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    Hawaiʻi Volcano Expeditions used this image to advertiser trips from Oʻahu to fly over Kīlauea Volcano when it
    was erupting. A U.S. Circuit Court ordered the FAA and National Park Service today to regulate helicopter and
    small plane flights over National Parks. Photo from Hawaiʻi Volcano Expeditions

    U.S. COURT OF APPEALS ORDERED ENFORCEMENT OF AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT PLANS for flights over Hawaiʻi Volcanoes and other National Parks. The order from the U.S Court of Appeals for the district of Columbia found that the FAA and National Park Service have been "underwhelming and ultimately unsuccessful" in their enforcement of federal law mandating air tour management plans."
    Congressman Ed Case is a key supporter of regulating and eliminating
    tour helicopter and small plane flights over National Parks. He
    announced a major court ruling today.
         Congressman Ed Case praised the extensive ruling, noting that the federal law dates back to 2000, requiring regulation of helicopters and small aircraft tours over National Parks. He said, "The D.C. Circuit's ruling recognizes correctly that the Federal Aviation Administration and National Park Service have simply not complied with the law for decades. In that period, the destruction of our national parks from virtually unregulated air tours has worsened exponentially. I expect the FAA and NPS to fully comply with the court’s order and will do all I can to assist."
         Case said that of the 23 National Parks affected by this ruling, two, among the most impacted, are Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park. "NPS' own annual report released in October 2019 stated that Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is the most impacted by tour helicopter flights of all Parks across the country, with 8,333 flights in the prior year, or some 22 flights per day, 365 days per year," said Case. "That number is down from double in previous years, when the Volcano was erupting.
    A helicopter photo from the HICOP website.
         That same report showed Haleakalā National Park on Maui as the fourth most impacted, with 4,757 flights in the prior year. "At that level of overflights, the peace, serenity, and sanctity of our parks is destroyed and one of the core purposes of our parks is utterly defeated," said Case.
         "In addition to the complete degradation of the Park experience, life in the surrounding communities over which the tour helicopters fly to access the parks is to many resident unbearable and the heightened safety risks are clear."
         Case said the court ordered the two agencies to produce a schedule within 120 days of the issuance of the opinion, for bringing all 23 Parks into compliance, and to complete the task in two years as originally mandated by Congress.
         The case arose originally from a suit brought by the Hawai‘i Island Coalition Malama Pono (HiCOP) and the Washington, DC-based Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, claiming that the FAA and NPS had failed to implement plans to manage competing uses under the Air Tour Management Plan Act of 2000 and subsequent legislation.
         In agreeing, the three-judge panel for the D.C. Court of Appeals noted that the Air Tour Management Plan Act of 2000 directed the FAA and NPS to "make every effort" to establish rules governing such flights within two years of the first application. The panel said that "although applications have been pending at 25 parks for nearly two decades, the agencies have fulfilled their statutory mandate at only two." Noting the failure to come up with the ATMPS in more than 20 years, Bob Ernst of HiCOP said his organization "joined with Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility to litigate the FAA/NPS in a mandamus suit asking the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to find that in fact the FAA/NPS had failed to implement the ATMPs and for the Court to direct the FAA/NPS to do so."
         Ernst said HiCOP is a non-profit with the sole purpose of returning serenity to Hawai‘i, free from tour copter noise nuisance pollution and safety from tour copter crashes.
         Paula Dinerstein, PEER General Counsel, argued the case before the court. "For almost 20 years, the FAA and the NPS have allowed an airborne reign of terror to go unmitigated over park skies," she said, promising that "PEER will work with affected communities and parks to, at long last, develop responsible air tour management plans."
         PEER describes itself as working "nationwide with government scientists, land managers, environmental law enforcement agents, field specialists, health experts, and other resource professionals committed to responsible management of America's public resources and public health."
         Last year, Case introduced H.R. 4547, The Safe and Quiet Skies Act, pointing to fatal crashes of tour helicopters and small aircraft in Hawai’i and throughout the country, along with widespread and growing community disruption from rapidly increasing and largely unregulated operations. His bill would in part prohibit tour flights over National Parks, as well as Wildlife Refuges, Wilderness Areas, military installations, and national cemeteries. States and counties would also be able to limit tour flights over their jurisdictions.
         Case also wrote last year to the FAA and NPS, objecting to their plan to limit their initial air tour management plan efforts to a few low-impact parks, and to suspend plan efforts for high impact parks like Hawai’i Volcanoes and Haleakalā. He said he is continuing his efforts this year through plan development funding through his membership on the House Appropriations Committee.
         Read the court's decision.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    STATE SEN. DRU MAMO KANUHA, who represents west Kaʻū and Kona, released a May Day
    statement:
         "As the first day of May 2020, I want to wish you all a happy May Day. With our beautiful Hawaiian tradition of making and giving the flower lei, today also included federal announcements for reopening the economy.
    According to federal guidelines, states can begin to reopen business when a state's total coronavirus cases have declined over a 14-day period, not after 14 consecutive days of declining numbers. Before any consideration can be given to reopen our state, first and foremost, we must exhaust all of our safeguard measures to ensure Hawaiʻi has met the federal guidelines; truly limiting any further potential loss of life due to COVID-19.
         "Therefore, I implore each and every one of you to take the month of May as a challenge to maintain your commitment to general physical precautions to meet the federal guidelines and reopen our economy – safely, as a unified command, and with aloha for the families that have lost loved ones during this difficult time."
         Kanuha also said he wants people to be aware of new guidelines fro centers for Disease control and Prevention for COVID-19: Symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure to the virus.
    People with these symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have COVID-19 if experiencing cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, and/or at least two of these symptoms: fever, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of taste or smell. Children have similar symptoms to adults and generally have mild illness. Please note, this list is not all-inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


    "IF YOU ARE FEELING INCREASINGLY FRUSTRATED by the COVID-19 lockdown and its effect on civil liberties and the economy, you're not alone." That's the lead into the Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi's latest editorial on the balance of personal freedoms and community security during the pandemic. Here is the opinion piece by Dr Keliʻi Akina:
         Over the past several weeks, the Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi has been watching the actions of the governor and county mayors with concern, alert to the hazards that come with balancing freedom with safety. On Sunday, we were featured in a Honolulu Star-Advertiser news article in which I warned that the economic and social damage of the lockdown could, at some point, exceed the damage of the virus itself.
         If you think the warnings about the loss of freedom are alarmist, consider the suggestions being weighed by the government when it comes to reopening tourism. They include ankle monitors and GPS tracking of tourists – something that Grassroot Policy Director Malia Hill called 'positively Orwellian' in a Wednesday Honolulu Civil Beat news article.
         For many in our state, the civil liberties issue pales beside the economic one. With unemployment skyrocketing and no real plan for getting the economy back on track, locals are beginning to wonder how much longer we can go on like this. More than anything, people want to be able to get back to work. They want to be able to earn a paycheck again, start serving customers again, and just get the economy moving. While aware of the need for health and safety measures, they also want to be able to work within those guidelines to... well... work.
         That's why the Grassroot Institute has launched a new petition with a very simple message: "Let Hawaiʻi Work." We are asking Gov. David Ige to make it his top priority to get the economy back on track. We want to see him start easing restrictions in a sensible way so that people can work again.

         Ultimately, Hawaiʻi works as a state when we are able to pursue our own dreams and careers. When Gov. Ige and the four county mayors need to understand that this isn't a fringe movement. They need to know that their constituents are willing and able to take responsibility for their health and safety while returning to work. They need to see that there are thousands of Hawaiʻi residents who feel this way. And we can help them see that.
         The Grassroot Institute launched a petition drive Wednesday night to send a message to our leaders that we are ready and able to get back to work. If you would like to help make that happen, please go to this special page on our website and sign the petition. Then share the petition with your family, friends, and neighbors. We don't need to throw open the doors of the state and eliminate every safeguard at once. But the time has come to lift the economic lockdown and Let Hawaiʻi Work.

         As I told the Star-Advertiser, "In my view, given the freedom and flexibility to do so, most individuals are quite capable of deciding how best to protect themselves against the coronavirus."
         When we are cut off from doing so for too long, the whole state suffers. It's not that we don't understand there are risks. We know it is difficult to balance health concerns with economic ones. But we also believe that it is time to let the people take charge of striking that balance.


    Alaska Airlines might move more into cargo during the pandemic.
    Photo from Alaska Airlines.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    CARRYING CARGO IS A WAY FOR ALASKA AIRLINES TO KEEP GOING. Alaska, a major carrier to the Hawaiian Islands, released a statement this week as it considers a program that would enable the company to use passenger aircraft to carry cargo:
         "Since making the difficult decision to reduce our flying due to the coronavirus, we've been looking at other ways to utilize passenger aircraft to carry essential goods to people and businesses who need it most," the company explained in a blog post on Wednesday. The airline conducted a test run this week and is currently seeking approval from the Federal Aviation Administration. If granted, the new service could launch in May.
         Prior to reducing service in response to the coronavirus, Alaska Airlines carried 400,000 pounds of cargo daily on passenger aircraft. If Alaska receives FAA approval for the service, the airline could carry cargo items in the passenger cabin, including under seats, in overhead bins, and in closets, allowing for an additional 13,500 pounds of cargo compared to a regular passenger flight. Cargo includes items such as books, electronics, produce, and seafood, as well as medical equipment and medicine.
         "Our cargo customers depend on us as much as we do them to fuel our supply chain with life-saving medical treatments, medical supplies and perishable foods that have a short shelf life," said Rick Bendix, cargo marketing and business development program manager, in the blog post. "With the decrease in cargo capacity, this innovative approach allows to meet the demand of cargo customers, whether 'mom and pop' businesses or large freight forwarders who are working tirelessly to keep the critical goods moving."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    NO NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported for Hawaiʻi Island today. Of 73 cases, as counted by the state Department of Health, 60 have been released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by DOH. No one is currently hospitalized and no one has died on-island.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "This Island and State are doing very well in minimizing the spread and impact of the coronavirus. It is very important to follow the policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and personal health of physical and emotional care. Know that all these policies have one goal in common; to stop the spread of the virus. Do your part and wear a mask. Thank you for listening and be well on a very, very special day in Hawaiʻi, Happy May Day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         Statewide, one new case was reported today by DOH, on Oʻahu, bringing the state's case count to 619. The state death toll remains on Oʻahu and five on Maui. The recovery rate is about 86 percent, with 532 people released from isolation.

         In the United States, more than 1.13 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 142,000. The death toll is over 65,600.
         Worldwide, more than 3.34 million have contracted COVID-19. Recovery has exceeded one million people. The death toll is 238,663.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    How to use this map: Hold this map over your head so that the northern horizon points toward the north on the Earth. 
    For best results, use a red flashlight to illuminate the map. If you are looking east, hold it in front of you so that east is 
    on the bottom. For south views, south at the bottom, and for west, west at the bottom. Use this map at the times shown 
    on in its upper left corner. Keep this page handy and show it to your keiki next month. They probably have bedtimes 
    before the time of the chart shown here.

    The constellations are presented with their 3-letter abbreviations, with their common names shown in the margins. This 
    is done to take advantage of the truly dark skies Ka‘ū is blessed with when there is no bright moon and the skies are clear 
    of vog. The star charts are produced from a sky Atlas program written by Jerry Hudson, who has given us permission 
    to publish it. Thank you, Jerry.

    STARS OVER KA‘Ū - May 2020:
         Planets
         No bright planets are visible at chart time. Venus was up at sunset, but it set an hour and a quarter before chart time (10 p.m. on May 15th). Jupiter will rise at about 11:12 p.m. on the 15th and Saturn at 11:30 p.m. On the first of May, these times are 12:06 a.m. and 12:25 a.m., while at the end of the month, they are a couple hours earlier, at 10:08 p.m. and 10:26 p.m. for Jupiter and Saturn, respectively. Mars will rise at around 1:20 a.m.
         Fridays Sunrise and Sunset times:
         Date                     Sunrise       Sunset
         May 1, 2020        5:53 am      6:45 pm
         May 8                  5:50 am      6:47 pm
         May 15                5:47 am      6:50 pm
         May 22                5:45 am      6:53 pm
         May 29                5:44 am      6:55 pm
         The sun will pass directly overhead (meaning a vertical pole casts no shadow) at local solar noon around May 14 (South Point) until May 18 (Volcano) depending upon your location.
         Moon Phases
         Phase                   Date                   Moonrise     Moonset
         Full Moon           May 7, 2020       7:31 pm       7:03 am**
         Last Quarter        May 14               1:03 am       12:35 pm (erroneously written as 13:35 in the print paper)
         New Moon          May 22               5:52 am       7:11 pm
         First Quarter       May 29               12:10 pm     1:11 am**
         **next morning
         Local Attractions
         The Hilo ʻImiloa Planetarium may continue its closure through May but there is a wealth of information at ʻImiloa@home. See imiloahawaii.org/imiloaathome for information.

    Read online at kaucalendar.comSee our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, 
    ranches, takeoutPrint edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and 
    to all postal addresses throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. 
    Read online at kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your business or
    your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         Beginning Wednesday, May 6, a testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday.
         The next drive-thru screening will be Wednesday, May 13 at Nāʻālehu Community Center from  to  Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is to be announced
         The Nāʻālehu location is Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Thursday, May 28 at  Call 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 11 a.m. until food runs out. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On Call Emergency Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Fridays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 808-933-6030.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.


    Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.

         Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
         Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
         Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
         Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
         See ohialehuahalf.com.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



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    University of Hawaiʻi's John A. Burns School of Medicine is studying the high rate and impact of COVID-19 on 
    Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Photo from University of Hawaiʻi

    NATIVE HAWAIIANS AND OTHER PACIFIC ISLANDERS ARE HIT HARDEST BY COVID-19, says a new study from the University of Hawaiʻi John A. Burns School of Medicine. It shows a high rate of testing positive in Hawaiʻi and on the mainland. Authors of the study, Professor Keaweʻaimoku Kaholokula and Assistant Professor Robin Miyamoto, released the following:
         It has been six weeks since the first COVID-19 positive patient was identified in the State of Hawai‘i. As the data accumulates, several states in the U.S., in which there are a large number of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) residents, report the highest rate of COVID-19 positive cases among these Indigenous peoples of the Pacific than other racial and ethnic groups. In some cases, as high as 217.7 cases per 100,000, more than other ethnic groups. It is important to highlight that the rates of COVID-19 positive cases within these states are greater than those reported for African Americans and American Indians, two racial/ethnic groups receiving much of the national attention regarding COVID-19 risk.
         All Indigenous peoples share similar concerns that put them at an increased risk for COVID-19 and other related problems. These include limited access to healthcare services, more chronic and infectious diseases, and poorer economic and living conditions. These are all long-standing health concerns for Indigenous people that predate the arrival of COVID-19, but they are even more concerning now. The higher risk of infection among NHPI is linked to preexisting and underlying inequities in the social determinants of health across racial and ethnic groups that are ubiquitous in the U.S. The following is a list of issues hypothesized to impact the extremely high rates of COVID-19 in Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHPI).
         High rates of chronic disease: NHPI have among the highest rates of  chronic medical conditions, and associated mortality rates, among ethnic groups in Hawai‘i as well as the larger U.S., and among the highest in the world for those in the Pacific nations and territories, such as the Marshall Islands and Guam. These rates put them in the highly vulnerable category in the event they are infected.
    Professor Keaweʻaimoku Kaholokula
         High rates of smoking and vaping: NHPI, especially adolescents and young adults, have the highest rates of smoking and vaping compared to other racial and ethnic groups. Smoking and vaping thicken the air sacs and cause inflammation of the lungs, which makes a person highly susceptible to severe symptoms should they contract COVID-19.
         Poor access to quality health care: About 20 percent of NHPI are uninsured compared to 11.4 percent of non-Hispanic whites.
         Overrepresentation in category of essential worker: A large percentage of the NHPI community is comprised of essential workers, with heavy representation in the military, security, service, and healthcare industry, who are at an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 due to greater face-to-face interaction with patrons and co-workers.
         Lower wages and poorer economic and living conditions: Service-related jobs often do not provide a livable wage. NHPI are more likely than many other ethnic groups to have fewer financial resources and live in larger multi-generational households and densely populated neighborhoods.
         Overrepresentation in incarcerated and homeless population: Native Hawaiians alone comprise 43 percent of the prison population and, on Oʻahu alone, 39 percent of the homeless population. It is difficult to practice social distancing in prison or while living on the streets, and the conditions are unsanitary in these environments.
         Although an issue not directly linked to the medical side of the COVID-19 crisis, the "shelter at home" and "social distancing" measures to stop the spread of COVID-19 are placing a heavy emotional toll on NHPI communities. In particular are the psychosocial and financial stressors caused by the COVID-19 crisis leading to elevated levels of interpersonal violence and substance abuse in our NHPI communities. Before COVID-19, the prevalence of interpersonal violence and substance abuse were already high among many NHPI communities so any increases will surely have detrimental and long-term repercussions, making recovery efforts more challenging.
    Assistant Professor Robin Miyamoto
         Despite the higher COVID-19 risk among NHPI, it is important to remember and recognize the resiliency and fortitude of NHPI communities and their cultural assets that can be leveraged to reduce the adverse impact of COVID-19. Despite two centuries of colonization, occupation, and exploitation by Western powers, NHPI communities continue to flourish while maintaining their unique cultural values, perspectives, practices, and aspirations. The value and practice of Aloha (compassion), Mālama (caring), and Lōkahi (unity), although said differently across the different NHPI languages, provide the guiding principles to overcome any challenge.
         This data compels us to act immediately to develop a plan in Hawai‘i and across the continental U.S. that includes ongoing data collection, ensure essential workers are protected (e.g., provided with personal protective equipment), free COVID-19 testing, paid sick leave, and hazard pay. The COVID crisis has brought clarity to the structural racism that has created these inequities and we need to engage in the critical conversations while we have the opportunity. We are partnering with the American Psychological Association in their initiative Equity Flattens the Curve #EquityFlattensTheCurve. We are hopeful that we can shine a light and begin to make meaningful changes, write the authors from U.H Medical School.
         Kaholokula is Chair of Native Hawaiian Health.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A NEW DIGITAL TOOL TRACKS THOSE IN CONTACT WITH COVID-19 VICTIMS to trace the disease and check on their health. The state Department of Health uses it to follow up with people who had close contact with a person identified by DOH as having COVID-19. The tool "will improve the efficiency of data collection by public health staff," says the statement from DOH.
         Previously, DOH employees made daily phone calls to monitor those at risk for infection. The new program relies on those monitored to input and upload information on their health status on their own. The online survey takes less than five-minutes and transmits responses directly and securely to DOH. All information is encrypted to protect the privacy of the individual.
         Bruce Anderson, Director of the Department of Health, said, "Having a well-developed contact tracing and monitoring system with timely investigations, especially in underserved areas, is one of the criteria for reopening our state. The efficiency of this new system will increase our capacity to identify new cases and their contacts. We estimate this tool may allow us to monitor up to five times more new contacts than previously and thereby enhance our efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19."
    Bruce Anderson
         DOH notifies those identified as a close contact of a person with COVID-19 and requires them to remain at home and monitor their health for 14 days from the last time they made contact. DOH emails or texts the daily survey to the quarantined. The survey asks about fever, cough, shortness of breath, and other symptoms of COVID-19.
         Those without internet, or who prefer to answer by voice, receive calls to collect their health information, daily.
         The online survey does not collect location information and is viewed only by DOH staff, without sharing it with any other organization.
         The tool was developed by HealthSpace, a cloud-based platform with more than 20 years of experience in offering data solutions to local and state public health agencies in the US and Canada. DOH contracted HealthSpace for the tool, which serves more than 500 health departments, many of them using this tool in their fight against COVID-19.
         The statement says the portal protects an individual's privacy by providing each person a unique link that expires after 24 hours. The information is then stored on a secure HIPAA-compliant server. Once an individual uploads their health information, surge capacity workers, who may serve as an extension of DOH staff, are allowed limited access to the contacts assigned to them. Surge capacity staff include DOH employees who have been redirected to support the Disease Outbreak Control Division as well as persons with appropriate experience and vetted by DOCD.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE WILDFIRE LOOKOUT! CAMPAIGN IS LAUNCHED FOR MAY by Hawaiʻi Wildfire Management Organization. It aims to inform Hawaiʻi residents about fire and drought conditions, and provide tips to protect life and property from wildfires. It also gives advice on dealing with prolonged drought. More than three dozen federal, state, and county government agencies and supporting organizations partner in the effort.
         A message from Hawaiʻi Wildfire Management Organization says, "May is that crucial time just before we usually see the biggest and hottest wildfires of the year. With fire-prone summer months ahead, we must Learn, Plan, and Take Action to prepare for the added wildfire risks!... Wildfires are a frequent and significant hazard across Hawaiʻi. Wildfires impact drinking water, coral reefs, fisheries, recreation, traffic, native forests, and human lives, homes, safety, and health! These are under publicized and need attention. Spread the word!"
         The campaign says "nearly all" wildfires are started by people, and that "Taking simple steps around your home, yard, and community can protect you and your family."
         Wildfire LOOKOUT! prevention tips include: Clear vegetation ten feet around campfires and BBQs, keep a shovel and water nearby, and put them out COLD before walking away. Be sure machinery (chainsaws, weed trimmers) and recreational vehicles have operating spark arrestors and are maintained regularly. Heat from vehicle exhaust systems can ignite dry grass – park cars on areas that are paved or where vegetation is trimmed and cleared. Avoid these activities when it's windy or grass and brush are dry.

         Wildfire Preparedness Action Ideas from Wildfire LOOKOUT! Include:

         Harden Your Home by clearing leaves and debris from gutters and roof; maintaining six inches between siding and ground; covering eaves and vents with 1/8" mesh; clearing combustible materials next to and under home and lanai; and protecting windows by clearing vegetation, close them when the fire comes.

         Lighten Your Landscape by creating defensible space within 100 feet of home or up to boundary line; keeping grass short and tree branches high off ground; and clearing brush and leaf piles.

         Plan Ahead by creating and practicing a family evacuation plan, including assisting neighbors with special needs in evacuation plans; making sure fire vehicles and personnel can defend your home from all sides; making sure hydrants, pools, and water tanks are accessible; and working with neighbors or community association to become better prepared for wildfire.
         More preparation can include gathering a group of volunteers to clear weeds along village boundaries and in communal areas; inviting HWMO to offer a community Firewise workshop; or gathering neighbors to discuss and address wildfire safety.

         Resources available to the public include Ready, Set, Go! Hawaiʻi Wildland Fire Action Guide from Hawaiʻi Wildfire Management Organization at hawaiiwildfire.org/fire-resource-library-blog/rsg-your-personal-wildland-fire-ac4on-guide.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported for Hawaiʻi Island today. Of 73 cases, as counted by the state Department of Health, 60 have been released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by DOH. No one is currently hospitalized and no one has died on-island.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "This Island and State are doing very well in minimizing the spread and impact of COVID-19. It is so very important to follow the policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and personal health of physical and emotional care. All of these policies have one goal in common: help stop the spread of this virus. Thank you for your help. Thank you for listening and did you know this is National Fitness Day? This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         Statewide, one new case was reported today by DOH, on Oʻahu, bringing the state's case count to 620. The state death toll remains  on Oʻahu and five on Maui. The recovery rate is about 87 percent, with 541 people released from isolation.

         In the United States, more than 1.16 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 152,000. The death toll is over 67,060.
         Worldwide, more than 3.42 million have contracted COVID-19. Recovery has exceeded one million people. The death toll is 243,831.

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    Portion of the Geologic map of the lower east rift zone of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi by Moore and Trusdell (1991), 
    showing the southeastern part of the Leilani Estates subdivision. Some geologic units depicted here are now buried by 
    2018 lava flows; a red star marks the location of fissure 8. The large pink area depicts lava flows and vents from 
    an eruption in CE 1790. Labels correspond to geologic units described on the full map sheet.

    WHERE TO FIND MAP AND DATA INFO on the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website is the subject of this week's Volcano Watch, written by USGS HVO scientists and affiliates:
         Many messages to askHVO@usgs.gov request resources relating to geologic maps and geographic information systems (GIS) data. "Is there a map of a certain lava flow?""Where can I find the associated GIS data?" All HVO and USGS publications are searchable at pubs.er.usgs.gov, but this service is most effective if you already know what to look for.

         HVO has its own list of publications available online. Another way to find this page is by clicking "Publications" in the "Quick Links" section on the right side of the HVO homepage. This list includes selected publications relating to Hawaiian volcanism. Recently, it has been updated with geologic map and GIS products of interest to citizen-scientists.

         These products are compiled at varying scales and cover different regions of the State, so it may be difficult to determine quickly which is best for your specific interest. To help, here we review some of these maps and data sets, from larger (State-wide) to smaller (sectors of a volcano). Use the list of publications on the HVO web site to find links to each product.

    Lava flow map from during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. USGS map
         The Geologic map of the State of Hawaiʻi was prepared by Dave Sherrod and others (2007; scale 1:100,000); this publication also includes GIS data. Most of their mapping for the Island of Hawaiʻi was borrowed from the important island-wide geologic map by Edward Wolfe and Jean Morris (1996; 1:100,000) and the digital database by Frank Trusdell and others (2005; 1:100,000). However, these maps are coarser than the finer-scale products discussed below. Only lava flows from the modern historical period – CE 1790 through the publication date – were identified individually, with older lavas being grouped into broader age ranges.

         For volcanoes on the other islands, such as Haleakalā on Maui, the Sherrod and others publication remains the definitive source.

         Several geologic maps cover the Island of Hawaiʻiand individual volcanoes. For Mauna Kea, Wolfe and others (1997; scales vary by region) mapped from the summit to the Kohala coast as part of a report on the geology of the volcano. A map of Hualālai was prepared by Richard Moore and David Clague (1991; 1:50,000), with a finer-scale inset of the summit region (1:24,000).

         For Mauna Loa, there are very recent products for the northeast, central-southeast, and southern flanks by Frank Trusdell and John Lockwood (2017, 2019, and 2020, respectively), which include both detailed geologic maps (1:50,000) and GIS data (1:24,000). Two more geologic map publications will cover the remainder of the volcano. Additionally, maps and GIS data for lava inundation zones on Mauna Loa were published by Frank Trusdell and Michael Zoeller (2017; scales vary by region).

    Lava flow map from after the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. USGS map
         Geologic map products for Kīlaueaare more fragmented, since there has been no recent map or series of maps dedicated to the entire volcano. 1980s geologic mapping by Robin Holcomb was incorporated into the work of Wolfe and Morris (1996) and subsequent products; maps with finer detail have only been published for certain sectors of Kīlauea.

         For the summit region, there is a map by Christina Neal and John Lockwood (2003; 1:24,000) and a GIS database by Dillon Dutton and others (2007; 1:24,000). For middle East Rift Zone, Trusdell and Moore(2006; 1:24,000) published the Geologic map of the middle East Rift geothermal subzone; Zoeller and others (2019; 1:24,000) produced the associated digital database. For the lower East Rift Zone – including areas buried by lava in 2018 – there is a map by Moore and Trusdell (1991; 1:24,000).

         Importantly, more than 35 years of eruptive activity from 1983 to 2018 mean that most of these Kīlauea maps are in serious need of revision!

         HVO's publication list also includes several standalone GIS datasets. James Kauahikaua and others (2016) calculated steepest descent lines for Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, Hualālai, and Mauna Kea which enable us to visualize plausible, topographically influenced lava flow paths. Tim Orr (2018) published GIS shapefiles for historical Kīlauea lava flows from CE 1790 through 1982. There are also GIS shapefiles depicting progression of two Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows: the episode 61g flow from May 2016 through May 2017, by Orr and others (2017), and the June 27th flow from June 2014 through June 2016, by Orr and Patrick (2019).

    USGS map
         As HVO's bibliography of maps and other geospatial data sets grows, our online publications list will be updated accordingly. We will keep you posted!

         Volcano Activity Updates

         Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level NORMAL (volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly. Monitoring data show no significant changes in seismicity, sulfur dioxide emission rates, or deformation.
         The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information regarding the depth of the lake, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html.
         Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.
         During the past week, HVO seismometers recorded 62 small earthquakes beneath the volcano's summit and high-elevation. Most of these occurred less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show continued slow summit inflation, consistent with ongoing magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system.
         Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly. This week, a new multi-gas monitoring station was installed in the summit caldera.
         For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.
         HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa.

         There was one event with three or more felt earthquake reports in the Hawaiian islands during the past week. A magnitude-2.5 earthquake 8 km (5 mi) SW of Kahaluu-Keauhou occurred on April 23, 2020 at  
         Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvofor past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Trojans culinary students presented their chocolatier skills at last year's Big Island Chocolate Festival in Kohala. 
    Photo by Fern Gavalek

    Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
         Last year, Kaʻū High culinary students made a splash on the Kohala Coast over the final weekend of April 2019. They shared their skills with a sold-out crowd of 700 attendees at the eighth annual Big Island Chocolate Festival gala, which benefited seven island non-profits, including high school and college culinary programs. The Kaʻū Trojans team, mentored by Aina Akamu, offered Smoked Meat with Kaʻū Coffee Chocolate Barbecue Sauce and Chinese Pretzel with Kaʻū Gold Orange Chocolate Drizzle.
         Indoors and outdoors, the event spread throughout the Westin Hapuna Beach Resort, showcasing chocolate recipes by chefs, chocolatiers, and culinary students. The foods were critiqued on taste, texture, appearance, and creativity by a team of celebrity judges. Competitions spanned the annual two-day festival.
    Food made with chocolate. Photo from konacacaoassociation.com

         In addition to culinary contests, farmers entered competitions for their production of the beans that are processed into chocolate. Ken Melrose of Primavera Farm bested 13 other entries for the Best Cacao Bean while Kealia Ranch earned Best Criollo Bean. 

         Kaʻū students, as first time competitors at the Chocolate Festival, were in the mix with famous chefs and food creators, including Mike Winder of Kailua-Kona's Loko Wraps for Best Savory, who offered a vegan dish, and Anna Hohenberger of Puna Chocolate Company for Best Plated Dessert. Pastry Chef Kalani Garcia of Four Seasons Resort Hualalai took Best Bonbon while Michelle Yamaguchi of Oʻahu's Waialua Estate Chocolate won Best Bean-to-Bar Chocolate.

         Those who best dazzled the crowd with their creations earned the People's Choice Awards: Chef Dayne Tanabe of Hilton Waikoloa Village for Best Savory and Pastry Chef Daniel Sampson of the Fairmont Orchid, Hawaiʻi for Best Sweet.
         Kaʻū, at the festival for the first time, was one of four Hawaiʻi Island high school culinary teams that vied for the People's Choice Awards. Kealakehe High culinarians took top honors for both savory and sweet offerings, a dual repeat winner from last year. The event theme, Black and White, was depicted at culinary stations and Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory of Kona was tapped Best Decorated Booth.

         The festival also offered knowledge on planting to plating: a Kona cacao farm tour, cacao growing and processing seminars, how-to culinary demonstrations by chocolate industry experts, and a unique chocolate and tequila pairing.
         Farsheed Bonakdar, president of the Kona Cacao Association, the organization that produces the festival noted, "It's great the field of competition is growing in the bean division, which basically critiques the quality of beans after fermentation and drying. Proper fermentation optimizes the flavor profile of chocolate."
          Visit bigislandchocolatefestival.com or follow @BIChocoFest for updates on the next event, scheduled for Aug. 14 and 15.


    Read online at kaucalendar.comSee our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar 
    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         Beginning Wednesday, May 6, a testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday.
         The next drive-thru screening  at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is to be announced
         The Nāʻālehu location is Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Thursday, May 28 at  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 11 a.m. until food runs out. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.


    Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.

         Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
         Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
         Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
         Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
         See ohialehuahalf.com.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



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    Kumu Debbie Ryder, singing with maile lei, Ty Chun, Makana Kamahele, and Terry Lewis, accompanied the students 
    at May Day for Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School in 2019. This year, the pandemic put a pause on all May Day
     activities. See more in The Way We Were story, below. Photo by Julia Neal
           See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

    WILL THE INTERISLAND BAN ON TRAVEL without 14 days of quarantine be lifted soon, giving Hawaiʻi residents almost exclusive air travel within the state?
         Not sure. In the meantime, this week, Hawaiian Airlines rolls out protocol for distancing and for cleaning its fleet of planes, and will require everyone to wear face masks. Hawaiian Air released a statement on new standards.
         Hawaiian Airlines enhances health measures by requiring travelers to wear face coverings starting Friday, May 8 and creating more personal space at check-in, boarding, and during flights. Airport employees and flight attendants wear face masks. Last month, Hawaiian Air began electrostatic spraying of cabins for more protection against coronaviruses.
         Peter Ingram, president and CEO at Hawaiian Airlines, said, "Taking care of our guests and employees has always been our primary focus, and these new health measures will help us maintain a safe travel experience, from our lobbies to our cabins, as Hawaiʻi continues to make progress in containing COVID-19. We appreciate our guests' understanding and flexibility as we adapt our operations with their wellbeing guiding every decision we make."
         Effective May 8, passengers will be required to effectively cover the mouth and nose. The coverings are required from check-in at the airport to deplaning at destination. Young children unable to keep a face covering on, or guests with a medical condition or disability preventing its use, will be exempted from the policy.
         More personal space is provided between passengers at check-in, boarding, and during the flight.
    The airline will modify boarding by asking guests to remain seated at the gate area until rows are called. Main Cabin guests will board from the rear of the aircraft, in groups of three to five rows at a time, and agents will pause boarding as needed to prevent congestion. Guests who require special assistance and those seated in First Class will be able to pre-board.
    Hawaiian Airlines electrostatically sprays the interiors of its interisland planed every night and its
    transpacific planes between flights. The chemicals used are approved for disinfecting hospitals.
    Photo from Hawaiian Airlines
         Beginning next week, the airline - which has been manually assigning seats to increase personal space onboard - will begin blocking middle seats on its jets, adjoining seats on ATR 42 turboprop aircraft, and other, select seats to continue to provide more space for guests and flight attendants. Depending on load factors, seating may need to be adjusted at the gate to maximize spacing throughout the cabin, and meet weight and balance restrictions.
         Hawaiian will make efforts to seat families and guests traveling in the same party together, whenever possible, and encourages guests who prefer to sit together to contact the airline ahead of the flight or see an airport agent.
         Keeping Spaces Clean: Last month, Hawaiian began using electrostatic spraying to comprehensively and evenly clean aircraft cabins with hospital-grade disinfectants, registered with the Environmental Protection Agency, that coat hidden and hard-to-reach surfaces. Electrostatic treatment dries in five minutes. Hawaiian sprays it nightly on Boeing 717 aircraft it operates on flights between the islands, and prior to each departure from Hawai‘i on Airbus A330s that serve transpacific routes. The airline's A321 neo fleet is currently not in service due to a reduced flying schedule.
         Hawaiian's fleet is equipped with HEPA air filters that create a dry and essentially sterile environment inhospitable to viruses. In addition, the airline intensified detailed cleaning and disinfecting protocols, paying special attention to high-touch areas such as seats, seatbacks, headrests, monitors, tray tables, overhead bins, walls, windows, and shades, as well as galleys and lavatories.
         Hawaiian also distributes sanitizing wipes to passengers and has temporarily adjusted certain in-flight services, such as suspending the refilling of beverages in cups or personal bottles, and hot towel service.
    Face coverings will be required from airport check-in to leaving the airport when flying Hawaiian Airlines.
    Photo from Hawaiian Airlines
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MARSHALLESE ETHNICITY INVOLVING THE COVID-19 MCDONALD'S outbreak among employees and their families at three Kona restaurants was mentioned in recent state legislative hearings. The identity by ethnic group drew criticism from a Marshallese community organization, according to a story by Chelsea Jensen in Sunday's West Hawaiʻi Today. She reported on a joint statement from Big Island Marshallese Community Association President Taruo Abner, Vice President Charles Kelan, and member Meetu Kelen. They wrote that identifying the victims of the McDonald's outbreak was discriminatory because no other reporting on ethnicity occurred during the pandemic.
         Dr. Bruce Anderson, Director of the state Department of Health, revealed the ethnicity, apparently when pressed by the state Senate Special Committee on COVID-19. He mentioned Marshallese employees and their families living in two places becoming ill. "This Marshallese community in the Kona area... basically were in living situations where they couldn't effectively isolate themselves," said the health director.
         West Hawaiʻi Today reported that Association member Meetu Kelen said, "Now everybody is looking at us, and we're feeling small, but we don't want our community to feel that. We want to be part of this community." Kelen said the community is target to prejudice from the public. "They think we don't  know anything, that we're spreading the virus." She said the Marshallese are practicing distancing and washing hands like others.
    Dr. Neal Palafox and Marshallese leader in Ocean View, Johnathan Jackson, work on health care for
    the Marshallese community. Photo by Julia Neal
         Department of Health responded: "The Hawaiʻi Department of Health sincerely apologizes for any offense that may have been taken when race and ethnicity was mentioned related to those affected by COVID-19. The department was apprised of these concerns and will strive to use sensitivity when mentioning race. Please know that the intent was to express concern for those groups or populations that are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and the need to build awareness about protecting those who may be at greater risk." The statement emphasized that "recent outbreaks were described to emphasize the need to physically and socially distance ourselves when we are sick.
         "We've seen from national data that Pacific Islanders are affected by COVID-19 at higher rates than other groups, and this is a high concern in Hawaiʻi. We need to protect those at higher risk and ensure they have the knowledge and tools to protect themselves."
         Both the community association and health department said they are working with the Marshallese community to spread more education about the disease.
         In Ocean View, outreach workers are also communicating with Marshallese residents, who often live in large family groups. Ocean View Marshallese leader Johnathan Jackson and U.H. Medical School professor, Dr. Neal Palafox, who specializes in Marshallese health, are working on improving health care. They both spoke at last year's Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association's annual meeting. There have been no reported cases of COVID-19 in the Marshallese community in Kaʻū.
         See a story on the high rate of infection of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, as described by University of Hawaiʻi Medical School, in Saturday's Kaʻū News Briefs.

    Ocean View youth signed up with Boys & Girls Club Big Island are
    receiving deliveries of food on weekdays. BGCBI photo
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    BOYS & GIRLS CLUB'S FEEDING PROGRAM for students and kūpuna received statewide television coverage during the past week. See the KHON2 story. The program feeds many Marshallese and Native Hawaiian children who are members of the Boys & Girls Club in Ocean View. They are fed five days a week, as school campuses are closed and the weekday meetings at Ocean View Community Center are called off until after the pandemic.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    AN UPTICK IN READING during the Stay-At-Home requirement for the pandemic has prompted Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries to provide a free book exchange so Kaʻū readers can access reading material. Currently, free books are available at the laundromat in Nāʻālehu. Patrons are invited to take the books they want and pass them on to another reader or return them to the laundromat when finished reading them. The book selection will be replenished frequently. Soon, Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries will provide another free book exchange site in Ocean View, said its President, Linda Morgan.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FOURTEEN DAYS OF FOOD for those in need will be available at Nāʻālehu Shopping Center tomorrow, Monday, May 4 from  to . Distributed by The Food Basket, those who attend are asked to stay in their cars. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ONE NEW CASE OF COVID-19 was reported for Hawaiʻi Island today. Of 74 victims, as counted by the state Department of Health, 63 were released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by DOH. There was one overnight hospitalization and no one died on this island.

         In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno said, "For your information, The Food Basket will be conducting a food drop off service tomorrow, May 4th at the Nāʻālehu Shopping Center. To the multitude of people and organizations contributed to this statewide food drop off program, Mahalo Nui Loa. This is the specialness of Hawaiʻi." He also thanked the organizations that are conducting free COVID-19 testing around the island.
         "Be reminded the policies of stay at home, physical distancing, and gatherings remains in effect. These policies all have one major goal, that is to help stop the spreading of the virus or from getting it. This is why, you are asked to please wear a mask. Thank you for listening and have a safe Sunday. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense," said Magno.

         Statewide, two new cases were reported today by DOH, bringing the state's case count to 620. The state death toll remains  on Oʻahu and five on Maui. The recovery rate is about 88 percent, with 544 people released from isolation.

         In the United States, more than 1.18 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 153,000. The death toll is 68,276.
         Worldwide, more than 3.5 million have contracted COVID-19. Recovery has exceeded 1.12 million people. The death toll is 247,497.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Pāhala Elementary students performed a Hukilau Hula, throwing nets to the sea, at last year's May Day celebration. 
    Photo by Julia Neal

    Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
         This time last year, Kaʻū District Gym was filled with families and the public, entertained by the school's classes and May Day Court and attendants. The May Day Court and attendants were comprised of Kaʻū High
    Keiki from PāhalaElementary School sang for the public at the
    May Day celebration last year. Photo by Julia Neal
    School students. Hula and song were presented by PāhalaElementary School students. The program was directed by Pāhala Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder with assistance from local musicians Makana Kamahele, Ty Chun, and Terry Lewis.
         During the event, the May Day Court welcomed the Queen and King. A Hukilau Hula featured keiki throwing nets to the sea.             When school is open on campus, Ryder teaches hula in all of the preschool, kindergarten, and elementary school grades in Pāhala.
         At the May Day celebration last year, preschool students performed a sitting Baby Doll Hula. Another young class of students performed a sitting hula as the May Day court watched.

         May Day has been a tradition for many generations of students attending school on the Pāhala campus. This year's May Day was canceled due to COVID-19 spread mitigation.
    Pāhala preschool students performed a sitting Baby Doll Hula at last year's May Day celebration. Photo by Julia Neal


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         Beginning Wednesday, May 6, a testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday.
         The next drive-thru screening  at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is KahukuPark on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location is Nāʻālehu Shopping Center Monday, May 4, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030. The next distribution is Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Thursday, May 28 at  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 11 a.m. until food runs out. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.


    Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.

         Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
         Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
         Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
         Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
         See ohialehuahalf.com.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



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    Hawaiʻi Farmers United encourages home gardeners to sign up for a food safety webinar next week. Find
    out how to register for the limited space Zoom event, below. Photo from HFUU

    WHILE HAWAIʻI COVID-19 CASES ARE DWINDLING, with no deaths on this island, deaths related to novel coronavirus nationwide could reach 134,000 in less than 12 weeks. The prediction, today, from University of Washington School of Medicine's Institute for Health Metrics & Evaluation, is a stark increase from its earlier projection of 72,000 deaths by August. The "premature relaxation of social distancing" in many states is the reason for the change in the evaluation, said IHME's director, Dr. Christopher Murray. The model for the new prediction still depends on an increase in testing and contact tracing, and isolating victims throughout the country. It also depends on the assumption that summertime temperatures will tamper down the virus spread. It shows the cases per day declining slowly to August.
         A more dire prediction comes from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, which advises the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. It predicts that cases per day will increase. By June there will be 3,000 deaths per day, with 175,000 new cases per day nationwide. The recent peak nationwide was 37,000 cases per day.
         It appears that the State of Hawaiʻi, with only one new case today, is planning to reopen businesses and public interaction slowly, but maintain the 14-day quarantine for people coming from outside the state for months to come. The University of Hawaiʻi, which plans to open its campuses in late August, announced 14 days of quarantine for students from outside of Hawaiʻi. See story below.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI-HILO AND HAWAIʻI COMMUNITY COLLEGES PLAN TO OPEN  CAMPUSES ON AUG. 24 for Fall instruction. The announcement came today in a letter to students regarding opening all 10 UH campuses statewide. UH President David Lassiter wrote that online lectures can take the place of the big lecture hall gatherings, while interactive classes will be
    conducted with distancing within classrooms. Students from outside the state will be quarantined at housing provided by the University for 14 days before classes begin.
         To enroll in UH-Hilo, see hilo.hawaii.edu
    To enroll in Hawaiʻi Community College, see hawaii.hawaii.edu/apply.
         Chaminade University and Hawaiʻi Pacific University on Oʻahu also announced resumption of in-person classes.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    TOURISM COULD RESTART IN LATE JULY, and about half the unemployed workers in the state could be mostly employed by the end of the year, according to projections provided to the state
    legislature. Carl S. Bonham, PHd., Executive Director of University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization, gave a presentation today to the state House of Representatives Committee on COVID-19. He said the overall state economy could reach about a 75 percent recovery by the end of the year. Tourism could be up to about 28 percent of its peak in September.
         The outlook depends on the state coming up with more testing and contact tracing in order to isolate anyone with COVID-19, to prevent a second wave of the virus.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MANY BUSINESSES THROUGHOUT THE STATE COULD BE OPEN BY THE END OF THE MONTH, according to Gov David Ige. Low contact retail that can minimize contact between employees and customers will be first with other businesses phased in, said the governor during his press conference. Restaurants are more complicated, said the governor, who said he is working with the Hawaiʻi Restaurant Association to come up with distancing protocols and the expansion of delivery services.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FOODBANK AND HAWAIʻI FARM BUREAU NEED REUSABLE FOOD BAGS for their Farm to Car and free food distribution programs. Nicole Pfeffer of Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture said, "Due to the impacts of COVID-19, orders for reusable bags will take a month to get here. Please let us know if you have any reusable bags you are willing to donate and where we can pick them up. The need is Statewide."
         Contact Pfeffer at nicole.y.pfeffer@hawaii.gov or (808) 973-9573 . See hdoa.hawaii.gov/add/md/.


    ELECTIVE SURGERIES ARE AGAIN AVAILABLE at Hilo Medical Center, which performs many surgeries needed by patients of Kaʻū Hospital and its Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic. Without any COVID-19 patients checking in to either hospital during the pandemic, non-emergency surgeries are proceeding, according to the Hilo Medical Center newsletter.
         Though there is only a small number of COVID-19 cases remaining in the Hawaiian Islands, the hospital promises extra precautions in line with the pandemic and follow best practices to ensure high standards of safety.
         COVID-19 screening for surgeries includes testing, self-quarantine before procedures, social distancing, and self-monitoring. Patients will be tested for COVID-19. They will also be called and screened the day before surgery, and screened for symptoms when entering the hospital. Hilo Medical Center's no-visitor policy remains in place.
         In the newsletter, hospital staff sent out a mahalo to the community for helping flatten the curve, and to all those who donated personal protective equipment, refreshments, snacks, and "a whole lot of love and support!" Read the Hilo Medical Center newsletter.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    AGRICULTURAL BUSINESSES ARE URGED TO APPLY for Economic Injury Disaster Loans, says a message from Andrea Kawabata, a University of Hawaiʻi Agricultural Extension Agent who works with many Kaʻū Farmers. Today, May 4, the Small Business Administration began accepting new Economic Injury Disaster Loan applications on a limited basis, specifically to provide relief U.S. agricultural businesses. The SBA will process up to $10,000 of economic relief per business. The funds will not have to be repaid.
         Applications are accepted on a first-in, first-out basis, and Kawabata urges applicants to go to the online application portal as soon as possible. Applicants who have already submitted applications will not need to reapply and will continue to be processed on a first-come, first-served basis.
         Submit an application here. Review a webinar on applying for the loan and reference a tutorial video that walks through the application process, step by step. Questions about this application or problems providing the required information? Contact the SBA Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 or TTY: 1-800-877-8339, or email DisasterCustomerService@sba.gov.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FOOD SAFETY IN HOME GARDENS WEBINAR is offered by the University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Farm Food Safety Team next Wednesday and Thursday, May 13 and 14, from  to  The webinar will provide an opportunity for home gardeners to learn about food safety.
         The webinar will cover: slug and snail management; handling produce in the kitchen; and Good Agricultural Practices in the Garden, such as personal hygiene, fertilizers, water, tools, and harvesting.

         Speakers will be Joshua Silva from Oʻahu, Kylie Tavares from Maui, and the CTAHR Farm Food Safety Team.
         Register for the May 13 webinar here. Register for the May 14 webinar here. Limited to the first 100 registrants, per webinar. Contact Tavares at kylielw@hawaii.edu with questions.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    IT'S BIO-LOGICAL "to build immunity via community, breathing deeply of nature's life giving bounty and staying active, outside, in the garden, under Hawaiʻi's glorious sky," says the latest news from Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. The communication also says, "It is inspiring to see how local farmers and food hub operators are coming together to fortify food access while those stuck at home are rediscovering the simple joy and satisfaction of gardening and cooking." See more on the Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United here or see hfuuhi.org.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū is District 6 for representation on the County Council and takes up
    more territory with the smallest population density of any of the
    nine districts. Volunteers are sought for the Redistricting Commission.
    CANDIDATES FOR VACANCIES ON HAWAIʻI COUNTY'S REDISTRICTING COMMISSION are sought. The district boundaries are for the purpose of confirming the geographical areas served by the Hawaiʻi County Council members. Hawaiʻi County must fill one vacancy for each of the nine districts by July 1, 2020, and up to when the redistricting plan is filed – no later than December 31, 2021. Travel expenses to and from meetings are reimbursed to the volunteer commissioners.
         The Redistricting Commission establishes the boundaries of the Council districts every 10 years. 
         The Mayor's Office will fill the vacancies. Application forms are available online at hawaiicounty.gov/office-of-the-mayor. For further information, contact Rose Bautista, Executive Assistant to the Mayor, at 961-8211 or at rose.bautista@hawaiicounty.gov.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    SEVERAL WASTE COLLECTIONS SERVICES ARE SUSPENDED through the end of May due to COVID-19 concerns, says a statement from County of Hawaiʻi's Solid Waste Division.
         Greenwaste collection is suspended in Volcano, Kealakehe, Keʻei, Pāhoa, Keaʻau, and Waimea Transfer Stations, but continues in Hiloat East Hawaiʻi Organics Facility from to , daily, and in Waikoloa at West Hawaiʻi Organics Facility from to , Monday thru Saturday.

         Scrap Metal and White Goods collections are suspended at Volcano, Waiʻōhinu, Pāhala, Hilo, Keaʻau, Pāhoa, Keʻei, Kealakehe, Puakō, Waimea, Hāwī, Honokaʻa, and Laupāhoehoe Transfer Stations. See hawaiizerowaste.org/recycle/scrap-metal/ for a list of other metal recyclers.

    Through the end of May, metal and white goods disposal is suspended at Pahala and Volcano. Greenwaste
    collection is suspended at Volcano. Photo by Julia Neal
         County Electronic Device Recycling collection programs are suspended. See hawaiizerowaste.org/recycle/e-waste/for other resources. County HI-5 Certified Redemption Centers are temporarily closed. See hawaiizerowaste.org/recycle/hi5/ for a list of location and hours for other HI-5 Certified Redemption Centers. County Reuse Centers are temporarily closed. See hawaiizerowaste.org/reuse-2/ for a list of other reuse centers.
         Residents are encouraged by the county to use the other service providers or hold onto their items until collection at transfer stations resume. "We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience and understanding as we tackle the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic." See hawaiizerowaste.org website for locations and future closure information.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    ONE NEW DEATH FROM COVID-19 was reported in the state today, bringing the total to 17. Calling it "another reminder of how deadly this disease is, and the way that COVID-19 continues to hurt our community," Governor Ige expressed his deepest condolences to the family and friends of the latest Hawai‘i resident to fall victim to coronavirus.
         He said, "Nevertheless, things are getting better every day. The numbers continue to look very good. With only one new case announced today, we are confident that we have flattened the curve." The governor indicated that testing capacity remains strong and hospital capacities are very manageable. This means, the governor said, "With these kinds of numbers we are looking to further ease restrictions and will continue our phased approach to re-opening our local economy."

         Ige said, with some non-essential businesses reopening, "such as florists, cetain real estate services, car dealerships, automated and mobile service providers, golf courses, and services provided on a one-on-one basis," everyone must remain vigilant. He thanked everyone who has started patronizing these businesses and "reminds us that all safety guidelines outlined in his emergency proclamation need to be followed, as a second wave of COVID-19 cases could mean some mandates may have to be reinstated," according to a statement today.

    Civil Defense Director 
    Talmadge Magno.
    Photo from Big Island Video News
         Ige also congratulated all high school seniors who are graduating, saying many of them will choose the University of Hawai‘i for their undergraduate education. He called on UH President David Lassner to announce plans for the UH System. See the info, above.

         Of 75 cases on Hawaiʻi Isalnd, as counted by the state Department of Health, 63 have been released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by DOH. No one is currently hospitalized and no one has died on-island.

         In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno thanked the "multitude of people and organizations that contributed to make" feeding of those in need possible, and thanked Police and National Guard "for helping… Thank you, people of Hawaiʻi for who you are, a community together, helping at a very difficult time. Thank you for listening and a safe Monday to you all. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         Statewide, only the one new case on Hawaiʻi Island was reported today by DOH, bringing the state's case count to 621. The state death toll rose to 17. The recovery rate is about 88 percent, with 548 people released from isolation.

         In the United States, more than 1.21 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 160,000. The death toll is over 69,680.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         Beginning Wednesday, May 6, a testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday.
         The next drive-thru screening  at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location is Nāʻālehu Shopping Center Monday, May 4, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030. The next distribution is Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Thursday, May 28 at  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 11 a.m. until food runs out. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.


    Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.     Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
         Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
         Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
         Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
         See ohialehuahalf.com.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






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    KUPU's Environmental Stewardship Program, which trains and puts youth to work in Kaʻū and other wilderness places,
    receives $2.29 million through AmeriCorps. Photo from KUPU
    See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

    RETAIL STORES AND A HOST OF OTHER BUSINESSES received permission today from the state to open for business this Thursday, May 7, contingent on their business practicing social distancing, sanitation, and promising to follow workplace safety guidelines.
         Restaurants and visitor industry activities, including tours and accommodations, will remain shut down. Shopping malls could reopen approved businesses. Gov. David Ige announced his Seventh Supplemental Emergency Proclamation to allow the following to open: nonfood agriculture, including, landscape, floral, and ornament; astronomical observatories and support facilities; car washes; pet grooming services; health care and social assistance, including elective surgery and non-emergency services; nonprofit organizations previously considered non-essential; retail business and services, including apparel and electronics; shopping malls; and wholesale and warehousing operations.
    Gov. David Ige announcing his 7th Supplemental
    Emergency Proclamation for the pandemic.
    Photo from khon.com
         Already approved are florists, certain real estate services, car dealerships, automated and mobile service providers, services provided on a one-on-one basis, and golf courses.
         To stay open requires social distancing, sanitation, and compliance with workplace safety guidelines, as outlined in the governor's emergency guidelines proclamation.
         Places of businesses, including malls, will be responsible to prevent people from gathering, and enforcing other required health standards, such as wearing face coverings, the governor said.
         Read the proclamation here.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    SOME ISLAND NATIONS ARE PLANNING A TRAVEL BUBBLE after largely conquering the COVID-19 challenge. They propose safe visitation and economic recovery through tourism in their travel bubble. Travel from places with any significant COVID-19 would be banned.
         A story from National Geographic on Tuesday says, "New Zealand's success in moving toward eliminating the coronavirus is a bright light in a dark season."National Geographic author Aaron Gulley writes, "While governments worldwide have vacillated on how to respond and ensuing cases of the virus have soared, New Zealand has set an uncompromising, science-driven example."  New Zealand "used strict lockdowns and austerity measures to bring COVID-19 to heel."
         The story quotes New Zealand's 39-year old Prime Minister, Jacinda Arden: "We have the opportunity to do something no other country has achieved: elimination of the virus."
    Will New Zealand and Australia create a safe Travel Bubble? Will
    Hawaiian Islands do the same? Will they share?
         The story turns to travel and reports that "Cooperative plans for economic recovery will play another part in creating our post-COVID world. New reports that New Zealand and Australia are discussing the possibility of creating a 'travel bubble' between the two nations (separated by 1,243 miles of sea) offer a promising proposal for leveraging tourism dollars to support communities in need. This plan might especially benefit Kiwis, as tourism is the country's biggest export industry. It will be interesting to see what other recovery plans emerge."
         The story also quotes Winston Churchill who said: "I am an optimist. It does not seem too much use being anything else."
         West Kaʻū's state Rep. Richard Creagan said on Tuesday that East Kaʻū's state Sen. Russell Ruderman is a leader in supporting interisland travel without 14 days of quarantine, while leaving the quarantine in place for all those coming from outside of the state. Creagan said he is also supportive of a Travel Bubble for Hawaiʻi, given credible testing and continued COVID-19 tracing. The local community could enjoy the visitor accommodations to themselves. The host could provide discounted rates, and hard-hit visitor industry employees could get some work, according to the two legislators. Creagan said that with success, perhaps Australia and New Zealand could accept Hawaiʻi as part of their Travel Bubble.
         The population of Australia and New Zealand combined is about 30 million, about the same as a combined Southern California and Oregon. The Australia-New Zealand Travel Bubble could provide a potentially sound travel exchange opportunity for the Hawaiʻi Islands and their southern sister island nations.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    James Koshiba, of Hui Aloha, predicts
    more homeless people with sustained
    unemployment.
    MORE PEOPLE MAY BECOME HOMELESS after losing their jobs during the pandemic. James Koshiba, co-founder of the volunteer homeless support group Hui Aloha, spoke to the state House of Representatives Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness on Monday. He said he expects a wave of additional homeless people in the near future due to unemployment caused by the pandemic.
         Koshiba said people who cannot pay their rent now because they are unemployed, but have temporary state protection from eviction, could become homeless when that aid expires at the end of July. He said most homeless programs target chronic homeless people rather than the recently unemployed families who could soon find themselves on the streets. He submitted a working document to the committee detailing some of the issues, opportunities, and possible priorities that can help prevent a housing crisis in the coming months.
         Koshiba suggested that government and private sector groups leverage their resources now to limit the number of people soon to become homeless by building up social service staffing to help people find much-needed support programs and by using federal funds to build low-cost permanent affordable housing.

    Sheryl Matsuoka, of Hawaiʻi Restaurant Association
    presents a blueprint for reopening.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE HAWAIʻI RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION addressed the state House of Representatives Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness on Monday. Sheryl Matsuoka, Executive Director of the Hawaiʻi Restaurant Association, said the health and safety of staff and customers is the organization's top priority, and referred the committee to the National Restaurant Association's reopening guidance document as a blueprint for Hawaiʻi businesses.
         Matsuoka said the national guidance can be adjusted for local businesses, but the basic rules include food safety, cleaning and sanitizing, employee health monitoring and personal hygiene, and physical distancing.
         Matsuoka said many restaurants have been functioning as take-out only and are ready to reopen as soon as possible. They have moved tables at least six feet apart in their dining rooms, sanitized their spaces, and are ready to bring back staff. "We want to be ready to go when we get the green light," Matsuoka said.

    Tina Yamaki, President of Retail Merchants
    of Hawaiʻi, said guidelines for retail
    operations should be available this week.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    RETAIL MERCHANTS OF HAWAIʻI took guidelines before the Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness on Monday. Tina Yamaki, President of Retail Merchants of Hawaiʻi, said her members are working on finalizing guidelines for retail operations this week. Yamaki said grocery stores, pharmacies, clothing shops, and kiosks all have very different requirements. She said the National Retail Federation has created guidelines on reopening retail stores called Operation Open Doors.
         Yamaki said merchants don't expect a flood of shoppers to return to stores quickly, returning only when they feel safe. Merchants are considering starting with curbside pickups, online ordering, limiting physical contact, and reduced store occupancy. She said association members are also concerned about safety, with customers wearing masks, dark glasses, and hats while shopping. To prevent thefts, some stores are considering shorter business hours, new security measures, and limiting store access.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Dr. Mark Mugiishi, HMSA President & CEO, said
    Hawaiʻi is at the orange level, supporting some opening
    of businesses, with continuation of screening, testing,
    tracking, and quarantine throughout the community.
    THE PUBLIC HEALTH RECOVERY PLAN, developed by the Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness, drew comments Monday from Hawaiʻi Medical Service
    Association President & CEO Dr. Mark Mugiishi. He said that according to the four risk levels in the Public Health Recovery Plan developed by the House COVID-19 Task Force, Hawaiʻi is now in the second from highest, or orange alert level. The orange level is supportive of some businesses reopening while the state continues with its public health including screening, testing, tracking, and quarantine measures.
         For more information about the committee and to see related documents go to capitol.hawaii.gov/special
    committee.aspx?comm=cov&year=2020.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    KUPU ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP will be funded through AmeriCorps' receipt of $4 million for Hawaiʻi. Sen. Mazie Hirono made the announcement Tuesday, saying the AmeriCorps funding includes Kupu, Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi's Project Kaulike, and Hawaiʻi Commission for National and Community Service programs.
         Corporation for National and Community Service is the federal agency that manages AmeriCorps and other national service programs. It awarded $4,215,326 to Hawaiʻi. Kupu will receive approximately $2.29 million, Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi will receive $174,648, and the Hawaiʻi Commission on National and Community Service will receive $716,156 for its state competitive-funded programs and formula-funded programs. The funds will support more than 270 AmeriCorps members in Hawaiʻi.
    KUPU will receive $2.29 million for its environmental job training
    program, through AmeriCorps. Photo from KUPU 
         The Kupu Environmental Stewardship project will engage more than 250 AmeriCorps members to remove invasive species, plant native vegetation, and support streams and trails across the state on Hawaiʻi Island, as well as the islands of Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, and Maui.
         The Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi's Project Kaulike's 20 AmeriCorps members will assist Hawaiʻi's low-income residents in navigating the justice system and any civil legal issues they may face.
         "AmeriCorps members in Hawaiʻi support some of our state's critical programs. From keeping our treasured environment clean to assisting low- and moderate-income individuals with the justice system, I am grateful for the work that hundreds of AmeriCorps members do every year in our state."
         Earlier this year, Hirono cosponsored a resolution recognizing the contributions of AmeriCorps members and alumni to the United States. Additionally, she signed a letter requesting continued support for CNCS programs like AmeriCorps in Fiscal Year 2021. Last year, she signed a similar letter, requesting support for these programs in Fiscal Year 2020.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MOTHER'S DAY FRESH FOODS ON THE KAʻŪ CALENDAR FEATURE THREE LOCAL RESTAURANTS with special take-out menus.
         South Side Shaka Restaurant & Bar in Nāʻālehu is offering a Mother's Day take-out special of Prime Rib for $25.95, beginning at  on Sunday, May 10. Meals must be pre-ordered at 929-7404. Delivery is available for the Nāʻālehu, Green Sands, and Discovery Harbour areas. Check for delivery elsewhere for large family orders.
         Daily, the restaurant offers a full takeout menu from  to , with bar service on the lanai only. The restaurant also offers delivery in Nāʻālehu, Green Sands, and Discovery Harbour. See more at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar. Call 929-7404.

         Kīlauea Lodge at 19-3948 on Old Volcano Hwy, is open for take out by calling 808-967-7366. Call for the special Mother's Day menu. A 15 percent discount from prices on the standard menu is offered. Take out breakfast from  to , and lunch and dinner from  to  Special family meal offers are posted on the Kīlauea Lodge Facebook, along with a menu link. Wine is available by the bottle and beer is available by the bottle and can. See more at 

    Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.
         Lava Rock Café will have special offerings for Mother's Day breakfast. The restaurant is open for take-out by calling the adjacent Kīlauea General Store at 967-7555. Hours for pick-up are , daily. Alcohol is available in Kīlauea General Store. See lavarock.cafe. See more at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.
         See a directory of fresh food available in Kaʻū and Volcano – a list of farmers and ranchers, restaurateurs, food and pharmacy retailers at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Full course meals and a card were gifted to Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic staff by the Kekoa ʻohana. Photo from Merilyn Harris
    DONNA KEKOA'S FAMILY SURPRISED Kaʻū Hospital and Rural Health Clinic staff with full course meals recently. Kekoa told The Kaʻū Calendar that she was moved by her family's gift of cards and food for the staff, since her children and grandchildren no longer live in Kaʻū, but wanted to honor the community where they grew up.
    Full course meals and a card were gifted to Kaʻū Hospital
    staff by the Kekoa ʻohana. Photo from Merilyn Harris
         Merilyn Harris, Administrator at Kaʻū Hospital and Rural Health Clinic, told The Kaʻū Calendar, "We had a wonderful surprise at Kaʻū Hospital and Rural Health clinic last week when Donna Kekoa's daughters and their families presented both the clinic (and) hospital with two lovely thank you cards for their service to the community and full course meals for the entire staff! It was incredibly thoughtful and brought tears to her proud mother's eyes."
         Harris asked The Kaʻū Calendar"to share our heartfelt thanks to such a thoughtful family."
         One card is inscribed, "Mahalo Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic for continuing to service our community. You are recognized and greatly appreciated. Thank You! Blessings to you all, Shulen Hashimoto, Tiffany Rosenthal, Camilyn Javar, and our ʻOhana." Donna Kekoa is a staff member of Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    FOUR NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported in the state today, bringing the total to 625. All four were on Oʻahu. No new cases were reported for Hawaiʻi Island, where the count remains at 74.
         So far, 63 victims on this island have been released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by Department of Health. No one is hospitalized and no one died on this island.

         In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno said, "The people of Hawaiʻi Island and the State of Hawaiʻiare doing very well in minimizing the spread and impact of COVID-19. It is so important to follow these policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and physical and emotional care. Your help is needed to follow the policies to stop this coronavirus from affecting the beautiful lifestyle of Hawaiʻi. Thank you for listening and have a good day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         Statewide, the death toll is 17. Five hundred fifty-one of the 625 victims are released from isolation.

         In the United States, more than 1.23 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 164,000. The death toll is over 71,912.
         Worldwide, more than 3.65 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 1.19 million. The death toll is over 256,894.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Protesters against discrimination and hate crimes focused
    on Asians. Photo from Asian America Commission
    ENDING CORONAVIRUS-RELATED ANTI-ASIAN DISCRIMINATION AND HATE CRIMES is the goal of Sen. Mazie Hirono and colleagues. In a letter, Hirono, Senators Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar and 11 other Senators urged the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division to "take concrete steps to address the surge in discrimination and hate crimes" against Asian American and Pacific Islander individuals. The recommendations are similar to those DOJ has taken in the past, to address jumps in discrimination and hate crimes against a particular community. They include: a plan to address coronavirus-related hate crimes and discrimination; designation of an official to coordinate an interagency response and a review of these incidents; monthly updates to Congress; public outreach and engagement with Asian American and Pacific Islander community leaders; and distribution of materials about civil rights protections in diverse languages.
         Hirono's office says the senators sent this letter after Asian American organizations collected nearly 1,500 incidents of anti-Asian harassment and discrimination, in the last month alone.
         The senators called the federal response to "these racist and xenophobic attacks,""inadequate… a sharp break from the efforts of past administrations, Republican and Democratic alike.

         "There are more than 20 million Americans of Asian descent, and 2 million AAPI individuals are working on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, as health care workers, law enforcement agents, first responders, and other essential service providers. It is critical that the Civil Rights Division ensure that the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans are protected during this pandemic." Read the letter here.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         Beginning tomorrow, Wednesday, May 6, a testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.


    Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.
         Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
         Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
         Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
         Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
         See ohialehuahalf.com.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.





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    Manuka State Park is open for hiking and walking in Kaʻū. Photo from Hawaiʻi Scenic Byways

    MORE BUSINESSES WILL BE ABLE TO OPEN ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, under Mayor Harry Kim's Emergency Rule NO. 4 issued Wednesday, May 6. It reopens private and public golf courses, with the announcement that Hilo Municipal on Monday, May 11, with modified rules for play and social distancing requirements, will open.
         Also able to open with restrictions and guidelines are: all real estate services; all florists, nurseries, and sales of plants; bicycle shops for sales and repairs; bookstores; jewelry shops for sales and repairs; pet grooming and boarding facilities; shops that sell walking and running shoes, apparel, and exercise equipment; shops that sell surf and swimming equipment; and automated service providers that don't involve human interaction, like car washes.
         A statement from the mayor says that "Anyone needing assistance in providing a safe and healthy business for employees and customers, contact the COVID task force on education and Prevention at 935-0031."
    Suisan Drive Thru at Punaluʻu Bake Shop
    Suisan Foodservice is bringing some of its wholesale foods
     to Nāʻālehu Bake Shop for sale in a drive-thru tomorrow,
    Thursday, May 7, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., selling Aloha Packs
    with pork back ribs, chicken, pork butt, New York steaks,
    butter, and fries. Add-on items are pork loin, mayonnaise
    gallons, pork link sausages, chicken nuggets, and
    onion rings. Image from Suisan
         The new rule reminds folks that the "COVID-19 disease is easily transmitted, especially in group settings, and it is essential that the spread of the virus be slowed to protect the ability of public and private health care providers to handle an influx of new patients, and to safeguard public health and safety.
         "Because of the dangerous conditions caused by the risk of rapid spread of the disease and the need to protect the residents of this County, this rule requires all individuals anywhere in this County to stay at home or in their place of residence except for conducting permitted essential activities, performing permitted activities outside the home or place of residence, operation of an essential business or governmental operation, or other designated businesses and operations. Know the importance of staying mentally, physically, and socially healthy within these rules."
         Permitted Essential Activities include: Engaging in solitary outdoor exercise activity including walking, hiking, or running; obtaining necessary services or supplies for an individual or that individual's family or household members, such as getting food, pet food, and supplies necessary for staying at home; performing work related to operation of an essential business or essential government function; caring for a family member in another household; caring for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with a disability, or other vulnerable at-risk persons; and tasks related to maintaining health and safety, such as obtaining medicine or seeing a doctor.
         All businesses require the wearing of face coverings when interacting with employees and customers, and the six-foot distancing between everyone not living in the same household.
         Those failing to follow distancing and face mask-wearing rules, may be subject to a fine up to $5,000 or one year of imprisonment. 

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    CHILD CARE SERVICES CAN REOPEN on Wednesday, with Gov. David Ige naming them essential. Child care providers will be required to maintain social distancing between children and for the children's families when bringing and retrieving them from the child care centers.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    NO RENTAL CARS FOR VISITORS FROM NEIGHBOR ISLANDS OR THE MAINLAND will be allowed until they finish their 14 days of quarantine at their accommodations. The effort is to make it more difficult for those from out of state to vacation here until the pandemic is over. It also aims to stop the visitors from sneaking away from their quarantine quarters.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    SAFETY CHECK STATIONS will be allowed to operate, according to the state Department of Transportation. The waiver allowing safety check stickers expiring on or before May 31 will still remain valid until Aug. 31. There is no waiver for motor vehicle registrations and insurance.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    WAIʻŌHINU COUNTY PARK AND MANUKA STATE WAYSIDE, both in Kaʻū, are reopening, along with some of the other parks around the island. Manuka is available for hiking and walking along its Nature Trail through the 13.5 mile Manuka Natural Area Reserve, daily, from 7 a.m. to  4 p.m. Restrooms are open. Waiʻōhinu, with its large field, is open for exercising.



    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, FOOD BASKET, HAWAIʻI COUNTY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL, AND HOPE SERVICES will receive funding for their relief services during the pandemic, with a $1.54 million grant to the County Office of Housing and Community Development. The money comes from the federal government in a Block Grant.
         Mayor Harry Kim said today, "These funds made available by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development are greatly appreciated, and will be such an asset to these programs that provide much-needed services during these hard times. It is noted that all of these funds will be allocated to those nonprofits to give direct services to those in need."
    The Food Basket will receive a $643,000 grant from a County of Hawai`i federal block grant. The non-profit provides
    14 days of food regularly to residents of Ka`u and the rest of the island, with drive thru service like this one
    at Ka`u High & Pahala Elementary where O Ka`u Kakou also lends many hands. Photo by Julia Neal
         The Boys and Girls Club of the Big Island will receive $200,000 to support their food preparation and delivery program, which serves vulnerable populations (homeless, and poverty level elderly and families), as well as households residing in rural communities. The Food Basket will receive $643,000 to support their food distribution programs, including the ʻOhana Food Drop program, in which they partner with local farmers, organizations, and businesses to provide and distribute food and prepared meals to those in need.
         Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council (HCEOC) will receive $150,000 to support its food preparation and delivery program, serving the elderly and disabled population.
         Hope Services, in partnership with the County of Hawaiʻi, will utilize its $300,000 allocation to provide emergency rent and mortgage assistance payments to those impacted by COVID-19, who meet the income requirements.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


    TODAY KICKS OFF NURSES' WEEK. "With nurses risking their lives every day to keep the U.S.safe from COVID-19 and National Nurses Week kicking off May 6," WalletHub yesterday released its report on 2020's Best & Worst States for Nurses.

         WalletHub says, "The U.S. has gained a profound appreciation for nurses during the coronavirus pandemic, as they risk their lives every day to minimize the spread of the disease. That situation is made even more difficult by critical shortages of respirators, surgical masks, gloves, gowns, and other necessary protective treatment. It's more important now than ever for states to step up and make sure that nurses are properly equipped to do their jobs and have the best work environment possible.

         "Despite the stresses of the occupation, nurses are generally well-rewarded for their life-saving work. Nursing occupations are some of the most lucrative careers, with a mean annual wage of over $75,000 and some of the lowest unemployment rates in the U.S.In fact, the industry is expected to grow at more than double the rate of the average occupation through 2028."
         In order to help new nursing graduates find the best markets for their profession, WalletHub compared the relative attractiveness of the 50 states across 22 key metrics. The data set ranges from monthly average starting salary for nurses to health-care facilities per capita to nursing-job openings per capita.
         Hawaiʻi ranked 48th, ahead of New York at 50th and Louisiana at 49th. Alabamaand Oklahoma ranked 47th and 46th. The best states for nurses are Oregon, Washington, New Mexico, Minnesota, and Nevada.
         Hawaiʻi ranks 50th in the number of Nursing-Job Openings. Here, 66.04 percent of nursing professionals do not work in nursing, making Hawaiʻi's rank 48th worst.
         The average starting salaries for nurses in Hawaiʻi is $1,912, the 45th lowest when adjusted for cost of living. The top-ranked states' nurses start closer to $2,000 or more per month. The average salary for nurses in Hawaiʻi is the 42nd lowest.
         Hawaiʻi has the 44th lowest number of health facilities per capita, and was not ranked in quality of nursing schools, as there are none in the state. There are 9.06 nurses per 1,000 residents, placing Hawaiʻi with the third lowest rank. The quality of the public hospital system in the state is ranked 45th, according to WalletHub
         The AlohaState also ranked 43rd in overall Opportunity & Competition, and 39th in overall Work Environment for nurses. Hawaiʻi hospitals ranked 33rd in Friendliness Toward Working Moms, 15th in average number of work hours, and 40th in average commute hours.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


    THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY URGES EVERYONE TO HELP SAVE THE U.S.POSTAL SERVICE, "one of the oldest and most vital public services in our nation." According to the message from the Democratic National Committee, USPS is "currently on track to run out of money in just a few months... It's absolutely urgent we come together now to save this vital public service. Add your name to demand the USPS be properly funded before it's too late by signing the petition at I'M IN."

         The statement says that dismantling the United States Postal Service would risk:

         "The livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of hardworking postal workers during a global health crisis when unemployment numbers continue to skyrocket. Postal workers continue to work on the front lines during this crisis, keeping our economy going by making sure folks like you and me get the resources we need;


         "Further disconnecting rural, poor, and native communities from their needs. The USPS delivers all mail at a flat rate regardless of distance -- ensuring that no matter where you live, you can get your medication, pay your bills, and stay connected at an affordable rate;
    The motto of the U.S. Postal Service, inscribed in stone at the
    James A. Farley post office building in New York City:
    "Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stays these
    couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds."
         "Accessible vote-by-mail. It has been in practice in many states and localities and is made possible by the USPS. Now, more than ever, we should be scaling up vote-by-mail capabilities to ensure a safe, secure general election."
         The message also notes that the "vital public service" is carried out by 600,000 postal workers, frontline workers. The U.S. Postal Service makes it possible for every postal address to receive the print version of The Kaʻū Calendar newspaper at no cost to the reader. Sign the petition here.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ATTEND A WEBINAR ON FUNDING FOR COMMERCIAL AG PRODUCERS on Friday, May 8, from 

         Agencies and organizations will speak at the webinar about how and where to apply for loans, grants, the Small Business Administration's programs, and more.

         Speaking at the event will be representatives from The Kohala Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency, Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture, Hawaiʻi Community Reinvestment Corp., Feed the Hunger Fund, American AgCredit, West Oʻahu Soil and Water Conservation District, GoFarm Hawaiʻi, and Hawaiʻi and Maui County Extensions of University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
         Agricultural producers can sign up at zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIude2sqDMoG9ZsN_wWcUtH5k88Vamj8NqG. Questions?
    Contact Kylie Tavares at kylielw@hawaii.edu or Janel Yamamoto at janelnoy@hawaii.edu.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    PAYING TRIBUTE TO ESSENTIAL WORKERS SHOULD INCLUDE ESSENTIAL PAY and benefits, is the message from Sen. Mazie Hirono today. In an email to her supporters, she said, "On May 1st, we observed May Day and paid tribute to workers and laborers, in honor of the hundreds of thousands of workers who fought together in a nationwide strike for an eight-hour workday in 1886. In the midst of a global pandemic, May Day bears a new significance.

         "I am so grateful for those working on the frontline of this pandemic who keep us safe. Millions of Americans work long hours and put their own health and safety at risk to provide the essential services and supplies we need. 
         "We rely on workers in grocery stores, pharmacies, delivery services, food service and healthcare like never before. While these workers have been deemed essential during this pandemic, they are not treated as such -- many are hourly minimum wage workers who cannot earn a living wage, and now they are forced to work in unsafe conditions and risk their own health.

    Sen. Mazie Hirono
         "When we finally get through this difficult time -- and we will get through it -- we cannot return to business as usual. We must make drastic changes to the way we treat workers in our country -- with paid sick leave, child care, and a living wage. We must provide essential workers with hazard pay and safe working conditions. We cannot allow multi-national corporations to continue taking advantage of their workers, especially as we are dependent on them to get through the pandemic.

         "This crisis has exacerbated and shed a light on inequality in our country. It's important for us to remember that people are experiencing the pandemic very differently. We don't know what the future holds. We face uncertainty and unanswered questions each day as stay-at-home orders are being extended across the country. But there are things we can all do to ensure we emerge from this united and stronger than before."

         Hirono pointed out that all people should be wearing face coverings, continue social distancing, and follow health and safety guidelines from local and federal government and healthcare professionals. "We have seen these guidelines make a difference in the communities that have been impacted from the coronavirus."

         She also said that being kind and lending a helping hand to others is needed. She suggested offering to pick up groceries for seniors or someone with a preexisting condition who can't make it to the store, or making a contribution to local food banks or other local social service nonprofits helping those most affected by the pandemic. "We are all hearing and reading stories about the unprecedented increase of need and the hardship individuals and families are experiencing… We are all facing unprecedented challenges, and those challenges come with stress and anxiety. We are all adapting to a new normal, and from this experience we see the difference we can make by supporting each other.

         "We're all in this together. Be kind to yourself, your family, and to those around you. Take care of each other. Lend a helping hand -- so that we can pull out of this together, as one big ʻohana.

         "In Hawaiʻi we celebrate May Day as Lei Day. This May Day was designated a special 'Na Lei Koa Day,' a chance to display our aloha and to thank all essential workers by making and displaying lei. The coronavirus pandemic has not wavered the spirit of aloha -- it has only strengthened it and demonstrated our resilience.
         "Stay safe, stay healthy, be kind."


    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ONE NEW CASE OF COVID-19 was reported in the state today, bringing the total to 626. No new cases were reported for Hawaiʻi Island, which remains at 74. So far, 66 victims have been released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by Department of Health. No one is hospitalized and no one has died on this island.

         COVID-19 testing was conducted today in Kaʻū at St. Jude's by Aloha Critical Care from Kona and Pathways Telehealth. St. Jude's hosts testing every other Wednesday from to On other Wednesdays, the next being May 13, Nāʻālehu Community Center will offer free testing from Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group, and Pathways Telehealth. Free tests are also offered at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600. Wearing masks is required for everyone. See below for details on how to get pre-screened and for more safety guidelines.

         In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno thanked the groups running testing and said, "The Island and State of Hawaiʻiare doing very well in minimizing the spread and the impact of COVID-19. It is so important to ramp up all the preventive measures so we can get Hawaiʻi better and keep Hawaiʻi Safe and stop this virus from affecting the beautiful lifestyle of Hawaiʻi. Thank you for listening and to all the nurses, thank you, thank you, and a grateful and happy National Nurses Day to you. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

    Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno.
         Statewide, the death toll remains at 17. Five hundred fifty-eight people are released from isolation.

         In the United States, more than 1.25 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 167,000. The death toll is over 73,667, with over 2,400 new deaths since yesterday.
         Worldwide, more than 3.74 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 1.24 million. The death toll is over 263,068. The US leads the world by more than double the number of deaths of any other country.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    VOLCANO'S ʻŌHIʻA LEHUA HALF MARATHON and other races are canceled. Scheduled for Saturday, July 25, the second annual event included a Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash. A portion of the proceeds was to be donated to University of Hawaiʻifor furthering research on Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and to The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences.

         A message on social media from Hawaiʻi Island Racers says, "We have decided to cancel our 2020 Volcano's ʻŌhi'a Lehua Runs. With the continued threat of the pandemic and the safety of our island at stake, our HIR family feels that we are making the best decision for our community. We are still trying to determine what, if any, type of refund we can offer. Thank you for your continued patience."
         See ohialehuahalf.com.



    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    DONATIONS OF 500-PLUS UNUSED, REUSABLE OR PLASTIC BAGS are requested by The Farm Bureau and Hawaiʻi Food Banks. The "urgent need" will be used for food distribution programs. The message from Nicole Pfeffer of Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture said, "Top priority bags are reusable bags, but we will also accept plastic bags. If you have at least 500 bags that you are willing to donate, please contact Nicole Pfeffer – Nicole.y.pfeffer@hawaii.gov or 808-973-9573. We, unfortunately, are not able to accept previously used bags due to sanitization and food safety issues."

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







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    Jeff Hoffeinbein was one of the Ocean View partners with Habitat for Humanity. Using his sweat equity, he became
    a homeowner with a mortgage, assisted by Habitat, which reopens its ReStores May 12. The stores sell upcycled
    building materials, and furnishings, to help fund the non-profit. Photo from Habitat for Humanity

    KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION IS SET FOR FRIDAY, MAY 22 at 1 p.m., with the drive-thru in the parking lot of Kaʻū District Gym. Graduating seniors will be escorted by family members to a stopping point, where the student will step out of the vehicle wearing cap and gown, receive their diploma from Principal Sharon Beck,
    and stand with her for a photo. The vehicle will move along to pick up a bushel basket from Uhane, the nonprofit group of Kumu Hula Debbie and Kawehi Ryder, who give hula and other Hawaiian cultural training at the school. The basket will include some of the fixings for a graduation celebration including luau pig, head cabbage, and sweet potatoes, along with a letter from Mayor Harry Kim.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE HAWAIʻI STATE LEGISLATURE WILL RECONVENE MONDAY, May 11, for six to ten days. Lawmakers will meet in person, following social distancing rules. House and Senate
    Sen. Russell Ruderman
    chambers will be deep-cleaned after each gathering. Those representing Kaʻū - Senators Dru Kanuha and Russell Ruderman and House of Representatives members Richard Creagan and Richard Onishi - will fly to Oʻahu. As essential workers, they are exempt from the 14-day quarantine. Only legislators and staff are allowed into the Capitol. Everyone entering the building is screened for COVID-19.

         During a press conference today, Senate President Ronald Kouchi and House Speaker Scott Saiki said legislators will remake the state budget, in light of an expected shortfall of $1.6 billion, given the
    Sen. Dru Kanuha
    drastic drop in state sales, Transient Accommodations, and income tax revenues. Also contributing are extra expenses from state coffers during the pandemic.
         In question is whether an across-the-board 20 percent pay cut for state workers will be enacted, along with furloughing some, to help reduce the shortfall. Extra expenses not already in the budget are also expected, such as those to control COVID-19 in the future, with more staff at the airport to screen visitors and more contact tracing employees for the state Department of Health.
    Rep. Richard Creagan 
         The possible reduction of teacher pay drew resistance from the public and teachers. The teachers union asked Gov. David Ige and the legislature to protect their income. Union leader Corey Roselee said that a pay cut would detract teachers from staying in Hawaiʻi and could result in too few fill-in instructors to meet classroom requirements. Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Chirstina Kishimoto, said some money has been saved during distance learning with schools closed.
    Rep. Richard Onishi
         The House and Senate leaders said that to avoid pay cuts, the state may be able to borrow money from emergency funds and other sources, at very low interest rates, with authorization from the legislature.  Federal assistance could also be used, they said.

         Kouchi, a Senator from Kauaʻi, said reconvening next week takes advantage of this time of few new COVID-19 cases in Hawaiʻi. "If we have a surge again, we may not be able to get back" in June, for the next scheduled session.
         To catch up on bills being considered during the 2020 Hawaiʻi Legislature, go to hawaii.capitol.gov and search by subject of choice, names of legislators. Submit written testimony at capitol.hawaii.gov/login/login.aspx. Watch hearings online at capitol.hawaii.gov/broadcasts.aspx.


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    HABITAT FOR HUMANITY'S ReSTORES REOPEN TUESDAY, MAY 12. Habitat has helped Kaʻū residents, particularly in Ocean View, become homeowners through family sweat equity, skilled volunteers, and assistance with mortgages. Building materials and furnishings are core items upcycled through the ReStores to raise money for Habitat.
    Skilled volunteers and the families who will own the home join with
    Habitat for Humanity to help people become homeowners.
    Photo from Habitat for Humanity
         New hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at  Hilo and Waimea ReStores. The Kona ReStore will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. All three ReStores will accept drop off donations.
         Patrick Hurney, Executive Director for Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island, said, "Our ReStores are an integral component of our organization. Not only does it provide an affordable shopping alternative for Hawaiʻi Island residents it also reduces the amount of reusable waste to our landfills and helps support our mission to build affordable homes for families in need on Hawaiʻi Island."
         He said that health and safety are the priority. All shoppers are to wear a mask while in the store or dropping off donations. Social distancing will be implemented, too.
         For more information on donation drop off at a ReStore, call: Hilo Restore at 808-935-6677, Kona Restore at 808-331-8010, or Waimea Restore at 808-885-9091.
         Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island is an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a global, non-profit housing ministry. Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island works with families in need to build a safe and affordable place that they can call home. Habitat Hawaiʻi Island is volunteer-driven, and relies on donations to help partner families. To make a monetary donation, visit habitathawaiiisland.org.

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    HAWAIʻI REGISTERED FEWER UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS THAN 22 OTHER STATES during the pandemic, according to a WalletHub study released today. Hawaiʻi ranks 23rd in states most affected since theCOVID-19 crisis began, March 16. The most affected, according to WalletHub, are Georgia, New Hampshire, KentuckyLouisiana, and Florida. The least affected are Connecticut, Oregon, Alaska, Wyoming, and Wisconsin.
         In Hawaiʻi, unemployment claims for April climbed to 782.85 percent over January. Idaho registered 143.29 percent, the smallest increase. Florida measured the largest increase, at 3650.35 percent.

    The number of Hawaiʻi unemployment claims ranks 23rd in the country,
    according to WalletHub. Image from state Department of Labor
         Unemployment claims in Hawaiʻi increased by 2597.86 percent between March 16 and May 3. Georgia recorded the highest increase, with 4,995.9 percent. Connecticut recorded the lowest, with 1148.07 percent.

         The U.S.saw the most unemployment claims during the week of March 23-29, with 6.9 million claims. Since March 16, the unemployed filed 33.5 million claims. The entire Great Recession – December 2007 to June 2009 – destroyed 8.8 million jobs. Since then, until the pandemic, a bustling economy created 22.7 million jobs, but 10.8 million have been lost since March 16 due to COVID-19 stay-at-home regulations.

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    Papayas that may otherwise be dumped as markets shrink, will be fed to pigs, which are cut off from receiving
    food waste from most restaurants and schools. Photo from CTAHR
    PAPAYAS TO PIGS is one solution to the overabundance and potential loss of papayas grown in Puna. An article in University of Hawaiʻi News says its College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Cooperative Extension Service is bringing pig farmers and papaya growers together.
         UH News reports that pig farmers faced a shortage in feed, since 75 percent comes from food waste generated by schools and restaurants, a source much reduced during the pandemic. They "quickly switched to purchasing mainland grain," creating an extra cost and causing a shortage of pig pellets at local feed stores.
         Papaya growers faced a shortage in markets as U.S. mainland distributors purchased far less papaya, as consumers stockpiled canned and other non-perishable items. Local papaya growers were in danger of going under. Approximately 50 families, independent growers, and members of the non-profit Hawaiʻi Papaya Industry Association, "are in desperate need of immediate assistance. They have no other income than selling papayas, and their market has crashed, yet they do not qualify for unemployment," reports UH News.

    University of Hawaiʻi Agricultural Extension Service is working with papaya growers and shippers to
    provide the fruit to pig farmers during the pandemic. Photo from CTHAR
         CTAHR extension livestock agent Mike DuPonte, a member of the Hawaiʻi Island Pork Association, coordinated with HIPA President Eric Weinert of the Hilo papaya packing plant, and exporter Calavo Growers. Together, they created a short-term means to protect both industries and a sector of Hawaiʻi's local food supply.
         UH News reported that "Pigs readily eat papaya, and there are plenty to be had." The Extension Agent provides an estimate of papaya needed by pig farmers. Farmers pick the papayas to be used as feed. Weinert opens the packing plant as a marshaling yard to receive and distribute the papaya to livestock producers. HIPA provides forklifts, scales, and recordkeeping.

         "While this is not a complete solution, this locally grown partnership is keeping both industries afloat while they explore other solutions, ensuring that essential elements of our Islands' food sufficiency can survive,"reports UH News.
         Papaya does not provide all the nutrients that pigs need over the long term, and swine producers cannot afford to pay the prices that papaya farmers usually command from human consumers. CTAHR agents also help members of both organizations apply for financial funding and other emergency aid from the federal government, and large corporations such as Land O' Lakes, which runs a feed and shipping program, and will work with farmers to subsidize them.

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    JOIN COFFEE BERRY BORER WEBINARS by preregistering for each CBB Zoom session by clicking on the link https://bit.ly/3frPPQD.
         Today, May 7th's webinar was with Peter Follett, of USDA, entitled Multiplying Predators. Others include May 14 with Paul Bayman (UPR) – Coffee Fruit Rot and its Relation to CBB and Beauveria bassiana; May 21 Roxana Myers (USDA-ARS) – Management of Plant-parasitic Nematodes; May 28 Melanie Bondera (HDOA) – Farmers Managing CBB: Update from HDOA Subsidy Program Surveys.
         Agricultural Extension Service agent Andrea Kawabata explains that following registration, a Zoom link will appear onscreen and be sent to the participant's email. Click on the URL to join the CBB webinar. The email includes a phone number for those who want to join by phone.
         Kawabata said she welcomes all those "who have joined us for past CBB webinars," and who have an interest in coffee and learning about coffee berry borer research and extension projects, "to join us for these short presentations with Q&A."
         Evaluation surveys can be found at hawaiicoffeeed.com/cbbwebinars.html.

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    SPECIALTY COFFEE ASSOCIATION WEBINARS are recommended by Agricultural Extension Agent Andrea Kawabata. She said they are focused on coffee, and on mental health and stress, online sales, business, communication, delivery, and grocery. She said they "could have a broader reach with other farmers and agricultural industries. You might find a suggestion or idea helpful to you and your business."
         Here are topics of the webinars found at sca.coffee/covid19: Mental health and stress;
    SCA survey results and key learnings (mills, cooperative, and producer responses @ 13:00 of presentation); Pivoting to online sales; Walk-up and takeaway business in the time of COVID-19;
    The importance of communication during business interruptions; Coffee delivery: How does it work?; and Getting into grocery.

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    A SHORT SURVEY FOR FARMERS AND THEIR FAMILIES on the Covid-19 virus pandemic in Hawaiʻi, is available online. It seeks to understand multiple impacts on people and their families within the farming and agriculture networks in Hawaiʻi, some more significantly affected than others.
         Michael Cheang Lynn Yamashita, Associate Professor Lecturer of Human Development & Family Studies at UH-CTAHR, said, "Please tell us how this pandemic has affected you and your families. Your participation will help us identify where help is needed, and how we can best assist individuals and families in the community with which the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources works or partners."
         The survey takes about 15 minutes to complete: surveymonkey.com/r/ZZH2H53. The survey will close on Friday, May 15 at noon. Contact Yamashita at cheang@hawaii.edu or (808) 956-2252 with questions.

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    FARMERS WITH AN OVERSUPPLY OF PRODUCE are urged to contact Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture, to join as suppliers for a new farm-to-state initiative. Contact Nicole Pfeffer at nicole.y.pfeffer@hawaii.gov or 808-973-9573 to provide information, including type of produce, quantity, grade, price, and frequency of availability.

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    A WEBINAR ON DOING BUSINESS ONLINE is available on Tuesday, May 12 from to . E-Commerce Made Simple: How To Successfully Take Your Business Online is presented by Chamber of Commerce Hawaiʻi. Learn about best practices and web platforms available for e-commerce in this webinar led by Meli James, co-founder of Mana Up. The cost to attend for non-members is $35. Register online by Monday, May 11 at Contact Tricia Fetui at tfetui@cochawaii.org with questions. 

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    NO DIRECT FLIGHTS WITH PASSENGERS ARRIVED TO HAWAIʻI ISLAND YESTERDAY according to a report from Hawai‘i Tourism Authority. The state received 669 passengers, with 233 visitors, 189 residents, and 55 intended new residents on Oʻahu, Maui, and Kauaʻi.

         Today marks six weeks since the Hawaiʻi's mandatory 14-day self-quarantine started for all passengers arriving in Hawai‘i from out of state. The rule also applies to interisland travel, except for essential workers and those with medical appointments.
         Interisland travel saw KonaInternationalAirport receive 161 passengers from Oʻahu and five from Kahului, Maui. Hilosaw 71 arrivals, all from Oʻahu. 


    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
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    THREE NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported in the state today, all on Oʻahu, bringing the total to 629. No new cases were reported for Hawaiʻi Island, which remains at 74. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense reports 72 of the virus' victims are released from isolation. The remaining two are quarantined at home and monitored by Department of Health. No one is hospitalized and no one died from COVIID-19 on this island.
         In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno said, "Know that all the policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and personal health remains in effect. Your help is needed to keep Hawaiʻi Safe. Hawaiʻi Island and State of Hawaiʻiare doing very well in minimizing the spread and the impact of the coronavirus.
    Civil Defense Director 
    Talmadge Magno.
    Photo from Big Island Video News
         "We need to all do our part and get better so we can keep Hawaiʻi safe and stop this virus from affecting the beautiful lifestyle of Hawaiʻi. Thank you very much for listening and thank you for your help. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         Statewide, the death toll remains at 17. Five hundred sixty-five people are released from isolation.
         In the United States, more than 1.29 million cases have been confirmed, an increase of 25,696 in the last day. Recovery is about 175,000, an increase of about 8,000 since yesterday. The death toll is over 76,537, with over 1,926 new deaths since yesterday.
         Worldwide, more than 3.84 million cases have been confirmed, an increase of about 117,000 since yesterday. Recovery is about 1.28 million, an increase of about 40,000 since yesterday. The death toll is over 269,594, an increase of over 6,500 since yesterday. The USleads the world by more than double the number of deaths of any other country.


    Read online at kaucalendar.comSee our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū 
    Calendar  directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū 
    Calendar is free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal 
    addresses throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout
     the district. Read online at Www.kaucalendar.com and 
    facebook.com/kaucalendarTo advertise your business or your 
    social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and
    Twitter.
     See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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    0 0

    A healthy reef. The Conservation Reauthorization Act was introduced by Rep. Ed Case today, to update and improve
    the national commitment to saving endangered coral reefs. Read more, below. Photo from NOAA

    ZERO FOR ALL THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS IS THE NEW COVID-19 CASE COUNT, released today by the state Department of Health. It is the first time since March 13 - eight weeks - there are no new cases statewide. No new deaths were reported since Sunday; the state death toll is 17 since the pandemic began.
         A message from DOH says, "While this is good news, it does not mean, in any way, the end of the COVID-19 crisis. Health officials caution everyone to remain vigilant. Hawaiʻi State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park said, "We have seen a steady decline in new cases over the past several weeks. Although today we're at zero, we want to maintain these declines. As businesses reopen, as people become more active and travel more freely, we will inevitably see an increase in cases." Health experts indicate that, while Hawaiʻi is fortunate to have this pause, it should be used to reassess response capacity, preparedness plans, and to ensure the state is ready for a second and potentially larger wave of the disease.
         The DOH points to a particular concern - Hawaiʻi residents resuming travel to the mainland, particularly to COVID-19 hotspots. The epidemiologist explained, "Travel continues to pose a risk for the spread and reintroduction of the coronavirus. This risk is not just posed by visitors. Residents can actually pose a greater risk by unknowingly infecting others. When people travel for entirely appropriate and necessary reasons (work, healthcare, significant family events) they can inadvertently bring the infection home." Park and other health experts say this is why it is critically important for visitors and residents to observe the mandatory traveler 14-day self-quarantine. "It protects our community."
    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
         The message emphasizes that Hawaiʻi is not a "me first" culture, but a culture of "we." This philosophy allowed control of the COVID-19 pandemic to this point.
         "Hawaiʻi residents, particularly, respect our kūpuna and others who may be more susceptible to this serious disease."
         For that reason, "the strongest defense we have against future, rapid increases in COVID-19 cases is dependent on everyone's consistent observation of safe practices. Wear a mask when you are outside your home. Wash your hands frequently. Keep a distance of six feet from non-household members. Clean frequently touched surfaces often.  Stay at home when you are sick."
         On Hawaiʻi Island, of 74 COVID-19 victims, 72 are free from isolation. The remainder quarantine at home, monitored by DOH. Only one person stayed in a hospital overnight, and no one died here. Only one case in Kaʻū, in the 96773 zip code, is reported since January.

         In the United States, more than 1.31 million cases have been confirmed, an increase of over 25,000 since yesterday. The number of confirmed recoveries is about 178,000, an increase of over 36,000 since yesterday. The death toll is over 77,925, an increase of nearly 2,000 since yesterday.

         Worldwide, more than 3.92 million COVID-19 cases have been reported. More than 1.3 million recoveries have been reported. The death toll reported is 274,422. However, many countries are unable to give accurate counts of the sick, the dead, and the recovered, and some countries may not be transparent with the true accounting of COVID-19.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    DRIVE-THRU ANTIBODY TESTING BEGAN TODAY on Hawaiʻi Island. The event in Waimea today was the first drive-through COVID-19 antibody testing in the state, according to an announcement from sponsors Hawaiʻi County and Premier Medical Group. The next clinics will be at North Kohala (Kamehameha Park) on Saturday, May 9 from  to , and Hilo (behind the Civic) on Monday, May 11 from  to Antibody testing can determine whether a person contracted COVID-19, even if asymptomatic.
         The antibody testing is for those previously identified with COVID-19, and those with high-risk exposures, including healthcare workers, first responders and family members, and those with close contact to known positives. A simple blood draw detects the presence of SARS-Cov2 IgG antibodies for the disease.
         A $43 charge goes to those not covered by medical insurance plans. Those seeking antibody tests are urged to call insurance providers to see if covered.
         People who visit screening clinics must show photo ID. Bring a pen and health insurance cards, although insurance is not required. For further information, call Hawai‘i County Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Long lines on Hwy 11 into Punaluʻu Bake Shop, when Suisan came to sell their Aloha Packs on Thursday.
    Suisan will receive a large grant for its food deliveries. Photo by Nalani Parlin

    CHEERING AND ALOHA RANG OUT AT PUNALUʻU BAKE SHOP Thursday, where Aloha Packs from Suisan sold out at discounted prices. Some people waited nearly two hours to take advantage of Aloha Pack deals. The line of cars stretched along Highway 11 from the bakery past Nāʻālehu Elementary.
         As the last cars made it to the front of the line, Suisan employees cheered and rewarded patient customers with shouts of, "You made it!" Punaluʻu Bakery manager Connie Koi and staff gave a free pack of Punaluʻu sweetbread rolls to those in each vehicle.
         Suisan sold frozen food packs that included fryer chicken, pork butt, butter, New York steaks and bags of fries. Add-ons included mayonnaise, pork loins, pork link sausages, chicken nuggets, and onion rings. Suisan brought two large refrigerated trucks of food but supplies dwindled before all customers could buy. However, Suisan continued to alter packs and prices based on the remaining inventory, so that long-waiting customers could still receive a good deal on food. A Suisan representative said the crew will return to Nā'ālehu in the future.
    A long line of cars, left; Suisan staff, middle; and Punaluʻu Bake Shop staff, right, yesterday, on the bake shop's property. 
    Photo by Nalani Parlin


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    HAWAI`I'S FARMERS AND FOOD DISTRIBUTORS WILL RECEIVE $5.2 MILLION in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to provide food to families in need. Sen. Mazie Hirono announced today that the funding, distributed under the Farmers to Families Food Box Program, is part of the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program that Congress established in the second coronavirus relief legislation that passed the Senate in March.
    Suisan, known for its fish and local foods market, is
    also a wholesale food distributor and will receive
    more than $600,000 to help feed the needy on
    this island. Photo from Suisan
         Hirono said, "Like so many places across the country, the COVID-19 pandemic is driving unprecedented demand for food assistance in Hawaiʻi. The harrowing images we've seen of families lining up for hours to receive food demonstrate the urgency to direct more federal resources to assist those in need. This funding, provided through the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program, will facilitate the delivery of assistance to food banks and other social service organizations across our state. It will also support the ongoing efforts of our farmers and distributors who have worked hard to adapt to feed individuals and families in our community. I will continue to advocate for this program and other crucial initiatives to assist Hawaiʻi families in need."
         The funding to Hawaiʻi-based companies under this program goes to: Suisan Company Limited receives $621,813. Ham Produce and Seafood Inc. receives $3,584,000. Hawaiʻi Foodservice Alliance receives $313,500. ʻĀina Hoʻokupu O Kīlauea receives $468,000. Mālama Kauaʻi receives $235,200.
         The Farmers to Families Food Box Program, a component of the USDA CFAP, is aimed at supporting farmers and ranchers through the purchase of excess commodities while replenishing supplies for over-extended food banks and organizations throughout the country. Through the program, national, regional, and local suppliers partner with USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service to purchase up to $3 billion in fresh produce, dairy, and meat products.
         Suppliers in the program will package these products into family-sized boxes and transport them to food banks, community and faith-based organizations, and other non-profits that distribute food to Americans in need, with deliveries from May 15 through June 30. Additional information on the Farmers to Families Food Box Program, including webinars and answers to FAQs, is available on the AMS website at ams.usda.gov/selling-food-to-usda/farmers-to-families-food-box.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FILE FOR UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS ON DAY OF THE WEEK ASSIGNED TO NAMES BEGINNING WITH: A-G on Mondays, H-O on Tuesdays, P-Z on Wednesdays, with Thursday-Sunday designated as open days for anyone.
         The assignments are to prevent overloading the state unemployment system, said Gov. David Ige and Scott Murakami, Director of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations. They gave updates on unemployment insurance processing, during Thursday's Community Connection Facebook Live.
         Murakami reported 141,077 claims processed as of Wednesday, which represents 63 percent of the total claims received. Of that number, 100,602 claims were paid out.
         DLIR is also expanding its call center with an additional 150 phones to handle more questions. Staff is creating a database for businesses bringing back employees and receiving Paycheck Protection Program federal loans. Ige's new Q&A will be on Facebook Live next Wednesday, May 13. Watch at facebook.com/GovernorDavidIge/.


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    "STAMP IT OUT AND KEEP IT OUT!" is the advice of West Kaʻū's member of the state House of Representatives. Physician and Rep. Richard Creagan issued this opinion piece today. It takes a look back at history:

         As we experience this horrible COVID-19 pandemic and search for a strategy that will make Hawaiʻi a paradise again, we should first look to the past. The 1918-20 Spanish Flu pandemic killed over 50 million people worldwide, but one island group was spared. American Samoa had zero deaths from that pandemic.
         The reasons were that it was very isolated and, as the flu pandemic started during WWI, American Samoa was under a military governor who banned all visitors. There was no testing, just a complete ban. Contrast that with what happened in Western Samoa with an identical ethnic group. Western Samoa was under the British Commonwealth. A ship from New Zealand brought in the flu and 22 percent of the ethnic Samoans died – one of the highest mortalities in the world. The entire United States lost less than one percent of its population.
    While women in Japan wore gauze masks during the 19117-1918 pandemic, a ship took the disease to Western
    Samoa, where 20 percent of the people died. American Samoa kept out everyone and suffered zero deaths.
        In Hawaiʻi, we are the most geographically isolated island group in the world. That could work to our favor in dealing with an infectious disease pandemic. Unfortunately, we are no longer functionally isolated and so COVID-19 swept in here, but we reacted quickly. We took a number of steps to limit further cases coming in, and will be increasing that restriction until readily available immediate and reliable testing can let us screen all incoming visitors and returning residents. Because of our extreme physical isolation, we can more easily than most countries, and all our other states, reestablish a protective functional isolation.
         We are doing well from a public health standpoint. Our hospitals have not been overwhelmed. We have, compared to most states, has a relatively low number of cases and a small number of hospitalization and deaths, mostly on Oʻahu. But our economy and our people are suffering greatly.

         We can and must do better. We need to stamp out this disease and we need to keep it out. We need to become the only COVID-free state in the United States. That will not be easy, but it is doable, and the benefits will be remarkable.

         China did it and is continuing to do it. We hear talk of "mitigation" and "bending the curve." That is the best the other states can probably do. It will keep the number of cases per unit of time down. If successful, it will avoid overwhelming the health care systems, but will not decrease the number of cases, and many deaths will occur over the several years that will pass until herd immunity is achieved or a vaccine is developed. Our country's economy has been and will be further severely impacted by the economic and social shutdown necessary for this mitigation.
         However, what China aimed for and achieved is "suppression" with the goal not being to minimize deaths to "acceptable" levels but to eradicate the virus. Their goal was to recover their society as a largely COVID-free country. They did it, New Zealand is trying it – and we can do it here.

    The 1917-1918 Spanish Flu pandemic killed 50 million people worldwide. 
         It will take will and hard work, but when it is done, we will have a thriving, healthy, and safe economy again. Don't throw away a chance for a total victory for short term economic gain.

         We are not only isolated as a state, but each of our islands is substantially isolated from the other islands, and we can stamp it out in each individual island first before tackling the larger problem of Oʻahu, where most of our population, cases, and deaths are found.

         We have emulated much of the social distancing and closing down tactics which limited the spread of the virus, but there are aspects of China's strategy that we should emulate to truly "stamp it out."

         The most important thing that China did is to isolate all COVID-19 positive cases, even if mild, either in existing hospitals that were designated as COVID hospitals or in their "pop-up" hospitals, which consisted mainly of a bunch of beds in large spaces with sanitation, food and water, some oxygen, but no advanced treatment. This is where the mild cases were kept, so they could be observed and moved to more advanced facilities as needed, but that strategy kept these infected patients from spreading the disease further to their families or neighbors.
         It should be noted that they kept some hospitals – such as trauma and cardiac centers – as COVID-free as possible. We should emulate that approach as well, and keep all our neighbor island hospitals and some Oʻahu hospitals COVID-free. We should also concentrate our younger and less vulnerable health care providers at these COVID hospitals. We do not want to wipe out much of a generation of older health care workers.

    We have no need to create these temporary buildings, lacking in comfort and privacy.
         The massive slow down in tourism and the mandatory 14-day quarantine limited new cases coming in but also freed up our hotels to be used in dealing with the COVID-19 cases and their care givers. Hotels are almost ideal hospitals, with privacy, ability for individual isolation, bathrooms, food service, security, communication, robust electrical systems, big elevators, multiple isolatable floors, and individual air handling for most rooms. The Army Corps of Engineers has plans to readily and quickly convert hotels for effective isolation, quarantine, and treatment of mild to moderate cases not needing critical care or ventilators. There would also be plenty of room to house health care workers so they would not bring COVID-19 home.

         Letting people self-quarantine at home does not work if you want to eradicate. New York found 100s of people dead who were self-isolating. Had they spread the disease before they died? Could they have been saved? Many of those self-isolated patients had other family members who unnecessarily got the disease. Television news anchor Chris Cuomo "self-isolated" in his basement but gave it to his wife and then they gave it to his 14-year-old son. That pattern will continue here in Hawaiʻi and prevent eradication – if we do not alter it.

         Our neighbor island hospitals need to be preserved to take care of the regular medical problems which they were already struggling to deal with before COVID. Trauma, cardiac care, delivering babies, surgery, cancer care, etc. are functions that are compromised if COVID patients are treated in neighbor island hospitals.

         Mild cases can become very severe very quickly and should be kept in at least a health provider-staffed COVID hotel/hospital, ideally near regular hospitals that can provide advanced treatment. I would argue that, with the decrease in the threat of overwhelming our Oʻahu hospitals, that treatment of COVID patients should be there. It moves the risk of COVID transmission out of the neighbor islands, preserves our critically needed neighbor island hospitals and health care providers, and protects their families and communities
       Since infected patients are isolated because of their disease, they cannot be visited by family anyway, so having them on Oʻahu makes medical sense and social sense. The neighbor islands do not have enough specialists needed to take care of critical and complicated patients, and some patients that might survive on Oʻahu will likely perish.
         One example of treatment that is not readily available at hospitals on the neighbor islands is renal dialysis for renal failure, which developed in about a third of critical patients in New YorkKona Hospital does not have any dialysis units. While Hilo does, those units could be needed by existing non-COVID patients. Many patients in New York died because of the limited availability of dialysis.

         New York is reporting severe strokes in their young and middle aged COVID patients, which could be reversed by interventional neurologists that are not available on the neighbor islands – certainly not on the Big Island. Cardiac complications are not easily treated on the neighbor islands. Patients that require hospitalization cannot be visited so there is little benefit to keep them near their families and with the superior treatment available on Oʻahu they are more likely to be able to return home as functional and healthy individuals.

         The Air National Guard or perhaps unused Hawaiian Airlines planes could be used to fly the patients to Oʻahu.
         Read more on Creagan's outlook in tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs.



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    CONSERVATION REAUTHORIZATION ACT was introduced by Congressman Ed Case today. He said it will update and improve the national commitment to saving endangered coral reefs as first set forth in a measure enacted 20 years ago. "In the two decades since the passage of the 2000 Act, the state of our reefs has deteriorated alarmingly and the challenges and opportunities for effective management have evolved," said Case.
    A healthy coral reef. NOAA photo
         Case said coral reefs are vital natural infrastructure that safeguard our coastal and island communities. Healthy, resilient coral reefs buffer against severe weather, shoreline erosion, and flooding, and serve as natural breakwaters for maritime ports and harbors. "Coral reefs also support countless American jobs in the tourism, hospitality, boating, recreation, and fishing industries," he said. "In particular, coral reefs are integral to commercial and recreational sport fisheries across the United States and in our nation's Exclusive Economic Zone.
         "As coral reefs provide a rich habitat for a variety of marine life, the loss of coral reef ecosystems is having very serious consequences for coastal communities and economies, the health of fish and other marine wildlife, biodiversity, and the overall marine environment. In fact, such loss is accelerating rapidly, for various reasons. Warmer-than-normal ocean temperatures combined with widespread pollution are threatening their health and causing mass bleaching events. Bleaching events cause corals to be more susceptible to disease and increase their chances of dying."
         Case explained that his Coral Reef Conservation Reauthorization Act would:
         Strengthen the federal responses to coral reef emergencies, including bleaching, vessel groundings, harmful algal blooms, coral disease/invasive species outbreaks, and unexploded ordnance underwater;
         Expand federal grant-making for local coral reef conservation projects, including research on coral biodiversity, propagation, and resiliency;
    An example of coral bleaching. NOAA photo
         Authorize the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force and the Coral Reef Management Fellowship; and
         Authorize the U.S. Department of the Interior to research and conserve coral resources, including coral reefs within national parks, national wildlife refuges, and national monuments.
         "Coral reefs represent the planet's greatest source of biodiversity," said Case. "Coral reefs cover less than 1 percent of the ocean floor but are home to some 25 percent of all known marine species." Coral reef ecosystems also support upwards of 12 percent of global fisheries and an estimated 25 percent of all known fish species. "It is critical to life as we know it that we accelerate our efforts to preserve these invaluable and indispensable elements of our natural world."
         Case said co-sponsors of his measure include: Rep. Tulsi Gabbard from Hawaiʻi and other members of Congress from coastal regions.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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    Evan Enriques sells ono and aku this morning to a county firefighter. The volleyball star and Stanford University
    alumni through graduate school came home to Punaluʻu to fish full-time. See story below on federal
    funding available for fishing, aquaculture, and local food distribution. Photo by Julia Neal
    See Mothers Day Takeout Specials in Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.

    VOLCANO GOLF COURSE CLOSES, LESSEES LEAVE. The Japanese company that has managed Volcano Gold Course & Country Club since 1982 recently shut the place down, after a double whammy: a fire that burned the clubhouse and COVID-19, which led to temporary government bans on playing golf throughout the islands. The 18-hole, 156-acre Volcano course opened nearly a century ago on Kamehameha School lands.
         After the fire, staff members told The Kaʻū Calendar that the business wanted to use insurance money from the fire, and loans, to rebuild the clubhouse. The golf course operated out of a trailer next to the golf cart shed.
         This morning's Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald, however, carries a story by Michael Brestovansky, saying, "The Volcano Golf Course and Country Club has permanently closed, leaving the future of a beloved Big Island destination in doubt."
    Volcano Golf Course clubhouse after last November's fire.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         Brestrovansky quotes Kamehameha Schools' Alapaki Nahaleʻa, senior director of community engagement and resources for Hawaiʻi Island. Nahaleʻa told the Tribune-Herald that Kamehameha Schools is surprised and disappointed. "We want the businesses on our lands to succeed." He also told the Tribune-Herald that the school will weigh its options on the best future for the lands, but could "stay the course," noting the golf course is appreciated by travelers and residents, including those living in houses along the golf course boarder. See more at Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FISHING AND AQUACULTURE BUSINESSES IN HAWAI‘I WILL RECEIVE MILLIONS IN TARGETED COVID-19 AID. Congressman Ed Case announced this week that more than $4.3 million is available for Hawai‘i's fishing and aquaculture industry impacted by COVID-19. The state Department of Land & Natural Resources is tasked to administer funds. Eligible are commercial fishing, charter for-hire fishing, qualified aquaculture operations, and marine fisheries management agencies, said Case.
         He said money comes through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, which Congress passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. The President signed it into law on March 27. U.S. Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administers the funds. Read more on funding for fishing and aquaculture industries.
         Case serves on the U.S. House Committees on Natural Resources and on Appropriations and subcommittees, overseeing NOAA. He urged Commerce to accelerate CARES funding.
    Fishing to sell for the local community increases as hotel and restaurant orders dive. Fishing businesses, even small ones,
    and community non-profits developing local food distribution, are eligible for funding. Photo by Julia Neal
         Case also announced that State of Hawai‘i and counties can apply for a share of $1.5 billion in emergency assistance through the U.S. Department of Commerce's Economic Development Administration aid to combat the effects of COVID-19. "Much of that $1.5 billion will come in the form of grants," said Case. "It was made possible through the CARES Act.
         "Those eligible can apply through EDA's Economic Adjustment Assistance program. Projects eligible for this very flexible grant funding include: economic recovery planning and preparing technical assistance strategies to address economic dislocations caused by the coronavirus pandemic;  preparing or updating resiliency plans to respond to future pandemics; implementing entrepreneurial support programs to diversify economies; and constructing public works and facilities that will support economic recovery, including the deployment of broadband for purposes including supporting telehealth and remote learning for job skills.
         Eligible applicants under the EAA program include State, county, city, or other political subdivision of a state, including a special purpose unit of a State or local government engaged in economic or infrastructure development activities, or a consortium of political subdivisions; institution of higher education or a consortium of institutions of higher education; or public or private non-profit organization or association acting in cooperation with officials of a political subdivision of a state. For more information, visit EDA CARES Act Recovery Page.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A full ʻumeke or calabash is a sign of "strong relationships, knowledge, and resource abundance" in a community. 
    Photo by Kaʻōhua Lucas
    SUPPORTING HAWAIʻI ISLAND'S FOOD SECURITY is the goal of the Full Calabash Fund. Established by The Kohala Center and a group of Hawaiʻi food systems practitioners, the fund will support community-based organizations that are purchasing food from local farmers, ranchers, and food producers, and providing food to community members in need.
         A message from The Kohala Center Rural and Cooperative Business Development Services team says, "In Hawaiʻi, when an ʻumeke or a calabash was full, it was a sign of strong relationships, knowledge, and resource abundance held within our communities. Following this tradition… the Full Calabash Fund reminds us of the honor that comes from the generous exchanges of gifts, including time, energy, and food." Initial funding comes from The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, Frost Family Foundation, and The Johnson ʻOhana Foundation.
         For more information or to donate to the Full Calabash Fund, contact Nicole Milne at 808-987-9210 or nmilne@kohalacenter.org. See kohalacenter.org/business/full-calabash-fund.

    The Boys & Girls Club takes meals to some of the
    most remote homes on the island, where children
    depended on nutrition at school before the pandemic.
    Photo from Chad Cabral
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB SERVED OVER 20,000 MEALS IN 35 days, according to its CEO Chad Cabral, who sent out a message on Friday to the public, volunteers, and contributors to the program.
         "Now into our sixth week, the Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island continues to provide free, hot meals during this coronavirus pandemic, to assist our most in-need and vulnerable populations throughout Hawaiʻi Island. Today it was beef stroganoff, mashed potatoes, and hot cooked vegetables produced out of our two Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island kitchen operations.
         "Our meals continue to be made hot and fresh and transported directly to Hawaiʻi Island rural area communities, social support agencies, and residential public housing programs for keiki, kūpuna, struggling family households, and our homeless population to access." The Boys & Girls Club produced 800  hot meals distributed Friday evening.
         Said Cabral, "Remember that, for some children, school is the primary resource for them to access daily nutrition. During this unprecedented time period, where Hawaiʻi schools are closed and many family households have lost their source of employment, the Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island will continue to assist those in need with our supplemental Monday-Friday meals for as long as we are able to." Read more and donate at bgcbi.org.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REMAINS IN THE PLANNING STAGE. The Kaʻū News Briefs recently jumped the gun and posted one of the ideas for the event, but graduation remains in the planning and approval stage. Principal Sharon Beck said that she will soon release the details, date, time, and protocol, following finalization and approvals from the Department of Education.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    STAMP IT OUT AND KEEP IT OUT is the campaign of West Kaʻū's member of the state House of Representatives. Also a physician, Rep. Richard Creagan issued this opinion piece on Friday. See Part I here. The following is Part II. It takes a look at testing and contact tracing with program development at University of Hawaiʻi Medical School. He emphasizes opportunities f

    or a COVID-free Hawaiʻi in health, education, the economy, and by providing a very safe harbor for hosting the U.S. military. According to Creagan:
         Hawaiʻi can look to China for guidance from its response to the COVID-19 challenge. China was quick to initiate testing. We are still not at the level of test availability that China achieved in the four months it took them to eliminate the virus in Wuhan. A recent report indicated that, as part of a planeload of COVID assistance to IndonesiaChina provided almost a million test kits, which was more than our whole country had used at that point.
    Rep. Richard Creagan, a physician, gives his views on
    COVID-19: Stamp It Out and Keep It Out!
         I asked our medical school to come up with a proposal for developing further testing and they came up with a plan that could provide over 100,000 tests over the next 12 months if they were given $3 million dollars. They would also develop high-quality antibody tests that would be better than what is now available. If funded, they could expand their capacity as needed. We need to continue to expand the quantity and quality of our testing, and our Department of Health is being very resistant to that to the point of being almost criminally obstructive.
    Dramatically Expand Contact Tracing
         We need to expand contact tracing dramatically. Chinahad 1,500 teams of five people per team that roamed all over Wuhanand the surrounding areas. They found individuals and clusters, isolated them in their "hospitals" and quarantined others with monitoring at home or in government facilities. They screened those who might be infected with adequate testing to find the infected individuals.
         At the start of our outbreak I was told that our department of health had seven contact tracers. That number has since been increased by use of volunteers, but it is still far from adequate. A new, well-trained, and fiercely dedicated doctor with an MD and an MPH, Sarah Kemble, is leading that group. She is Sara Park's deputy, but Sarah Kemble seems to believe that contact tracing cannot just mitigate but suppress and eradicate this disease. We need hundreds if not thousands of contact tracers with that same belief to ensure we stamp out this disease and keep it from coming back, and she could lead that group.
         I worked as an epidemiological investigator for the Department of Health on the BigIsland in 2002-2003 for part of the SARS outbreak and know that we can readily train the contact tracing teams that we need. In a recent op-ed to the Star Advertiser, I advocated recruiting a COVID Corps of young people that could more safely do that and other jobs. There are thousands of college students that could be activated and trained, housed, and fed in empty hotels, provided transportation by the National Guard – who could get this critical job done. In addition to their food and housing, they could be given college credit for their work and tuition waivers they could use when they got rid of COVID-19 and reopened their campuses.

         Undoubtedly the U.S.mainland has become a grisly testing ground for possible medical treatments, but most of those treatments will likely help only marginally. They could possibly shorten hospitalization time and perhaps spare a few more lives. Our best course in Hawaiʻi is to have no cases to treat.


    The Issue of Vaccines
         The issue of vaccines is a worrisome one. In the 1980's, I was the medical director of a biotech star-up vaccine company that was using new techniques to make veterinary vaccines. We were one of the first two companies to make a Feline Leukemia Vaccine. The reality is that making vaccines is not easy. Making vaccines for animals is easier as they do not have to be as flawless as human vaccines.
         Human vaccines are usually tested first in animals to confirm safety and some degree of effectiveness but then they have to have that safety and efficacy confirmed in human trials. No one has successfully made a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine for humans. Attempts were made to make vaccines for two earlier coronaviruses that caused outbreaks. SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) vaccines failed in part because, in both cases, Antibody-Dependent Enhancement (ADE) occurred in the animal trials, which made the diseases worse in some vaccinated animals and stalled the project. After 40 years, we still do not have a vaccine against HIV. It could take years for a vaccine, but Hawaiʻi could solve our problems without a vaccine.


    Benefits of a COVD-19 Free Hawaiʻi
         How would Hawaiʻi benefit if we could "Stamp It Out, and Keep It Out?" I would leave that to your imagination but the increase in quality of life would be dramatic. Some examples:

         Our kūpuna in our nursing homes could stop cowering in fear of a horrible death and could see their families again. Our other vulnerable populations could breathe easier as well. My father is 101 years old and his mind is sharp as a tack. He was born during the 2018 flu pandemic and remembers hearing stories of its horrors as a child. He is now totally isolated in a Minnesotanursing home and just wants to die. Prior to COVID, my sisters visited him every day.


    Hula from kūpuna of Lori Lee's Hula Studio. The kūpuna would be free
    to gather again, for exercise and socialization, if COVID-19
    were gone from the island. Photo by Julia Neal
         Our schools could reopen. Colleges could selectively recruit the best students from the mainland. They could recruit great faculty fleeing the COVID-ridden mainland. We could solve our teacher shortage. We could recruit the best and brightest teachers who wanted to teach in a school without fear of death. Older, more vulnerable, but experienced teachers would flock here.
         Our health care workers shortage would also be solved. Rather than facing death every day they work on the mainland, they could rejoice in our COVID-free workplace and lifestyle.

         The tech and dot.com industry from Californiawould likely also see us as a fear-free paradise for them and they could bring their money and their skills, and provide great, high paying jobs.
    The Future of Film & Tourism
         The film industry would love to come to a beautiful and COVID-free place.
         The tourists could be brought back with rigorous prescreening and we could reinvent our tourism industry to be more selective and emphasize quality not quantity. We would be the only COVID-free tourist destination in the world (although New Zealand and Australiamight join us). What a great trifecta that would be. It is likely that we would free the neighbor islands of COVID initially, and those could be opened up to local and out-of-state tourism with appropriate screening. Oʻahu could join us with a little more work and in the meantime screened Oʻahu residents could take a COVID-fear-free break on the neighbor islands.


    Ag, Real Estate, & the Military
         Our real estate industry would probably get so heated up that we would have to impose strict regulations to protect our local residents.

         The best is left for last. Our military, particularly our surface and undersea Navy – but also our best airmen, our marines, and our army – would love to be able to train and live in a COVID-free environment. They would not have to be penned up on their bases behind razor wire, fearing that their crews could be decimated by disease at sea. We could have a spending and building boom to support an increase in the Indo-Pacific Command and be able to stand up to Chinaagain. We could make our most important forward military bases secure and functional, as Chinais undoubtedly going to try and take advantage of this pandemic.

         Furthermore, if we can do this now, we can do it again when the next pandemic comes our way (and it will)!
         Let us join together to realize that with a little more patience, dedication, and hard work we can "Stamp It Out and Keep It Out!"

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    DEADLINE IS EXTENDED for the revʻULUtion student art contest. Featuring ʻulu - the breadfruit grown in Hawaiʻi - student artists now have until June 30 to submit their art. Hawaiʻi ʻUlu Cooperative invites all students residing in Hawaiʻi in PreKindergarten through 12th grades, to create and submit original artwork that will be featured in an upcoming traveling art exhibit, a 13-month calendar, and across the internet on the cooperative's partners websites and social media.
         The purpose of the contest, announced Hawaiʻi ʻUlu Cooperative, is to raise awareness of ʻulu as a "resilient cultural and agricultural resource" that is a "viable option for increasing food security and self-sufficiency across the Hawaiian Islands. The ‘ulu tree is also an amazing kumu (teacher) and storyteller for past, present and future generations. Through the inspiration and opportunities presented by this indigenous crop, Hawai‘i can take meaningful steps towards a more sustainable way of life for all."
         Each student may submit as many pieces as they wish on 8.5 by 11 paper, in the landscape (horizontal) orientation. Any art medium, except computer graphics and photographs, may be used as long as the artwork is flat and can be scanned. Each entry must be accompanied by a short – 75 words or less – explanation of ʻUlu's Place in Hawaiʻi: Past, Present, and Future, and an entry form.
         Visit eatbreadfruit.com/pages/artcontest for more information and to submit an entry.

    Roasted Kaʻū Coffee can be sold to USDA. Photo from Rusty's Hawaiian
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ROASTED HAWAIIAN COFFEE CAN BE SOLD TO THE USDA. Synergistic Hawaiʻi Agricultural Council is working to facilitate the sale of Hawaiʻi-grown coffee products to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Those with roasted coffee to sell can contact Suzanne Shriner at suzanne@shachawaii.org with information about quantity, price, and packaging format.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A WEBINAR ON BEEKEEPING AND PLANTING BEE-FRIENDLY NATIVE TREES will be presented by Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United - Kohala Chapter on Tuesday, May 12 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bees & Trees teaches about the environmental benefits of beekeeping and planting bee-friendly native trees.
         Speakers will be Jeremiah Morgan, Arborist and Earth Activist; Dawn Barnett, Bee Keeper; and Mariah Barnett, Bee Whisperer.
         There is no cost to attend, but registration is required in advance by emailing kohalahfuu@gmail.com or calling 808-990-3458 to obtain the Zoom meeting ID and password.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ONLINE SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP will be held by St. Jude's, here. Sunday sermons are also available online. Cindy Cutts says, "Special thanks to Reverend Constance in North Carolina and this week's worship team for their help in creating the on-line service." See stjudeshawaii.org.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    ONE NEW COVID-19 CASE ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND is reported by state Department of Health today. Two other new cases are on Oʻahu, and in Maui County. The state case total is 631. No new deaths were reported since Sunday; the state death toll is 17 since the pandemic began.

         On Hawaiʻi Island, of 75 COVID-19 victims, 72 are free from isolation. The remainder quarantine at home, monitored by DOH. Only one person stayed in a hospital overnight, and no one died here. Only one case in Kaʻū, in the 96773 zip code, is reported since January.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "Hawaiʻi Island and State are doing very well in minimizing the spread and impact of the coronavirus. We need to continue to follow the policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy as best as you can. Look out for each other. Be well and please wear your mask. Thank you for listening and a very happy Mother's Day weekend to all. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.34 million cases have been confirmed, an increase of over 27,000 since yesterday. The number of confirmed recoveries is about 201,000, an increase of over 23,000 since yesterday. The death toll is over 79,696, an increase of more than 1,700 since yesterday.
         Worldwide, more than 4 million COVID-19 cases have been reported. More than 1.38 million recoveries have been reported. The death toll reported is over 279,000. However, many countries are unable to give accurate counts of the sick, the dead, and the recovered, and some countries may not be transparent with the true accounting of COVID-19.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
    A hike through native Hawaiian forest along old sugar plantation waterways is offered during Kaʻū Coffee
    Festival. Take a look back at other activities during festival week, canceled for this year during the pandemic.
    Photo by Lee Neal

    Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
    During Kaʻū Coffee Festival week, Kaʻū Valley Farms offers 
    a tour of its hydroponic plant nursery. Photo by Lee Neal

         This time last year, a week of Kaʻū Coffee Festival events wrapped up. This year, all the events were planned but were canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.
         The events included the Kaʻū Mountain Hike & Lunch above Kaʻū Coffee Mill. The annual experience begins with a ride through the coffee plantation, up the mountain, into the rainforest. Participants hike along old wooden flumes that carried water down the mountain to float sugar to the mill in Pāhala, which opened more than 100 years ago.
    Kau kau at Kaʻū Coffee & Cattle Day at Aikane
    Plantation. Photo by Lee Neal
         Kaʻū Valley Farms Tour & Lunch above Nāʻālehu offered a visit to its plant nursery, where hydroponic vegetables grow for public sale. The annual tour includes a look at coffee and tea plantings, native forest, and a trip up the slopes of Kahilipali Ahupua‘a. At the top of Pu‘u Ho‘omaha (Hill of Leisure), participants listen to stories of the Ahupua‘a and land tenure, from the Hawaiian Kingdom to present, while looking out over the expanse of the Kaʻū coastline, Volcano to South Point, the valley of Makino – relatively unknown to many, as it lies hidden from below the summit of Ho‘omaha – and the hills of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's Kahuku Unit.
         Kaʻū Coffee and Cattle Day at Aikane Plantation Coffee Farm included a farm and ranch tour, BBQ buffet, and hayride. The annual event takes participants deep into the history of the area. The home of Aikane Plantation Coffee is where descendants of the first coffee farmer in Kaʻū integrated coffee into cattle ranching and other agriculture. Also on offer each year is Hawaiian music and working with cattle and horses.

         The Kaʻū Stargazing event shuttled guests to a mountain above Pāhala. Each year, participants learn about the Hawaiian night sky and stars after the sunset. With the help of laser beams, participants are treated to an astronomy lesson, a history of the land, and some history of Kaʻū Coffee becoming the vibrant industry it is today.
         See photos from last year's Kaʻū Coffee Festival Hoʻolauleʻa on tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs. See photos from last year's Kaʻū Coffee College at Pāhala Community Center on next Saturday's Kaʻū News Briefs. See KauCoffeeFestival.com.

    Kaʻū Coffee & Cattle Day shows off ranch and Kaʻū Coffee farming life at Aikane Plantation during the
    Kaʻū Coffee Festival. Photo by Lee Neal

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at CooperCenter on
    Wright Road
    , off of
    Old Volcano Highway
    , is open on Sundays from to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.


    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.



    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







    0 0

    The Volcano Store was one of the favorite places for masked men to pick up flowers for Mothers Day today.
    Photo by Julia Neal

    THE PUBLIC WILL BE ABLE TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE 2020 HAWAIʻI LEGISLATIVE SESSION when it reconvenes this Monday, May 11 in Honolulu. Kaʻū's two Senators, Russell Ruderman and Dru Kanuha, as well as Kaʻū's two House of Representative members, Richard Onishi and Richard Creagan, will travel there to participate as essential workers.
         The State Capitol will be secured and closed to the general public. Only lawmakers and essential staff will be given access to the building. These restrictions are to limit any possible coronavirus infections and to protect the health and safety of everyone working at the Capitol. The measures are compelled by the Governor's statewide stay-at-home order, which remains in effect through May 31.
         Even though the public is unable to physically enter the Capitol building, there are many ways to participate and contribute to the outcome of proposed legislation. The public can watch online and televised sessions. The public can participate by submitting written testimony on specific bills. All hearing notices are posted on the legislative website.      
    The old days of holding hands and sitting close to one another will change for distancing when Kaʻū members of the
     state House of Representatives reconvene with their colleagues on Monday during the pandemic.
    Photo from Hawaiʻi House of Representatives
         Pay attention to testimony instructions listed on each hearing notice. Committees ask that testimony be submitted 24 hours prior to a hearing.
         The reconvened Legislative Session is expected to last from six to nine working days with all Representatives and Senators in attendance during floor sessions. The primary goal is to revise the state budget bill to avoid any draconian budget cuts to wages or services and to plug a more than $1 billion hole in the budget caused by the coronavirus pandemic.
         The entire House of Representatives will meet at noon Monday through Friday during the session in a reconfigured seating arrangement to conform to physical distancing. These meetings will be televised on ʻŌlelo Community Television and its live stream. They will also be shown on public television stations on the neighbor islands. See the channels at olelo.org for the latest information. The public can also watch the House Finance Committee members as they work through the budget process with hearings live-streamed and televised on ʻŌlelo. See more broadcast information.
         Submit public testimony with: Testifier's name with position/title and organization; Committee(s) to which the comments are directed; date and time of the hearing; and measure number.
         Submit testimony in one of the following ways: For testimony less than 20MB in size, transmit online. By fax, testimony less than five pages in length can be transmitted to 800-535-3859. Testimony submitted will be placed on the legislative website and on the bill's status page. The public posting of testimony on the website should be considered when including personal information in the testimony.
    The Hawaiʻi Senate Chambers have much more room for the Senators to spread out. The layout of the
    desks will be different when the Legislature reconvenes on Monday. Photo from Hawaiʻi Senate
         In addition, every Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., an in-house news and information program called Live at the Legislature is shown on ʻŌlelo channel 49. The weekly show features timely interviews with lawmakers discussing events, bills, and issues moving through the House of Representatives.
         Every Wednesday at noon, Talk Story with House Majority is aired on ʻŌlelo channel 49. House Majority Leader Della Au Belatti is the host. She interviews community and government leaders along with State Representatives discussing pressing community issues.
         Both programs are also available to neighbor island viewers through their public-access stations. The Legislature has been in recess since March 17 when one lawmaker tested positive for the coronavirus.
         For more information on the legislative process, submitting testimony, and keeping track of bills and Kaʻū's legislators, go to capitol.hawaii.gov. Read about Kaʻū legislators and connect with them through the Legislature's links to: Creagan,Onishi, Ruderman, and Kanuha.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Gold Oranges family sells oranges and beef at OKK Nāʻālehu Market. Photo by Lora Botanova
    OKK'S NĀʻĀLEHU MARKET is now open three days per week: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, to . The market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, and handmade soaps.
    Kaʻū Boy's Stone Oven offers different breads, from sourdough to dill, 
    organic and vegan, non-GMO, and cinnamon rolls, baked in a traditional 
    Portuguese oven in Ocean View. Sold at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 
    Market in Nāʻālehu. Photo by Lora Botanova

         Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, says, "Due to the popularity of the Wednesday market, we need to expand the days in order to spread out the number of customers and vendors. The goal is to have no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. The number of vendor booths per day is already limited 25, with 30' spacing between vendors.
         "Masks and hand sanitizing are required for attending this farmers market. Social distancing will be enforced.
         "Coffee and other vendors will be added as space allows."
         Contact Barnett at 808-345-9374 to sign up.



    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU will hand out free food Monday at 1 p.m. at the parking lot behind Bank of Hawaiʻi in Pāhala, near R&G store. OKK Pres. Wayne Kawachi said hamburger patties, raw onions, rice, and saimin will be distributed to those in need during the pandemic.

    Masked volunteers help distribute food to those in need in Kaʻū. Front left, 
    volunteer firefighter Liz Stabo. Back: Terry-Lee Shibuya and 
    Officer Dane Shibuya. Photo from Terry-Lee Shibuya
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE FOOD BASKET FOOD WILL DISTRIBUTE 14 DAYS OF FOOD in Ocean View at KahukuPark tomorrow, Monday, May 11, to . Call 933-6030 to verify schedule as dates, times, and places are subject to change. Social distancing, masks, and other COVID-19 precautions will be in use.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    The Food Basket will distribute 14 days worth of food per family at the county Kahuku Park Monday from 10 a.m. to noon.
    Photo by Terry-Lee Shibuya
    A MESSAGE FROM WEST KAʻŪ'S STATE REP. DRU KANUHA takes a look at how the pandemic affects the work of the legislature and gives thanks to his staff:
         "This time last year, my office was busy as we wrapped up the regular 2019 Legislative Session. Although this year had many surprises, I would still like to take this opportunity to thank my staff. When Senate President Ron Kouchi recommended the Senate offices at the Capitol close on Thursday, March 19, my staff immediately shifted gears to teleworking and moved all communications online.
         "We started with morning briefings on Microsoft Teams, sending bi-weekly newsletters on Tuesdays and Fridays every week, providing time-sensitive information about new State mandates and exemptions through social media as well as responded to numerous constituent inquiries via email, phone calls, and social media. Needless to say, we wanted to make sure every piece of critical information during COVID-19 was made available to you – our Senate District 3 ʻohana.
         "Therefore, I would like to take this opportunity to thank my permanent staff, Tonga Hopoi, and Iokepa Command as well as our wonderful session staff, Marlene Sai and Kirstin Kahaloa. Although we have been in recess since mid-March, it has been a pleasure and blessing to have my session staff Marlene and Kirstin with us. I wish them well and truly thank them for their ongoing commitment to the health and safety of our entire community."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR A COMPOST REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM IS EXTENDED through Friday, May 15. Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture is accepting applications for invoices dated July 1, 2019 to March 31, 2020. Reimbursement is 50 percent of the compost cost with a $50,000 cap per farm. Only for-profit businesses may qualify. Compost must be purchased from a certified processor, retailer, or wholesaler licensed to do business in Hawaiʻi, regulated under the Hawaiʻi Department of Health's Solid Waste Management Program. Qualified applicants must also provide a W-9 tax form, sample invoice, and proof of compliance with federal, state, and county tax, and business regulations.

         Phyllis Shimabukuro-Geiser, chairperson of the Hawaiʻi Board of Agriculture, said, "The reimbursement program is aimed at providing assistance to farmers to ease some of the operational cost relating to the purchase of composting material."

         For more information and to download the application forms, go to hdoa.hawaii.gov/blog/main/compostreimbursement.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FARM VISITS BY AGRICULTURE EXTENSION AGENT ANDREA KAWABATA have resumed by appointment for coffee growers and others with orchard crops. Kawabata says, "I'm happy to see that social distancing, hand washing, masks, etc. are helping to slow the rate of new coronavirus cases on the Big Island. I will begin resuming on-farm visits to assist commercial coffee and orchard crop farmers. Social distancing and masks will be required." Schedule a farm visit appointment by emailing andreak@hawaii.edu, calling 808-322-4892, or texting 415-604-1511.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    INFO TO START COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE is provided by University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Cooperative Extension Service. CTAHR published a fact sheet in response to growing demand for Community-Supported Agriculture programs, to sell food directly from farms and ranches. See Kohala Center's presentation with links for more info online.
         Community-Supported Agriculture is a membership-based subscription for local fruit, vegetables, and/or other food products. Members receive a bundle of items at regular intervals in exchange for a subscription or membership fee.
         There are many variations on the CSA model. Some CSAs require payment at the start of a season, while others offer a pay-as-you-go plan. Some CSAs accept SNAP benefits or offer discounts.
         CSAs can help producers with membership fees paid in advance or in several scheduled payments. Producers plan on this income and use it to buy supplies, pay workers, and handle other farm expenses. For consumers, a CSA can introduce them to local products, new foods, and scheduled good nutrition.
         CSAs offer pick-up and/or delivery options to minimize in-person contact and health risks during the COVID-19 pandemic. CSAs may provide orders online and over the phone.
         At this time, the only CSAs on these lists that deliver to Kaʻū are:

         Big Island Creamery, which sells vegan, plant-based cheeses, creams, spreads, and desserts. They deliver to Kaʻū and Volcano for free with purchase of at least three items. Order at bigislandcreamery.com. Questions? Email govegan@bigislandcreamery.comor call 808-825-8485.
         Tai Shan Farms, located at 92-9095 Lehua Lanein Ocean View, is a farm and commercial kitchen. They offer take-out and hot sauce, cocktail mixes, vinaigrettes, baked goods, jam, and honey. Tai Shan Farms products are available at taishanfarms.com/shop. Their take-out menu is available at taishanfarms.com/oceanview-to-go-menuWednesday, Fridays, and Sundays from to for lunch and for dinner. Call 808-929-9613.

         See the list of other farms in or that deliver to Kaʻū, and stores and restaurants that are open during the pandemic, at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    WARNINGS ABOUT POSSIBLE INTERNET SC

    AMS involving political candidate websites are issued by Hawaiʻi Police Department.
         HPD says that "suspect(s) created a 'fake' social media account for a local political candidate," appearing very similar to the candidate's actual social media account. The suspect(s) transferred images from the actual account to the fake account and gained access to the candidate's followers. The suspect(s) solicited money under the guise of the candidate's campaign.

         HPD warns the public to withhold personal information over the phone and online to anyone who's identity is unconfirmed. The list includes birthdates, social security numbers, credit card information, bank account information, etc.
         Those contacted by persons, either by phone or online, whom they believe are involved in a scam, call the police department's non-emergency number at (808) 935-3311 to report the activity.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND were reported by State Department of Health on Sunday. The state death toll remains at 17. The total number of cases since the pandemic began is 632, up one from Saturday.

         On Hawaiʻi Island, of 75 COVID-19 victims, 74 are free from isolation. The remainder quarantine at home, monitored by DOH. Only one person stayed in a hospital overnight, and no one died here. Only one case in Kaʻū, in the 96773 zip code, is reported since January.
         In the United States, more than 1.36 million cases have been confirmed. The number of confirmed recoveries is about 210,000. The death toll is over 80,574.
         Worldwide, more than 4.1 million cases have been confirmed. The number of confirmed recoveries is about 1.4 million. The death toll is over 282,000.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    INTERNATIONAL TRAINING is the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, a weekly article and activity update written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. Today's article is by Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes educational specialist Darcy Bevens and Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes director Don Thomas. HVO assists CSAV with International Training:

         The mission of USGS HVO is "to monitor, investigate, and assess hazards from active volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawaiʻi, and communicate results of this work to the public, emergency managers, and scientific community."

         Whether this work is done during a volcanic crisis (such as in 2018), or during the COVID-19 pandemic (when HVO staff work remotely from home), HVO is on the job, 24/7.

         Because HVO has over 100 years of volcano monitoring experience, scientists from volcano observatories around the world are eager to visit and learn from HVO and our active volcanoes. During Bob Decker's tenure as HVO Scientist-in-Charge (1979–1984), he hosted many scientists from international observatories, such as Indonesia, to "shadow" HVO staff and learn modern monitoring techniques.

    CSAV International Program participants from 2011 came from volcano observatories in the Philippines, Democratic 
    Republic of Congo, Costa Rica, Mexico, El Salvador, Colombia, Comoros, and Indonesia. Photo courtesy CSAV 

         The occasional request for shadowing and training became a flood in 1985 after a small eruption of the Colombian volcano, Nevado del Ruiz, produced debris flows that tragically killed more than 23,000 residents living at the foot of the volcano. 

         To meet the need for training, Dr. Decker, who by then was a geology faculty member at the University of Hawai‘i's Hilocampus, came up with a brilliant plan: UH-Hilo would host an International Training Program in Volcano Monitoring Methods. This would provide scientists from developing countries, such as Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Guatemala, with training in how the USGS monitors volcanoes.

         Thus, the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, or CSAV, was established at UH-Hilo. CSAV is a partnership among UH-Hilo, the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at the UH-Mānoa campus, and HVO.

         Since 1990, CSAV has offered an annual six- to eight-week summer training course for international volcanologists. UH-Hilo organizes course logistics, from airline flights to housing to schedule. HVO staff, as well as scientists from other USGS observatories and UH, provide instruction and hands-on training in geophysical, geochemical, and geological methods of monitoring and assessing volcano hazards. Training is also provided on how to best communicate those hazards to civil officials and the public.

         Six weeks of the course are in Hilo and two weeks are at Cascades Volcano Observatory, where trainees have an opportunity to learn about more explosive volcanoes than we have here in Hawaiʻi.

         Scientists who attend the training program return to their home countries better equipped to gather and interpret monitoring and other data, and to communicate effectively.

    HVO gas geochemist Tamar Elias (entering data on laptop) coaches CSAV 
    participants from Peru, Argentina, and Ecuadoron 
    gas geochemistry monitoring. Photo courtesy CSAV

         Compared with Hawaiian volcanoes, volcanoes of Peru, El Salvador, and the Philippinesare far more dangerous, and are surrounded by cities with millions of people who are at risk. Hence, the CSAV program is not merely educational, but is designed to save lives by empowering developing nations to be self-sufficient in monitoring and forecasting eruptions. 

         In addition to the International Program, HVO and CSAV have had a formal Cooperative Agreement in place for more than two decades. This agreement allows USGS funds to hire technical support staff and UH-Hilo students who assist HVO in monitoring and research and to acquire scientific equipment used by both HVO and UH-Hilo earth scientists. This relationship has had many benefits for both USGS and UH. As an example, a number of UH-Hilo’s students and staff worked long hours during the 2018 eruption crisis to help alleviate the tremendous demands made on the HVO staff by that event. 

         The HVO-CSAV Cooperative Agreement also provides funding to augment HVO's public outreach efforts. A CSAV education specialist, funded by the agreement, visits BigIsland schools to talk to students about the volcano and other natural hazards on the island. 

         These school visits are extremely popular and feature hands-on demonstrations where children try on the field gear worn by volcanologists, make a miniature tsunami, and create their own "earthquake." This program also provides students with informational handouts to take home to their parents and help the entire family be better prepared for our natural hazard events.

         As with the threat to our community posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the key to successfully managing volcano hazards requires cooperation and work by many individuals and organizations, as well as awareness, preparedness, and adaptability by our entire community. Please keep informed, stay safe, and stay healthy.

         Learn more about CSAV at hilo.hawaii.edu/csav.

         Volcano Activity Updates

         Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL(https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

         Kīlauea monitoring data for the past month show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/
    summit_water_resources.html.
         Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption from the current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.

         This past week, about 62 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show continued slow summit inflation, consistent with ongoing magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

          There were four events with three or more felt reports in the Hawaiian islands during the past week: a magnitude-3.7 earthquake 25 km (16 mi) W of Kailua-Kona at 41 km (25 mi) depth on May 06, 2020 at 10:55 p.m., a magnitude-3.9 earthquake 18 km (11 mi) S of Hawaiian Ocean View at 35 km (22 mi) depth on May 05, 2020 at 03:22 p.m., a magnitude-3.1 earthquake 6 km (4 mi) ENE of Pāhala at 33 km (21 mi) depth on May 04, 2020 at 01:50 a.m., and a magnitude-3.2 earthquake 7 km (4 mi) ENE of Pāhala at 32 km (20 mi) depth on May 04, 2020 at 01:46 a.m.

         HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa.
         Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loaupdates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Coffee Festival tents filled with people enjoying Kaʻū Coffee, entertainment, and food, as well as learning more 
    about Kaʻū Coffee culture, at the 11th annual Kaʻū Coffee Festival. Photo by Peter Anderson

    Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
    Kaʻū Coffee farmers joined in a coffee picking contest at the 11th annual 
    Kaū Coffee festival, showing off sorting skills. Photo by Julia Neal

         Last year, the 11th annual Kaʻū Coffee Festival drew thousands of people to its Hoʻolauleʻa, the ninth day of activities that took participants from rainforest and ranches to food and coffee farms, a mill, historic home, and  Pāhala    Community center.           
         The Hoʻolauleʻa saw Kaʻū Coffee farmers and baristas show off their top coffees. The event also supported the broader community with fundraisers for organizations and entertainment for all.
         Many businesses, Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority and other government agencies, and the Edmund C. Olson Trust, supported the event. The Kaʻū Coffee Farmers Cooperative and community group ʻO Kaʻū Kākou provided volunteers to stage it.
    Annabelle Orcino gasping for joy, surrounded by friends and family. 
    She took home the $1,000 check from Kaʻū Coffee Fest's 
    Buy Local, It Matters campaign last year. Photo by Lora Botanova

         Volunteer organizers included Chris Manfredi, President of Hawaiʻi Coffee Association, Brenda Iokepa Moses, now with the USDA; Julia Neal, of Pāhala Plantation Cottages and The Kaʻū Calendar; Gloria Camba, President of Kaʻū Coffee Growers Cooperative; Maria Miranda, of Miranda's Farms and Coffee Shop; Miss Kaʻū Coffee Pageant Director Trini Marques; and many more.
         Visitors and local coffee enthusiasts were cooled by a brisk wind, but the sun remained shining for the all-day event. The festival recovered from slightly lower attendance in 2018, during the Kīlauea Volcano lava flow and earthquakes disaster. The day before the 2018 Hoʻolauleʻa, a 6.9 magnitude earthquake shook the region and the annual Kaʻū Coffee & Cattle Day at Aikane Plantation.

    Kimo sings with Braddah Ben, center, whose wife of 30 years offers hula, 
    at last year's Kaʻū Coffee Festival Hoʻolauleʻa. Photo by Julia Neal

         In 2019, the Hoʻolauleʻa drew the maximum number of participants, who offered tastings and sold their Kaʻū Coffee, teas, honey, crafts, and ready to eat foods. The number of sponsors grew and the community showed its resilience with the many volunteers who represented educational, health, sports, culinary, and environmental groups, ready to help with life in Kaʻū.
         Entertainment included a welcome home for Gene and Bula Akamu, who brought their hālau with them from Kona. The Akamu family was one of the leading musical families of Kaʻū for generations. After the sugar plantation shut down, where Gene Akamu worked until 1996, the family moved to Kona for work opportunities.

    Coffee drinks and mac nuts enjoyed by local residents at the Kaʻū Coffee 
    Fest Hoʻolauleʻa last year. Shane Augustine, right, is a mac nut machinery 

    mechanic. Ed Olson, far left, owns thousands of acres of macadamia and 
    coffee in Kaʻū, and is a major sponsor of the festival. Photo by Julia Neal
         Son Bula Akamu continued with the music tradition he learned in Kaʻū. He attended Berkeley College of Music in Boston, where he studied music education and earned a masters degree in guitar. He became a Hawaiian music teacher in the public schools on this island. The Akamu family became known for Hawaiian weddings and performances in Kona, and for original songs and recordings. See bulamusic.com for more.

         The land of this district that supports Kaʻū Coffee farmers and nature was celebrated by musician Bolo, who sang a song composed at an earlier Kaʻū Coffee Fest songwriting workshop with Daniel Ho. Written about the mystical mountain of Kaiholena, which rises above the coffee farms and ranches, its lyrics include:

    Last year, Bolo performed the song 
    Kaiholena, written at an earlier Kaʻū 
    Coffee Fest music workshop. 
    Photo by Geneveve Fyvie

         As I walk through the valley on my ancestors' feet.

         Memories entwined with desired eyes.
         Kaiholena, Kaiholena.
         Gold pushing through green misty skies.

         ʻUa falling on watchful eyes,
         Kaiholena, Kaiholena.
         Voices from the past, visions that will last in Kaʻū.

         Mana of the land, coming from the hand of Akua - Kaʻū.
         Also participating in Kaʻū Coffee Fest were conservation and stewardship groups that care for lands conserved along the Kaʻū Coast and other special places.
         Keoni Fox represented the Ala Kahakai Trail Association. Chris Reid represented Hoʻomalu Kaʻū, which manages the makahiki grounds. Wendy Vance and Leilani Rodrugues represented the Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. They all shared their conservation efforts with presentations and education for the public.

         Buy Local, It Matters is a leading theme of the Kaʻū Coffee Fest, which offered many locally grown, prepared, and crafted items for sale at last year's Hoʻūolauleʻa. The campaign encourages people to buy locally to support the Kaʻū community. The person who comes up with the most business cards and receipts from participating area businesses, wins a prize. Last year, $1,000 went to Annabelle Orcino, whose family plants, tends, and sells Kaʻū Coffee.
    Volunteers are the backbone of the Kaʻū Coffee Fest. Photo from the Kaʻū Coffee Festival

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.


    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.



    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







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    Vehicles parked at Volcano Golf Course & County Club, where local residents played, and practiced
    putting and hitting, on Mother's Day. The Japanese golf course operators of nearly four decades departed last week.
    Photo by Julia Neal

    VOLCANO GOLF COURSE & COUNTRY CLUB drew a slew of golfers on Saturday and Sunday, following the departure of the operators of the 18 holes and fairways on Kamehameha School lands.
    Children accompanied by parents practiced putting on greens until other groups of players headed their way. Golfers played the entire course, carrying golf club bags or rolling them on wheels, with no golf carts seen.
    Learning golf from an adult on the Volcano
    course on Mother's Day. Photo by Julia Neal
          The golf course, which opened in 1921, designed by Jack Snyder, was operated by a Tachibana entity beginning in 1982. Everyone knew its female manager, Sunai. Years ago, its clubhouse was full of diners, delivered by tour buses, vans, and rental cars, with locals eating there, too. Its restaurant and bar were the scene of many local events, from wedding parties to club meetings. The golf club hired many local people to take care of the greens, carts, and overall operations. They also hired chefs, cooks, waiters, and cleanup crews.
         Many people live along the fairways of Volcano Golf Course and pay to be members of the Volcano Golf Course & Country Club.
         In another situation where a golf course with homes around it closed in Kaʻū, Discovery Harbour residents took it upon themselves to do as much of the golf course grooming as they are able. They make contributions to hire professionals to mow large swaths. Some living on the edge of the golf course mow sections behind their own homes. Expenses include fuel to run landscaping equipment.
         For Volcano Golf Course & Country Club, Kamehameha Schools plans to determine the best use of the land and perhaps solicit ideas from the broader community, residents of the area, and potential investors or non-profits, to operate the restaurant and golf course designed by Jack Snyder.
          The 156-acre parcel features an 18 hole, par 72, 6,547-yard course. Golfing websites describe it as "one of the world's most unusual courses" due to its proximity to Kīlauea Volcano and its views of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes. The course is lauded on several sites as being "peacefuloffering ample time for concentration," and as "a truly enjoyable game of golf for players of all abilities."
    A family plays together at Volcano Golf Course & County Club on Mothers Day. Photo by Julia Neal
         The mostly flat course has some rolling hills "which can cause uneven lies," according to hawaiiteetimes.com. Most tees and some greens are elevated. The back nine offers "several marvelous holes with one of Hawaii's best par-5's at the 17th Hole," states golfcourseranking.com. "Some say the most difficult hole on the course is #15, a 425-yard, par 4, requiring a tee shot up a dogleg fairway with tall pines guarding the turn. This is a par 72 course that plays to 6,547 yards from the blue tees, 6,190 yards from the whites and 5,567 yards from the red tee boxes."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    WEARING FACE MASKS AT COUNTY RECYCLING & TRANSFER stations is required. County of Hawaiʻi reminded residents in a statement today that also announced reopening Reuse Centers this Wednesday, May 13 and HI-5 Certified Redemption Centers around the island on Saturday, May 23.
    In addition to wearing face masks, social distancing of six feet is required.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    OKK Provides Food to the Needy in Pāhala
    The nonprofit community group ʻO Kaʻū Kākou gave out hamburger patties, fresh, onions, rice, and saimin today behind
    Bank of Hawaiʻi in Pāhala. OKK provided beverage cartons of frozen raw eggs to large families. Photo by Julia Neal

    AN OPINION ON OPENING UP TOURISM comes from Hawaiʻi Island resident Bob Johnson. It was posted on Monday's The Kaʻū Calendar Facebook:
         "I do not think I am the only one on this Island that has an abundance of common sense, but I fear that our political system is devoid of this most essential asset. Somewhere economics 101 should have been in our elected officials schooling?
         "If 80 percent of our money is derived from tourism, why are we not focusing on getting testing at all departure gates to the islands? It makes no sense to open anything that is not directly related to this. Drop the 14-day quarantine now and just test at the airports. Those that pass can fly and those that do not stay home until they do. Very simple.
    At Home, Praising the Frontliners
    At Home, Praising the Frontliners Nancy Kaneshiro, whose daughter and her family,
    with "three beautiful granddaughters," sent this image from the eldest girl.
    The young lady designed and made the poster to show appreciation to the
    frontliners in Kaʻū. They include Kuahiwi Ranch, where her dad and mom
    work. Kaneshiro reports that "grandchildren and parents are busy,
    with work and at home being creative, during this
    time of isolation." Image from Nancy Kaneshiro

         "I read all about the soft opening of shops around the Big Island, but who will want to open with no one to spend money. Last time I checked, the Big Island was not a very wealthy populace and in no way able to support the shops that have been cleared to open. Who in their right mind is going to open up their shop and just stand around looking stupid? If you're on commission you will starve and if you are getting a wage the shopkeeper will go broke, even with the government sending money.
         "The little money in the hands of the local population will be going to feed their families, not buying trinkets in our local shops. Please wake up before there are serious protests in the streets. Believe me when I say that there will be protests as many are being planned as I type this letter.
         "The people will not continue to stand idle while their lives are being destroyed. I hope Mr. (Mayor Harry) Kim at his advanced age can untether himself from Mr. (Gov. David) Ige's lack of intestinal fortitude and in the process show why he is still relevant as a prospective Mayor in the upcoming election."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND were reported today, but two travel-related victims were reported on Oʻahu. An announcement from the governor's office sends out a warning:
    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
         "Don't Congregate, No Big-Groups, Masks in Public." During a Monday afternoon news briefing, Gov. David Ige again asked everyone to remain vigilant in order to stay on the right track. He commented, "We'll lose all of our progress and the sacrifices you've all made if we see a surge in COVID-19 cases. All of your work will have been meaningless."
         Hawaiʻi has reported fewer than three new cases each of the past four days, with no new cases reported last Friday. The governor said we have flattened the curve, but the state has received numerous reports of people not following social distancing guidelines and not wearing masks while in close proximity to other people, said the governor's announcement.
         Though there are two new cases on Oʻahu today, no deaths were reported since Sunday, May 3; the state death toll is 17 since the pandemic began.

         On Hawaiʻi Island, of 75 COVID-19 victims, 74 are free from isolation. The one remaining victim is in quarantine at home, monitored by DOH. Only one person stayed in a hospital overnight, and no one died here. Only one case in Kaʻū, in the 96773 zip code, is reported since January.

         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno thanks Hawaiʻi Food Basket, Hawaiʻi National Guard, and the County Task Force for helping with a food distribution at Kahuku Park, in Ocean View today.
         Magno said, "These are very good numbers for Hawaiʻi Island and Hawaiʻi State, so much gratitude to the health care family for their guidance, hard work, and care. So proud of Hawaiʻi State, being the number one in the nation of testing per capita, and in the top three states of having the lowest active cases identified. These numbers reinforce the importance of following the policies of prevention. We need to continue and get better to keep Hawaiʻi Safe and stop this virus from affecting the beautiful lifestyle of Hawaiʻi.   

    Thank you very much for listening, have a safe day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

         In the United States, more than 1.38 million cases have been confirmed. The number of confirmed recoveries is about 219,000. The death toll is over 81,289.
         Worldwide, more than 4.17 million COVID-19 cases have been reported. More than 1.45 million recoveries have been reported. The death toll reported is over 285,000. 


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    HAWAIʻI COUNTY WILL RECEIVE NEARLY ONE MILLION DOLLARS in additional funding to deal with the pandemic. Sen. Mazie Hirono announced Monday that the state will receive more than $5 million in supplemental Community Development Block Grants coronavirus response funding to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the coronavirus. This is the second disbursement of CDBG-CV funds from the CARES Act, the third coronavirus relief package Congress passed.
           In addition to Hawaiʻi County receiving  $975,815, Kauaʻi County will receive $261,137, Maui County  $698,280, and the City and County of Honolulu $3,081,677. 
           Funds are intended to target public health, coronavirus, and housing and economic disruption needs, which could include constructing testing, diagnosis, or treatment facilities; supporting new businesses or business expansion to create jobs while responding to infectious disease; and expanding microenterprises that address specific needs during quarantine related to medical, food delivery, cleaning, and other essential assistance.
        The counties are using the first tranche of CDBG-CV funding to prepare and deliver meals, replenish food bank shelves, provide rental and mortgage assistance, and increase access to transitional housing for those experiencing homelessness.
         “The pandemic has exposed the deep divisions and inequality that are present in our nation. This funding will help our state with flexible resources so each county can appropriately address the needs of particularly vulnerable populations. Hawaii, and the nation, will continue to need assistance as we grapple with COVID-19, and I will continue to support funding to address the changing needs of Hawaii residents during the pandemic,” Senator Hirono said.
    An HVO field engineer guides the helicopter as it lowers
    part of the MultiGAS station down onto the floor
    of 
    Moku‘āweoweo caldera. USGS photo by T. Elias
         Last month, Hirono announced that Hawaii received $12 million in Department of Housing and Urban Development grants, including nearly $8 million in Community Development Block Grant coronavirus response funds.

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    INCREASED MONITORING OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AT MAUNA LOA is aided by the recent installation of a MultiGAS station.  It measures gases from within Moku‘āweoweo – Mauna Loa's summit caldera. The new station will transmit information to Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory.
         The MultiGAS station measures real-time volcanic gas concentrations – such as carbon dioxide, water, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide – from a fumarole (gas vent) on the floor of the caldera. Ratios of concentrations of gases can give information about the depth and degassing history of magma within the volcano. The MultiGAS station also measures fumarole temperature and meteorological parameters such as wind speed and direction, temperature and humidity, and atmospheric pressure.

    An HVO gas geochemist assembles components of the
    MultiGAS instrument, which is connected to the power
    unit on the left via weather-proof wiring.
    USGS photo by F. Younger
         The new equipment components are housed in a weather-proof case to protect from extreme conditions at Mauna Loa's summit. At an elevation of 13,681 feet, wind, precipitation, and temperature can damage equipment. The station includes a power package of solar panels and batteries, and an antenna that transmits data to HVO around the clock.
         The installation was performed April 27, with HVO field staff observing social distancing.
         Mauna Loa is at Alert Level/Color Code ADVISORY/YELLOW. This change in status went into effect on July 2, 2019, reflecting an increase in seismicity and summit inflation above background levels. Mauna Loa is not currently erupting, and the network of webcams helps HVO to keep a watchful eye.
         See updates about HVO's work monitoring Mauna Loa at volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/mauna_loa_multimedia_15.html.

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    HONORING FALLEN POLICE OFFICERS TODAY while practicing social distancing, Hawaiʻi Police Chief Paul Ferreira lea the annual kickoff ceremony for National Police Week on Facebook Live. The field in front of the memorial for the fallen, which reads Ka Malu Aloha – Peace – is usually crowded for events with attendees from the public. Today, it was sparsely populated by officers in dress uniforms, standing at least six feet apart. Members of the special response team fired a 21-gun salute, followed by the playing of Taps.

    Photos of the fallen, in front of the memorial at Hilo Police
    Station today. Photo from HPD
         Police Chaplain Renee Godoy gave the invocation. "Jesus said, 'Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.' They displayed the ultimate love… we honor them today." She said it was fitting that Police Week begins by honoring those who sacrificed their lives.  

         During his speech, Ferreira honored officers who fell in the line of duty in Hawaiʻi County, from the 1918 death of Officer Manuel Cadinha, Officer William "Red" Oili in 1936; Officer Ronald "Shige" Jitchaku in 1990; Officer Kenneth Keliʻipio in 1997; Park Ranger Steve Makuakane-Jarrell in 1999, and the most recent loss, Officer Bronson Kaimana Kaliloa, who was killed by gunshot on July 18, 2018.
         Police Week is a nationally recognized week of activities in support of police work. In 1962, President John F. Kennedy proclaimed every May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day; this year, it falls at the end of National Police Week.
    Mia Wheeler and her ʻohana take math and art to 
    another level by using shapes and paint to create a stained 
    glass window project. Photo from the Wheeler family

         Watch the cast at facebook.com/watch/live/?v=2494827330829579.

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    NĀʻĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS STAY CONNECTED WITH STUDENTS using technology like video conferencing, applications, email, text, and telephone calls.
         Principal Darlene Javar and Vice-Principal Christina Juan make home visits to students unreachable by phone, in an effort to ensure their wellbeing and that they have what they need to learn online.
         Second-grade teacher, Janice McRoberts, exemplifies teachers, educational assistants, and staff offering tutoring and classes to as many students as possible, through personal learning via Google classroom, virtual lessons, and phone calls.


    Second-grader Mia Wheeler, dressed up as a bullfrog, 
    acts out the story Hiding in the Pond, as part of her 
    language arts lessons. Wheeler's mom shares the 
    pictures with Mia's teacher, Janice McRoberts, who 
    tutors her over the phone. Photo from the Wheeler family

              McRoberts calls second-grader Mia Wheeler a couple of times a week for one-on-one tutoring, and receives picture updates from the Wheelers via text. Mia's ʻohana is taking advantage of learning time together at home by engaging in crafts, and enhancing lessons by incorporating fun, drama, and art into assignments.


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    GRANTS FOR VOCATIONAL AND HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENTS pursuing degrees or certificates in organic agriculture are offered by California Certified Organic Farmers Foundation. Eligible students from Kaʻū and across the U.S. can apply for an award of up to $2,500 from the Future Organic Farmer Grant program. The application period closes on Monday, June 1. The funds can be used to help with tuition and educational expenses. Prior grantees are welcome to re-apply. Graduate studies are not eligible for grant funding. Applicants' financial need is considered as part of the grant decision process. Refer to the program website for eligibility criteria and to apply. Contact ccoffoundation@ccof.org or 831-423-2263 with questions.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.


    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.



    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
         Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
         Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

         Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
         Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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    0 0

    A swarm of earthquakes at Lō‘ihi and around Pahala, recorded by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Photo by USGS

    LŌʻIHI SEAMOUNT & PĀHALA EARTHQUAKES SHOOK EAST KAʻŪ AND THE OFFSHORE SEABED yesterday and this morning. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is recording an ongoing swarm of more than 100 earthquakes about 22 miles southeast of Pāhala at the 10,000-foot tall underwater volcano. Some offshore quakes registered as high as 3.9 magnitude  Monday evening. On land, smaller earthquakes created bumps in the night and day around Pāhala. The temblors drew a surge of email alerts from USGS.

         Tina Neal, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge,toldBigIslandVideo News that the offshore quakes do not confirm an eruption and pose little threat to Kaʻū though small tidal waves could lap onto the shore. 

         Lō‘ihi is an active Hawaiian submarine volcano, much like those that rose above the ocean to form the Hawaiian Islands millions of years ago. The summit of Lōʻihi reaches about 3,000 feet below the Pacific's surface. Scientists first recorded its earthquake activity in 1952.
         The most energetic Lōʻihi swarm of quakes rocked the underwater world July through August 1996. More than 4,000 earthquakes, with 95 of them magnitude-4.0 to 4.9 and  300 larger than magnitude 3 helped HVO confirm an eruption with Lōʻihi lava flowing underwater.

    The Iron Eaters of Lō‘ihi Seamount mapped Lō‘ihi in 2014.
         After the eruption, USGS and University of Hawaii's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology ran an underwater cable from the Honu`apo shoreline to its Hawai`i Undersea Goe-Observatory on Lō‘ihi's summit. During the five year mission, University of Hawai`i and USGS staff and students collected data remotely from  a seismometer, hydrophone, and a pressure sensor. The 47-kilometer-long fiber optic cable from Honu`apo to Lō‘ihi sent power to the Hawai`i Undersea Goe-Observatory and retrieved its data. It operated from 1998 to 2002 when funding lapsed.
        With the underwater cable retired, real-time information about Lō‘ihi came from land-based seismometers. 
         More data on Lō‘ihi arrived In 2014, when University of Hawaiʻi-Manoa, University of Minnesota, IFREMER Centre de Brest, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute mapped Lōʻihi and collected samples. The project called The Iron Eaters of Lōʻihi Seamount was based on Woods Hole Oceanographic's research vessel Falkor with its Sentry autonomous underwater vehicle.
         Scientists collected water samples to better understand delivery and dispersion of hydrothermal fluids from Lō‘ihi and water chemistry related to hydrothermal plumes, and to study bacteria oxidizing iron from hydrothermal fluids and seafloor rocks. See Falkor ship's log with video and photographs of the expedition to Lō‘ihi in 2014.
    The crew launches the autonomous Sentry with a Hawaiian
    flower painted on her side on the way to explore the underwater
    seamount Lō‘ihi. Photo from Woods Hole Oceanic Institute
         Another research vessel arrived off Ka`u in 2018. NOAA's Nautilus floated on the surface above Lō‘ihi while robotic submersibles Hercules and Argusdescended to explore the seamount. Scientists with Systematic Underwater Biogeochemical Science and Exploration Analog examined microbial life on Lōʻihi. One of their goals is to help prepare for human and robotic voyages to Mars and beyond. Check out the Nautilus expedition in 2018.
        See updates on the Lō‘ihi earthquakes and Pāhala swarms.

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    NO IMMEDIATE NEED TO CUT PAY OR ISSUE FURLOUGHS for state workers, said Gov. David Ige today. He earlier warned that state workers, including public school teachers, might have to weather up to 20 percent in pay reductions. He said on Tuesday than other ways to pay for the pandemic and recovery would be found.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Social distancing spreads out House of Representatives members in their Chamber this week at the Capitol, as
    the Hawaiʻi  Legislature reconvenes. Photo from House of Representative
    OPENING THE ECONOMY AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, while adhering to health and safety guidelines, became the challenge when the state House of Representatives reconvened on Monday.
    The House Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness presented its COVID-19 Community-Based Risk Model.
         Carl Bonham, Executive Director of University of Hawaiʻi Economic Research Organization, said
    one important reason to reopen the local and tourism economies quickly is the negative effect of a closed economy on high school and college graduates entering the workforce. Bonham said that during the recession of the early 2000s, young people suffered because good jobs were very hard to find. He said the same could happen to new graduates, negatively affecting their earning potential for the rest of their lives.
         Major General Kenneth Hara, Director of the Hawaiʻi Emergency Management Agency, told the committee that the risk model provides a flexible guides, allowing policymakers to explore risk options,  from high risk coded red, to no risk coded blue, with the projects results in health and the economy. Hara said that
    Hawaiʻi's leaders will ultimately decide when to take a risk to move forward to reopen the economy. even if it means pushing the limits of the capacity of the state's healthcare system. Conversely, Hara said, if the economy doesn't reopen soon, there is a risk of civil unrest. Gov. David Ige said later that he does not expect civil unrest.
         Hara asked for House Speaker Scott Saiki to help to come to a consensus to plan the state's movement from one risk level to the next. Chris Tatum, President and CEO of the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority, said if the economy does not move toward recovery by the end of June, he would be concerned about the challenge of laid-off workers providing health care for themselves and their families, once unemployment insurance funds run out.
       Deborah Zysman, Executive Director of the Hawaiʻi Children's Action Network, gave a report to the committee on COVID-19 impacts on Hawaiʻi's child care sector. Zysman said child care was in crisis before the pandemic hit and that there is no economic recovery without child care. Zysman said parents cannot return to work without somewhere to take their children. With 70 percent of child care facilities now closed and the reopening of public schools uncertain, economic recovery will be impossible, she said. The report details child care needs and economic impacts, CARE Act funding requests, and short- and long-term recommendations to solve the problem.
         The House Speaker asked House Majority Leader Della Au Belatti to work with Representative Linda Ichiyama, of Department of Human Services, and child care providers to refine recommendations for next week's briefing.
         See  more information about the committee and related documents.

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    ADDITIONAL SNAP BENEFITS are approved by the Department of Human Services. Those enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program will receive three months of maximum benefits, based on household size, regardless of income. Households that already receive the maximum benefit will not receive more.
         There is no action needed to receive these additional payments. Emergency supplements will be automatically issued to the SNAP household's EBT card. See the maximum benefit chart.


    Wax flowers are banned from importation to Hawaiʻi as they bring
    a fungus that damages ʻōhiʻa and other native plants.
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    PROTECTING ʻŌHIʻA AND OTHER NATIVE PLANTS FROM NEW FUNGUS STRAINS, and other pests and diseases, is the goal of a ban on importing plants in the myrtle family, which are commonly used in floral arrangements. Last week, Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture and Gov. David Ige amended a Hawaiʻi Administrative Rule to prohibit importing Myrtaceae.


          Phyllis Shimabukuro-Geiser, chair of the Hawaiʻi Board of Agriculture, said, "The department realizes that this new rule has a considerable impact on some in the floral industry and we have tried
    to give the industry as much lead time as possible to find alternatives to importing these particular plants. We hope the industry will see an opportunity to grow and source flowers and foliage from within the state to help decrease the risk of importing other plant pests and pathogens."
    Importing bottle brush is now banned in Hawaiʻi
         The primary threat is a fungus, Puccinia (Austropuccinia) psidii, commonly known as ʻōhiʻa rust or guava rust."] The fungus affects plants in the Myrtaceae family, including guava, eucalyptus, and ʻōhiʻa. Commonly imported plants that will be banned include: wax flower, myrtle, bottle brush, allspice, and clove. The plants are often used in floral, nursery, landscaping, and food industries. The rule doesn't ban plants already in the state. Processed allspice and cloves are unaffected.

         Dept. of Ag's Plant Quarantine Branch is authorized to prohibit the introduction of any Myrtaceae plant, plant part, or seed into Hawaiʻi, except dried, non-living plant materials; seeds, with no other plant fragments, that have been surface sterilized using a treatment approved by the PQB chief; tissue cultured plants grown in sterile media and in a completely enclosed sterile glass flask or other similar container; or by approved permit.
    Importing myrtle, popoular in floral design, is
    banned in Hawaiʻiand Dept. of Ag urges use of
    locally grown plants for arrangements.
         A Dept. of Ag statement said shipments may be "delayed, quarantined, destroyed, or returned to place of origin at the expense of the owner or importer," if they do not meet these new rules.    
         See the full list of plants in the Myrtaceae family. 


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    AGRICULTURAL BUSINESSES ARE URGED TO APPLY for Economic Injury Disaster Loans, says a message from Andrea Kawabata, a University of Hawaiʻi Agricultural Extension Agent who works with many Kaʻū Farmers. She sent another message out today, reminding farmers that Small Business Administration's Economic Injury Disaster Loan applications can provide relief to agricultural businesses, at up to $10,000 per business, which will not have to be repaid.
         Submit an application here. Review a webinar on applying for the loan and reference a tutorial video that walks through the application process, step by step. Questions about this application or problems providing the required information? Contact the SBA Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 or TTY: 1-800-877-8339, or email DisasterCustomerService@sba.gov.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    APPLY FOR PRESCHOOL OPEN DOORS  by Friday, May 15. The extended deadline is to allow families in need of affordable preschool for the 2020-2021 school year extra time to apply for the program.
         Department of Human Services Director Pankaj Bhanot said, "During these challenging times, we will continue to serve our State with aloha. Together, we honor our commitment to supporting our collective community; individuals and families from keiki to kūpuna."
         To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2021-2022 DOE school year (born between August 1, 2015 and July 31, 2016). If awarded a subsidy, families may use any one of the 426 state-licensed preschools. DHS also gives priority to underserved or at-risk children. Learn more and apply.


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    FREE DRIVE-THRU COVID-19 SCREENING will be held at Nāʻālehu Community Center tomorrow, Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group, and Pathways Telehealth.
       Bypass the screening queue by calling ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms. Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported for Hawaiʻi Island Tuesday. There are also no active cases on the island. Of 75 cases confirmed on this island since the pandemic began, all 75 recovered. There were no deaths on Hawai`i Island. Only one case was confirmed in Ka`u, the victim, now recovered, from the 96772 zip code.
         Mayor Harry Kim read the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense:  "Boy, that does sound good, leaving no active case on the Island of Hawaiʻi. Again, an active case means one that has been tested and verified having the coronavirus by the Department of Health. The first active case reported for the Island of Hawaiʻi was back on March 16th.
         "These numbers today reinforces the importance of and success of following the policies of distancing, gatherings, cleanliness, face coverings, staying home if sick, and keeping yourself physical and emotionally healthy. The virus is still out there, and we need to continue to get better following the preventive policies of spreading this virus Acknowledgement and a huge Mahalo to all for helping to keep Hawaii safe.Thank you for listening, very, very beautiful day to you."\

         Statewide, one new case was reported today by DOH, on Oʻahu, bringing the state's case count to 635. The victim is a traveler who came here and was tested. The state death toll remains The number of people recovered and released from isolation is 632.



    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state or traveling interisland. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.


    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.



    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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    While Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is closed, its staff and USGS Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory
     are asking the public to weigh in on its future by June. Photo by Julia Neal
    See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

    PUBLIC INPUT FOR THE DISASTER RECOVERY PROJECT AT HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK is sought by the Park and the U.S. Geological Survey. A joint statement issued today says they seek, "community input to consider and refine four initial design concepts for the proposed HAVO Disaster Recovery Project via a virtual civic engagement process."
         The intent of the project is to repair and/or replace critical park infrastructure and USGS-operated facilities and equipment, damaged during the 2018 eruption and summit collapse of Kīlauea volcano. The project also includes plans for the potential future use of the Uēkahuna Bluff area, a site considered sacred to many Native Hawaiians and other groups.
    The public is invited to be involved in planning for the future of
    Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park as it remains closed due to
    Covid-19. Photo by Julia Neal
         Beginning in May 2018, the Park and Kīlauea summit underwent a major change as magma drained from the chamber beneath Halema‘uma‘u Crater, and the caldera began to collapse, triggering 60,000 strong earthquakes and clouds of rock and ash that continued until early August.
         The seismic activity was primarily centered near the crater, and significantly impacted buildings in the immediate vicinity on Uēkahuna Bluff, including Jaggar Museum and the USGS-operated Reginald T. Okamura facility and equipment, resulting in the closure of the area. The 2018 eruption and caldera collapse were the most destructive eruptive events in Hawai‘i in the last two centuries.
         The results of an initial post-disaster assessment conducted in October 2018 found that significant investment would be necessary to make Jaggar Museum and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory-operated Reginald
    Rhonda Loh, Acting Superintendent
    of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
    NPS photo
    T. Okamura building safe to occupy and operational. Most importantly, the buildings are surrounded by fault lines and the area continues to subside on the crater side, undermining slope stability at the existing terraces and building foundations.
         In addition, the project presents solutions to overcrowding at Kīlauea Visitor Center, ranging from renovation to rebuilding the facility elsewhere in the Park.
         The Park is closed during the pandemic, but during normal times when it is open to the public, "The existing KVC building is inadequate for current visitation due to its small size, and the closure of Jaggar Museum has exacerbated the overcrowding of KVC by concentrating all visitor contact in one location," says the statement from the Park and USGS.
         Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Acting Superintendent Rhonda Loh said, "Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park belongs to everyone, and to our future generations. We need to hear from our community and stakeholders about what they envision for their mo‘opuna - their grandchildren - and the generations that will follow."
         USGS HHVO Scientist-in-Charge, Tina Neal said, "The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is looking forward to a new field station inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. A facility in the summit region is vital for our volcano monitoring and research programs that support Park management and public safety in Hawai‘i."
         To slow the spread of COVID-19, the Park will conduct the civic engagement online in lieu of public meetings.
    USGS Scientists in Charge Tina Neal
    USGS photo
         To view and comment on the four design concepts and summaries, visit parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectId=92891. To be mailed the design concepts, or to receive answers to questions, call (808) 460-6212, or email havo_planning@nps.gov. The comment period will end June 15. Following this period, the National Park Service will use community feedback received to determine which concept, or modified concept, will be the proposed concept. NPS will evaluate the impacts of any proposed alternative.
         The statement from the Park and USGS says, "During this process, if it is safe to do so, the Park hopes to hold in-person meetings with the community. The NPS and USGS encourage civic engagement throughout the process. Public input early in the process is important. The park is currently in the preliminary planning phase of this project, and invites all interested members of the community to voice your ideas, comments, or concerns regarding this effort."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    CAN HAWAIʻI IMPOSE AND ENFORCE COVID-19 PREVENTION PUBLIC HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR PEOPLE TO FLY HERE? Congressman Ed Case today called on the Federal Aviation Administration to clarify. Case's letter to FAA Administrator Steve Dickson asks  for the FAA's "cooperation in confirming Hawai‘i's ability to impose and enforce conditions on air travel to Hawai‘i, which are critical to ensuring the health of Hawai‘i's residents and visitors, and the safe recovery of Hawai‘i's economy and in particular our travel and tourism industry."
         Case wrote, "This could include requiring testing of all intended passengers (including crew) on any direct air travel to Hawai‘i before boarding. Such testing could include at least fever testing and, as available, on-site rapid COVID-19 testing, as now required by international airlines such as Emirates on some flights."
         Case said the airline would enforce the conditions to accept any intended passenger on any direct flight to Hawai‘i, and any airline "would be required to deny boarding to any intended passenger with a fever which, under Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, indicates potential COVID-19 infection or who tests positive."
         He noted that State of Hawai‘i imposed the 14-day incoming quarantine requirement, in large part, because it understood from the FAA that imposition of such pre-board conditions was not authorized by existing statutes and regulations, and would jeopardize federal funding. He also said that he understands that FAA focuses on safe and efficient use of the nation's airspace (with safety not generally including protection of general ground populations from COVID-19). He said, "protection of the general public health in addition to air-related risks is not within FAA's mandate." He wrote that "absent superseding authority in other federal agencies such as the CDC, the FAA is unwilling or unable to authorize the State of Hawai‘i to impose reasonable public health-related restrictions on travelers as a condition of travel to Hawai‘i."
         Case urged the FAA Administrator to "revisit these issues and assist me, the State of Hawai‘i, the people I represent, the visitors to Hawai‘i, and the destinations to which they will return, in finding a solution allowing the State of Hawai‘i to impose reasonable public health pre-board conditions on intended passengers to Hawai‘i." He asked that, if necessary, the FAA help him to propose statutory amendments that would provide FAA with the necessary authority.
         "I ask that you do so on an emergency basis, considering the continued public health threat to Hawai‘i from our inability to impose and enforce effective mitigation requirements. But I also ask that you do so because these questions will have to be answered and the necessary changes will have to be made for Hawai‘i to reopen to any great extent to air travel. Simply put, if passengers do not feel safe coming to Hawai‘i because they fear contracting COVID-19 on the flight or in Hawai‘i, or if Hawai‘i residents do not feel safe with passengers getting off planes in Hawai‘i, air travel to Hawai‘i will not recover, leading to many consequences to include FAA and airport-supportive revenues."
    The moringa giveaway at OKK Market in Nāʻālehu today came with
    education from Ed  Rau.He promotes growing the trees for high nutrition
    value food,courtesyof hisSustainable Bioresources, based in Discovery
     Harbour. Photo by Yvette Slack
         The letter concludes: "Considering the urgency of protecting Hawai‘i's current and future public health, I ask for your specific response by no later than Wednesday, May 20th. I stand ready, together with the State of Hawai‘i and other interested parties both in Hawai‘i and nationally, to work with you on fashioning an effective solution to this critical matter."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MORINGA, A HIGHLY NUTRITIOUS, HARDY TREE, propagated to help those in need of food throughout the world, made its way into the ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Market in Nā‘ālehu on Wednesday. Propagator and researcher of food plants, Ed Rau, founder of Sustainable Bioresources, LLC in Discovery Harbour, set up a booth and gave young, potted trees away.
         Food from the moringa comes from its deep green leaves, tubers, and very young seed pods. It is familiar in Filipino gardens and cuisine as malunggay. The new leaves can be eaten raw in salads, and cooked in soups and stews. The young seedpods can be cooked and eaten before they become large and fibrous. The tubers are also known for their nutrition and for cooking.
    The young pods of moringa, locally called malunggay, offer
    muchprotein, vitamins, and fiber, as do the leaves and
    tubers.Photo from sustainablebioresources.com
         Trees can grow tall and thin or be pruned to stay low, like coffee trees, to allow them to bush out with maximum leaf productivity. Rau says the flowers are edible and provide nectar for bees.
         Moringa is a member of the horseradish, drumstick, and bottle tree family. It is also known for its medicinal uses. Rau said, "Research and development of new products from moringa, establishing an International Moringa Seed Bank, and promotion of moringa as a major crop in Hawai‘i, have become the primary activities of our company." He said he will meet with anyone interested in moringa farming or placing moringa in family food gardens.
    Moringa plants flower year-round
    forfood and honey production in
    Haiti Photo from Sustainable 
    Bioresources.
         In places where there is famine, moringa has been planted and seeds distributed to grow food for the hungry. According to sustainablebioresources.com:
         "The leaves are the most nutritious part of the plant and are a significant source of vitamins, minerals, protein, and soluble dietary fiber. They can be eaten fresh, cooked as a vegetable, or dried and made into a powder for addition to soups, stews, bread, and other dishes. The powder is lightweight and easy to transport, does not require refrigeration, resists pest infestations, and retains much of its nutritional and medicinal properties in storage. These properties make it an ideal food supplement for use in programs to combat malnutrition, and iron and vitamin A deficiencies, in remote areas that have limited infrastructure and resources."
         Moringa farms, with beehives, can provide honey year-round, as the flowering of moringa is continuous in such tropical places as Haiti, Rau said.
         See sustainablebioresources.com or call Rau at 808-339-7325.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE ANNUAL HAWAI‘I COFFEE ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE IS POSTPONED. HCA President Chris Manfredi made the announcement today. The statewide event brought together HCA members, sponsors, coffee quality and tasting competitors, vendors, friends, and supporters.
    HCA Pres. Chris Manfredi
         "We regret to announce the HCA's 25th Annual Conference, Trade Show and Cupping Competition originally scheduled for July 30-August 1, 2020 will be postponed until a date to be determined. The recent developments surrounding the COVID 19 pandemic make planning and safely executing the event impractical at this time. We will continue to survey our members so that we may best address the needs of Hawai‘i's coffee industry."
         Visit hawaiicoffeeassoc.org for recent information. "We have been posting information to help you manage the recent crisis," said Manfredi.
         HCA is also planning a webinar to provide updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawai‘i coffee industry, and other topics. See the HCA website for webinar dates and schedules.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A KA‘Ū HOSPITAL NURSE DREW AN AWARD AND PRAISE through a Central Pacific Bank celebration of frontline workers during the pandemic. Jerelyn Hammer, RN, works in long term care. Here is the write up for the nomination:
         "I nominate Ajer Hammer, a ER/Long-Term-care nurse at Ka‘ū Hospital on the Big Island, a remote hospital with some of the hardest working CNA's and fellow RN's/LPN's.
    Nurses and staff receive Thai Thai Mahalo Meals to frontline
    workers courtesy of Central Pacific Bank and a winner for her
    work,Jerelynn Hammer, RN, at Kaʻū Hospital.
    Photo from Kaʻū Hospital
         "Most days, one RN is in charge of the entire ER, while another is in charge of the entire long term care, hustling after their shift is over, working through lunch breaks. She is my hero because she never ceases to amaze me with her compassion towards her patients and her co-workers. She always has time to help others. She and her co-workers are some of the kindest hospital staff you will ever be treated by. Thank you Ajer Hammer for all you do for your community."
         Central Pacific Bank rewarded Hammer with Mahalo Meals, from the restaurant of her choice. She chose Thai Thai in Volcano. The meals arrived on Monday, "a great way to begin celebrating Hospital Week. The food was sensational. We are so proud of Jerelyn and really appreciative of the recognition of our great nursing staff," said Ka‘ū Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE LŌʻIHI AND PĀHALA EARTHQUAKE SWARMS SLOWED DOWN on Tuesday and Wednesday. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued an overview:
         Beginning at about 3 a.m. May 11, and continuing through the morning of May 12, HVO detected more than 100 earthquakes beneath Lōʻihi, including 79 magnitude-2 and 19 magnitude-3 and above. This is a significant increase above long term background rates of fewer than three earthquakes per day at Lōʻihi, generally with magnitudes less than M2. The number of earthquakes peaked at 14 per hour between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Monday afternoon and decreased thereafter. Since the early morning hours of March 12, earthquake rates have been less than four per hour.
         The earthquake swarm is located beneath the southeast rift zone and southeastern flank of Lōʻihi at depths of 3.6 to 12.4 km (2.2 to 7.7 mi) below sea level or approximately 1 to 9.8 km (0.6 to 6 mi) below the volcano's surface.
         According to HVO, "This swarm may represent a brief magmatic intrusion or movement of magmatic fluids within the volcanic edifice. Although the swarm appears to have diminished in intensity, if earthquakes become shallower, it could lead to the beginning of a submarine eruption, similar to what occurred in 1996.
    Lōʻihi, the seamount, an underwater volcano, off the Kaʻū Coast. Images from University of Hawaiʻi
         "An eruption of Lōʻihi, if it were to occur, may cause partial draining of its summit magma chamber and summit collapse, as happened in 1996. Significant, sudden changes to the volcano's surface could displace large volumes of ocean water, which, if large enough, might generate very small local tsunami waves. Earthquakes of magnitude 4 and above could occur if the swarm were to intensify and these may be felt on the Island of Hawaiʻi.
         "If an eruption or stronger earthquakes occur, very small tsunami waves may affect southeast shores of the Island of Hawaiʻi. Relatively low-energy, steam- and gas-driven explosions can occur at the depth of Lōʻihi, but with limited local effects on the volcano and surrounding ocean water.
         There is no direct relationship between the current Lōʻihi swarm and the ongoing increased seismicity observed in Pāhala over the past year. The Lōʻihi swarm is ~35 km (21.7 mi) southeast of Pāhala, at significantly shallower depths. The current Lōʻihi swarm is also unrelated to seismicity observed on the south flank of Kīlauea."
         HVO provides its in-depth description of Lōʻihi: The seamount is an active volcano on the seafloor south of Kīlauea Volcano, about 30 km (19 miles) from the shoreline of the Island of Hawaiʻi. The top of the seamount is about 975 m (3,199 feet ) below sea level. The volcano consists of a broad summit area marked by three pit craters and two prominent rift zones extending from the summit about 22 km (13.6 mi) south-southeast and about 15 km (9.3 mi) north-northeast. The volcano likely has a shallow magma chamber between 1 to 2.5 km (0.6 to 1.6 mi) deep below the summit.
    The Nautilus SUBSEA program collects data from the underwater Lōʻihi volcano in 2018.
    Photo from Nautilus
         Earthquake activity has been recorded near Lōʻihi since 1952. Prior Lōʻihi earthquake swarms occurred in 1952, 1971–72, 1975, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1996, 2005, and 2017, and were characterized by hundreds to thousands of earthquakes occurring over weeks to months with magnitudes ranging up to M4.9.
         The largest earthquake detected at Lōʻihi was a M5.1 in May of 2005. Many of the 1952 Lōʻihi earthquakes were felt in coastal communities and one of the earthquakes generated a small tsunami that swept inland about 180 m (600 ft) at Kalapana; no damage was reported. The 1996 Lōʻihi earthquake swarm was one of the most intense earthquake swarms recorded by the HVO monitoring networks and is summarized below.
    Lōʻihi will probably be the next volcano to rise out of
    the ocean to form a new Hawaiian Island.
         For the six weeks commencing July 16, 1996, HVO recorded more than 4,000 earthquakes in the Lōʻihi area. Ninety-five of the earthquakes were between magnitude-4.0 and 4.9, and nearly 400 were stronger than M3. Most of the quakes occurred during the last half of July during three time periods, each lasting about two to five days and separated by less than one to four days. Subsequent undersea expeditions to the area discovered that the volcano's summit area had collapsed to form a new crater about 1,800 ft across and 900 ft deep. Hydrothermal vents were observed in the new crater, and evidence was found of newly erupted lava. For more information, see the University of Hawaiʻi, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, web site.
         HVO continues to closely monitor the earthquake activity in the Lōʻihi area and will issue further updates as needed. There are no monitoring instruments on Lōʻihi seamount, thus earthquake locations are not as accurate as those on the Island of Hawaiʻi. Significant changes in activity at Lōʻihi, Mauna Loa, and Kīlauea Volcanos will be reported through the USGS Volcano Notification System and the HVO website. They are in frequent communication with Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i County Civil Defense, to keep them apprised of the activity.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported for Hawaiʻi Island Tuesday. There are also no active cases on the island. Of 75 cases confirmed since the pandemic began, all 75 recovered. There were no deaths on Hawaiʻi Island. Only one case was confirmed in Kaʻū, the victim, now recovered, from the 96772 zip code. There have been no cases in Volcano.
         Today's message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says that the number of people tested on Hawaiʻi Island is about 5,100. Seventy-five tested positive and all 75 have been cleared as recovered by the Department of Health.
         "The health care organizations, to all of you, and the supporting agencies, a huge acknowledgment and thank you, for your good work of developing and continuing a comprehensive testing network for the safety of Hawaiʻi's people. Know that early testing means early detection and early care, and you are helping develop a comprehensive database of information for health care officials to know what is going on and to keep on top of things.
          "Remember, the good numbers today just reinforces the importance of following the policies of prevention. The virus threats still remain, and we need to get better and keep Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for listening, and how lucky we are to be here in Hawaiʻi. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."
    Civil Defense Director 
    Talmadge Magno.
    Photo from Big Island Video News
         Statewide, three new cases were reported today by DOH, all on Oʻahu, bringing the state's case count to 638. The state death toll remains  on Oʻahu and six on Maui.

         In the United States, more than 1.42 million cases are confirmed. The death toll is over 84,763.
         Worldwide, more than 4.34 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 297,108.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    WATCH THE 2020 PANAʻEWA STAMPEDE RODEO tomorrow and Saturday. The Cowboy Channel show Wild Rides will feature the competition, which features paniolo from Kaʻū, on Thursday, May 14 at and Saturday, May 16 at The Thursday showing includes Rider the Rodeo Clown / Performer and his wife. The Saturday showing will include JJ Harrison.
         The first show from Panaʻewa Stampede Rodeo was on last week, on RFD TV. The second show has been on two times on Wild Rides on the Cowboy Channel.


    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram
    and Twitter.
    See our Fresh Food on 
    The Kaʻū Calendar
    and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.


    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.



    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.





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    Nāʻālehu's Independence Day Parade for this year is canceled. Sponsored by ʻO Kaʻū Kākou and the Discovery Harbour
    family of Lee and Debra McIntosh, the program is paused during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    See more below. Photo by Leilani Esperanza

    A COVID-19 CONTACT TRACING PARTNERSHIP is bringing University of Hawaiʻi and the state Department of Health together. With funding of $2.5 million, they plan to train personnel and community health workers in contact tracing. Health experts say extensive contact tracing is a key component to prevent spread of the virus while relaxing stay-at-home-orders and restarting Hawaiʻi's economy.
         At the peak of the first COVID-19 wave, DOH trained more than 100 contact tracers, including some 30 volunteers from UH and DOH with backgrounds in public health, epidemiology, medicine, and nursing. The new one-year program will leverage UH faculty expertise and existing courses across the ten-campus system to quickly develop content for the contact tracing training.
         UH President David Lassner said, "This has been a brainchild of State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park and UH's own Dr. Aimee Grace, who leads our UHealthy Hawaiʻi Initiative at the UH System. We believe that these programs to expand the number of contract tracers and community health workers will really help protect all of Hawaiʻi's communities."
         The plan is to train approximately 300 contact tracers. Some with appropriate backgrounds could be ready in two to three days. Others, needing more training, could be ready in two to three months, depending on their backgrounds and the university's capacity for the training. DOH would activate the trained contact tracers, as needed. Some could become emergency hires in the event of a surge in COVID-19 cases.
    University of Hawaiʻi and state Department of Health will use $2.5 million in funding to train personnel and
    community health workers in contact tracing to stem coronavirus. Photo from University of Hawaiʻi
         At a May 13 news conference with Gov. David Ige, DOH Director Bruce Anderson said, "With 300 staff to extend the capacity for monitoring and investigation, we expect to build the capacity up to at least 1,000 cases a day. Hopefully, we will not be approaching anything close to that, but we are planning for the worst and building up our capacity, accordingly."
         UH will offer two tracks for contact tracing training: a course for clinical professionals - approximately two to three days to complete for those with at least an undergraduate degree and a clinical health background; and an intensive contact tracing program - approximately two to three months for those with undergraduate degrees, health sciences preferred. All training content and materials will be approved by the DOH.
         Support will be provided to trainees who complete the program and join the DOH's volunteer Medical Reserve Corps.
         UH Community Colleges will add capacity in the community health worker programs and update curricula so that community health worker graduates will be prepared to support COVID-19 contact tracing as needed.
         A statement from the Hawaiʻi COVID-19 Joint Information Center said, "Health workers are a critical component to contract tracing with their special community-based training and ties to work effectively with identified high-risk populations. Those populations include Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander communities, which are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, along with the unemployed and homeless."
         The course for clinical professionals will be led by Kristine Qureshi, Associate Dean for Research and Global Health and emergency preparedness expert at the UH Mānoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene. The intensive contact tracing program will be led by Ricardo Custodio, Associate Professor of Health Science at UH West Oʻahu.
         Anyone interested in the contact tracing or community health worker training can contact COVID19@HAWAII.EDU.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    REP. TULSI GABBARD AND LT. GOV. JOSH GREEN joined in a telephone town hall this week to update Hawaiʻi residents about the coronavirus crisis. Listen to the full tele-town hall.
         Gabbard stressed that "Opening Hawaiʻi safely will require vigilant testing and contact tracing. As an island state, we are in a unique position to do this effectively. This should have been implemented in full force from the start of the outbreak, and we can't responsibly move forward without it."
         Gabbard noted that she will be in Washington, D.C. on Friday to vote on a new emergency assistance bill, H.R.6800, the Heroes Act. It would provide financial resources to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments. Some $3.3 billion would go to Hawaiʻi, divided between the state, counties, and municipalities, over two years.
    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard during one of her telephone town halls. Photo from Tulsi Gabbard
         The Heroes Act also includes $200 billion to provide hazard pay to essential workers, nationwide. It provides funding to help those hit hardest by the crisis. It includes an employee retention credit, additional funding to small businesses through the Paycheck Protection Program and Economic Injury Disaster Loan programs, $175 billion in housing assistance, additional funding for nutrition programs that help families put food on the table, education, and an extension of the $600 weekly federal unemployment benefits payments until January 2021.
         The legislation would also provide a second $1,200 direct payment to all individuals, including dependents, up to $6,000 per household. Rep. Gabbard was the first in Congress to call for a monthly direct payment to continue as long as the crisis continues, and she will continue to fight for a monthly emergency basic payment to provide certainty for Americans during this crisis, said Gabbard.
         Gabbard expressed concern that the Heroes Act was crafted without Republican or White House negotiations. She predicted that Friday's vote will only be a starting point before a bipartisan consensus is achieved to pass a final bill, which would meet the critical needs of first responders, frontline workers, and families.
         The Lieutenant Governor gave an update on Hawaiʻi's success in flattening the curve. He noted that while the risk has gone down, it is still important to maintain social distancing, mask-wearing, and personal hygiene.
         Gabbard and Green answered questions on the call about the next steps, as Hawaiʻi begins to open back up. They emphasized the importance of testing and contact tracing as the keys to reopening.
         Gabbard also answered questions related to the safety of elections, noting the funding and language in the Heroes Act to ensure every voter can access voting by mail for the November 2020 election.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Thy Word Ministries and its patriotic float in the 2019 Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade. The 2020 event, sponsored
    by OKK and the McIntosh family, is canceled due to the pandemic. Photo by Peter Anderson
    NĀʻĀLEHU'S INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE is canceled for this year, according to Wayne Kawachi, President of ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, the major sponsoring organization. The annual event features floats, horses and riders, walking groups, and classic vehicles along the Hwy 11 route through Nāʻālehu. Most creative and most patriotic presentations are named.
         To put on the event, OKK works with the McIntosh family of Discovery Harbour.
         
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, THE FOOD BASKET, AND ACTIVATE HAWAIʻI AID will receive money from Hawaiian Electric and Hawaiian Electric Industries Charitable Foundation. The nonprofit organizations feed people impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic on this island, including residents of Kaʻū and Volcano. To each non-profit, the utility is donating $2,000 and the Foundation, $5,000.
         A statement from the utility says the biggest concern and priority on Hawai‘i Islandis food security. The donations to The Boys & Girls Club of the BigIsland, The Food Basket, and Activate Hawai‘i Aid are intended to "support their ongoing efforts to provide fresh produce, shelf-stable food, and prepared meals to Hawai‘i Islandfamilies."

         Sharon Suzuki, Hawaiian Electric's president of MauiCounty and Hawai‘i Island Utilities, said, "Communities count on us to provide reliable electric service to operate essential businesses and support new stay-at-home lifestyles. It's also important for us to do what we can to help those who are struggling with basic needs. I'm grateful these three organizations are working together to meet Hawai‘i Island's food security needs during this very tough time."

         Through its daily Community Meal Support Initiative, the Boys & Girls Club of the BigIsland provides nutritional hot meals to the island's most vulnerable populations including keiki, kūpuna, homeless, and struggling families. Their efforts help fill shortfalls and resource gaps, especially in very rural communities that are unable to benefit from school-based cafeteria meals due to lack of transportation. Last month, it provided more than 18,000 meals and it now provides up to 800 meals daily. Through this donation, BGCBI can provide 1,272 meals for the community.

         Chad Cabral, Chief Executive Officer of Boys & Girls Club Big Island, said "The continued support of Hawaiian Electric and the HEI Charitable Foundation has allowed the Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island to be able to quickly respond to the needs of those on Hawai‘i Island who are struggling as a result of the pandemic. Thank you for a true partnership that helps to support and strengthen our Hawai‘i Island communities."

         The Food Basket provides ʻOhana Drop boxes which include a multi-day supply of shelf-stable food and local fresh produce for individuals and families. It offers drive-thru food distribution at 16 sites around the island and home delivery for those with limited transportation or compromised health. Through this donation, The Food Basket is able to purchase 5,000 pounds of food for the community.

         Kristin Frost Albrecht, executive director of The Food Basket, said "We are so extremely grateful to HEI and Hawaiian Electric for their long-time partnership and generous support to provide food assistance to the most vulnerable residents on Hawai‘i Island. Given the skyrocketing number of families and individuals in need in our hard-hit communities across the island, this donation will provide critical food support during this unprecedented and challenging time."

         Activate Hawai‘i Aid is a collective of community and government, working together to activate an islandwide network of resilience. The $2,000 donation supported the Keiki Care Packs initiative by providing 2,712 packs to children in more than 30 Hawai‘i Island communities, including Miloliʻi, Nāʻālehu, and Volcano. Learn how to sign up to receive food, below. Each pack includes foodstuffs, curated activities, resources, and materials to help keiki and parents better understand and cope with the pandemic. The additional $5,000 will support the #FeedThePeopleHI - Puna project, a collaboration between Chef Hui and AHA to increase food security for Puna households. Beginning May 15, and every Friday for the next eight weeks, 500 meal kits with ingredients and recipe cards for one-to-two big batch meals will be distributed to communities in upper and lower Puna subdivisions.
         Ashley Kierkiewicz, lead organizer for Activate Hawai‘i Aid, said, "Many hands and many huis have come together to do something special for our keiki and community. So much thought, aloha, and planning goes into each project, and because it is a massive, ongoing give, working with community leaders is key. We rely on generous donations such as those from Hawaiian Electric, so we can activate our volunteer network and amplify our give."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    SIGN UP FOR KEIKI CARE PACKS by Friday, May 15, for distribution the week of May 25, through Activate Hawai‘i Aid. Specific pick-up days, times, and locations are posted to the calendar at activatehawaiiaid.org/keiki-care-packs. Those who sign up are notified via email and/or text to confirm pick-up date and location, at least 48 hours in advance.
         RSVP for keiki pack(s) by taking the Community Pulse Survey online or by calling the Food Access Hotline at 808-793-5703. For those who have already filled out the survey and just want to RSVP for the next distribution, the survey has been modified to ask only questions related to their RSVP.

    Volunteers don masks and gloves to distribute Keiki Care Packs
    in Miloliʻi. Photo from Activate Hawaiʻi Aid
         Care packs are distributed by drive-thru. Recipients are asked to stay in their vehicles to maintain safe social distancing. Home deliveries are generally not available; however, a few case-by-case exceptions may be made, when resources permit.

         The organization's website asks the public to "be understanding if we are unable to provide you the full number of Keiki Care Pack(s) for which you have RSVP'd. A limit per household may be implemented at the time of distribution if demand exceeds our supply. We are working diligently to make sure this does not occur, but please be patient with us if it does."

         Each pack contains approximately $15 worth of items for kids and young teens, including non-perishable foodstuffs (e.g. canned meats, packaged goods, snacks, cookies, fruit cups, juice, etc.) and curated coloring sheets, activities, and resources "to help children better understand the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as materials to support parents to engage their keiki and cope with the stresses of living through this pandemic." Each round of care packs is different; contents will vary based on what is available from local distributors and community partners.

         Activate Hawaiʻi Aid schedules islandwide distributions of Keiki Care Packs once per month. They started with 1,000 packs in 13 communities in March 2020; in April, it was 2,700 packs in two dozen communities. Packs are assembled in Hilo in an environment that mitigates COVID-19 exposure risk and trucked to distribution locations in every district on Hawaiʻi Island. 
    Keiki Care Packs, delivered to Volcano. Photo from Activate Hawaiʻi Aid
         Activate Hawaiʻi Aid is partnered with Connect Point Church in Hilo to purchase products and stage distribution. All volunteers are screened and vetted before being confirmed to serve. All involved in packing must wear masks and gloves, and each packing shift is limited to no more than 10 people. Captains ensure that proper social distancing, hand washing, and disinfecting protocols are being adhered to in both packing and distribution. Packs are organized so that they will be touched as little as possible to avoid contamination or cross-contamination.

         The Activate Hawaiʻi Aid website says, "We are constantly fundraising to support this program and would love for your kōkua. All coordination, packing, and distribution efforts are volunteered, which means all money donated to this program goes to care packs! You can either click here to donate via our fiscal partner or volunteer to help us with our hotline or packaging and distribution of packs by emailing us at aloha@activatehawaiiaid.org. Our goal is to provide a Keiki Care Pack to every child in need on Hawai‘i Island each month. We appreciate your help!​"

         Activate Hawaiʻi Aid started the Keiki Care Pack program during the pandemic: "Going to school means so much to our keiki. It's a place for socialization, structure, and extracurricular activities. For many, it's a source of support and a place where essential services, such as breakfast and lunch, can be accessed. Our schools provide a safety net, but COVID-19 has upended that. Due to extended school closures by the DOE, a hui of parents joined forces with Activate Hawai‘i Aid to figure out a way to support our keiki. We wanted to do something that served their physical and emotional well-being. Hence, the Keiki Care Packs program was born."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
    Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
    yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
    Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
    NO NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported in the entire state today. The state Department of Health reported that one case was removed, bringing down the total count during the pandemic to 637 in the Hawaiian Islands. No one died on this island and only one victim was hospitalized for one night. One victim was reported as being from the 96672 zip code. No other victims were confirmed in Kaʻū nor Volcano.
         The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "There are no identified positive Coronavirus cases on Hawaiʻi Island at this date. All that was tested positive has been cleared as recovered.
         "To all the Health care organizations and supporting agencies, thank you for your good and hard work of developing and continuing a comprehensive testing network for the safety of Hawaiʻi's people.
    Civil Defense Director 
    Talmadge Magno.
    Photo from Big Island Video News
         "Know that early testing means early detection and early care. By your participation, you are helping develop a comprehensive database of information for Health Care officials to keep on top of things so they can respond appropriately and timely.
         "Please understand the good place that Hawaiʻi is in today just reflects the importance of following the policies of prevention. The virus is still out there and we need to get better to keep Hawaiʻi safe! Thank you for doing your part. Thank you for listening. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding. his is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."
         In the United States, more than 1.45 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 86,541.
         Worldwide, more than 4.44 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 302,376.

    directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
    free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
    Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
    kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
    business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

    MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

    ONGOING
    Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
         A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
         The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
         Wearing masks is required for everyone.
         To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
         Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
         For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.


    Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from  to , with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.



    Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.


    St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

    The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

         The Ocean View location for May was Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030, for the next date.
         The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

         The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
         The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.



    On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






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    Jaggar Museum and the USGS headquarters in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park in 2018 before earthquakes
    severely damaged the buildings. Give public input into reconstruction of the facilities. See story below. NPS Photo
    KAMEHAMEH