed his appreciation: "We believe that the wave of endorsements over the past two weeks speaks to the fact that the people of Hawaiʻi Island are looking for someone with a proven track record of leadership. This has never been about me, but always about us. I look forward to the opportunity to put my skills, talents, and experience to work for the people of the County of Hawaiʻi. One island, one future isn't a dream, it's a promise!"
         Others who have announced their candidacies include incumbent Harry Kim, County Prosecutor Mitch Roth, Public Works Highways Division Chief Neil Azevedo, former County Councilmember Kelly Greenwell, first-term County Council member Kanealiʻi Kleinfelder, former county Director of Parks & Recreation Bob Fitzgerald, Puna community organizer Ikaika Marzo, former community radio and television news producer Wendell Kaʻehuʻaeʻa, former Kona restaurateur Tante Urban, musician and entertainer Grayden Haʻi-Kelly, State Family Law attorney James "Jiro" Yuda, Highway Division Division Chief at county Department of Public Works Neil Azevedo, and medical cannabis advocate Mike Ruggles. Those who have expressed interest or pulled nomination papers but not yet filed include: Yumi Kawano, of Volcano, a forester-conservationist and former teacher; Wendell Kaehuaea, a Hilo security guard and consistent candidate for more than a decade; Abolghassem Abraham Sadegh, a former government official in Iran and frequent testifier at County Council meetings; Daniel Cunningham, former County Council District  candidate; Harvey W. Eli, of Kona; Michael Glendon, an active protestor of the Thirty Meter Telescope; and Ted "Toku San" Shaneyfelt, a lecturer in computer science at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

         The primary election, by mail, is Saturday, August 8. The deadline to file papers to run for Mayor is Tuesday, June 2. If one of the top two candidates receives more than 50 percent of the vote, the mayorship is decided. If not, the top two square off in the general election on Nov. 3.


    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    HAWAIʻI ISLAND SPORTS THE ONLY NEW CASE OF COVID-19 reported in the entire state today. The state Department of Health has not disclosed the victim's location, nor zip code. The total count during the pandemic is 638 for the state. The island's total count is 76, with 75 cleared as recovered by the Department of Health. No one died on this island and only one victim was hospitalized for one night.         One victim was reported as being from the 96672 zip code, which includes Naʻalehu. No other victims were confirmed in Kaʻū nor Volcano.

         The daily message from Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "To all the health care organizations and supporting agencies, thank you, for your good work of planning and developing an island wide system of testing for the safety of the Hawaiian Island Community. Testing will continue and is needed to help develop a comprehensive database for health officials to stay on top of things so they can respond timely and appropriately.

    Civil Defense Director 
    Talmadge Magno.
    Photo from Big Island Video News
         Please, know how important it is to continue following the policies of prevention.  The coronavirus is out there, and we need to work together to keep Hawaiʻi Safe. Thank you for doing your part. Thank you for listening and a huge acknowledgment to all the police officers on this National Law Enforcement Week and the deepest of gratitude and remembrance on this Peace Officer's Memorial Day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.47 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 89,200.

         Worldwide, more than 4.53 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 307,000.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FREE BOOK EXCHANGE at the laundromat in Ocean View is provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. The other free book exchange is located at the laundromat in Nāʻālehu. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.


    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.

         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






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    Pūhāhonu, the turtle rising for breath, is the tiny peak of the massive volcano. New research deems it the
    largest shield volcano in the world, much larger than Mauna Loa, the former title holder. Pūhāhonu
    was formerly called Gardner Pinnacles. Photo from Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
    KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP WILL REOPEN ON JUNE 1 for accommodations and plans to start serving meals at its Crater Rim Café. When its bowling alley,  luʻau, and bar reopen depends on the schedule of reopening Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, the location of the KMC campus. It also depends on state and county health directives connected to the COVID-19 pandemic. The store and gas station remain open.
          Crater Rim Café announced its Father's Day Dinner Special with prime rib for Sunday, June 21 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The restaurant will offer sit-down and Grab & Go dinners. For dine-in seating, reservations are required by calling 967-8356. See more below.
    Kīlauea Military Camp plans to open its accommodations and restaurant
    on June 1. Photo from militarycampgrounds.us
         Volcano House is also taking reservations for check-in beginning June 1, pending reopening of access to its site within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes Park.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    PŪHĀHONU, THE TURTLE RISING FOR BREATH, IS THE LARGEST MOUNTAIN IN HAWAIʻI, and the hottest and largest shield volcano on earth. Mauna Loa is no longer seen as the biggest mountain. University of Hawaiʻi School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology recently published the study that measured Pūhāhonu, formerly called Gardner Pinnacles. It's a volcano located within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Only five acres at the surface, it rises above the ocean between French Frigate Shoals and Maro Reef.
         An article this week in Phys Org says, "Geoscientists and the public have long thought Mauna Loa, a culturally-significant and active shield volcano on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi, was the largest volcano in the world. However, after surveying the ocean floor along the mostly submarine Hawaiian leeward volcano chain, chemically analyzing rocks in the UH Mānoa rock collection, and modeling the results of these studies, the research team came to a new conclusion. Pūhāhonu, meaning 'turtle rising for breath' in Hawaiian, is nearly twice as big as Mauna Loa."
         Michael Garcia, lead author of University of Hawaiʻi's SOEST study, said "It has been proposed that hotspots that produce volcano chains like Hawaiʻi undergo progressive cooling over 1-2 million years and then die. However, we have learned from this study that hotspots can undergo pulses of melt production. A small pulse created the Midway cluster of now extinct volcanoes and another, much bigger one created Pūhāhonu. This will rewrite the textbooks on how mantle plumes work.
         "In 1974, Pūhāhonu (then called Gardner Pinnacles) was suspected as the largest Hawaiian volcano based on very limited survey data. Subsequent studies of the Hawaiian Islands concluded that Mauna Loa was the largest volcano but they included the base of the volcano that is below sea level that was not considered in the 1974 study. The new comprehensive surveying and modeling, using methods similar to those used for Mauna Loa show that Pūhāhonu is the largest.
         "This study highlights Hawaiian volcanoes, not only now but for millions of years, have been erupting some of the hottest magma on Earth. This work also draws attention to an infrequently visited part of the state of Hawaiʻi that has ecological, historical, and cultural importance."
         Garcia told Phys Org: "We are sharing with the science community and the public that we should be calling this volcano by the name the Hawaiians have given to it, rather than the western name for the two rocky small islands that are the only above sea level remnants of this once-majestic volcano."
         Friends of Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge gives the history of westerners finding in 1820, when Captain Joseph Allen of the Nantucket whaler, Maro, reported seeing "a new island or rock not laid down on any of our charts... It has two detached humps... We call it Gardner's Island."
    Pūhāhonu, Gardner Pinnacles, is known for its giant ʻopihi. 
    Photo from Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
         According to Friends, Pūhāhonu is noted for giant ʻopihi, the endemic Hawaiian limpets, and 27 species of stony coral. Acropora table corals occupy the leeward side, while tube, stony, and soft corals live throughout the reef. Pūhāhonu is known for some of the most variety in fish species in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. It is home to seabirds, insects, and one plant, a succulent called sea purslane. Nineteen seabird species live there, a dozen of them nesting.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A NEW VISITOR CENTER IS AN OPTION PRESENTED IN CONCEPT TWO, the second of four alternative plans for the future of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park facilities. The public is invited to comment and make suggestions for the future of the park through June 15. Concept Two, illustrated in the Park's Disaster Recovery Project documents, includes a new visitor center with interior restrooms, constructed east of Kīlauea Visitor Center. It includes a covered lanai, outdoor exhibits, theater, visitor parking, bus parking, and pedestrian circulation.
         A new visitor center would be large enough to accommodate visitor functions, space currently provided by KVC and previously provided by Jaggar Museum. It would allow a single, easy-to-find stop for the interpretation of the Park's defining features in a coordinated and consolidated manner.
    New covered picnic tables would be constructed in the existing picnic area adjacent to the 1877 Volcano House.
         Visitor use in the Kīlauea Visitor Center building would be relocated to the new visitor center. The existing KVC building would be repurposed as an education center, with existing NPS office and auditorium uses being maintained. The existing education center in the NPS administrative area would be repurposed for NPS administrative use.

    See the larger concept drawings online at Disaster Recovery Project.
         A new USGS HVO & PIERC-KFS Field Station, parking, and wastewater system would be constructed near the Visitor Emergency Operations Center, in a currently forested area. An administrative bypass lane, additional fee booth, and replacement staff parking would be added to the entrance station.
         Crater Rim Drive would be realigned, and a roundabout would be constructed to improve traffic flow, safety, and wayfinding at the Crater Rim Drive intersection. Existing water and communications lines would be utilized with minor relocation and connection spurs.
         See Concept Three in Sunday's Kaʻū News Briefs and Concept Four in Monday's Kaʻū News Briefs. See all four concepts and provide input here. To be mailed the design concepts, or to receive answers to questions, call (808) 460-6212, or email havo_planning@nps.gov. The comment period will end Monday, June 15. The National Park Service will use community feedback to determine which concept, or modified concept, will be the proposed concept. NPS will evaluate the impacts of any proposed alternative.

    State Sen. Kai Kahele included this photo, from a 2015 Kāneʻohe Bay Air
    Show at the Marine Corps Base on Oʻahu, in his Armed Forces Day
    message. Photo from Kahele

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    IT'S ARMED FORCES DAY and state Sen. Kai Kahele, himself a National Guard pilot, sent out this message:

         "Pres. John F. Kennedy declared National Armed Forces Day an official holiday to honor all the brave men and women who serve our country. Today, we close out Armed Forces Week by celebrating every branch of our military.

         "Hawaiʻi is one of few states in the country with one base from each branch of the military — with the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard all represented throughout our islands. With 11 military bases in Hawaiʻi, the military creates around 100,000 civilian jobs in our beautiful home state.

         "It's wonderful that we have a week dedicated to our military every May, but we can't let our commitment to them end today. When we ask our service members to put their lives on the line for us and our families, we must always have their backs. This means providing proper mental and physical healthcare, good job opportunities, and housing options for veterans when they come home.

         "There's a long way to go to make sure we're keeping our word to our veterans and their families. In Congress, Kai will honor the commitment of our service members, veterans, and their families.
         "Mahalo to all the men and women who serve."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR FATHER'S DAY at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from to  Seating is limited due to social distancing. Grab & Go dinners will be available. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with salad, mashed potatoes, and steamed rice side dishes, and cheesecake dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, Grab & Go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    A FALSE POSITIVE ON A COVID-19 TEST reported Friday on Hawaiʻi Island led to a retraction by the Department of Health. DOH reports on Saturday, one new case on Hawaiʻi Island, and one on Oʻahu.
         Seventy six COVID-19 cases have been confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with all but today's victim recovered.
         DOH confirms 639 cases statewide since the pandemic began, with 415 on Oʻahu, 117 in Maui County, 21 in Kauaʻi County and 10 cases involving residents diagnosed outside the state.
         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "Know that all policies of distancing, face coverings, cleanliness, and personal health remains in effect. Thank you for doing your part to keep Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for listening and a humble and grateful recognition of all service personnel on this National Armed Forces Day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."
         In the United States, more than 1.5 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 89,420.
         Worldwide, more than 4.63 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 311,000.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    At last year's Kaʻū Coffee College, Brittany Horn instructs coffee farmers on using yeast during processing.
    Photo by Lora Boronova

    Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
    KAʻŪ COFFEE COLLEGE drew many coffee farmers, buyers, roasters, and enthusiasts to Pāhala Community Center last year in May to wrap up the eleventh annual Kaʻū Coffee Festival. The Coffee College and other Festival events are on pause this year during the pandemic.
         Andrea Kawabata, of the University of Hawaiʻi Agricultural Extension Service, who is working through the pandemic online and on the ground, gave a presentation last year on increasing yields on farms. She laid out some basic rules: Seek science, keep records, spend wisely. Understand that time is money and be committed.

         She advised that the simplest way to grow more coffee is to plant more coffee in areas where coffee trees are weak. Replace them where coffee trees have died or been taken out.
    Andrea Kawabata from University of Hawaiʻi Extension Service 
    encourages coffee farmers to seek science, keep records, 
    and spend wisely. Photo by Lora Botonnova

         She also emphasized proper use of pesticides, and provided examples of using poisons that can weaken the coffee plant and lead to mites and other infestations, that lead to a higher cost and losses in the long run. She said that keeping trees healthy is the best practice, along with careful pesticide management when needed.
         Kawabata provides coffee berry borer integrated pest management recommendations to growers throughout the state, Puerto RicoEl Salvador, and in an emerging coffee growing business in California.
         Dr. Adel Youkhana, of University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, advised farmers on making accurate predictions of their Kaʻū coffee crops. He is also an expert on productivity and carbon sequestration on the growing of coffee, particularly in shade-grown coffee.
         Brittany Horn, founder and owner of Pacific Coffee Research, talked about the introduction of coffee yeast to the Kaʻū Coffee fermentation process. Ongoing trials with coffee cupping feedback help each farmer to determine the yeast protocol for coffee. Yeast helps to quicken the fermentation process, which is one of the key steps in processing coffee.
         Cal Westergard, of the state Department of Agriculture, advised farmers on the safe use of pesticides on their Kaʻū Coffee farms.

    Gloria Camba, left, and Bong Aquino, right, still smiling after a week of Kaʻū Coffee Festival events last year. 
    Photo by Lora Botonova


    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.



    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:
         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Call 928-8208.
         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.

    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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    Mayoral candidate Mitch Roth came to Pāhala with food on Saturday. Helping with distribution of boxed food and plate lunches were members of the ILWU, a union that endorsed him. Roth is the elected county prosecutor.
    See story below. Photo by Julia Neal

    CHEF KEONE GRACE LAUNCHES A FOOD SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC on the grounds of Kaʻū Hospital on Monday. The chef, and Institutional Food Service Manager at Kaʻū  Hospital, produced a menu with his crew, at a cost of $8 per meal. It's ready for takeout at 11 a.m. Mondays through Fridays.
    A chef salad from the new weekdays lunch service for the public from
    Chef Keoni Grace and his food service crew at Kaʻū Hospital.
    See story below. Photo from Keone Grace
         Chef salads and cold sandwiches are available each day, with a choice of turkey, ham, or pastrami. Sandwiches come with chips, small salad, and dessert.
         Hot meals come with small salad and dessert, and a change of the entré each day. This Monday is roast pork; Tuesday, hamburger steak; Wednesday, baked chicken; Thursday, pork adobo; and Friday, fried fish.
         To order, call Jennifer at 932-4372 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. and pre-pay. Pick up is in the back of the hospital at the kitchen's rear entrance, after 11 a.m. Ring the bell for service, wear a mask, and observe social distancing with other persons picking up food.
    Keone Grace interviewed for a cover story in Japan Airlines magazine.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         Grace and crew are known for good food for long term Kaʻū Hospital residents and staff. In addition, he caters for numerous events in Kaʻū and beyond.
         His recipes using Kaʻū Coffee were featured last November in Skyward, the inflight magazine of Japan Airlines in a cover article entitled Kaʻū Coffee The Big Island.
    More than 900,000 copies went to subscribers and the story was available on JAL's planes to more than 2.6 million passengers last November.
         Pāhala Plantation House hosted the photographer, writer, and editor  from JAL. In its dining room, Grace, Kaʻū Coffee farmers, and enthusiasts presented food using Kaʻū Coffee, such as brazed meats and skewered coffee-infused fruits, vegetables, and shrimp. Grace promoted cuisine employing produce from local farmers.

    The kitchen staff at Kaʻū Hospital starts a luncheon takeout 
    service on Monday. Photo from Keone Grace

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MAYORAL CANDIDATE MITCH ROTH arrived in Pāhala on Saturday with food to distribute to seniors and families in need. With face masks on and social distancing, he and campaign staff shared goodwill, boxed fresh fruit and vegetables, and plate lunches. They engaged in some informal discussions of local issues as people arrived to the  Longakit driveway on Koali Street, a family home of Roth's campaign manager Pomai Bartolome. Her father, a well-known musician, Lloyd Longakit, played Hawaiian music.
         Among Roth's supporters at the food giveaway were leaders and members of the ILWU, including Hawai`i Island Director, Elmer Gorspe. The ILWU endorses Roth for Mayor of Hawaiʻi County.
         Roth serves as elected Prosecuting Attorney for County of Hawaiʻi, first elected in 2012. He oversees 124 employees, 34 of them prosecuting attorneys. He is known for his peacekeeping work in Ocean View, supporting neighborhood watch and other programs to reduce drug use and crime in the community. His staff has prosecuted cold cases, implemented a restorative justice project, created a sexual assault unit with attorneys experienced in such cases, and set up community outreach and training about sexual assault.
         In support of victims, Roth employs counselors to offer victim services. Victims receiving counseling include those with personal assault and property theft cases. He also works on programs to prevent agricultural theft.
         He helped launch the Veterals Treatment Court and Big Island Juvenile Intake and Assessment Center. His campaign website says the Juvenile Intake and Assessment Center has helped cut in half the juvenile crime in this county. 
    ILWU leader Elmer Gorospe gives a food box to a Pāhala family, in
    support of the Mitch Roth for Mayor campaign. Photo by Julia Neal 
         Roth earned his undergraduate degree from University of Hawai‘i -Manoa, his Jurist Doctorate from Whittier Law School. Between undergraduate and law school, he lived in Japan and taught English.  There, he met his wife-to-be, Noriko Yamada. Mitch and Noriko Yamada Roth are parents of three adult children, alumni of Waiakea High School in Hilo.
         Mitch Roth won the Honolulu Prosecuting Attorney's Award of Excellence. On this island, he oversaw the Asset Forfeiture Program and served as a Special Assistant United States Attorney.
         His community service activities include helping to create Hawai‘i Island Visitor Aloha Society, the Community Coalition for Neighborhood Safety, and NexTech STEM, along with helping to establish training and organization of CERT - Citizens Emergency Response Teams - around the island.
         Roth is a board member of Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island and Camp Agape Big Island - a four-day camp for children of incarcerated parents. He volunteers for Rotary Club of Hilo and  Hilo Exchange Club and RYLA, the Rotary Youth Leadership. He served on the YMCA corporate
    board, and as an officer of Turning Point for Families.
         See more on the Mitch Roth campaign website.
    Families drove to the Longakit house in Pāhala Saturday to pick up food from mayoral candidate Mitch Roth.
    Photo by Julia Neal

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    KATIE KAMELAMELA, DEMOCRATIC PARTY CHAIR FOR DISTRICT THREE, is reaching out to the community to suggest names of volunteers to serve in posts for the Pāhala Precinct 7 Club. With the Precinct 7 Club's revival, ideas and concerns of local residents would flow through the Democratic Party's District Three Council and on to Hawaiʻi County Democrat's Council, State Central Committee, and Democratic Party of Hawaiʻi. There is one open seat for a woman and one open seat for a man for Precinct 7 with additional seats available to fill positions of President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and District Council Representative. Members can become Hawaiʻi County Convention Delegates.
    Katie Kamelamela, Democratic Chair for District Three,
    is urging Precint 7 - Pāhala - to organize for representation
    in the Democratic Party. Photo from UH
         Kamelamela said that benefits of an active District 3 Precinct 7 Club would include "the ability to advocate for platforms that directly impact your Precinct," along with the ability to send a nomination to the Governor of Hawaiʻi to name new State Representatives; voting at District 3 Council meetings for President, Vice President and Council Representative; voting at Hawaiʻi County Conventions; participating in  the Hawaiʻi County Democrat Council and voting at the State of Hawaiʻi Democratic Convention. The precinct representatives can also participate in the state Central Committee.
         Precinct 7 members could also help to nominate, run, and vote for a District 3 National Delegate.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    CONSTRUCTING AN ADDITIONAL KĪLAUEA VISITOR CENTER  BUILDING is in Concept 3 of the Disaster Recovery Project plan for the future of facilities of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. A  visitor center addition would be constructed as a separate building on the west side of the KVC in an existing developed landscape. It would includes a covered lanai and outdoor exhibits along with visitor parking, bus parking, and pedestrian circulation. The lanai would connect to visitor parking and the KVC.
    In Concept 3, Kīlauea Visitor Center would be renovated to include an additional building. Photo from NSP
         Together, the existing KVC and smaller visitor center addition would accommodate visitor functions currently provided at KVC and previously provided by Jaggar Museum.
         The existing KVC lobby would be used for an expanded bookstore and orientation information. Exhibits will be replaced in the new visitor center addition.
         The visitor experience would be segmented into two separate buildings with enhanced wayfinding to guide visitors between areas/buildings.
         A new USGS HVO & PIERC-KFS Field Station and parking would be constructed in the historic former ballfield area, adjacent to the Kīlauea Military Camp land assignment.
    Concept 3 in the plans for renovating and rebuilding facilities at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. See the larger
    design maps and give input at Disaster Recovery Project.   
         A new water line, water tank, and wastewater system, would be constructed adjacent to the new USGS HVO & PIERC-KFS Field Station.
         A new two kiosk entrance station would be constructed to the west of the existing kiosks, which would be demolished. An administrative bypass lane would be added to reduce traffic congestion at the entrance.
         Crater Rim Drive would be realigned to improve vehicular circulation in the KVC area.
         NPS released A Concept 3 Statement: "Maximize reuse of existing visitor space by repurposing the existing visitor center and auditorium area and constructing an adjacent smaller new visitor center and expanded parking area. Leverage existing parking and utilities with expansion needed to accommodate replacement facilities and visitor use levels. USGS functions are separated from NPS functions and relocated to the former ball field area, west of the Kīlauea Military Camp land assignment."
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ENROLL IN KUA O KA LĀ'S HĪPUʻU VIRTUAL ACADEMY for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. Join a virtual tour of the award wining Hīpuʻu program on Wednesday, May 20 at The HawaiianFocusedCharterSchoolteaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.  

         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻirequirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.orgto apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ONE NEW COVID-19 case was reported on Hawaiʻi Island Sunday, the second consecutive day of a new confirmation.
         Seventy seven COVID-19 cases have been confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with all but this weekend's two victim recovered.
         DOH confirms 640 cases statewide since the pandemic began, with 415 on Oʻahu, 117 in Maui County, 21 in Kauaʻi County and 10 cases involving residents diagnosed outside the state.
         In the United States, more than 1.52 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 89,932.
         Worldwide, more than 4.71 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 315,000.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    USGS HVO WELCOMES NEW DEPUTY SCIENTIST-IN-CHARGE DAVID PHILLIPS in this week's Volcano Watch, a weekly article and activity update written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. Today's article is by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal:

         Coming home: HVO welcomes Deputy Scientist-in-Charge David Phillips

         It takes a village to run a volcano observatory. The position of Deputy Scientist-in-Charge, once called Operations Manager but always known as the right hand to the Scientist-in-Charge, has long been key to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's success, especially as technology has advanced and staff size increased. Continuing in the tradition of skilled and dedicated leaders including Reggie Okamura, his brother Arnold Okamura, and recently retired Steve Brantley, HVO is proud to welcome David Phillips to the team.
    New Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Deputy Scientist-in-Charge David Phillips and his wife Francine Coloma, 
    with Japan's iconic Mt. Fujiin the background. Photo courtesy of Yasushi Harada

         This belated Volcano Watchshould have been written in January when David and his wife Francine Coloma, who is a scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, moved to Hilo. David and Fran come (back) to us from Boulder, Coloradowhere David was a program manager for UNAVCO, the Geodetic Facility for the US National Science Foundation and NASA. There, he oversaw multimillion-dollar facility operations to collect, process, and archive geodetic data, led community science activities around the globe, and coordinated earthquake response missions.

         David has utilized high precision Global Positioning System and Light Detection and Ranging instruments to support state-of-the-art geophysical research projects in Hawai‘i, the mainland US, Japan, Italy, Croatia, Puerto Rico, and other locales. As examples, he conducted terrestrial lidar fieldwork in Japanfollowing the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, and coordinated airborne lidar and satellite radar imaging of the San Andreas fault, Yellowstone, and other important geologic features.

    HVO technician inspects power/communication station at 
    Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on April 16, 2020.USGS photo by F. Younger

         In Hawai‘i, David had a leading role installing continuous GPS sites on Mauna Loa Volcano in 2005 as part of a collaborative project involving UNAVCO, USGS and the University of Hawai‘i. He has also installed continuous GPS sites on Kīlauea Volcano, at the Hiloairport, and on O‘ahu and Kaua‘i to support sea level and atmospheric studies in addition to volcano monitoring. Thus, he is no stranger to the challenges and wonders of working on Hawaiian volcanoes with local communities and with profound respect for Hawaiian culture.

         David has a PhD in geophysics from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and a BS degree in geology from the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. His dissertation focused on collecting and analyzing GPS data to study plate tectonics in the South Pacific, and also included work in South America and Antarctica.

         While an undergraduate at UH-Hilo, he was a student assistant at the Center for Study of Active Volcanoes, where he worked directly with HVO staff on volcano monitoring and outreach. David continued to be involved with CSAV as an instructor while at UH-Mānoa and UNAVCO, always returning to teach. He is passionate about science education and the encouragement of local youth to enter science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers. He has taught youth programs at the Lyman Museum, led fieldtrips for Upward Bound, and helped Jim Kauahikaua of HVO and Jim Anderson of UHH teach a program for Nā Pua No‘eau. David is excited to contribute to HVO's outreach program going forward.

         David brings professional ties to scientists and technical experts at major research institutions and other U.S. Government agencies such as NOAA and NASA who utilize technology and generate data very familiar to HVO. These ties will prove extremely useful to HVO as we enter the era of National Volcano Early Warning System expansion and integration of our efforts with the other USvolcano observatories.

    A view from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u shows a lower collapsed block which has remains of Crater Rim Driveand 
    the Halema‘uma‘u parking lot. The white feature in the lower right is a stop sign that was present at the eastern exit 
    of the parking lot. Near the top of the photo, a lower collapsed block is formed from the remains of the 
    pre-2018 Halema‘uma‘u crater floor. USGS photo taken May 6 by M. Patrick

         As HVO DSIC, David will supervise the field engineering staff and monitoring network managers, essentially the critical infrastructure backbone of the HVO instrumentation that tracks activity at our volcanoes. He will also oversee work on HVO facilities, play a pivotal role in the planning our new buildings, and facilitate important interagency relationships with Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park and other cooperators in Hawai‘i.

         In many ways, David and Fran are coming full circle. David's career in geophysics and volcano monitoring began when he was a geology major at UH-Hilo. Fran was born and raised in Hilo, was also a geology major at UH-Hilo, and previously worked at HVO. And, David and Fran first met while surveying in front of an active lava flow! Please join me in welcoming David and Fran back to Hawai‘i and to the HVO family.

         Volcano Activity Updates

         Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL(https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

         Kīlauea monitoring data for the past month show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html.
    No major changes were observed this week at Kīlauea's summit. The water level within Halema‘uma‘u continues to 
    slowly rise, and the water surface has a sharp color boundary separating the east and west portions of the lake. 
    USGS photo by M. Patrick

        Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.

         This past week, about 92 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). GPS measurements show slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html

         There were 2 events with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian islands during the past week: a magnitude-3.2 earthquake 8 km (5 mi) NE of Pāhala at 32 km (20 mi) depth on May 10, 2020 at 12:20 p.m., and a magnitude-3.7 earthquake 25 km (16 mi) W of Kailua-Kona at 41 km (25 mi) depth on May 06, 2020 at 10:55 p.m.

         HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa.
         Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loaupdates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
    Metropolitan Opera Soprano Amy Shoremount-Obra and 2018 International Bach Competition Prize-Winning Pianist
    Andrew Rosenblum performed works by Turina, Mahler, Fauré, Rachmaninoff, Duke, and more at Pāhala
    Plantation House in May of 2019. Photo by Julia Neal
    Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
         Last year, Pāhala Plantation House was filled with music. Inside, a concert to raise money for stewardship of the Kaʻū Coast filled attendees' ears. The recital was one in a series of annual performances of the Hawaiʻi International Music Festival. Last year was its third season in the islands. The fourth festival's performance in Kaʻū was held this year in the first week of March, just ahead of the Stay-At-Home measures for COVID-19 mitigation.
    Metropolitan Opera Soprano Amy
    Shoremount-Obra. HIMF photo

    2018 International Bach Competition
    Prize Winning Pianist Andrew Rosenblum.
    HIMF photo

         Last year's series, called Of Water, featured internationally acclaimed artists Metropolitan Opera Soprano Amy Shoremount-Obra and 2018 International Bach Competition Prize-Winning Pianist Andrew Rosenblum. They performed works by Turina, Mahler, Fauré, Rachmaninoff, Duke, and more.
         Donations accepted at the 2019 concert went to Kaʻū Coast non-profit stewardship organizations Nā Mamo O Kāwā, nmok.org; Ka ʻOhana O Honuʻapo, honuapopark.org; Ala Kahakai Trail Association, alakahakaitrail.org; Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, wildhawaii.org; and Hoʻomalu Kaʻū, hoomalukau@gmail.com.
         Attendees can support Hawaiʻi International Music Festival by reserving best seats at each concert. See the concert schedule for 2021 at himusicfestival.com. Overnight accommodations should be available at Pāhala Plantation Cottages, 928-9811.


    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.



    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:
         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Call 928-8208.
         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.

    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






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    Punaluʻu Beach, with its black sand and lifeguard stand, reopens tomorrow, with social distancing rules
    and directives for only small numbers of people to gather. Photo by Julia Neal

    PUNALUʻU AND WHITTINGTON BEACH PARKS WILL REOPEN on Tuesday, May 19, along with most other beach parks on the island, pending approval of Gov. David Ige. Mayor Harry Kim made the announcement, saying that the number of active cases of COVID-19 remains low, thanks to the efforts of the entire community to stem the spread of the virus. Today, the Mayor asked the Governor for final approval of his Rule Number 5, which will officially reopen the County's beach parks. The rule also covers permitted activities.
         Kim said, "These beach parks are being reopened for your enjoyment and your wellbeing. Please keep up the safe practices of social distancing that helped us get to where we are today." He said he is working with the Department of Parks and Recreation to determine the next phase of County facilities to reopen, such as tennis courts, pickleball courts, and more. A statement from the Mayor's staff said, "Although the County beach parks will reopen, the threat of COVID-19 is still present and we must do all we can to remain safe."
         The Mayor said that all beachgoers must follow the safe practices stated in the CDC guidelines and Hawai‘i County Rules. "Know the importance of staying mentally, physically, and socially healthy with these rules," said the Mayor. "Please keep up your good work as we continue to reopen in a safe way." For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.
    Punaluʻu Beach Park is set to reopen tomorrow but with limitations on the number of people who can gather at
    one place and social distancing rules in place. Photo by Julia Neal
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FROM SAFER AT HOME TO ACTING WITH CARE is the next transition for Hawaiʻi to continue to move away from the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown to the opening up of society and the economy, according to Gov. David Ige. During his news briefing Monday afternoon, the governor said that the new Acting with Care phase celebrates Hawaiʻi's Kamaʻaina economy. "In this phase we start to reconnect Hawaiʻi's local activities by gradually reopening medium-risk businesses and activities; followed by high-risk businesses and activities." The move from a stabilization phase that included Stay-at-Home and Safer at Home directives "was made possible by the flattening of the COVID-19 infection curve due to good social-distancing practices, and other measures taken by the community to help protect our most vulnerable populations from coronavirus," said the governor.
    The World Health Organization providing guidance to Hawaiʻi in
    its reopening during a waning number of COVID-19 cases.
    See WHO guides for businesses, food establishments, and more.
         He details the change from Safer at Home to Acting with Care in his 8th Supplementary Proclamation, which he signed today. It retains mandatory 14-day traveler quarantine order for domestic and interisland flights. He said, "Acting with Care means exactly that. With more and more businesses reopening throughout the state, it is up to all of us... to make sure we take care to keep each other safe. So when you go outside that includes physical distancing, good hygiene, and following all safe practices that are being put in place."
         Ige said the next phase will be Long-Term Recovery, followed by Resilience. "Long-term Recovery," said the governor, "is where Hawaiʻi's economy is renewed and rebuilt through planning and policy discussions which will incorporate transitional workforce modernization opportunities, support economic diversification initiatives, target the development of emerging industries, and advance long-term resiliency." At the recovery impact level, the governor says the focus will be on reopening highest-risk businesses and activities, while remaining cautious and adjusting safe practices as needed. "We can expect this phase to take much longer, since this is when we will be reshaping Hawaiʻi's economy." 
    Gov. David said this guide from Johns Hopkins
    helped him to plan the reopening of the
    state as the COVID-19 numbers subside.
    Read the Public Health Principles
         The governor said that Resilience is Hawaiʻi's intended outcome. "Together, we will emerge stronger and more resilient as a result of learning from and overcoming this challenge." With Resilience, Counties can choose to relax stricter local orders at their own pace in coordination with the Governor's Office. A 14-day-long observation period, between decision points, will allow time to assess conditions before moving to the next impact level. If infections spike and threaten to overwhelm systems, the state has the ability to enforce capacity to effectively manage a surge in cases. As a safeguard, the governor explained, "We can consider the option of moving back."
         Ige said that the reopening strategy is rooted in science, data, and best practices, predicated on expert input from prominent international and national health organizations. The governor said he is committed to making sound decisions with direction from the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Johns Hopkins University Public Health Principles.
         His statement says that "All of the guidance suggests that Hawaiʻi continues to act with care by maintaining physical distancing and safe practices across all phases to protect the health and safety of people."  He said health experts agree that one or more of these outcomes will occur "while we learn to live safely with COVID-19.
    Advice from the CDC and others guide Hawaiʻi on 
    reopening with care. See CDC advice for states.
         "One possibility is that treatments and containment methods increase survivability and decrease pressure on Hawaiʻi's hospitals and health care providers. The second possibility is that our population develops a natural immunity to COVID-19, referred to as herd immunity. And a third, longer-term possibility, is that a vaccine is developed, and at least 60 percent of our population is immunized. We can feel confident reopening knowing that Hawaiʻi's health care and public health systems are ready, and continue to increase testing, contact tracing, surveillance, and quarantine capacity. "

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    LIBRARY BOOKS WILL BE QUARANTINED FOR FOUR DAYS upon their return. The Hawaiʻi State Public Library System announced reopening of book drops today, including those at Pāhala and Nāʻālehu libraries.
         The Hawaiʻi State Public Library System issued an announcement, saying, "re-opening of the book drops represents the beginning of a phased-in approach to providing library services to support the health and safety of our communities. No book donations will be accepted at this time."
         The statement noted that "all returned items will be placed into quarantine for a minimum of four days before checking those items in. Depending on the date of return, and the location's hours of operation, it may take a few days for your library account to reflect the return. No fines will be assessed during this period."
    Public water fountain for keiki and adults is bagged and taped next to the
    book drop, where the tape came off to receive returned books in Pāhala.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         Fines assessed from Feb. 26 through future reopening dates of libraries will be waived. For questions about library card accounts and more, library patrons, call 808-586-3500 or toll-free at 1-800-390-3611, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
         "Our buildings will continue to remain closed to the public as we continue to prepare our spaces to welcome communities back. We appreciate the public's patience as we navigate this difficult time until we can reopen. Until then, we welcome the community to join our virtual library!" says the library statement.
         Many Hawaiʻi State Library resources are available online, free with a library card. See librarieshawaii.org for online resources 24/7. Online collections include OverDrive: ebooks; New York Times; Ancestry Library Edition: genealogy access through June 30, 2020; Kanopy: streaming movies; Bookflix: kids movies; and Virtual Programs presented by librarians of the Hawaiʻi State Libraries. Sign up for a library card online. Gain access to ebooks, digital newspapers and magazines, streaming movies and more.
    A four-day quarantine will be placed on books
    returned to the book drops at public libraries
    around the state, like this one in Pāhala.
    Photo by  Julia Neal
         "The Hawaiʻi State Public Library System appreciates how much the community wants to return to the library, and we are working to prepare services and spaces to welcome everyone back soon," states the announcement.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A TELE-TOWN HALL MEETING this Wednesday at 4 p.m. will feature U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard with updates on the latest federal legislation. Joining her will be Shawna Lamothe from the IRS and Gayvial James from the IRS Local Taxpayer Advocate office, to provide an update on coronavirus relief efforts.
         Also joining in will be Dr. Scott Miscovich, to answer questions about testing efforts across the state as Counties start to implement plans to reopen safely. Miscovich is leading COVID-19 testing efforts and working closely as a senior advisor to Lt. Gov. Josh Green.
         This will be the tenth of a weekly coronavirus-related live telephone town hall series hosted by Gabbard. Anyone can participate. Sign up on Gabbard's website to receive a phone call to join the event, or listen online at gabbard.house.gov/live.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ANOTHER THREE THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR FOOD BANK expenditures in South Kona, Ocean View, throughout Kaʻū and Volcano, is up for approval by the County Council Wednesday. The housekeeping proposal transfers money for the grant from the Clerk Council Services Contingency Relief account, Council District 6, to the Department of Liquor Control, Public Programs account. Food distributed is for relief from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Food Bank, with help from local organizations like ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, regularly distributes 14 days of food per family.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Concept four in the plans for renovating and rebuilding facilities at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
    See the larger design maps and give input at Disaster Recovery Project.
    CONCEPT FOUR, IN THE PLANS FOR RENOVATIONS AND REBUILDING HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK FACILITIES, proposes combining Jaggar Museum and Kīlauea Visitor Center functions in a new Kīlauea Visitor Center. The National Park Service invites comments and ideas on all four concepts, which are available online.
         In Concept 4, a new building would be constructed on the former ballfield area adjacent to the Kīlauea Military Camp land assignment. Visitor services currently provided at KVC and formerly provided at Jaggar Museum, made unusable by 2018 earthquakes, would come together at the new facility.
         A new USGS field station, the old made unusable by the earthquakes, would be constructed adjacent and west of the new visitor center. New parking and utility infrastructure would support the new facilities. The existing Kīlauea Visitor Center would become an education center.
         The new visitor center would include a separate restroom building. There would be a covered lanai, outdoor exhibits, visitor parking, bus parking, NPS administrative parking, and pedestrian circulation. The new USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory & PIERC-KFS Field Station and parking would be constructed adjacent to the new visitor center. A new shared water line, water tank, and wastewater systems would be constructed adjacent to the new visitor center and USGS HVO & PIERC-KFS Field Station.
         The existing KVC would be repurposed as an education center with existing National Park Service office and auditorium uses being maintained.
    HVO Chief Scientist Tina Neal and acting Superintendent of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National park Rhonda Loh 
    showed Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt the plaza overlooking Kīlauea Caldera in front of 
    Jaggar Museum and USGS headquarters for Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Both will be moved
    according to Concept 3 in new plans for the Park. Photo by DOI/Tami A. Heilemann
         The existing education center in the NPS administrative area would be repurposed for NPS administrative use. New covered picnic tables would be constructed in the existing picnic area adjacent to the 1877 Volcano House.
         An administrative bypass lane and additional fee booth would be added to the park entrance station. Crater Rim Drive would be realigned to improve vehicular circulation in the KVC area.      See all four concepts and provide input through parkplanning.nps.gov/document.cfm?parkID=307&projectID=92891&documentID=103878. To be mailed the design concepts, or to receive answers to questions, call (808) 460-6212, or email havo_planning@nps.gov. The comment period will end Monday, June 15. The National Park Service will use community feedback to determine which concept, or modified concept, will be the proposed concept. NPS will evaluate the impacts of any proposed alternative.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    NO NEW COVID-19 CASES in the state, reports the Department of Health. On Hawaiʻi Island, two people are self-isolating and monitored by DOH. The case count confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began is 77.
         DOH confirms 640 cases statewide since the pandemic began, with 415 on Oʻahu, 117 in Maui County, 21 in Kauaʻi County, and 10 cases involving residents diagnosed outside the state.
         In the United States, more than 1.54 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 90,694.
         Worldwide, more than 4.81 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 319,000.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.



    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:
         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Call 928-8208.
         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.

    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. Join a virtual tour of the award-wining Hīpuʻu program on Wednesday, May 20 at  The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







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    Kaʻū High Class of 2020 before the pandemic shut down the school campus. A virtual graduation will
    be available for the public to view online, this Friday, May 22 at 6 p.m

    A VIRTUAL CEREMONY CELEBRATING KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL 2020 GRADUATES will take place this Friday, May 22 at 6 p.m. on Nā Leo TV,  on Spectrum Channel 53/54, and online at naleo.tv/channel53, and streaming via Nā Leo TV mobile App. With strict guidelines required by the state Department of Education, the graduation event is not open to the public.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    WEDNESDAY IS THE OPENING DAY FOR PUNALUʻU, WHITTINGTON, and most other county beach parks around the island, with pavilions remaining closed. Gov. David Ige today approved yesterday's request from Mayor Harry Kim for the reopening. Other county parks in Kaʻū, such as Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Community Centers, Waiʻōhinu Park, and Kahuku county park in Ocean View will remain closed.
         The Mayor's amendment to COVID-19 Emergency Rule No. 4 lays down the safety restrictions through June 30: No group shall exceed ten persons. All persons using opened beach and shoreline parks who are not members of the same household or living unit shall comply with State and County social distancing requirements (six feet apart), provided that a caregiver may accompany a dependent.
    Whittington and Punaluʻu Beach Parks open Wednesday, but
    pavilions remain closed. Photo from American Travel Journal
         All permits and reservations for use associated with county beach parks are canceled until further notice. All pavilions, playgrounds, sport courts and fields, indoor facilities, and similar areas where gatherings may occur in these parks shall remain closed until further notice.
         Commercial activities are not allowed and all other State or County restrictions related to COVID-19 must be followed, including but not limited to, applicable quarantine restrictions.
         A statement from the Mayor today said that he is working with the Department of Parks & Recreation to determine the next phase of County facilities to reopen, such as tennis court, pickleball courts, and more.
         "Although the County beach parks will reopen, the threat of COVID-19 is still present and we must do all we can to remain safe." The Mayor said that all beachgoers must follow the safe practices stated in the CDC guidelines and Hawai‘i County Rules.
         "Know the importance of staying mentally, physically, and socially healthy with these rules," said Kim. "Please keep up your good work as we continue to reopen in a safe way."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    HAWAI‘I COUNTY CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY invites residents and other stakeholders to review and comment on the recently completed draft update to the Hawai‘i County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan. The 14-day public review period of the Draft Plan began May 18 and ends June 2 at 5 p.m.
         In October 2019, the Civil Defense Agency embarked on a planning process to prepare for and lessen the impacts of specified natural hazards by updating the Hawai‘i County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan.
         Responding to federal mandates in the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-390), Hawai‘i County Civil Defense began to pool resources to create a uniform hazard mitigation strategy that can be consistently applied to the defined planning area and used to ensure eligibility for specified grant funding success.
         Access a copy of the draft Muti-Hazard Mitigation Plan and narrated Power Point presentation.
         The 610-page plan, prepared by Tetra Tech, of Honolulu, with community and agency input, presents a wealth of geographical, population, and historical information about Ka‘ū and other Districts around the island as background for making the hazard plan. The Hawai‘i County Profile includes overviews of Geography, History, Major Hazard Events, Geology and Topography, Climate, Natural and Cultural Resources, Land Use and Development, Critical Facilities, Demographics, and the Economy.
         A brief live virtual presentation regarding the Draft Plan and opportunities for public comment will be provided on Wednesday, May 27 at 5 p.m. on the Virtual Meeting Platform, WebEx.
    Register at https://arcg.is/1Pb9mb to receive an invitation to the hosted meeting.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Willie K passed away at age 59, leaving a rich legacy
    of musical recordings and live-performance memories.
    WILLE K LOVED TO PLAY AT THE OLD SOUTH POINT BAR & RESTAURANT. He described it as a wild west place, deep in the heart of Ocean View. It was sometimes called the Knife & Gun Club - Willie K arrived and turned that energy positive.
         With a reputation as the Hawaiian Jimi Hendrix, an amazing Hawaiian falsetto, and renditions of O Holy Night and the National Anthem, Willie K was famous for an extraordinary range of voice. He was also known for many instrumental talents, interests, and moods. He was often described as someone who could have soared to international superstardom, but chose emersion into his Hawaiian homeland. Superstars became his friends and he performed with Willie Nelson, Prince, Santana, and many more. He entertained Pres. Barack Obama.
         Willie K played for everyone, from bikers at the old Sugar Bar in Waiʻalua on Oʻahu to polite company at the historic Hawaiʻi Theatre, and large crowds at Aloha Stadium. He most often settled into small venues on his home island of Maui.
         During his 59 years, Willie K won  Grammy nominations and 19 Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards. Some of his most familiar songs are Kachikachi Music Makawao, You Kuʻipo, and Waterfall. He is also known for his many collaborations with Amy Hālaialiʻi Gilliom.
         More recently, he became involved with the Grand Naniloa Hotel in Hilo, co-owned by Kaʻū Coffee Mill founder Ed Olson. They named its music venue Willie K's Crown Room and he flew over from Maui to play there.
         Willie K continued to perform in Hawaiʻi and beyond for most of his two years of treatment for lung cancer. The music committee for the Kaʻū Coffee Festival hoped Willie K might be able to come here this year. Though he always talked about feeling better and getting ready for more live performances, his illness prevented travel, and COVID-19 canceled the event.
         Willie K - William Awihilima Kahaialiʻi - passed away Monday evening, May 18, at home with his family on Maui. He is survived by his wife, Debbi Kahaialiʻi, and their four children, Karshaun, Max, Lycettiana, and Antoinette. See Willie K's Facebook for more.
    Add caption
         Public officials released numerous messages about the life of Willie K today. Sen. Mazie Hirono wrote: "Willie K was not just a unique artist with diverse range – I also considered him a friend. Whenever we met, he would sing my favorite aria – Nessun Dorma– which is not a song found on the setlist of many artists. It's not the only aria he performed, as people will also remember his renditions of Ave Maria. Willie's talent allowed him to expand beyond Hawaiʻi into national and international venues, but I think it's safe to say he was most comfortable performing home in Hawaiʻi.
         "Two of his most memorable performances, to me, were a sunset performance he held at a private residence on Maui, and his amazing show in WashingtonD.C. with Amy Hanaialiʻi at Hawaiʻi on the Hill in 2015. At both, his connection to the crowd was evident, and that connection made for great performances. I will miss Willie, his exuberance, and his talent. I join all of Hawaiʻi in extending my deepest condolences to Willie's family. Aloha, my friend."
         Gov. David Ige wrote, "Willie K was a unique talent whose huge voice effortlessly ranged from Hawaiian music and the blues to opera – all in one performance. Recognized locally and nationally, his songs touched our hearts."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    VEHICLE REGISTRATION & LICENSING will start up again on Monday, June 1. The County of Hawai‘i Department of Finance announced its first phase of reopening today for its Division of Vehicle Registration & Licensing offices for limited in-person services. While all Vehicle Registration & Licensing offices will remain closed to the public until June 1, citizens may renew

    vehicle registrations and driver's licenses (issued after May 1, 2014) by using the following alternatives:
         Vehicle Registration Renewals: Mail-in renewals can be sent to County of Hawai‘i, Motor Vehicle Registration, 101 Pauahi St., #5, Hilo, HI 96720. Online applications can be found at: https://mvr.ehawaii.gov/renewals/lookup.html?county=hawaii. They can also be taken to kiosks at Safeway stores in Hilo and Kona as well as the Foodland store in Waimea. An in-wall drop-off slot is located at the Hilo MVR office. DMV urges everyone to refrain from sending cash to pay for renewals.
         Driver's License and State ID renewals (issued after May 1, 2014): Mail in renewal applications to 349 Kapi‘olani St., Hilo, HI 96720. Duplicate license requests for lost licenses will also be accepted by mail. See www.hawaiicounty.gov/departments/finance/vehicle-registration-licensing for application details and forms.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FREE COVID-19 TESTING will be provided at St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View tomorrow, Wednesday, May 20 from  to by a team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona.

         To bypass the screening queue, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.


         Testing for antibodies may be available at this testing site. The cost, $43, is usually not covered under insurance, and is given under discretion of a physician.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms. Wearing masks is required for everyone.
    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031. See other opportunities for testing in Kaʻū in the Ongoing section, below.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ONE NEW CASE OF COVID-19 ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND is reported today, the only new case reported in the state. Seventy-eight cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with 76 recovered. The remaining two are quarantined and monitored by the Department of Health. Statewide, 641 people have been confirmed positive for the virus since the pandemic began.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The Island and State of Hawaiʻi are moving forward in removing some of the restrictions established to address the coronavirus. The State of Hawaiʻihas done well in minimizing the spread and impact of COVID-19 but we must be well aware that the virus is out there.
    Civil Defense Director 
    Talmadge Magno.
    Photo from Big Island Video News
         "In moving forward, we need to continue to get better in following the preventive policies of distancing, face coverings, cleanliness, gatherings, and personal health to keep Hawaiʻi Safe. Thank you for doing your part. Thank you for listening. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

              In the United States, more than 1.56 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 92,258.
         Worldwide, more than 4.89 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 323,000.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.



    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:
         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Call 928-8208.
         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.

    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. Join a virtual tour of the award-wining Hīpuʻu program on Wednesday, May 20 at  The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻirequirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.


    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







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    Lava trees, native plants and animals, and rainbows are some sights people can see when traveling through
    newly reopened portions of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. See details below. NPS photo

    RUSSELL RUDERMAN WILL NOT RUN FOR REELECTION. The sate Senator, who represents District 2, Punaluʻu and Pāhala through Volcano, into Puna, made the announcement on his Friends of Russell Ruderman Facebook page today. He stated, "After eight years as your state senator, I have
    Sen. Russel Ruderman at a Democratic rally at old Hilo Bandstand.
    Photo  by Julia Neal
    chosen not to run for a third term this year. I want to thank each of you for your support over these last eight years. Serving Puna and Kaʻū in the state legislature has been one of the great honors of my life. The reasons include personal, health, and political."
         Ruderman summed up his two four-year terms, which end this year, without his running for reelection: "I'm proud of what we have accomplished together. We represented our community with an honest, independent voice working towards responsiveness and integrity in our government. Our community deserves this and strongly supported me in this commitment. While some projects remain unfinished, I will remain involved and hope to see them through. I will also be involved in other efforts, some to be announced soon, and I hope to make much more of a contribution to our community in these other ways."
    Kaʻū High students met with Ruderman, asking for
    more Advanced Placement classes, a carpentry program,
    and land security for coffee farmers. Photo by Julia Neal
         He thanked "everyone who ever helped my campaigns, or supported my efforts in office. Few thought I could win, or get reelected, or be effective. With your help we did all of that. Every time one of you said 'Mahalo!' or 'Hang in there' here in our community is forever appreciated, and that's what kept me going.
         "I also thank my longtime staff, Maigee Chang and Michael Greenough, who have been the foundation of my senate office for all these eight long years! I believe we are the only office that had this stability or talent. This has allowed us to be much more effective for our community, which my staff has grown to love as much as I do. I could never thank them enough and I could not have been more fortunate to have them. I also thank my hardworking campaign team, Chair Brent Norris and Treasurer Gretchen Klungness! We never lost an election!"
    Sen. Russell Ruderman congratulated sixth, seventh, and eighth
    grade girls for completing an aviation class on U.S.S. Missouri.
    Photo by Eileen O'Hara
         Ruderman became involved with may issues in Kaʻū, including improving education, land security for farmers and publicly funded projects. He met with Kaʻū students over the years to encourage them to become involved in the democratic process.
         His Puerto Rican Band, El Leo, played at the Kaʻū Coffee Festival and Plantation Days Celebrations.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MOBILE LEARNING LABS WILL ROLL INTO KAʻŪ, as part of a state Department of Education effort to reach students living in remote places without good Wi-Fi reception. The learning labs arrive in June as a pilot project destined for four locations: Kaʻū, and remote neighborhoods on Molokaʻi, Maui, and Kauaʻi. Superintendent of Schools Christina Kishimoto said the mobile labs could become permanent hubs for teaching to students living remotely in the Fall.
         The mobile teaching hubs help to address the COVID-19 situation, with summer school mostly online. On Tuesday, DOE announced distance learning summer school, with in-person teaching for those with online learning issues. Students without internet connections and other serious challenges can sign up to come to campus and for the distance learning labs close to their homes. Classes will be no larger than six to eight persons, with some of them smaller and sometimes one-on-one.
         Summer programs aim to help students in grades six through 12 to recover credits. For all grades, they aim to accelerate receiving credits. Online school will be for grades nine through 12. In-person teaching will be for all grades for students needing remediation, intervention, and enrichment. See bit.ly/HISummerLearning.
         Kishimoto said that DOE is coordinating with nonprofit organizations and that school administrators hope to be ready for the fall to provide "that kind of reach, especially as we know our school year is not going to be normalized."
         She said that plans for Fall are not yet fixed, though an opening date of Aug. 4 is expected, with 180 days of instruction.
         The BOE takes up a resolution this Thursday to design summer school "in a way that supports students disproportionately impacted by school closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic."
         Department of Education is asking middle and high school students, grades six to 12, to take a distance learning survey to help better understand experiences and needs to plan for the next school year on and off campus. Access the survey.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
    Hurricane Lane passed south of Hawaiʻi Island in 2018. NOAA image
    HURRICANE SEASON WILL CREATE TWO TO SIX TROPICAL CYCLONES to pass through the Central Pacific Basin from June 1 through Nov. 30, according to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. The first named storm will be called Hone.
         The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration agency released its annual forecast today. The average number of storms is about five, with zero in 1979 and 16 in 2015. Central Pacific Hurricane Center Director Chris Brenchley said the prediction for 2020 is based on neutral warm-water El Nino conditions early in the season transitioning to cooler La Nina conditions later in the Fall. Putting the forecast in numbers, he calculated a 75 percent chance of a near-or-below normal season or normal season, with a 25 percent chance of an above-normal season. Last year, only one storm passing through the Central Pacific reached Hurricane strength.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Photo of an apapane alighting on an ʻōhiʻa lehua, taken from Kīpukapuaulu Trail during a Friends of Hawaiʻi
     Volcanoes National Park bird watching trip. FHVNP photo
    COMMUNITY ACCESS TO HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK increased this morning with the re-opening of the following places:
         Mauna Loa Road to Kīpukapuaulu for vehicles, bicyclists, and hikers, including Tree Molds is open. The picnic area remains closed. The Park website describes it as an easy 1.2 mile (1.9 km) loop trail that  "reveals a story of struggle and survival for some of Hawai‘i's rarest plants and animals." The trail travels through a kīpuka, an area of older vegetation surrounded by a more recent lava flow from Mauna Loa. A unique biological diversity of rare plants, birds, insects, and very old-growth forest of koa and ʻōhi‘a trees can be found along the path.

    Kaʻū Desert Trail offers a vista overlooking land and sea. NPS photo
         Mauna Loa Road past Kīpukapuaulu is open for hikers and bicyclists to Mauna Loa Overlook at 6,662 feet, but closed to vehicles. Mauna Loa Lookout provides panoramic views of Kīlauea volcano, old lava flows, and the ocean on clear days. The subalpine woodland includes koa, māmane, and ‘ōhi‘a trees, and endemic bird species, including ‘i‘iwi.
         Footprints Trail from Highway 11 to the Ka‘ū Desert Trail and Mauna Iki Trail junction, including the Footprints shelter, is open. The Park website says a 1790 explosion at the summit of Kīlauea sent a torrent of hot gas, ash, and sand raining down on the Kaʻū Desert. "Caught in the middle of this deadly, suffocating storm were groups of Native Hawaiians, traveling through the region on long-used trails. In the newly fallen layer of ash, these groups left behind footprints that we can still see today – a reminder that Hawaiians have born witness to the geological drama of this island for centuries." Kaʻū Desert "is a harsh landscape where volcanic eruptions and ashfall from events in Halemaʻumau crater have created a desolate, moon-like environment," says the site. A shelter with an exhibit about the footprints is accessible via an easy walk about half a mile (.8 km) from the Kaʻū Desert Trailhead. Mark Twain called the desert "The Kingdom of Desolation." Mauna Iki Trail travels through sand and ash as it passes Puʻu Koaʻe and the Twin Pit Craters, where Koaʻeʻkea, white-tailed tropicbirds, nest in the walls.

    Mauna Ulu, along the Escape Road. NPS photo
         Escape Road, for bicycling, horseback riding, and hiking to the Mauna Ulu junction, was originally built in the 1800's to transport tourists and provisions to the crater from boats on the coast. It now serves as an alternate way out of the Kīlauea Crater area in case the Chain of Craters Road gets blocked by new lava flows.
         A statement from the Park says that the openings within the park follow "guidance from the White House, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state and local public health authorities." The National Park Service is working servicewide with federal, state, and local public health authorities to closely monitor the COVID-19 pandemic and using a phased approach to increase access on a park-by-park basis.

         Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Acting Superintendent Rhonda Loh, said, "We have completed thorough risk assessments for the continued safety of our staff and the public, and while we are excited to increase access in areas of the park that allow for social distancing in an outdoor, open-air environment, we are urging each person to be safe to keep us all safe. If people cannot adhere to the latest health guidelines for their protection and ours, the park may have to close these areas again."

    Lava tree molds can be seen along the Kīpukapuaulu and Mauna Ulu Trails. 
    Photo from hikespeak.com
         The statement stresses: "The health and safety of park users, our employees, volunteers, and partners continue to be paramount. At Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park, our operational approach will be to examine each facility function and service provided to ensure those operations comply with current public health guidance, and will be regularly monitored. We continue to work closely with the NPS Office of Public Health using CDC guidance to ensure public and workspaces are safe and clean for all.

    "While these areas are accessible for the public to enjoy, a return to full operations will continue to be phased and services may be limited. Park users should follow local area health orders from the Governor of Hawai‘i, practice Leave No Trace principles, avoid crowding and avoid high-risk outdoor activities.

         The Park points to CDC guidance "to help people recreating in parks and open spaces prevent the spread of infectious diseases. We will continue to monitor all park functions to ensure that visitors adhere to CDC guidance for mitigating risks associated with the transmission of COVID-19, and take any additional steps necessary to protect public health."

    Footprints in Kau Desert. Photo from 
    Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
         Details and updates on park operations will continue to be posted at nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes and social media channels. Updates about NPS operations will be posted on nps.gov/coronavirus.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THIS IS ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH. Today, Sen. Mazie Hirono led 22 Senate colleagues to introduce a resolution noting the significant contributions by generations of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. The resolution recognizes noteworthy milestones in 2020: 35th anniversary of the mission aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery of Ellison Shoji Onizuka, the first Asian American in space, a man from Hawaiʻi Island; 45th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War and the beginning of the Southeast Asian diaspora to communities across the United States; 45th anniversary of the completion of the double-hulled voyaging canoe, Hōkūleʻa, marking the first traditional Polynesian voyaging canoe built in Hawaiʻi in more than 600 years; 55th anniversary of the enactment of landmark legislation that reversed restrictive immigration policies against immigrants from Asia; and the 110th anniversary of the establishment of Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco Bay, California, which served as a major port of entry for immigrants coming to the United States from Asia and the Pacific.
         Hirono wrote, "This year, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month falls during a pandemic that is testing the very fabric of our nation. Anti-Asian racism and attacks are on the rise, stoked by those in the highest levels of government. As we pay tribute to the achievements of generations of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders, the recent surge in discrimination and hate crimes against the AAPI community demonstrates how much work must still be done to achieve full equality. I join my colleagues in celebrating the contributions of the Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities, and advocating for the civil rights and equal treatment of all Americans.
        Sen. Elizabeth Warren joined Hirono and said, "This month, we honor and celebrate Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander communities, leaders, and history, and the significant contributions they have made to our country. It is also a time we must recommit to fighting alongside AAPI communities to end the discrimination they continue to face."
         Hirono has advocated for action to address anti-Asian racism, asking federal agencies to proactively address coronavirus-related anti-Asian discrimination and hate crimes, introduced legislation to support immigrant families while providing critical services during the pandemic, and urged Congressional leadership to build inclusive coronavirus relief packages.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    CURBSIDE PICKUP AT KAʻŪ COFFEE MILL begins Tuesday, June 2 from to on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. The public can call or order online to pick up award-winning Kaʻū Coffee, coffee treats, macadamia nuts, accessories, skincare, apparel, and more. Pick up location is 96-2694 Wood Valley Road, Pāhala. Call 928-0550 or go to kaucoffeemill.com to order.
         Also available are smoothies, blended coffee drinks, hot coffee, iced coffee, and cold brew. Customers can also order any products available on kaucoffeemill.com.
         Curbside Pickup customers must order and pay online or by phone. First Responders including police officers, firefighters, and Kaʻū  Hospital staff will receive a free cup of coffee daily. They can call to order and again upon arrival, with order number, for coffee delivery to their vehicles.
         All customers will park in the Kaʻū Coffee Mill parking lot and remain in vehicles for Kaʻū Coffee Mill team member to bring out the orders. Social distancing is required.
         The Kaʻū Coffee Mill Visitor Center remains closed to the public and no public restrooms are available. More info is available on the Kaʻū Coffee Mill Curbside Pickup FAQ page at kaucoffeemill.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    TWO NEW CASES OF COVID-19, one on Hawaiʻi Island, one on Oʻahu, are reported today by the Department of Health. Seventy-nine cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with 76 recovered. The remaining three are quarantined and monitored by DOH. Statewide, 643 people have been confirmed positive for the virus since the pandemic began.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The Island and State of Hawaii are moving forward in removing some of the restrictions established to minimize the spread of the coronavirus. In moving forward, know that the virus threat is still out there, and we need to continue following the preventive policies of distancing, face coverings, cleanliness, gatherings, and personal health to keep Hawaiʻi Safe. Thank you for doing your part. Thank you for listening. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.58 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 93,806.
         Worldwide, more than 4.97 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 327,000.


    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

         Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, May 26 and Tuesday, June 30.

         Volcano's CooperCenter at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, May 27 and Wednesday, June 24.

         Nāʻālehu's Sacred HeartChurch at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy on Monday, June 1.
         Ocean View's KahukuPark on Tuesday, June 8.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






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    Queen Liliuokalani Children's Center & KS Send Aid
    Kaʻū volunteers Terry-Lee Shibuya and Liz Stabo recently met Queen Liliʻuokalani Children's Center rep, Jaysha 
    Alonzo-Estrada, to receive a van load of goods to be distributed to families in need. Alonzo-Estrada helped to 
    deliver the food donated by QLCC and Kamehameha Schools East Hawaiʻi Region, while Shibuya and Stabo 
    distributed packages throughout Pāhala. Photo from Terry-Lee Shibuya


    See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

    CARDIAC AND CANCER TREATMENT AT HILO MEDICAL CENTER, where many Kaʻū residents seek treatment, is receiving millions of dollars, according to state Sen. Kai Kahele. He announced today that $3.5 million will go to construction and equipment for a second catheterization laboratory for the medical center's cardiac unit, and $6.5 million will fund plans, design, equipment, and construction to expand and improve the oncology center.
         The statement from Kahele says, "With the initial legislative funding in 2018 and permanent cardiologists now on staff at Hilo Medical Center, funding for a second catheterization lab will allow HMC to meet the demand for these services and ensure availability of critical lifesaving equipment. Expansion of the oncology center will improve the clinic treating cancers and as well as blood cancers and disorders. HMC's interventional cardiac program began service on Jan. 1, 2019, with initial funding from the Hawaiʻi legislature in 2018. Since July 1, 2019, interventional cardiac catheterization for the treatment of heart attacks has been made available 24.7 for residents of East Hawaiʻi. Kahele pointed out that, in the last year, more than 40 heart attacks have been treated in the catheterization lab with an additional 181 patients electively treated with stents for heart blockages, preventing future heart attacks.
    State Sen. Kai Kahele led the Ways & Means Committee on a tour of Hilo Medical Center in his quest
    for more funding for cardiac and cancer care. Photo from Kahele

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THREE NEW CASES OF COVID-19 ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND were announced today, with one more on Maui. State Director of Health, Dr. Bruce Anderson said two of the cases on this island were among family members of a COVID-19 victim. "Not unexpected," he said. He wouldn't reveal the location of the new cases on the island but said the two victims are "people who have been living with a confirmed case."
         The other cases reported toady are under investigation. Anderson said, "We've seen over the last couple of weeks that we've been able to keep the case numbers very, very low. The lowest in the country. And I am very pleased with that. But we are going to see new cases."
         He said there is "still a limited community spread and we are going to see clusters from time to time. But our real strength is being able to identify the cases quickly, and the contacts, and of course, be able to isolate and quarantine those as we go."
    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
         He did note that recent Hawaiʻi Island cases have been among residents of Hilo and South Kona. "I think the important thing to remember is that we are seeing sporadic cases in the state, which are probably associated with some community spread and unfortunately most of those are associated with known clusters... we can identify pretty much where who-infected-who in these situations. But everything is limited here, and – we believe – very much under control. We haven't seen any situations develop like they have on the mainland, where you have hundreds of cases springing up in a community and they simply are overwhelmed with the number of cases."
         Eighty-two cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with 76 recovered. The remaining six are quarantined and monitored by DOH. Statewide, 647 people have been confirmed positive for the virus since the pandemic began.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "This increase over the past few days are directly related to family connections. The lesson to learn here is how easily this virus can spread. This shows how critically important it is that we continue to practice preventive measures to help stop the spread of this virus. Your help is needed. Thank you for listening and have a good day. Thank you for listening. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.61 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 95,087.
         Worldwide, more than 5.08 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 332,000.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    LIFTING THE 14-DAY QUARANTINE FOR TRAVEL BETWEEN THE ISLANDS may come soon, according to Gov. David Ige. During his afternoon press conference, he said he is working closely with counties to open businesses and activities, and lift the interisland quarantine. "Health measures are pointing in the right direction to make this move... with infection levels appearing to be under control across the state." He explained this is important to avoid a high level of cases in one county from impacting another county as people begin to travel. Key issues under discussion with the counties and airlines include, screening, testing, contact tracing, and physical distancing. The governor concluded, "We are also going through the process of identifying other potential issues and welcome any thoughts or suggestions."
         Ige predicted that with interisland travel quarantine lifted there will likely be additional COVID-19 cases, "and we have the capacity to handle it. If a new surge occurs, some restrictions might need to be reinstated." He encouraged everyone to continue engaging in best practices of social distancing, washing hands, wearing masks, avoiding large gatherings, and staying home when sick.
    A Don Allison romantic map of interisland travel on Aloha Airlines some 60 years ago. The current two-week
    quarantine for those traveling interisland during the waning COVID-19 pandemic may be lifted soon. 
         Lt. Gov. Josh Green, a physician who formerly practiced in Kaʻū, said that healthcare capacity is in good shape for resumption of interisland travel. Green reported Hawaiʻi recorded 68 new coronavirus cases since April 21, with 21 cases in the past two weeks. He said the state's hospital system is in great shape, with 39 percent of intensive care unit beds occupied, 51 percent of total hospital beds in use, and only 9 percent of the available ventilators in use. He also indicated that the supply of personal protective equipment for healthcare workers is adequate, with a team under his direction monitoring and ordering additional PPE as needed. He said the team is building up inventory in the event of a worst-case scenario - a major outbreak in the state.
         Green emphasized relying on public health officials to provide guidance for the timing to lift quarantines.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A TWENTY-FOUR PERCENT UNEMPLOYMENT RATE PLUS LOSS OF INCOME BY INDEPENDENT WORKERS AND THE SELF-EMPLOYED, is the report from state Department of Labor and Industrial Relations. The agency made its announcement today showing 24 percent unemployment on Hawaiʻi Island and 22.3 percent statewide in April. The steep rise from March's 2.6 percent on this island and 2.4 percent statewide, came with the COVID-19 pandemic killing tourism and other businesses. Hawaiʻi County, however, suffered less than Maui, with 35 percent unemployment and 34.4 percent on Kauaʻi. Both are more dependent on tourism than Hawaiʻi Island. The national unemployment rate was 14.7 percent in April, up from 4.4 percent in March.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    STATE GOVERNMENT ACTIONS DURING THE PANDEMIC ARE WELL INTENTIONED BUT SOME THREATEN CIVIL LIBERTIES, according to a Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi opinion piece recently published in the Hawaiʻi Filipino Chronicle.
         The editorial, by Grass Root Institute of Hawaiʻi's Executive Vice President Joe Kent, names the following as threats to liberties: business closures, curfews, checkpoints, and drones, "all restricting our privacy and freedom of movement. The police have issued thousands of warnings, hundreds of citations, and even arrested a number of people, in an attempt to control Hawaiʻi's increasingly restless population."
         The editorial continues: Meanwhile, tourism has tanked, thousands of businesses have been sidelined or destroyed, almost 250,000 formerly productive workers have filed for unemployment, and tax revenues have dried up, leaving our state and counties looking at either massive deficits, big cuts in spending -- or both.
         "Unfortunately, Hawaiʻi policymakers in recent years have spent much of the state's budgetary surplus on nonemergency items, and now it's a struggle for them to deal with the current health and economic emergencies. Obviously, our lawmakers should be cautious about spending money they don't have, especially since it's not clear where that money will come from.
    Joe Kent
         "We also need to worry about our unfunded public liabilities, which will only get worse if this
    recession persists. Our best hope to get our lives, businesses, and communities back on track is greater economic freedom. In more mainstream quarters, the preference for bigger government has dominated the discussion, but isle policymakers should examine how shrinking government could make a difference. Roll back some of the regulations and taxes that have made it so hard to operate in Hawaiʻi all along. They were a problem before; they are even more of a barrier now.
         "Ironically, some of the emergency measures proclaimed by Gov. David Ige are actually worth keeping, even after the coronavirus emergency has passed. A perfect example was allowing out-of-state medical professionals to practice here. It was one of the most positive actions taken so far to help Hawaiʻi residents through the crisis, and it involved removing government barriers, not enacting them. Other emergency measures we hope will remain permanent include loosening restrictions on telehealth, allowing prescriptions from out-of-state doctors and nurses, and waiving licensing requirements for childcare. Such measures would be beneficial to the state — and the state's public health — long after the coronavirus danger has receded.
         "In terms of accountable government, the Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi recently joined other watchdog organizations, such as Common Cause Hawaiʻi and the ACLU, to challenge the governor's suspension of the state's open-meetings and open-records laws. Government transparency is critical to a healthy democracy -- all the more so during a crisis when public trust is paramount.
         "For Hawaiʻi to get back on its feet again, isle residents need flexibility and incentives to pursue prosperity for themselves, their families, and their communities. Open, accountable government also is critical, if we are truly to be in charge of those policymakers who presume to act on our behalf.
         "Yes, we have been struggling in this time of adversity, but no matter what the challenges, greater economic freedom and limited, accountable government — adopted as quickly as possible — are what Hawaiʻi needs."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A FREE SUMMER CLASS FOR GRADUATING HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS is offered by the Hawaiʻi Community Colleges. The free classes aim to provide an opportunity to explore career pathways. The summer classes are online and free for eligible students, who will earn college credits upon completion. Students may reserve their spot by signing up at uhcc.hawaii.edu/nextstep.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE ʻULU-THEMED ART CONTEST DEADLINE IS EXTENDED to June 30. Hawaiʻi ʻUlu Cooperative invites all students residing in Hawaiʻi (grades Pre-K through 12) to create and submit original artwork focusing on breadfruit. The art will be featured in an upcoming revʻULUtion traveling art exhibit. Refer to the flyer or visit eatbreadfruit.com/pages/artcontest for more information and to submit an entry.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU will give away food at the Ocean View Park and Ride area off Highway 11 this Saturday at 11 a.m. Those in need of food will receive chicken, rice, onions, and meat.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    COVID-19 HAS REVEALED THE EXTENT OF THE HOUSING CRISIS, according to Habitat for Humanity, Hawaiʻi Island. A statement released today says that "Hawaiʻi Island communities have been hit hard by the economic shocks of COVID-19. The world was already experiencing a housing crisis, but now COVID-19 has revealed the extent of that crisis and added to its urgency." Habitat announced a Homes, Communities, Hope + You campaign as "a unique opportunity for Habitat organizations all around the world to unite as a global network to galvanize communities and emerge from this crisis stronger together. Here on Hawaiʻi Island the needs of families have never been more pronounced. Habitat Hawaiʻi Island needs community support to help ensure that they are able to not just continue but accelerate work to ensure that everyone has a decent place to call home."
         To donate, go to Habitat Hawaiʻi Island's website at habitathawaiiisland.org/donate.

    Keone Grace
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    SUCCESSFUL GRAB & GO LUNCHES FOR THE PUBLIC AT KAʻŪ HOSPITAL will expand to include pizza on Fridays, according to chef and Institutional Food Service Manager Keone Grace. He said the pizzas will be available beginning Friday, May 29 for a medium two-topping pizza either take and bake or precooked for $10. Any additional toppings will be $1 each. Topping choices are: Cheese, Pepperoni, Ground Beef, Ground Pork, Bacon, Canadian Bacon, Chicken, Mushrooms, and Red and Green Bell Pepper. Weekday lunches include chef salads, sandwiches, and hot meals.
         Call in and pay for $8 lunch orders on weekdays and pizza orders on Fridays between 8 a.m and 10 a.m. for pickup after 11 a.m. See the complete menu and contact information at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING

    Café Ono on Old Volcano Highway is offering a special takeout menu for Memorial Day Weekend, this Saturday and Sunday, May 23 and 24, The regular menu is also available. Call ahead to order, 985-8979. See cafeono.net for menu.


    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou will give away food at the Ocean View Park and Ride area off Highway 11 this Saturday, May 23 at 11 a.m. Those in need of food will receive chicken, rice, onions, and meat.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

         Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, May 26 and Tuesday, June 30.

         Volcano's CooperCenter at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, May 27 and Wednesday, June 24.

         Nāʻālehu's Sacred HeartChurch at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy on Monday, June 1.
         Ocean View's KahukuPark on Tuesday, June 8.


    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






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    Melinda and Scott Eder ride together as brother and sister to their drive-through graduation at Kaʻū High
    School today. See more below. Photo by Julia Neal

    GRADUATION FOR 43 MEMBERS OF KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2020 went live today as they paraded toward campus and rolled up to pick up diplomas. A photo op greeted them with in-person congratulations from Mayor Harry Kim, Principal Sharon Beck and staff, and a gift basket from community groups Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawaiʻi and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou.
    Keynote speaker Duane Kurisu
         This evening, traditional elements beamed into the graduates' homes, courtesy of Nā Leo Community Television. Keynote address came from Duane Kurisu, who grew up in a Hawaiʻi Island sugar plantation town much like Pāhala, to become one of the most successful entrepreneurs and community-minded individuals in the Hawaiian Islands. He said as a child he thought he was poor, living on a sugar plantation, but later came to know that it gave him an advantage. He talked about character building in rural Hawaiʻi: "If you catch three fish, you give two away and keep one. If you grow two green onions, you share one of them." If a storekeeper gives too much change, take it back. His childhood community was "never about 'I', it was all about 'we,'" said Kurisu.
         He encouraged students to focus on the "we," particularly in this time of the COVID-19 crisis. The new normal can't be about fear and restriction; it's about kindness, trust, strengthening character and collaboration, said Kurisu.
         Kurisu told the graduates that one advantage over his generation is instant access to information. "Whatever you want to know is in the palm of your hand."
    Mayor Harry Kim waived and congratulated each Kaʻū high graduate today. Photo by Julia Neal
         He encouraged graduates "to go all in, to build strengths and face your fears... to hold ourselves to our own high standard, share ourselves with our families and communities... The world needs you now more than ever in modern history."
         Kurisu urged Kaʻū High School Class of 2020 members to "Be your own heroes." He asked them to say, "I am who I am, my own hero, and I am committed to go all-in with life and measure myself through my contributions to others." He said with this commitment, "You will never be lost."
         Kurisu and partners own Punaluʻu Bake Shop and recently purchased the Nāʻālehu shopping center across the corner. He said he hopes the historic Nāʻālehu Theatre can be restored, perhaps repurposed. Among his accomplishments are numerous real estate endeavors statewide, and founding a company that owns such magazines as Hawaiʻi Business, Honolulu Magazine, and numerous book titles. Recent non-profit work includes creating housing for the homeless and encouraging entrepreneurship. He is also part-owner of the San Francisco Giants.
    Athletic Director Kalei Namohala and Principal Sharon Beck, with a photo frame around a senior as
    he is photographed during the drive through graduation. Photo by Julia Neal
         In Principal Sharon Beck's address to the students, she acknowledged their losses at the end of the year, when everyone was forced off campus due to the dangers of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Senior Prom, May Day, the end of the athletic season, and a trip to Japan for the culinary students were among them. She said the tragedy brought out the strength, resilience, growth, and love in this Class of 2020. She compared the students to the sculpture on the school grounds by Randall Shiroma. It's called ʻAʻaliʻi Ku Makani, and describes the native ʻaʻaliʻi plant, standing strong in the fierce Kaʻū wind.
         Senior Class Advisor Matt Roddy described the Class of 2020 as exceptional and said the majority of graduates are headed to college or the military. He noted that their class song is Live by The Green. Class colors are black and gold. The class motto is "Miles may separate us, but memories will always bind us."
         See more on the students and their graduation in Saturday's Kaʻū News Briefs.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FUNDRAISING FOR A PUBLIC OCEAN VIEW SKATE PARK is underway. Organizer Travis Aucoin told The Kaʻū Calendar that the fiscal sponsor is Kalanihale, "a nonprofit that supports the cultural, physical, and emotional well being of our community. We know that during this uncertain time we don't know the future, but we are working hard to make sure we have a better place, a place that we all can be proud of and be safe for our families' health."
    Ocean View Skate Park concept design.
         Kaʻimi Kaupiko, of Miloliʻi,  is organizing the fundraiser on behalf of Kalanihale. Donations are tax deductible. See https://tinyurl.com/yc3jav9c.
         Aucoin said the group raised $465, and is "just getting started" with its outreach. He said the proposed site for the skatepark is at Paradise Circle. "We have been partnering with other organizations like Home School Network, Miller Surf, and the Tony Hawk Foundation to this park come to life. We are currently working with the County of Hawaiʻiand local representation in the process of seeing our vision come to life. We are in need of your help as we fundraise to get our designs done by a professional design business. Our goal is to fundraise $5,000. Every dollar helps.
         "We are waiting for government to open back up and for the Environmental Assessment process to happen. Right now, the advocacy group is raising money for the skatepark design cost. This is a great start towards a free-to-use public skatepark for the community. We would like more people to join us make this a successful skatepark project, and a great achievement for this community."


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    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW CASES OF COVID-19 STATEWIDE WERE REPORTED TODAY. The state Department of Health announced a reassessment of the case count, starting with the beginning of the pandemic. The DOH update shows 81  confirmed cases on Hawaiʻi Island, with 77 victims recovered. The remaining four are quarantined and monitored by DOH.
         Statewide, the update shows 642 victims of COVID-19 confirmed, with 414 in HonoluluCounty, 20 in Kauaʻi County, and 117 in MauiCounty.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "On this three-day weekend with opening of parks and beaches, know the importance of following the policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and personal health. Please do your part. Thank you for listening. Please be safe on this very special weekend of remembrance in honor of the men and women who died serving our great nation. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.63 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 96,329.
         Worldwide, more than 5.21 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 338,000.
    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.


    The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

         Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, May 26 and Tuesday, June 30.

         Volcano's CooperCenter at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, May 27 and Wednesday, June 24.

         Nāʻālehu's Sacred HeartChurch at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy on Monday, June 1.
         Ocean View's KahukuPark on Tuesday, June 8.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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    On the fence between high school and adult life, Kaʻū 2020 graduates are lined up, unmasked, in Congrats Grad photos
    at Pāhala Community Center on Friday, graduation day See their speeches below. Photo by Julia Neal

    RESTAURANTS, CHURCHES, HAIR SALONS, and other personal services will be able to reopen  on June 1. Mayor Harry Kim made the announcement today after Gov. David Ige gave the approvals.
         Approved restaurants will include food courts, but not dedicated bars and nightclubs. Social distancing will be required, reducing the number of dining tables to expand the spaces between them. In-dining service must be in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Interim Guidance for Restaurants and Bars, National Restaurant Association Guidelines, and any updated CDC guidance. The layout and design of restaurants must be compliant before reopening, said the Mayor.
         Faith-Based Worship is another category to reopen. The Mayor said that people must gather in accordance with the CDC Interim Guidance for Administrators and Leaders of Community and Faith Based Organizations to Plan, Prepare, and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 or any updated CDC guidance.
         Salons and barbershops must follow Rules Relating to Safety Guidelines for Barbers and Beauty Operators.
         Also allowed will be one-on-one services including, but not limited to, tutoring, music lessons, massage, yoga, Pilates, and personal training. They can reopen with distancing and other health measures.
         Anyone reopening can request no-cost assistance to provide a safe and healthy business for employees and customers, by contacting the county's COVID Task Force on Education and Prevention at 935-0031.

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    The stewards of Kaʻū High School groomed the grounds on Friday ahead of the graduation drive-through ceremony.
    The sign for Class of 2020 is made with white, translucent cups, pushed into the spaces of the chain-link fence.
    Photo by Julia Neal
    STUDENT SPEAKERS at Friday's Kaʻū High School graduation focused far beyond the challenges of the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic that cut their on-campus time short at the end of the year. Some talked about another major life event. Most of the 42 seniors were born in the year of 9/11 only to graduate in the year of COVID-19. They rolled to the venue to receive their diplomas, a photo shoot, mahalos from the school staff and Mayor Harry Kim, and a gift basket from community groups Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawaiʻi and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou.

    MALIAH ABABA, CO-VALEDICTORIAN FOR KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2020 gave the following remarks: "First off, I would like to thank my parents, family, and friends for always pushing me to the best of my ability and for supporting me in everything I do. I wouldn't be the person I am today if it wasn't for you. I'd also like to thank all my teachers and mentors for helping me grow, not only as a better scholar, but as a better person.
    Maliah Ababa is Co-Valedictorian of the Kaʻū High School Class of 2020. She rolls to Kaʻū District Gym to
    receive her diploma. Her speech was televised through a virtual half-hour graduation presentation on Nā Leo TV.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         "And, to my Class of 2020, although we didn't get to finish the year together, I'm so thankful to have you all as my classmates. You are some of the most unique, hilarious, and amazing people I've ever met. We made so many unforgettable memories, from winning Homecoming Week to running around the halls playing Senior Tag. Even though our year was cut short, it was great because of you all.
         "This year was a struggle for the Class of 2020. Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, our year was cut short unexpectedly. For most of us, it hasn't even dawned that we just graduated high school and are now adults.
         "It was heartbreaking to find out that we wouldn't be able to go to our last prom together or even enjoy our last memories walking down the halls one last time. We lost so many significant memories that can never be replaced. Many of us weren't able to finish off our sports seasons or even experience going to prom, but most of all, we all lost the opportunity to proudly walk across the stage and accept our high school diploma in front of our families and friends.
         "Throughout the hardship of this year, our community, family, and friends continued to support us through this tough time. They continuously show us how proud they are of how far we've all come and how much more we can achieve. The community continues to make a big effort to celebrate all of our accomplishments, despite the obstacles we're facing.
         "Life put us through so many obstacles; from pushing through the 9/11 after-effects when we were born to graduating during a worldwide pandemic. From the start, we were given challenges but we faced it and will only become stronger. These obstacles we face prepare us for the future and it makes us stronger for what's to come. This is the first obstacle we're facing as adults, and if we can get through this, then we can get through much more throughout life. A lot was taken away from us this year, but we also are learning an important lesson that through tough times, positive and better things are to come.
    Teachers and staff on the left waived to the graduates, with diplomas, photos, and gifts on the right.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         "Despite all the challenges we faced and continue to face, we can conquer anything we put our minds to. We fought through all the obstacles that were thrown at us and we still continue to make the best of every situation we're given.
         "I want you all to remember: Take pride in how far you have come and have faith in how far you can go."

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    KRYSTAL JANE VELASCO, CO-VALEDICTORIAN FOR KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2020, gave the following remarks on a graduation television show Friday: "First of all, I would like to thank God for wisdom and guidance. On behalf of the class 2020, I would like to thank the families of our class for bringing us into this world, raising us, supporting us, and helping us achieve this significant milestone in our lives.
    Krystal Jane Velasco, Co-Valedictorian for Kaʻū High School, her
    photo displayed on a fence line as graduations was a virtual,
    televised presentation paired with a drive-through for
    diplomas, photo, and a lauhala community gift basket.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         "I would also like to thank the faculty and staff of Kaʻū High School for the education, influence, and guidance they have provided along the way. You all have helped and shaped us into who we are today.
         "To the class of 2020, congratulations! Finally, our momentous time of the year has arrived! We did it! My fellow graduates, I may not have known you for a long time but you all showed me such warmth and love. I am glad that I am part of this amazing class. You are all creative and smart in many different ways, so I want you to trust in and never doubt yourselves. I am counting on seeing you conquer life in your unique way.
         "The reality is now in front of us. As we move forward in our lives and wherever the wind takes us, always remember to do so with an open mind and a full heart. The most wonderful lesson I learned throughout high school is that I am the captain of my ship. I am the decision-maker of which way I should go.
    Students presented their signs for access to the graduation venue.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         "Planning what to do after high school has been one of the hardest tasks for me, and maybe to all of my fellow classmates? Should I go to college, military, or should I just go straight and find a job? I asked myself this question, 'What do I want to do in the future, what do I want for myself?' I asked for advice from my parents, my brother, cousins, and my friends. They all told me the same thing, and that is to follow my dreams and what my heart tells me to do. I decided I want to study nursing in college. Today, I am now ready, more confident, and motivated to conquer the next chapter of my life because I am going to pursue the career that I love.
         "So, I wanted to say to you all that, in life, we need to be conscious and responsible for our actions. Learn to trust yourself and your decisions. Follow your heart because only you can choose which way to go. I know that each of us will go beyond the stars in whatever we do. Become the person you have always wanted to become, and work for what you really want."

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    Marilou Mae Manantan, President for Kaʻū High Class of 2020,
    mentioned that most of her classmates were born in the year
    of 9/11 only to push through the COVD-19 pandemic during
    their high school grad year. Photo by Julia Neal
    MARILOU MAE MANANTAN, CLASS PRESIDENT FOR KAʻŪ HIGH CLASS OF 2020, gave the following remarks: "It is my pleasure to welcome friends, family, and faculty to our virtual graduation ceremony. First off, I'd like to thank my friends and family for supporting me and sculpting me into the amazing woman that I am today. I would also like to give a special shoutout to my best friend, coaches, and my SP Boys for creating one of the most memorable chapters in my life.
         "We made it! Although COVID-19 impacted us in a way we never imagined, we made it. Some people may say that we were built for this because of how we were born in the same year as 9/11. Other people may say 'no cap & no gown' but here I stand before you in my cap and gown! This may have been a tough year but it's also a memorable one, one that's unforgettable. Our school year got cut short but don't let it put a pause on your greatness.
         "I will always miss high school. I will always miss the morning rides to school with my best friend. I will always miss watching and competing in lunchtime activities to see who's class is the best. I will always miss hanging out with my friends in Ms. Myashiro's class, I will always miss the feeling of competing in sports. I will always miss our game of senior tag that we never got to finish due to COVID. I will always miss the feeling of being a senior at Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary School.
    Unmasked faces along the way to graduation at Robert N. Herkes Gymnasium & Shelter, also known as Kaʻū
    District Gym, where diplomas and community gift baskets were presented to the Class of 2020. Photo by Julia Neal 
         "From all our firsts, here's to our last. Our last first day of school, our last game, our last assembly, our last dance, our last ride, our last time being a student. Today is when our journey begins. Today is our last day being all together; after this, we're going to part ways and take our journeys on different roads. We may not be graduating in a way that we wanted to and that's okay, it's not needed to validate our high school accomplishments. Here's to the class of 2020: miles may separate us but memories will always bind us. Mahalo."

    Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawaiʻi's Debbie Ryder and 
    Desmond Dacalio distributed lauhala gift baskets with food
    to graduates on Friday. Photo by Julia Neal
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition

    HOʻOKUPU IN LAUHALA BASKETS came from community groups Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawaiʻi and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou at Friday's graduation from Kaʻū High School. Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder, who works on cultural programs and presentations at the school, was joined by Kawehi Ryder to gather and prepare the food, including luʻau pork and fresh cabbage, plus steaks from Wayne Kawachi and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou.
         Desmond Dacalio assisted with handing out the gift baskets to
    graduates as they paraded by, after
    receiving diplomas and a wave from Mayor Harry Kim.
         The tag on the lauhala gift basket says, "A Hoʻokupu for You!"
       
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    PUNALUʻU BAKE  SHOP REOPENED its retail and food services to the public, this week. Hours are  to 
    daily.
         Food is available to order by phone all day, to include malasadas, Portuguese and other sweetbreads, cookies, soups, plate lunches, and hot and cold sandwiches, as well as beverages.
         Retail items include Kaʻū Coffees and many local packaged foods, keepsakes, and other collectible and gift items.
         Call ahead to 929-7343, or walk up and order. The store is limited to six persons at a time, wearing masks. Dining on site is off-limits until further notice.


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    The view from Pu‘u Kahuku. NPS photo, Sami Steinkamp

    THE KAHUKU UNIT OF HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK increased community access starting today by opening trails on Saturdays and Sundays from  to  Access will expand in phases.
    Popular Trails include:

         Pu‘u o Lokuana Cinder Cone is a short but strenuous climb. The hike is a .4 mile (.35 km) loop with a 130-foot (40 m) elevation change. The trail along historic ranch roads leads to a hidden pasture, lava tree molds, and lava flows from 1868.
         Kamakapa‘a Trail is an easy .5 mile (0.8 km) loop through grassy meadows to the top of a small cinder cone with a 40-foot (12 m) elevation change. Sweeping views from the top take in the full breadth of lower Ka‘ū.

    A large lava tree mold on the 1868 lava flow. NPS photo, Sami Steinkamp

         Palm Trail Hikeis a 2.6-mile (4.2 km) loop, where people can walk or bike through scenic pastures for "one of best panoramic views" in Kahuku, with a 310-foot (95 m) elevation change. Volcanic features include the 1868 fissure and the trail crosses the main lava channel.

         Pali o Ka‘eo Trail runs 2.1 miles (3.4 km), with a 410-foot (125 m) elevation change, through woodland meadows along the top of a steep grassy slope. Vistas along the way take in the coast of Ka‘ū from Ka Lae (South Point) to Na Pu‘u o Pele.
         Pit Crater Trail is a strenuous 4.1-mile (6.7 km) with a 1,165-foot (335 m) elevation gain. The trail leads steeply up old pasture roads to the edge of a huge pit crater. Hikers must decontaminate at the ROD Quarantine Gate.
         During Phase 1 of the opening, vehicles must remain below Upper Palm Trail. Park rangers will be on patrol.
          Services are limited and some places, such as the Visitor Contact Station and Book Store are closed to the public.

    The Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is opening in
    phases with hiking beginning today. NPS Photo by Janice Wei
         The National Park Service urges visitors to follow CDC and local guidance; park only in designated areas; pack out everything brought in; maintain 6 ft (2 m) social distance from others; stay on marked trails; be prepared for limited, or no access, to restrooms and other facilities. 

         Wendy Scott-Vance, of Kahuku Unit, said, "To all of you who have made hiking and exercise at Kahuku a regular part of your lives, we are looking forward to seeing you soon!"
         The entrance to Kahuku Unit is in Kaʻū, between South Point Road and Ocean View's town center, about an hour's drive south of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park Park's main entrance, on Hwy 11.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our late

    Jake Branch
    ANOTHER CALL FOR PUBLIC ASSISTANCE in the search for Jake Branch is requested by Hawaiʻi county police. Branch, a 36-year-old male who frequents Kaʻū, Kohala, and Kona Districts. He is wanted on multiple outstanding Criminal Contempt Bench Warrants, BOLO's for Resist Order to Stop, Reckless Driving, and Leaving the Scene of an Accident Involving Damage to a Vehicle.
         Branch was most recently contacted by police on April 11, while operating a stolen white Toyota Tacoma Pickup in North Kohala. The vehicle was reported stolen from the Puna District on April 1. The vehicle evaded officers but was later located in the South Kohala District, where officers once again attempted to contact Branch. The vehicle again fled and was located a short time later, abandoned in South Kohala. Branch is also wanted for questioning related to a Burglary reported in North Kohala on April 11.
         Branch is described as being 6-feet 3-inches, approximately 285 pounds, with long brown hair. Branch is known to operate a black Yamaha FJ 1300cc motorcycle with unknown plates.
         Anyone with information on his whereabouts is encouraged to contact the police non-emergency number, (808) 935-3311 or Detective Kayla Makino-Kahuli of the Area II Criminal Investigations Section at (808) 326-4646 ext. 277.


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    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND and only one new in the state, reports the Department of Health. The new case is in MauiCounty. Eighty-one cases of COVID-19 are reported on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with 77 recovered. The remaining four are quarantined and monitored by DOH. Statewide, 643 people – 414 in HonoluluCounty, 21 in Kauaʻi County, and 118 in MauiCounty– have been confirmed positive for the virus since the pandemic began.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The Island and State of Hawaiʻi are doing well in minimizing the spread and impact of this virus. During this holiday weekend when we gather and enjoy the lifestyle of Hawaiʻi please continue practicing the policies of distancing, gatherings, cleanliness, face coverings, staying at home if you are sick, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy. Please be safe on this very special weekend of remembrance in honor of the men and women who died serving our great nation. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.66 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 97,414.
         Worldwide, more than 5.29 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 341,000.


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    ONLINE WORSHIP SERVICE FOR TRINITY SUNDAY are held by St. Jude's Episcopal Church at stjudeshawaii.org/worship tomorrow, Sunday, May 24th. Cindy Cutts says, "Special thanks to Rev. Constance, Dan and Steve."


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    Dr. Neal Palafox explains the irony of Micronesians' fame as an ocean-going people, who wind up in 
    poverty and poor health in Hawaiʻi. He spoke at the annual Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association 
    meeting in Pāhala last year. Photo by Julia Neal

    Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
         Last May, the health and economic wellbeing of Micronesians and other South Pacific islanders who have moved to Hawaiʻi were the focus of the 21st annual Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association meeting at Pāhala Community Center.

         Keynote speaker was Neal Palafox, MD, MPH, a professor at University of Hawaiʻi John A. Burns School of Medicine's Department of Family Medicine & Community Health. He's spent decades studying and working with Pacific Islanders to improve their health and economic situation.
    U.S. military after World War II, when more than a decade of nuclear bomb testing was conducted in the islands. After the nuclear testing stopped, the U.S. government promised to help with economic development, health, and education for the islanders.
         The U.S. maintains large military bases in Micronesia and views them as important to the future, especially with Chinese government and companies making inroads into the Pacific. In exchange for keeping the bases, and for mitigation for the nuclear testing that made some islands uninhabitable, the U.S. allows residents of many of the islands to come to this country without a passport or visa, to live, work, and gain an education here. At first, the federal government paid for their health care, then the states chipped in as the federal government withdrew some of its support.
    Physician Richard Creagan talks about experience working
     with Marshallese in the Peace Corps. Photo by Julia Neal

         Palafox talked about the strategic importance of numerous South Pacific islands to the
         Some of the islanders went to places like Arkansas, where they were hired by large companies like Tyson's Foods and became factory workers. In Arkansas, Marshallese in particular have done well in terms of being lifted out of poverty, though far away from their island culture of subsistence farming and fishing.

         On Hawaiʻi Island, many of the families live remotely. Ocean View is one place where Micronesians found affordable land to create housing for extended families. Some of the parents and grandparents work picking Kaʻū Coffee. The children go to school.

         One problem brought up in the meeting was assimilation of the children into the American education system. With poor English skills upon arrival, they need more support through speakers of their own dialects, several attendees stated. Sometimes they are bullied and feel discrimination from other students and even teachers, Palafox said. He said that, throughout Hawaiʻi, there are many Micronesian jokes, online insults such as "Micronesian Cockroaches Go Home." People ask "How do we get them to go elsewhere?" and say, "Send these people a message," and "Stop them from coming." These islanders are often blamed for being the biggest cause of homelessness in Hawaiʻi, Palafox said.

         He noted that one difference between Micronesians here and other immigrants is that most other immigrants have to apply for a visa and are sponsored by families already here. They often arrive with a job waiting for them. With the Pacific Islanders who have free entry to the U.S., "we are getting the entire demographic," the middle class and the poor, the skilled and unskilled, said Palafox, "with their need for more education, employment training, health care, and assistance with assimilation."


    Dr. Neal Palafox and Marshallese leader from Ocean View, 
    Johnathan Jackson. Photo by Julia Neal

        Palafox introduced the idea of Cultural Safety with mediating variables to help the islanders. Among them are self-determination, social and restorative justice, equity, negotiated partnership, transparency, reciprocity, accountability, and resilience.

         Johnathan Jackson, one of the leaders of the Marshallese in Ocean View, talked about the attempt to maintain some of the traditional culture while living here. The Micronesians, for example, are well regarded as master navigators in the South Pacific. It is ironic that they would have a hard time being accepted here, said Jackson.

         Palafax said that health statistics are bleak among the islanders before and after they come here. He said they are affected by the worst of both worlds: cholera, dengue fever, and tuberculosis in their less-developed tropical home islands, and the poor diet of modern society with more diabetes, stroke, and cancer.

         Jesse Marques, founder of Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association, and physician Richard Creagan, who represents East Ka`u into Kona in the state House of Representatives and worked in the Peace Corps in the Marshall Islands, vowed to engage more with the Marshallese and other islanders who have moved here.
         See more on Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association at krhcai.com.


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    NOTABLE KĪLAUEA VOLCANO ANNIVERSARIES are the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. Several occur at the end of May:

         The past two years of Volcano Watch articles from late May focused on commemorating the 49th and 50th anniversaries of the Mauna Ulu eruption. However, the end of May has several other notable Kīlaueaeruption beginnings, changes, and endings. Here, we reflect on some selected anniversaries spanning 1823–2018. 

         The first eruption of Kīlauea documented by western missionaries was described in William Ellis's account of the 1823 eruption. A 6-mile-long fissure called "the Great Crack" produced the Keaīwa Flow on the lower Southwest Rift Zone sometime in early summer (month unknown). A now seldom-visited part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaiians described to Ellis that "Pele had issued from a subterranean cavern and overflowed the lowland… the inundation was sudden and violent, burnt one canoe, and carried four more into the sea. At Mahuku [Bay], the deep torrent of lava bore into the sea..." This description emphasized the importance of eyewitness accounts of volcanic activity.

    HVO scientist measures the episode 12 lava 
    fountain height at Mauna Ulu from Puʻu Huluhulu 
    on Dec. 30, 1969. The Mauna Ulu eruption marks 
    its 51st anniversary on May 24, 1969
    Photo by Hans-Ulrich Schmincke

         The 1840 eruption in lower Puna began on May 30 and lasted for 26 days. Nānāwale Estates is built on the lava flow from this eruption. Few eyewitness accounts exist of this eruption, which emphasized the importance of geological fieldwork to reconstruct the chronology of events that occurred. Geologic mapping indicated 1840 may have been similar to the 2018 eruption.

         In 1922, ten years after the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory was founded, a fissure eruption began around on May 28 in Makaopuhi and Nāpau craters on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The distinctive red glow of an eruption was observed from Uēkahuna Bluff an hour after a strong "swaying" earthquake. HVO scientists drove for 30 minutes and then hiked 3 hours (from to ) to reach Makaopuhi. The next day, another field party approached from the east and saw weak spattering in Nāpau Crater before reaching Makaopuhi Crater.  Both teams endured hours of jungle bushwhacking to reach the eruption sites.

         The explosive 1924 eruption of Halemaʻumaʻu lasted 17 days and ended activity on May 28. In an interesting coincidence, Halemaʻumaʻu unleashed a large ash cloud that resulted in a single fatality on May 18, 1924– a day later associated with the famous Mount St. Helens eruption.

         A 1954 anniversary occurs on May 31 for a 3.5-day-long fissure eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater. This eruption was one of the first at Kīlauea to be "anticipated" through geophysical monitoring. HVO scientists had noted signs of increasing pressurization at the summit and stated that "under such conditions, an eruption might come with very little forewarning." They were right. The first earthquake woke residents at , seismic tremor started at , and at , there was red glow in the sky.

         The 1955 lower Puna eruption ended on May 26 after 88 days of activity in the same area as the recent 2018 eruption. This eruption devastated farmland and isolated KapohoVillage.

         Mauna Ulu began erupting on Kīlauea's upper East Rift Zone on May 24, 1969. It followed a decade of short-lived fissure eruptions and HVO staff suspected it would be another week-to-month-long event. However, activity focused at a single vent between the now buried ‘Alae and ʻĀloʻi craters and continued there almost continuously for 4.5 years. This sustained activity allowed HVO staff to document, study, and understand volcanic processes in great detail. Specifically, the eruption advanced understanding of how lava flows advance and inflate, the effect of lava velocity and slope on flow textures, gas-pistoning behavior, and the formation of pillow basalts when lava flows into the ocean.

    Colored postcard depicting early 20th century eruption at Kīlauea. Postcard courtesy of Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park

         During the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption, fissure 8 reactivated for a final time on May 24 and was joined briefly on May 27 by the final fissure (#24) opening. In the evening of May 27, the main fissure 8 lava flow began its advance towards the ocean. This eruption was arguably the best-documented eruption at Kīlauea yet, with the existing geophysical network, new instruments rapidly deployed, 24/7 field presence for 6 months, use of new tools like Unoccupied Aerial Systems, and an outpouring of citizen science.

         Kīlaueahas had a long and active history, and each eruption provides us new insights into volcanic processes and hazards. HVO will continue to make observation-based discoveries to improve delivery of warnings and hazard assessments.

         Volcano Activity Updates

         Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL(https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

         Kīlauea monitoring data for the past month show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html.
    Colored postcard depicting 1921 Halemaumau eruption. 
    Postcard courtesy of Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park

         Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.
         This past week, about 63 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). Global Positioning System measurements show song-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

         There were 3 events with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian islands during the past week: a magnitude-3.8 earthquake 7 km (4 mi) NE of Pāhala at 31 km (19 mi) depth on May 21 at 12:42 a.m., a magnitude-3.0 earthquake 9 km (6 mi) NE of Pāhala at 32 km (20 mi) depth on May 18 at 1:49 p.m., and a magnitude-2.9 earthquake 12 km (7 mi) S of Volcano at 29 km (18 mi) depth on May 16 at 09:07 a.m.

         HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa.
         Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlaueaand Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


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    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING

    Café Ono on Old Volcano Highway is offering a special takeout menu for Memorial Day Weekend, this Saturday and Sunday, May 23 and 24, The regular menu is also available. Call ahead to order, 985-8979. See cafeono.net for menu.

    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

         Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, May 26 and Tuesday, June 30.

         Volcano's CooperCenter at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, May 27 and Wednesday, June 24.

         Nāʻālehu's Sacred HeartChurch at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy on Monday, June 1.
         Ocean View's KahukuPark on Tuesday, June 8.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.


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    Virtual Graduation for Sixth Grade at Nāʻālehu Elementary School last Friday. Screenshot from Olivia-ann Thomas
    THE FIRST VIRTUAL GRADUATION FOR NĀʻĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL sixth graders involved 100 students, staff, and well-wishers on Friday, May 22. Students virtually shared stories about the time they spent learning at Nāʻālehu Elementary, on campus before the pandemic, and recently online and with distance learning materials. They presented ideas about what they want to be when they grow up. They also talked about their favorite memory from school and about those they want to thank. The graduation ended with a hat toss and "Cheeeehuuu!" Hoʻomaikaʻi iā ʻoukou!

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    Kamehameha Schools Hawaiʻi Island Class of 2020 includes two Kaʻū graduates, Dane Masazo Shibuya, Jr and
    Jeysiah Demitri Camba-Penera. Photo from Kamehameha Schools
    TWO KAʻŪ STUDENTS GRADUATED FROM KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL in Keaʻau on Saturday. Ohuʻohu Keaʻau i ka liko Lehua, Keaʻau is adorned with beauty of our children, states the school motto.
    Dane Masazo Shibuya, Jr
         Dane Masazo Shibuya, Jr said he plans to attend a four-year program at Univertisy of Hawaiʻi, with a focus on administration of justice. He said his favorite moments from high school were playing Varsity football and lifting weights. His most influential adult throughout his K-12 journey is Manly Kanoa. He is most looking forward to becoming a police officer, in order to impact lives. His father is Dane Shibuya, Sr.; mother Terry-Lee Shibuya; sister Kassie Shibuya; grandmother Jade Andrade; sister Tiare-Lee Shibuya; niece Keulu.

         Jeysiah Demitri Camba-Penera, Cum Laude, plans to attend UH-Hilo, with a focus on digital art, 2D animation, and/or traditional art. His favorite moment from high school was "finding a group of people that I really vibe with, and also maybe the Keʻei trip (that was really fun)." He said the most influential adult throughout his K-12 journey is Mr. Pao: "He taught me a lot about art and helped me improve drastically in just the 2-3 years he was here." He said he is most looking forward to "escaping quarantine and being able to experience all that college life has to offer."

    Jeysiah Demitri Camba-Penera
         The Class of 2020 wrote a song, Hīhīmanu a Kāne. Composer Kyra Michiko Poʻipe Gomes said, "Each verse of this mele honors the different people in our lives who have helped us reach this point: our family, our teachers, and each other. Before writing this, I asked my fellow graduates to describe one another and utilized their responses to create the bridge of this mele. We have accomplished so much as a class and this song is no exception." Lyrics by Nāmelemanukukalaao Kapono and Gomes, with input from the Class of 2020:

         Ke kaʻao o Hāloa, Pili ke aloha ʻoiaʻiʻo, Haʻahaʻa, ʻAlakaʻi ʻana i ke ala kūpono

         Hui: Mau ka hoʻoilina a mākou, Me ka piha o ka na'au no ia papa nei

         Bridge: He ikaika ma loko o ka likeʻole, Hoʻohui me he ʻohana lā, E mau ka holomua a puka mai ke ao.

         Wrapped in your light, You have shielded us from the fears of the night, Ever kind, You treated us as one you call your own

         Chorus: Take these thoughtful years and carry on, Though we may be far away

         Bridge: Strength shown through our differences, Connected as a family, Let us continue to lead our lāhui towards the rising horizon of a new day.

    Father Dane Shibuya, Sr.; mother Terry-Lee Shibuya; sister Kassie
     Shibuya; grandmother Jade Andrade; sister Tiare-Lee Shibuya; niece
    Keulu; graduate Dane Shibuya, Jr. Photo from the Shibuya family
         The Valedictory Address was given by Travis Kanoa Chai Andrade; Poʻo Kula (Head of School) Address and Presentation of the Class of 2020 was given by Mrs. M. Kāhealani Naeʻole-Wong. Reading of Graduates and Diplomas, and Acknowledgement of Honors and Endorsements, was by Dr. Lehua Veincent and Angela Pōmaikaʻi Baptista. The Benediction was given by Naomi Kaleonahenaheonālani Schubert, Keiki Kahu. The Invocation was given by Kamakana Rodrigues, Keiki Kahu. The Welcome was given by Salesi Malu Haunga, Senior Class President. The Salutatory Address was given by Kayla Leigh Kealani Enanoria. The Guest Speaker was Angela Pōmaikaʻi Baptista.
         The graduation aired on Nā Leo TV, Channel 53, at 4 p.m. Saturday, and is available On Demand at naleo.tv/channel-53/.

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    KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL SHARON BECK GAVE THESE REMARKS TO THE CLASS of 2020 on Friday: "I want to start by acknowledging the loss our graduates have suffered during this time. They lost their senior prom, May Day, athletics, trip to Japan, and finishing the year hugging their classmates goodbye. Our graduates have demonstrated strength and resilience during this time.
         "Graduation is a special occasion: the culmination of years of hard work and investment in our futures. I would like to recognize the support and commitment from those who have made graduation possible... our parents and families, our teachers and school staff, and our community. You have provided strength, grounding, and love that contributed to our students' success.
    Principal Sharon Beck during on-campus activities before the pandemic. Photo by Julia Neal
         "That same strength and love was the inspiration for the ʻAʻaliʻi Ku Makani sculpture you see on campus. ʻAʻaliʻi Ku Makani refers to the lowland plant that thrives in the strong winds. Local artist, Randy Shiroma, created the sculpture to represent the strength of the people of Kaʻū. The ʻaʻaliʻi plant has many different uses and represents the different individual skills and talents necessary to become who you are. Standing strong and tall, the sculpture alludes to the tough independent nature of Kaʻū and the beautiful tough land of where we live. The two parts of the sculpture together represent nurturing or love and relationships. The sculpture takes the form of a mother and child alluding to the grounding and nurturing that are different facets of strength.
         "The sculpture reminds us of our strength, of the relationships that are our foundation, and our connection to place, this place, Kaʻū.
         "Parents, families, faculty, and staff you have much to be proud of. Graduates, you, too, should be proud of your accomplishments and remember while this may be the end of one long journey in your life, it is also the beginning of another. You now stand at a crossroads in your life where you will need to make wise decisions and commitments. Be proud, stand tall, and stay strong. With love, I wish you all the best! "   
         The graduates are:
    Maliah Ababa, Summa Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Destenie Alani Horan, Magna Cum Laude

    Ashli-Nikol Alley, Career Technical Education Completer

    Mhay Rose Baradi, Magna Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Daysen Burns, Magna Cum Laude

    Sidrelle Candaroma, Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Janelle Zharyne Cardenas, Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Weston Davis, Career Technical Education Completer

    Melinda Eder, Magna Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Seth Eder, Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Elijah James Evangelista, Career Technical Education Completer

    Angelica Felipe, Magna Cum Laude

    Valany Gonsalves, Career Technical Education Completer

    Kaʻohinani Grace, Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Isaia Hashimoto-Kainoa

    Ashantee Holeso

    Sierra Kaawa, Career Technical Education Completer

    Sarah Kailiawa-Escobar, Career Technical Education Completer

    Janne Labin, Career Technical Education Completer

    Marilou Mae Manantan, Cum Laude

    Fancis Ivan Mararac, Career Technical Education Completer

    Stacy Mattos-Kaluau

    Stephanie Mauricio, Career Technical Education Completer

    Kahiau Medeiros, Career Technical Education Completer

    Jeremiah Nurial-Dacalio, Career Technical Education Completer

    Kyle Pensula, Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Raymond Polid-Kalili, Cum Laude

    Winston Pumarus

    Lilliana Rabang, Career Technical Education Completer

    Alethea Joy Ramones, Summa Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Michael Rodarte

    Ziggy Rodrigues, Career Technical Education Completer

    Gabrielle Anne Santos, Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Emalia Tiner, Magna Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Kyson Toriano, Career Technical Education Completer

    Ruth Vega, Career Technical Education Completer

    Krystal Jane Velasco, Summa Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Shailani Vierra, Career Technical Education Completer

    Kellsie Wakimoto, Cum Laude and Career Technical Education Completer

    Luke Watson

    Jyron Young, Career Technical Education Completer

    Anthony Ysawa, Career Technical Education Completer


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI, reports the Department of Health. Eighty-one cases of COVID-19 have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with 78 recovered. The remaining three victims are quarantined and monitored by DOH. Statewide, 643 people – 414 in HonoluluCounty, 20 in Kauaʻi County, and 118 in MauiCounty– have been confirmed positive for the virus since the pandemic began.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "It has been announced that medium risk places such as hair salons, restaurants, and places of worship may reopen beginning June 1st. Know that all restrictions and social distancing requirements will continue to be enforced to ensure the Public's safety. If you need assistance in providing a safe and healthy place in your reopening for employees and customers, please call the County's COIVD Task Force at 935-0031. This service will be provided at no cost. Please be safe on this very special weekend of remembrance in honor of the men and women who died serving our great Nation. Thank you for listening. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.68 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 98,035.
         Worldwide, more than 5.4 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 345,000.


    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.


    The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

         Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, May 26 and Tuesday, June 30.

         Volcano's CooperCenter at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, May 27 and Wednesday, June 24.

         Nāʻālehu's Sacred HeartChurch at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy on Monday, June 1.


         Ocean View's KahukuPark on Tuesday, June 8.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program which provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






    0 0


    BLNR rejected an EIS, funded by aquarium fishers and National Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, who propose
    that ten permits be issued from Ka Lae up the Kona Coast. BLNR noted that Pākuʻikuʻi, Achilles tang populations
    are already depleted. Photo from Waikiki Aquarium
    AN EIS FOR AQUARIUM FISH COLLECTING IN WEST KAʻŪ and up the Kona Coast was rejected Friday in a 7-0 decision. The state Board of Land & Natural Resources sent back a more-than 2,000-page Environmental Impact Statement, produced by a group of ten West Hawaiʻi aquarium fishers and the National Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council. They propose that Department of Land & Natural Resources issue permits to the ten aquarium fishers. The proposed permits remain before the BLNR for a later decision, pending an acceptable EIS.
         DLNR noted in its statement that in Umberger et. al vs. the Department of Land & Natural Resources, the state Supreme Court required for the first time under Chapter 343, an environmental review before issuing permits for fine-mesh-net aquarium fishing. No permits were issued after the 2017 decision, though aquarium fishing using other gear, less optimal for aquarium fishing but unregulated under Hawaiʻi law, continues. The EIS was funded and carried out by the aquarium fishers seeking permit.
         After reviewing the EIS and testimony, and deliberating for over four hours,  BLNR ruled the EIS inadequate in disclosing potential environmental impacts of ten aquarium fishing permits for West Hawaiʻi.
         Board Chair Suzanne Case stated, "This was a tough process and decision. But the unanimous vote clearly reflects the Board's view that the aquarium fishers' proposal, without meaningful limits on future catch, without enough attention to our highly depleted stocks like pākuʻikuʻi (Achilles tang) and other low-number species, and without adequate analysis of the near-future effects of climate change, ocean warming and coral bleaching on our reefs, did not adequately disclose the potential environmental impacts of the proposed ten permits."
         Hundreds of written testimonies were submitted to BLNR, which is meeting online in response to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders. In a significant first for this state agency, the Land Board took oral testimony during the online meeting from over a dozen members of the community who signed up to testify live before the board on the matter.
         See more on the EIS in the April 26 edition of the Kaʻū News Briefs. Read the entire EIS here.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THIS IS MEMORIAL DAY with statements issued by public officials. Sen. Mazie Hirono wrote:
    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard tweeted this Memorial Day photo.
         "On Memorial Day, our nation comes together to honor the lives and sacrifices of the service members who have fallen in service to their country. As a state with strong ties to the military, we recognize that just as we commemorate those we've lost, we must continuously reaffirm our commitment to supporting the families and loved ones they've left behind. While the COVID-19 pandemic has forced the cancellation of our traditional remembrance ceremonies, we can still join with one another to pay homage to those we've lost and reflect on their enduring legacy. During this pandemic, we can demonstrate that by doing our part to keep our communities safe."
         U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard sent out this message referring to the young child visiting the graves of soldiers: "In another life, you two would be holding hands and he'd be learning about this place and who these heroes are from you. You'd say their names, he'd repeat them. But not in this life. In this life you are a hero too. So we will always speak your name."
         Gov. David Ige directed the United States and Hawai‘i state flags to be flown at half-staff at the State Capitol and upon all state offices and agencies as well as the Hawai‘i National Guard in the State of Hawai‘i, on Memorial Day, until noon. He noted that the President "proclaims Memorial Day a day of prayer for permanent peace... and asks that Americans observe the National Moment of Remembrance." 
         State Sen. Kail Kahele wrote: "On Dec. 7, 1941, the United States was attacked at the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaiʻi. We lost over 2,400 American lives that day. Memorial Day is an extremely significant holiday to us here at home in Hawaiʻi as we reflect on all those we have lost in battle. Today we say thank you to all the brave men and women who have sacrificed to serve our country, and we honor the memory of all the servicemen and women who are no longer with us. It is thanks to their sacrifices that we are all here today."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MEMBER RICHARD CREAGAN announced he will file his papers this week to run again to represent West Kaʻū into Kona. Here is his announcement:
         " I pulled papers to file for re-election a couple of months ago but have not had the time or opportunity to file. I am hereby announcing that I am filing to re-run this coming week. I also want to announce a profound change in how I will run for office and how my office will support my district.
         "We have entered a new era: the era of COVID-19. That disease is an existential threat to our state but also in my view an opportunity. We are the only state that can potentially defeat and eradicate COVID-19.
         "I am currently the Chair of the Agriculture Committee and it is likely that I could remain as that Chair if reelected. However, a lot of my attention and energy is devoted to the 'Stamp it Out, and Keep it Out' effort to rid our state of this virus while opening up and empowering our economy.
    Marilyn and Richard Creagan at their farm in Kaʻū.
         "I have had a career as an emergency physician. That specialty is on the front line of the fight against COVID-19. I have also been involved in academic research at Yale University and the University of Connecticut Medical School, studying the genetics of human diseases and of immune responses to diseases - and some of that research is of import to the COVID-19 pandemic.
         "I worked for our Hawaiʻi State Department of Health as an epidemiological investigator in 2002-2003 during the SARS outbreak, and have insight into the strengths and limitations of our state Department of Health.
         "With colleagues from Yale and their colleagues from UC Berkeley, I helped found and run a biotech vaccine company called Agrion, and was Planning Director and Medical Director of that company. I hold patents in vaccine design and production, and viral inactivation. I understand that we may not be able to design and produce an effective vaccine; after 40 years, we still do not have an HIV/AIDS vaccine. Attempts to make vaccine against past coronavirus outbreaks (SARS and MERS) were unsuccessful.
         "That background is very important for my understanding of this COVID pandemic, and how I can help my fellow legislators and our state deal with this health and economic crisis.
         "Unfortunately, one of the most problematic aspects of this pandemic is that kūpuna over 65 are at high risk and those over 80 are perhaps 100 times more likely to die than someone in their teens or twenties.
    Colehour and Melanie Bondera will assist Creagan
    with agricultural issues.
         "I am over 70 years of age and am at significantly higher risk of dying or becoming disabled if I am infected with COVID-19 than my younger colleagues. While I had decided to run one more time before the COVID pandemic hit, after it hit our country and our state, I had to debate with myself and my wife whether I should run again in this new COVID era. Being a neighbor island representative means flying weekly to the Capitol during our legislative session, leaving the relatively safe Big Island to go to Oʻahu. Apart from the danger to my own health or even my life, I would not want my district to be inadequately represented if I became ill.
         "I decided to run because I strongly believe that we can defeat this disease in Hawaiʻi (some of my ideas are outlined in an article published in Civil Beat and Kaʻū News Briefs, entitled How to Make Hawaiʻi a COVID-Free State. I want to fight this force that threatens to devastate our nation and our state.
         "But I also know that our agricultural sector also needs to be even more strongly supported to provide the food that our communities need. I have therefore selected Colehour Bondera as my office manager. You will see his qualifications elsewhere, but he and his spouse are a power couple in the agricultural sector. He will focus on agriculture while I will focus on COVID-19. They are also in a lower risk age group for COVID, so could soldier on if I became ill. We are therefore running as a team. I think that either Colehour or Melanie would be fantastic candidates to replace me and I hereby pledge to not run in 2022, and to support either of them if they decide to run. In the meantime, your interests will be doubly represented in the State."
         Read more on the Bonderas in an upcoming Kaʻū News Briefs.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI, reports the Department of Health. Eighty-one cases of COVID-19 have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island since the pandemic began, with 79 recovered. The remaining two victims are quarantined and monitored by DOH. Statewide, 643 people – 414 in HonoluluCounty, 20 in Kauaʻi County, and 118 in MauiCounty– have been confirmed positive for the virus since the pandemic began.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "It was announced by Hawaiʻi County that medium risk businesses such as salons, restaurants, barber shops, and places of worship may begin reopening June 1st. The individual opening dates will be dependent on their readiness to meet the requirements of safety. If assistance is needed in meeting the requirements please call the Hawaiʻi County's Task Force at 935-0031.

         "During this holiday weekend, when we gather and enjoy the lifestyle of Hawaiʻi, please continue practicing the policies of distancing, gatherings, cleanliness, face coverings, staying at home if you are sick, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy. Please be safe on this very special weekend of remembrance in honor of the men and women who died serving our great nation. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.7 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 99,459.
         Worldwide, more than 5.47 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 345,000.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays). Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

         Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, May 26 and Tuesday, June 30.

         Volcano's CooperCenter at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, May 27 and Wednesday, June 24.

         Nāʻālehu's Sacred HeartChurch at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy on Monday, June 1.
         Ocean View's KahukuPark on Tuesday, June 8.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
         Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

         The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
         See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

    Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

    Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.




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