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    USGS HVO geochemist measuring gases released from Kīlauea's summit lava lake surface to measure volcanic-gas
     composition, before the 2018 eruption, with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. 
    See Volcano Watch below. USGS photo/Janet Babb

    THE LAST DECADE FOR SELLING GAS-ONLY POWERED CARS in Hawaiʻi would begin this year if state Rep. Takashi Ohno's bill passes the Legislature. House Bill 2593 would allow the sale of only electric, hydrogen, or hybrid vehicles by car dealerships starting in 2030. Re-sale of gas-powered, used vehicles as well as purchase of large commercial vehicles or buses would still be allowed. "Seeing young leaders take the lead to protect our planet inspired me to make a strong
    statement on how Hawaiʻi can be a model of clean energy," said Ohno. "Future visitors to our state will see Hawaiʻi's roads full of green cars and understand how deeply our community cares for the planet we all share."
         Hawaiʻi remains the most fossil-fuel and dependent state. The Hawaiʻi Clean Energy Initiative seeks to achieve 100 percent clean energy by 2045, including reducing the state's overall ground transportation fossil fuel use by 385 million gallons per year.
         Rep. Richard Creagan said he thinks it is a positive and bold idea, and will be studying the bill and such aspects as tax credits to help purchase the green vehicles, and availability of charging station that will be needed to carry it out, especially on the Big Island where travel distances are longer and charging stations are few.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    ATTRACTING MORE PHYSICIANS TO HAWAIʻI is the aim of Sen. Mazie Hirono's support of bipartisan, bicameral legislation to increase the number of residency slots available through Medicare.
         The Resident Physician Shortage Reduction Act of 2019 (S. 348) would create 15,000 new residency training slots across the country over five years. The bill would prioritize increasing positions in states like Hawaiʻi with hospital training programs in rural areas, hospitals that focus on community-based training, new medical schools, hospitals already training resident physicians over their cap, hospitals that partner with VA medical centers, and hospitals that focus on community-based training.
         Hirono said today that the bill would help address Hawaiʻi's physician shortage by expanding residency opportunities that would help support and retain local talent in the medical field and expand access to care, particularly in rural and high need areas across the state. "With more and more Hawaiʻi physicians either retiring or leaving the state, we must do more to improve physician recruitment and retention in the islands. This legislation is one important way we can ease pressures on the current health care system, expand access to care, and support training for new physicians in Hawaiʻi."
         According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the United States is expected to face a shortage of about 120,000 primary care and specialty physicians by 2030. In Hawaiʻi, the physician workforce experienced an eight percent drop in 2019, with the highest shortages in primary care. According to the latest Hawaiʻi physician workforce data, there are currently 3,484 practicing physicians serving in civilian settings statewide. At the end of last year, Hawaiʻi had 245 physician vacancies as doctors retired, left the islands, or cut their hours. However, simply replacing these doctors will not meet Hawaiʻi's current health care needs. It is estimated that upwards of 820 primary care doctors, specialists, and other physicians are needed to ensure people across all islands receive quality health care.
         Hilton Raethel, President and CEO of Healthcare Association of Hawaiʻi, said, "We know that if we train providers here in Hawaiʻi, there is a higher probability that they will remain in the state and practice. This legislation will enable the state to attract and retain more physicians at a time when a number of young people are leaving the state, and offer more educational opportunities for students who are interested in medical school. We appreciate Senator Hirono's continued leadership and support in helping to ensure a strong healthcare workforce to treat our Hawaii residents."
         Jerris Hedges, MD, Dean of the University of Hawaiʻi John A. Burns School of Medicine, said, "There are not enough slots in the required post-graduate training programs for the number of medical school students graduating every year to enter. That slows down the pipeline for providing fully trained doctors into the communities where they are badly needed, including Hawaiʻi. The country, and Hawaiʻi, needs more Resident training programs so that our citizens can have access to the best trained health care providers in our clinics and hospitals, the physicians." 
         During her time in the Senate, Hirono has called for additional doctors, including a particular focus on veterans in Hawaiʻi. In 2014, Hirono chaired a Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee field hearing at the Oʻahu Veterans Center, in which she called attention to the shortage of doctors staffing VA facilities in Hawaiʻi and beyond.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    LOVE THE ARTS, the 16th annual fundraiser for VolcanoArtsCenter, will be held Saturday, Feb. 8 from to at the Niʻaulani Campus in VolcanoVillage. The gala is the main event to raise funds for VolcanoArtCenter which offers classes, exhibits, workshops, and creative arts experiences "in a uniquely inspiring environment," states the announcement.

         This year's theme celebrates The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by "unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and of course dancing!" states the announcement.

         The evening also features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions will provide attendees an opportunity to bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions.

         Tickets are $70, $65 for VAC Members, and can be purchased at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or by calling (808) 967-8222.

         Love The Arts tickets also provide free admission to the LTA Valentine's Day Dance held the following weekend on Saturday, Feb. 15 from to Learn the Charlestonand the Lindy Hop while enjoying live music by the Tin Pan Alleycats. Tickets for this event can also be purchased for $15, $10 VAC Members.
         More info at volcanoartcenter.org.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MAKAHIKI: A CELEBRATED SEASON will be discussed at this month's Coffee Talk at the Visitor Center of Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on Friday, Jan. 31,
         Makahiki is recognized and observed by many as a time to revel in Hawaiian culture with games, competition, and ceremony, and has come to be regarded as a time of peace and rejuvenation, states the announcement from the Park. In addition, Makahiki held immense importance as a method of time keeping, and was a major influence on the practices of farming, fishing, the division of resources, and even the political workings of the ruling chiefs.
         Kahakaʻio Ravenscraft works at Puʻuhonua o HōnaunauNationalHistoricalParkthrough their partner Hawaii Pacific Parks Association, providing cultural demonstrations for visitors to the Park's "royal grounds." He dedicates his work to perpetuating ‘ike Kupuna (ancestral practices) through the study of kālai kiʻi (sculpture), moʻokūʻauhau (genealogy), and moʻoʻōlelo (story-telling), as well as malama ‘iwi kupuna (care of traditional burial practices). Through his endeavors, Kahakaʻio seeks to empower others to connect to ancestral wisdom and become stewards of their place with the values of aloha ‘āina and mālama honua, states the announcement.
         Coffee Talk at Kahuku is an opportunity to get to know the Park and neighbors, and join an informal conversation on a wide variety of topics. Bring coffe or purchase Kaʻū coffee from HPPA at the event. Entrance to Kahuku Unit is located on Hwy 11 near mile marker 70.5, on the mauka (mountain) side of the road.



    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    GAS GEOCHEMITSRY – and the accompanying smell – is the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, a weekly article and activity update written by U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. This article is third in a series of articles about HVO people and jobs during Volcano Awareness Month 2020. Next week, another HVO team will write about its work. Today's article is by HVO research geologist and gas geochemistry team member Patricia Nadeau:

         HVO people and jobs, Part 3: Gas geochemistry work stinks!

         As many residents of the Island of Hawaiʻican attest, volcanic gases can stink – literally. But for those of us at the USGS HVO who are lucky enough to study those gases, our jobs are actually pretty amazing.

         Volcanic gases give clues about volcanic processes, even when no lava is erupting. This is because, similar to a bottle of soda with dissolved bubbles, magma contains dissolved gases that escape as it rises to the surface. Ratios of escaped gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) can tell us magma depth. The total amount of SO2 released also reflects the amount of magma or lava that is degassing.

    As fissure 8 erupts on Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone in June 2018 (left), a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer measures
     gas emissions from the lava fountains. At right, HVO gas geochemistry team members collect a sample of gas from Sulphur Banks
     in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. USGS photos

         No one single device or technique provides all the gas information we need to monitor Hawaiian volcanoes. We use a variety of methods to track gas emissions from Mauna Loa and Kīlauea, including direct measurements and indirect techniques called remote sensing.

         One of our most frequent measurements is the SO2 emission rate – how many tonnes are emitted per day. For this, we don't interact directly with the gas. Instead, we drive or walk under the gas plume with a tool called an ultraviolet spectrometer. SO2 absorbs ultraviolet light, so when more SO2 is present overhead, less ultraviolet light reaches the spectrometer.

         In the current low-emission era at Kīlauea, these measurements are made once every 2-4 weeks. But during the 2018 eruption, we attempted to measure emission rates at least every other day. When Kīlauea's summit lava lake was present, we had a network of ground-based spectrometers that calculated the SO2 emission rate every few seconds! There is no similar network at any other volcano in the world.
         Another measurement we rely on is the ratio of CO2 to SO2. The relative amounts of those gases give us information about the depth of magma, as explained in our February 21, 2019, Volcano Watch, volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_volcano_watch.html?vwid=1400.

         CO2 does not absorb ultraviolet light like SO2, so we measure CO2 directly. To do this, we use sensors placed right in the volcanic gas. One such instrument – dubbed a 'MultiGas'– was designed by colleagues at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. The MultiGas pumps in gas and determines concentrations of CO2, SO2, H2S (hydrogen sulfide), and water vapor. We then calculate their ratios and track changes that might indicate magma rising within the volcano.

         We have three types of MultiGas at HVO: permanent stations on Kīlauea and Mauna Loa that send data to HVO in real-time; a portable MultiGas, which is the size of a large briefcase and gives us flexibility to check gas chemistry in many places; and a miniaturized MultiGas mounted on UAS (Unoccupied Aircraft Systems, or drones) to measure gas in hazardous or inaccessible sites volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_volcano_watch.html?vwid=1415.

    An HVO scientist collects a volcanic gas sample from a fumarole on 
    the rim of Halema‘uma‘u Crater within Kīlaueacaldera. USGS photo

         There are additional gases in volcanic plumes that are not present in large amounts but still provide information about volcanic behavior. To measure those minor gases, including chlorine, fluorine, and helium, we use remote and direct methods.

         Many volcanic gases absorb infrared radiation, so during eruptions we can use remote sensing of infrared energy emitted by lava. A device called a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer detects different wavelengths of infrared and measures absorption by numerous gases simultaneously. This gives us many gas ratios that help us to understand degassing processes during eruptions.
         Another way to measure multiple volcanic gases at once is to collect a bottle of gas and send it to the lab for chemical analysis. For this, we use a specialized glass bottle with tubing inserted into a degassing vent called a fumarole. This kind of sampling is currently done once every three months at Sulphur Banks in the Park to track long-term changes in gas chemistry.

         That's a lot of instrumentation, so the gas geochemistry team works closely with HVO technicians and IT specialists to make sure that all our equipment functions properly. We also spend time at our computers to process, interpret, and write up our data. This often involves exchanging ideas with other USGS colleagues, local partners, and scientists around the world to ensure that we understand our volcanoes and hazards as best as we can from the gas geochemistry perspective.

         All that makes for a busy and exciting job, whether the gas stinks or not.

         Volcano Activity Updates

         Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL.

    Kīlauea monitoring data showed no significant changes in seismicity and ground deformation. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remain low. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen.

         Mauna Loa is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption is certain.

         This past week, 99 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa; the strongest was a M3.1 on Jan. 21. Deformation indicates continued slow summit inflation. Fumarole temperature and gas concentrations on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable.

         One earthquake with three or more felt reports occurred in the Hawaiian Islands this past week: a magnitude-3.1 quake 18 km (11 mi) northwest of Kalaoa at 38 km (24 mi) depth on Jan. 19 at
         Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvofor past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule


    Girls Basketball
    Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Mon., Jan. 27 @Kamehameha
    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Sat., Jan. 25 Girls BIIF
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Jan. 25 @Kamehameha
    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Sat., Jan. 25 @Kona Community Aquatic Center
    Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    SATURDAY, JAN. 25

    Palm Trail, Saturday, Jan. 25, , Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, relatively difficult, 2.6-mile, hike. Bring snack and water. nps.gov/havo


    Sounds at the SummitHilo Jazz Orchestra Frank Zappa Tribute, Saturday, Jan. 25,  Hawaiʻi Island musician and composer Trever Veilleux, director. Annual concert tends to sell out. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Blue Tattoo Band, Saturday, Jan. 25, Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge, in HVNP. $5 cover charge, free to in-house guests. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com


    MONDAY, JAN. 27

    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ʻĀina, the fabric of Hawaiʻi with Puakea Forester, Monday, Jan. 27 – fourth Monday, monthly – Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    TUESDAY, JAN. 28

    After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com

    Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – , St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333


    Public Information Mtg. by County of Hawai‘i Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division, Wednesday, Jan. 29 at Nā‘ālehu Clubhouse, 95-5635 Māmalahoa Hwy, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend and give input. The Solid Waste Division will be discussing the facilities' operating days and the possibility of modifying the current schedule for transfer stations. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org or call the Solid Waste Division Office at 961-8270 for more.

    Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28,  at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.


    THURSDAY, JAN. 30

    Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – -Pāhala Community Center. 928-3102


    The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.


    Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – 4-6p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org


    FRIDAY, JAN. 31
    Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or
    mosaicsinscience.org.

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Learning to Grow, a program of University of Hawaiʻi, is also the name of an agency, proposed at the Hawaiʻi Legislature this year. It would replace the Executive Office on Early Learning, transferring it from Department of Education to Department of Human Services. See more below. Photo from Learning to Grow.
    REAL ECONOMIC BENEFIT FOR WORKING-CLASS FAMILIES and individuals is the aim of eight bills in the 2020 state Senate and House of Representatives' joint legislative package. They were introduced yesterday with details provided:
         HB2541 and SB3102 seek to help working families. The legislation would make the state earned income tax credit refundable and permanent, and increase and amend the refundable food/excise tax credit by basing the amount of the credit on a taxpayer's Hawaiʻi earned income, rather than federal adjusted gross income. The bills would Increase the minimum wage rate to $11 per hour beginning Jan. 1, 2021, $12 beginning Jan. 1, 2022, $12.50 beginning Jan. 1, 2023, and $13 beginning Jan. 1, 2024. Read details at HB2541 and SB3102.
         HB2542 and SB3104 relate to land development. They would authorize the Hawaiʻi Housing Finance and Development Corp. to lease real property for a period not to exceed 99 years for the development of projects that include affordable housing. They would require HHFDC to submit a report to the legislature that identifies all state lands that may be developed for multi-unit dwellings.
         The legislation would authorize issuing $75 million in general obligation bonds, with proceeds used for affordable housing infrastructure in Hawaiʻi County and other counties with a resident population of 500,000 or less. The bills would authorizes a state or county department or agency to petition the appropriate county land use decision-making authority, rather than the Land Use Commission, for a change in the boundary of a district involving land areas between 15 acres and 25 acres where the majority of the development would be for affordable housing. Read the details at HB2542 and SB3104.
         The bills would also authorize the state Historic Preservation Division to delegate responsibility of historic preservation project reviews to the impacted county. The bills would establish the Office of the Housing Ombudsman. The bills would also remove the existing statutory cap on the amount of conveyance tax revenues that are deposited into the rental housing revolving fund each fiscal year.
         HB2543 and SB3101 relate to access to learning. The bills would transfer the Executive Office on Early Learning from the Department of Education to the Department of Human Services and rename it Learning to Grow Agency. The legislation would focus the jurisdiction of the agency to children who are 3 to 4 years old, or who will be eligible for kindergarten within two years, with access to learning through an early learning program by the year 2030. Funding would be appropriated. Read more at HB2543 and SB3101.
         HB2543 and SB3101 would create a School Facilities Agency to be responsible for all public school development, planning, and construction, related to capital improvement projects assigned by the Legislature, Governor, or Board of Education. The bills would transfer statutes pertaining to the Hawaiʻi 3R's and 3T's programs to a new School Facilities Agency statutory subpart. The legislation would place management of school impact fees with the agency. Appropriates funds. Learn more at HB2543 and SB3101.
         The links above also provide a portal for citizens to submit testimony.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    TULSI GABBARD RANKS IN TOP FIVE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE POLLS among Democrat candidates for President, states her campaign staff. Her staff announced today that it calls for CNN to invite Gabbard to one of its televised New Hampshire Town Hall Meetings, since other candidates who rank lower than Gabbard are scheduled.
         On Friday, CNN announced candidates invited for Wednesday, Feb. 4: Former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, businessman Andrew Yang, and businessman Tom Steyer.
         For Thursday, Feb. 6, candidates invited are: Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders; former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick.
         Gabbard's campaign statement says, "Here are the facts: Our campaign in New Hampshire is stronger than ever, and now the establishment media is going to extreme lengths to shut Tulsi out. First they ignore us, then they smear us as Russian assets and bots, and now CNN is flat-out denying Tulsi a New Hampshire Presidential Town Hall despite her polling among the top five in the state."
         The Gabbard campaign message states that those invited include Steyer, "the billionaire spending more than all the other candidates combined on early state ads, and Deval Patrick, both of whom are polling 5-7 points lower than Tulsi."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


    Foster Hair Design owner Kady Foster applies highlights to a client's hair. 
    Foster Hair Design is an Aveda-exclusive salon and retailer.
    Photo from the Fosters

    FOSTER HAIR DESIGN in Nāʻālehu moved to a larger location in the Kaʻū Realty Building. Kady and Drew Foster opened their shop in October 2018. Kady, a hairdresser since 2013, mentor her husband as he works as her apprentice; he expects to be licensed in March or April.
         Drew is offering $10 men's and boy's haircuts throughout February. The couple has provided free haircuts to those in need at St. Jude's every six weeks for the past year.

         The Fosters moved to Ocean View in February 2018. Drew's family has been in Ocean View since 1997. Drew graduated from Konawaena High School and University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. He spent almost ten years as a newspaper reporter and editor in Wyoming, Washington state and Asia. He owned and operated a small marketing and writing business from home for the past few years, and has decided to move on to barbering.

         From Long Beach, Washington, Kady graduated from Stylemasters with a certificate in cosmetology in 2013. She worked at Azure Salon in Ilwaco, WA, for five years. Her continuing education includes L'Oréal Professional Expert Network program; balayage certifications; and Aveda color and product education courses.
         The Fosters offer men's, women's and children's haircuts; hair coloring; smoothing treatment; beard trims; up-dos; blow-dry styling; and wash-blowdry styling. Kady is available Saturdays through Tuesdays. Drew is available Saturdays through Mondays. They run an Aveda-exclusive salon and barbershop, using and selling products by Aveda, "an environmentally- and socially-focused company that makes very high-quality hair products," states Kady. Book online at FosterHair.com.
    Rayco Nielsen, 13 years old, gets his hair cut 
    by Drew Foster. Photo from the Fosters 

         Kady told The Kaʻū Calendar, "I've loved every minute of living in Kaʻū. I have a ton of gratitude for the acceptance I've received from the community and the friendships I am making. I enjoy my job quite a lot. I find much joy in providing a service that allows me to be creative and makes people happy. Hair has been a passion of mine since I was a teenager. I did all my friends' hair in high school, and I remember my hairdresser telling me I'd be a hairdresser one day. My dad taught me, 'If you love what you do you will never work a day in your life.' I think he was on to something. My husband and I had our first baby a few months ago. As we prepared for our daughter's arrival in November I can't even begin to explain the generosity and love we received from my clients and the Kaʻū Realty team. Both my husband and I look forward to expanding our volunteer services and diving deeper into our communities. We're having a lot of fun."
         Drew told The Kaʻū Calendar, "I'd been working from home for several years and I liked the ease and lifestyle, but I missed being in the community and getting to know people. I wanted to get out of the office, out from behind the computer. I was considering going back to school and learning a trade when Kady proposed a barbering apprenticeship. The idea grew on me – we could work together, I wouldn't have to go back to school, I could operate my old business while I learned to cut hair. Now it's all coming together. I spent most of my professional life as a newspaper journalist, and the thing I miss most is talking to people about their lives, their journeys, their plans, their families, their history. Now, as a barber, I get to do that all day long, and I don't have to worry about taking notes or turning around an article. It's good. It's exciting. I've met many wonderful people in the Kaʻū community since joining Kady and I'll get to meet many more."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP activities for February have been announced. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after :

         Grand Slam Band, Saturday, Feb. 1, Lava Lounge, $5.00 cover charge.

         Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge. Doors open at with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase.

         SoulTown Band, Saturday, Feb. 8, Lava Lounge,  $5.00 cover charge.

         Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, Crater Rim Café, to 8 p.m. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. 

         Pupule Papales Band, Saturday, Feb. 15, Lava Lounge,  No cover charge.

         Blue Tattoo Band, Saturday, Feb. 22, Lava Lounge,  $5.00 cover charge.
         Blackwater Railroad Company, Saturday, Feb. 29, Lava Lounge,  No cover charge.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    VARSITY BOYS BASKETBALL traveled to the other side of the island to play against Parker yesterday. Kaʻū fought hard, scoring 32. The Bulls took the game with 39 points.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Mon., Jan. 27 @Kamehameha
    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    MONDAY, JAN. 27

    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ʻĀina, the fabric of Hawaiʻi with Puakea Forester, Monday, Jan. 27 – fourth Monday, monthly – Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    TUESDAY, JAN. 28

    After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com


    Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – , St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333


    Public Information Mtg. by County of Hawai‘i Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division, Wednesday, Jan. 29 at Nā‘ālehu Clubhouse, 95-5635 Māmalahoa Hwy, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend and give input. The Solid Waste Division will be discussing the facilities' operating days and the possibility of modifying the current schedule for transfer stations. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org or call the Solid Waste Division Office at 961-8270 for more.

    Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28,  at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.


    THURSDAY, JAN. 30

    Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – -Pāhala Community Center. 928-3102


    The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.


    Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – Cooper CenterVolcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org


    FRIDAY, JAN. 31
    Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Chinese New Year came to Kaʻū last night with parties and fireworks in neighborhoods. In Hilo, David Corrigan of Big
    Island Video News documented the Lion Dance for this Year of the Rat. See the video. Image from Big Island Video News

    A THIRTEEN DOLLAR AN HOUR MINIMUM WAGE BY 2024 "is not a 'good first step.' It's actually a step backward," says Gary Hooser, founder of Hawaiʻi Alliance for Progressive Action and the Pono Initiative. The former state Senator released a statement this past week, saying, "Anyone working 40 hours a week deserves to earn a wage sufficient to provide a dry and safe place to sleep, three meals a day, and basic health care." Hooser was referring to the joint state Senate, House of Representatives, and Governor's proposal calling for stepping up the minimum wage from $10.10 per hour over time.
         He noted that the state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism "has determined that for a single person without children the hourly wage needed to simply subsist is approximately $17.50 per hour (plus or minus depending on the island, etc). Note this is the State of Hawaiʻi's official subsistence wage and includes no-frills whatsoever… just the basics of staying alive."
         Hooser linked the wages to Hawaiʻi suffering the second-highest homeless rate per capita in
    the United States. "Our current minimum wage sits at $10.10 per hour and nearly 50 percent of our residents live on the very edge of poverty. Almost everyone is working two jobs or more, simply etching out a life devoid of the extras, so many of us take for granted. Thank god we have our warm weather and beautiful natural environment to help get us through the days."
    Former state Sen. Gary Hooser says a $13 an hour minimum
    wage by 2024 would not
    help enough in uplifting working people
     living in poverty in Hawai`i. 
    Photo from GaryHooser.co
         Hooser pointed out that the Governor, House, and Senate, with much fanfare, announced as a "good first step" their plan to increase Hawaiʻi's minimum wage to $13 per hour by 2024. Hooser said, "Let's do the math. In their own press release, the Legislature and the Governor talk of studies that show how single individuals and families are struggling to make $28,296 to $77,052 a year.
         "Unfortunately, the $13 an hour they propose by 2024 doesn't actually add up to helping anyone get even to that lowest threshold; $13 an hour, 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year, adds up to only $27,040. The inadequacy of the $13 per hour offer is even more apparent when you calculate the inflation which will accrue between now and 2024.
         "Remember, a subsistence wage now is $17.50 per hour and nearly half of our population lives on the edge of poverty. And here we are listening to the magnanimous offer of $13 – in 2024." Hooser said that the most recent "position" of the Hawaiʻi Senate (via House Bill 1191 SD2) was $15 per hour by 2023. "So no, $13 per hour in 2024 is not a good first step - unless, of course, the intent is to step backward. And no, the other elements of the package (tax credits and housing initiatives) do not replace the basic need to pay people fair wages for a fair day's work.
         "A 'good first step' is allowing legislators to publicly vote on what a clear and strong majority have said they publicly support, which is at least $15 per hour. An even better first step would be passing a measure that reaches the $17 target and includes annual cost of living increases. That is the step Hawaiʻi's working families need and the only step that will ensure they eventually achieve a true living wage."
         Concerning small businesses that fear negative impacts from having to increase their workers' wages, Hooser said they "need only look at the recent history in Hawaiʻi for reassurance.When Hawaiʻi's minimum wage was increased from $7.25 to $10.10, there were no increases in bankruptcy, no increases in unemployment, and no increases in inflation (outside the normal trend). It is well past the time that everyone in Hawaiʻi who works 40 hours a week can afford a dry, safe place to live, eat three meals a day, and go to the doctor when they are sick. Anything less is immoral and unacceptable."
         Hooser suggests contacting legislators. State Senators list and contact info is here. State Representatives list and contact info is here. Visit Living Wage Hawaiʻi and Raise Up Hawaiʻi.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


    THIS IS THE YEAR OF THE RAT, with Hawaiʻi residents of Chinese ancestry visiting family members and giving out gifts in red packages. Fireworks sounded across Kaʻū. Some traveled to Hilo for a Lion Dance.
         Rats are known for wisdom, intelligence, ability to adapt, their quick wit, charm, sociable personalities, and even artistic talents. People born in 1936, 1948, 1960, 1972, 1984, 1996, 2008, and and 2020 came into this world in the Year of the Rat.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    VOLCANO ART CENTER AND GALLERY activities for February have been announced. VAC is a non-profit educational organization created in 1974 to promote, develop, and perpetuate the artistic and cultural heritage of Hawai‘i's people and environment through activities in the visual, literary, and performing arts. Visit volcanoartcenter.org.
         VAC's newest series of monthly programs, Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendarfor the full lineup.

         The VAC Gallery exhibit, Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues through Feb. 16. A live woodturning demonstration at the Gallery happens on Saturday, February 1, from to

         Try indigo dyeing in the Indigo Fundamentals workshop with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp on Saturday, Feb. 1 at

         Want to learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise? Tim Tunison leads Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training on Saturday, Feb. 1 from to  

         Hula Voices at VAC Gallery on Thursday, Feb. 6, from to , presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho.

         The 16th annual Love the Arts fundraiser gala on Saturday, Feb. 8, will be held from to The theme this year is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. The evening also features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions will provide attendees an opportunity to bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets are $70, $65 for VAC Members, and can be purchased at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or by calling (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets also provide free admission to the LTA Valentine's Day Dance held the following weekend on Saturday, Feb. 15 – see info below.

         Get back to the basics in the Zentangle: Basics workshop with Ellen O'Dunn on Saturday, Feb. 15 from to

         Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson returns on Saturday, Feb. 15 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf itself that you'll create in class makes a great Valentine's Day gift, states the announcement.

         Valentine's Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15 will be held from to Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more.

         This month's Hula Kahiko performance at happens on Saturday, Feb. 15 with Kumu Hula Keala Ching with Nā Wai Iwi Ola and Nā Mea Hula with Loke Kamanu & ʻOhana from to at VAC Gallery. 

         Join Claudia McCall for the Fused Glass Basics workshop on Saturday, Feb. 22 at
         Learn Mixed Media Photo Encaustic techniques with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Feb. 29 at The class is slated for beginner to intermediate students.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule
    Girls Basketball
    Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Mon., Jan. 27 @Kamehameha
    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    MONDAY, JAN. 27

    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ʻĀina, the fabric of Hawaiʻi with Puakea Forester, Monday, Jan. 27 – fourth Monday, monthly – Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    TUESDAY, JAN. 28

    After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com


    Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – , St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333


    Public Information Mtg. by County of Hawai‘i Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division, Wednesday, Jan. 29 at Nā‘ālehu Clubhouse, 95-5635 Māmalahoa Hwy, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend and give input. The Solid Waste Division will be discussing the facilities' operating days and the possibility of modifying the current schedule for transfer stations. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org or call the Solid Waste Division Office at 961-8270 for more.

    Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28,  at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.


    THURSDAY, JAN. 30

    Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – -Pāhala Community Center. 928-3102


    The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.


    Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – Cooper CenterVolcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org


    FRIDAY, JAN. 31
    Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

    SATURDAY, FEB. 1
    Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Saturdays and Wednesdays beginning Feb. 1,  at the future Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site.


    Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


    Indigo Fundamentals Workshop, Saturday, Feb. 1 at  Indigo dyeing with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp. volcanoartcenter.org


    Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training with Tim Tunison, Saturday, Feb. 1, 1-3p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 2

    Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at  with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 

    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    An upwelling of orange lava from a lower level flowed over a stream of darker red lava on the floor of this lava
    tube. Spectacular lava tubes are the subject of a talk in Ocean View this Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. at Ocean View
    Community Center. See more below. Photo by Peter and Annie Bosted
    PROPERTY TAXES FLOWING DIRECTLY TO EDUCATION is the goal of a bill submitted to the sate legislature today by Speaker of the House Scott Saiki. He introduced HB 2671, a constitutional amendment proposing that the Board of Education hold concurrent real property tax authority to fund teacher compensation. "Concurrent" means the counties would share real property tax authority with the BOE.
         Said Saiki, "HB 2671 addresses the question of how to fund increased teacher compensation. The general public and business community must weigh in on whether taxes should be raised to increase
    teacher salaries, and, if so, whether a real property tax is an appropriate source of revenue. If approved by the Legislature, HB 2671 will be placed on the 2020 general 
    election ballot and voters will have the opportunity to ratify it." The ballot would read: "Shall the Constitution of the State of Hawaiʻi be amended by repealing the counties' exclusive jurisdiction over real property taxation and providing instead that the taxation of real property shall be under the concurrent jurisdiction of both the board of education and counties, thereby allowing the board of education to levy real property taxes to fund teacher compensation?"
         A separate bill, HB 2662, was introduced to statutorily implement the constitutional amendment if it is ratified. HB 2662 is a "short form" bill that requires the Legislature to insert statutory implementation language. The bill has been referred to its committees for public hearings.
         In most places on the mainland, school districts are funded within borders of cities, towns, and neighborhoods. Higher property taxes bring in more money for schools in wealthier neighborhoods.
         In Hawaiʻi, the school district covers the entire state, aiming to treat all children equally in quality of education. Some critics state that separating school funding from property taxes has created an underfunded public education system in Hawaiʻi. This is one of the reasons Hawaiʻi boasts the lowest property taxes in the country, making it a draw for outside investors in real estate.

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    AN ANTIDISCRIMINATION BILL FOR REFUGEES AND ASYSLUM-SEEKERS was lauded today at rally in Washington, D.C. featuring Sen. Mazie Hirono. Today, on the third anniversary of the announcement of President Trump's Muslim Ban, the U.S. Senator joined Congressional Democrats, faith leaders, and civil rights advocates urging swift passage of S. 1123, the National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants (NO BAN) Act. "If passed, the legislation would permanently end the Administration's discriminatory policy," said a statement from Hirono.
         Hirono said, "The Muslim Ban is sadly only one part of the Trump Administration's virulent and cruel anti-immigrant agenda. In addition to the Muslim Ban, there was the separation of children at the border, the detention of families with no end in sight, and many more harmful policies. Every day, Stephen Miller and others in the Trump Administration find new ways to hurt immigrants in our country. We must stand together in opposing these discriminatory policies."
          In addition to members of Congress, leaders from Muslim Advocates, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, the National Women's Law Center, Bend the Arc Jewish Action, National Council of Jewish Women, and NAACP Washington Bureau participated in the rally.
    Sen. Mazie Hirono at today's rally on a law to end discrimination of
    refugees and asylum-seekers. Photo from Hirono
         The statement from Hirono said that the NO BAN Act "underscores America's commitment to protecting refugees and asylum-seekers. The bill is supported by more than 250 members of Congress; over 400 national security, civil rights, faith, and community organizations; 19 state attorneys general; and more than 50 immigration law professors."
         As the Ranking Member of the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on The Constitution, Senator Hirono has been a persistent and vocal critic of the Muslim Ban. In 2017, she called for President Trump to rescind the Muslim Ban. In 2018, she joined 30 Senators in signing an amicus brief in support of the state of Hawaii in Trump v. Hawaii, a case challenging the Muslim Ban. Senators Hirono and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) successfully petitioned the Supreme Court to release same-day audio in Trump v. Hawaii.
         See video of today's rally.

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    PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR THE WHALE COUNT ALONG THE KA‘Ū COAST last Saturday were released today. Local residents and visitors joined the Sanctuary Ocean Count and Great Whale Count to observe humpback whales from the shores of Hawaii Island, Kauai, Oahu, and Maui. The site for counting in Ka‘ū was Punaluu Black Sand Beach, where volunteers documented six whale sightings in the nearshore waters.
         More than 550 volunteers gathered data from the 53 sites across all the main Hawaiian Islands. They recorded 279 whale sightings during the 8:30 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. time period, the most of any time period throughout the day's count. The next whale county will be Saturday, Feb. 29. To sign up to watch from Ka Lae, Punaluu, and Milolii, go to oceancount.org.
         Conditions varied but the majority of sites were beautiful, clear and sunny with low wind, great weather for spotting whales. High surf, haze, and rain were present at several sites with unfavorable conditions for spotting whales. Turtles, sea birds, flying fish, and spotted/spinner dolphins revealed themselves across the main Hawaiian Islands. Some volunteers saw Hawaiian monk seals.
    Whale watching at Punaluʻu on Saturday contributed to the official Sanctuary Ocean Count. Photo by Michelle Nason
         Ocean Count promotes public awareness about humpback whales, Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, and shore-based whale watching opportunities. Volunteer participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whales activity from the shorelines of Oahu, Kauai, and Hawaii islands. The humpbacks winter in Hawaiian water to give birth before heading north to summer feeding grounds.
         The Maui event is the annual Great Whale Count by Pacific Whale Foundation, which brings volunteers together to count whales from shore as part of a long-term survey of humpback whales, with 12 survey sites along the shoreline of Maui. This event provides a snapshot of trends in relative abundance of whales and is one of the world's longest-running citizen scientist projects.
    A humpback whales seen last Saturday during the Sanctuary Ocean Count. Photo by Dawn Graham
         Both counts take place three times during peak whale season: the last Saturdays in January, February, and March.
         Preliminary data detailing Sanctuary Ocean Count whale sightings by site location and volunteer sign-up are available at oceancount.org. Additional information will be available on Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary's website at hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov.
         The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, administered by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources, protects humpback whales and their habitat in Hawaiian waters where they migrate each winter to mate, calve, and nurse their young.
         The National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, established in 2000, is the official non-profit partner of the National Marine Sanctuary System. The Foundation directly supports national marine sanctuaries by protecting species, conserving ecosystems and preserving America's maritime heritage through on-the-water conservation projects, public education and outreach programs, and scientific research and exploration.

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    Colorful splatters from a long-ago lava flow are still in 
    evidence on the walls of this lava tube on Hawaiʻi Island. 
    White mineral deposits cover some of the splatters,
    but have peeled away from the surface of others.
    Photo by Peter and Annie Bosted
    LAVA TUBES IN HAWAII  will be topic of a show at Ocean View Community Center this Tuesday  starting at 6:30. p.m. The show will be presented by veteran cavers, Peter and Annie Bosted, who have explored and photographed caves all over the world. They will explain why Hawaii Island has the world's longest and best lava tubes, and show photos of the wide variety of lava tubes on this island, from ice caves high on Mauna Loa to water and ocean-filled caves at the shores. Their photos will reveal unusual sights in lava tubes, from tiny cave-adapted bugs the size of a grain of rice, to highly colorful splatters of lava, and curtains of ‘ōhia tree roots.
         Lava tubes that are open to the public and cave conservation organizations will also be discussed. The Bosteds will explain what it takes to map a 20-mile-long lava tube system, a project that they, with other cave explorers, have undertaken in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

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    HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK EVENTS for February continue the sharing of Hawaiian culture, stewardship programs, and opportunities to explore the main and Kahuku Unit portions of the Park. Events are free, but Park entrance fees may apply. Some programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association:
         Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series.
    The American Wild Ensemble will perform at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National 
    Park on Tuesday, Feb. 11. Photo courtesy of Geoff Shiel
         Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend the evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series.
         Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.
    Untitled painting by local artist Diana Miller, who will 
    be in the spotlight on Tuesday, Feb. 4.
    Photo courtesy of Diana Miller
         Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program.
         Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.
         Stewardship of Kīpukapuaulu, every Thursday at 9:30 a.m., Feb. 6, 13, 20, and 27. Meet at the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot, Mauna Loa Road, off Highway 11 in the Park. Help remove troublesome plants at Kīpukapuaulu, home to diverse native forest and understory plants. Bring clippers or pruners, sturdy gloves, a hat, and water. Wear closed-toe shoes and clothing that you don't mind getting permanently stained from morning glory sap. Be prepared for cool and wet or hot and sunny weather. New volunteer? Contact Marilyn Nicholson for more info at nickem@hawaii.rr.com.
    Christy Lassiter & Friends will perform at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
    on Wednesday, Feb. 19. Photo courtesy of Christy Lassiter
         Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet at 8:45 a.m. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details.
         A Walk into the Past with Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, every Tuesday, Feb. 4, 11, 18, and 25 at 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m. Each performance is about an hour. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Walk back to 1912, and meet the founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar,
    Living history actor Dick Hershberger portrays Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, 
    founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in a free program held 
    on Tuesdays in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo/Janice Wei
    at the edge of Kilauea Volcano. Dressed in period costume, Ka‘ū actor-director Dick Hershberger brings the renowned geologist to life. Dr. Jaggar will take you on a tour of his tiny lab located below the Volcano House to see original seismograph equipment and other early instruments. You'll learn what motivated Dr. Jaggar to dedicate his life to the study of Hawaiian volcanoes, and how his work helps save lives today. Space is limited; pick up your free ticket at the Kīlauea Visitor Center's front desk the day of the program. Program includes climbing stairs and entering a confined space. Supported by the Kīlauea Drama Entertainment Network (KDEN).
         Explore Kahuku. The Kahuku Unit is free, and is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Take a self-guided hike, or join rangers on weekends for a two-hour guided trek at 9:30 a.m. Enter the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Kahuku is located in Ka‘ū, and is about a 50-minute drive south of the park's main entrance. Sturdy footwear, water, rain gear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended for all hikes.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    TUESDAY, JAN. 28

    After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com


    Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – , St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333


    Public Information Mtg. by County of Hawai‘i Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division, Wednesday, Jan. 29 at Nā‘ālehu Clubhouse, 95-5635 Māmalahoa Hwy, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend and give input. The Solid Waste Division will be discussing the facilities' operating days and the possibility of modifying the current schedule for transfer stations. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org or call the Solid Waste Division Office at 961-8270 for more.

    Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28,  at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.


    THURSDAY, JAN. 30

    Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – -Pāhala Community Center. 928-3102


    The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.


    Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – Cooper CenterVolcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org


    FRIDAY, JAN. 31
    Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

    SATURDAY, FEB. 1
    Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


    Indigo Fundamentals Workshop, Saturday, Feb. 1 at  Indigo dyeing with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp. volcanoartcenter.org


    Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training with Tim Tunison, Saturday, Feb. 1, 1-3p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 2

    Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at  with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 
    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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    Big signage and bright white crosswalks are being painted by the county road crew this week in
    Pāhala. The corner of Pikake and Kamani Streets are the busiest in the village, with entrances
    to school, shopping center and a bus stop. Photo by Julia Neal
    GOOD SAMARITANS PULLED A WOMAN OUT OF THE WATER at GreenSandsBeachon Monday, Jan. 27 at about Hawaiʻi Fire Department, by the time its crew arrived,  the 40 year old was sitting up. Rescue firefighters helped her to the top of GreenSandsBeach trailhead where Chopper #2's flight medical crew assessed her, treated her and transported her to KonaCommunityHospitalEight units and three additional personnel were involved in the rescue.
    Green Sands, Mahana Bay, is a popular place for both locals and tourists. Photo from DHHL
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE ANNUAL HOMELESS POINT IN TIME COUNT will be conducted in Kaʻū and across the nation. It is the census of people experiencing homelessness on a given night. This week, volunteers will canvas local parks, beaches, parking lots, and other areas individuals and families are believed to be living. Volunteers will ask, "Where did you sleep on January 26th?" The survey, which is federally mandated, requires that anyone who slept on the street, in a car, or in other substandard conditions, be counted.
         On Hawaiʻi Island, HOPE Services has taken the lead in facilitating Point In Time Count. Last year's count found 690 people experiencing homelessness on Hawaiʻi Island, down 50 percent from 1,394 in 2016. "While there are fewer people on the street, we have more and more people becoming homeless for the first time every year," says Brandee Menino, CEO of HOPE Services. While the count provides insight into the enormity of the problem, the agencies working to end homelessness face an uphill battle, she said.

         "Rents are rising but wages are stagnant," said Menino. "The minimum wage is $10.10 per hour, but you'd need to work 103 hours a week at that wage to afford a 2 bedroom apartment on Hawaiʻi Island. Unless we see major shifts in prioritizing affordable housing, the number of people entering homelessness is expected to grow."
         While the count comes short of capturing every person experiencing homelessness, it does provide a one-night snapshot of the greater picture of homelessness. The data collected provides a benchmark that can be compared county to county and year to year, which can help illustrate the effectiveness of homeless services, or explain the impact of events such as the Kīlauea eruption. Ensuring accuracy is important, as it helps communities advocate for state and federal resources, Menino explained.
         The surveys include demographic data, which also helps service providers to decide how to focus resources in order to most effectively serve the population, said Menino.
         Menino said that homeowners can help end homelessness by offering rental housing, including bedrooms and studios, or by participating in HOPE's new Master Leasing program, where HOPE pays 100 percent of fair market value rent, and assumes liability for tenants. To inquire about this program, call Taylor Quanan at 808-765-8655 (West Hawaiʻi) or Kehau Fontes at 808-936-8705 (East Hawaiʻi), or email info@hopeserviceshawaii.org.
    Many homeless people live away from towns on Hawaiʻi Island. Volunteers organized by Hope Services will
    try to count them and ask them where they slept on Jan. 26 to estimate a census of the number of homeless
    on this island. It's called the Point in Time Count. Photo from Hope Services
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    JOIN THE 2020 U.S. CENSUS TEAM. A hiring workshop will be held at Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room on Thursday, Feb. 20 from  to  Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers will be paid $20 per hour, and gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will not have their Census income counted as exempt. See https://2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    HANA LAULIMA LĀHUI O KAʻŪ, a grassroots non-profit, plans to revive its Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, beginning this March 28. The group invites the community to attend its next membership drive and informational meeting on Friday, Feb. 7,  at the Nāʻālehu Community Center.
    Prince Kūhio will be honored by a
    Hoʻolauleʻa on Saturday, March 28.
         The rebirth Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa take place on Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member is invited to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization.

         Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū was first established in the 1990's by husband and wife team Terry-Lee and Dane Shibuya, Sr. and other community members to create a Hawaiian cultural center for Kaʻū. Hana Laulima hosted five successful hoʻolauleʻa, with the last one held in the early 2000s. The organization was on the cusp of making the cultural center a reality, with architectural plans and environmental assessments in place, before unforeseen circumstances put their dream on an indefinite hold.

         However, as Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū president, Terry-Lee Shibuya, told The Kaʻū Calendar, "Imua Kaʻū! The waʻa is moving forward again," referring to the cultural center plans. "Hana Laulima is focused on the upcoming generation, and supporting the development of a new economic base for Kaʻū, while preserving Kaʻū's rich cultural heritage and respect for the ʻāina (land).

         "Please come out, get involved and make a difference for our Kaʻū keiki's future, which is really everybody's future. We must stand together as one Kaʻū ʻohana for the future generations of Kaʻū," said Shibuya.
         For more information on membership, contact Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.


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    AN UNPAVED EMERGENCY ROUTE IS CLOSED in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park for two to four weeks, starting today. The closure on Escape Road between Highway 11 and the comfort station at Nāhuku (Thurston Lava Tube) is to repair a faulty electrical line. The replacement line will be placed underground after the area is trenched. Most visitors will not notice the closure, which is necessary to complete the last big step towards the reopening of Nāhuku, stated the announcement from the Park.

         Although there isn't an exact date, the Park is making steady progress to reopen the popular lava tube in the next few weeks, barring any unforeseen circumstances, stated the announcement.
         Nāhuku has been closed since May 2018 due to hazards caused by the destructive Kīlaueaeruption and summit collapse that include loose rocks and new cracks in the cave's ceiling. Since its closure, NPS geomorphologists and engineers have surveyed the lava tube, installed crack monitors, and removed loose rocks. Park staff have improved standing water issues by rerouting drainage and adding gravel to the cave floor, and overgrown vegetation and downed branches along the trail will be cleared by opening day.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    AN ORGANIZATION CALLED NEW POLITICS HAS ENDORSED SEN. KAI KAHELE FOR CONGRESS. An announcement came from the campaign of the Hilo state senator, who is running for the seat Tulsi Gabbard is leaving in the U.S. House of Representatives.  The statement said that New Politics is "dedicated to changing politics by recruiting and supporting leaders who have committed their lives to serving our country, either through the military or national service."
         With an endorsement from New Politics come strategic advising and training in all aspects of a candidate's campaign, such as fundraising, communications, organizing, hiring, and team building. In 2018, New Politics helped raise over $7M for its chosen candidates.

         Emily Cherniack, Executive Director and Founder of New Politics, said , "From the Air National Guard to the state Senate, Sen. Kahele has dedicated his life to public service and to putting Hawaiiand our country first. We are proud to endorse him because he embodies the service values we need in our politics, and we can't wait to see him bring the Aloha spirit to Congress."
         Kahele is a commercial pilot, 18-year combat veteran, and a commissioned officer in the Hawaiʻi Air National Guard, where he still serves as a Lieutenant Colonel. Kahele previously served as executive director for a non-profit that served rural native Hawaiian families at Miloli`i.

         Kai Kahele said, "I'm honored to earn New Politics' endorsement and join their nationwide movement to bring servant leadership to Washington. Service has always been central to my life, and it would be the greatest privilege to continue giving back to my community in Congress. We are all in this together, and we deserve leadership that will move Hawaiʻi forward."

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Sulphur Cone at Mauna Loa. USGS photo
    HOW TO PREPARE FOR MAUNA LOA'S NEXT ERUPTION is the focus of a free public program in Thursday, Jan. 30, at Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about Mauna Loa's current status, hazards of future eruptions, and how communities can prepare for the volcano's next eruption. An update on Hawaiʻi County's Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan and an opportunity to sign up to receive emergency messaging will also be provided.
         Details are posted on the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website – in the "HVO News" corner – at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/. For more information, email askHVO@usgs.gov or call 808-967-8844.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditationand more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. Jan. 29 BIIF @Civic
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    THURSDAY, JAN. 30

    Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – -Pāhala Community Center. 928-3102


    The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.


    Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – Cooper CenterVolcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org


    FRIDAY, JAN. 31
    Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

    SATURDAY, FEB. 1
    Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Saturdays and Wednesdays beginning Feb. 1,  at the future Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site.


    Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45a.m. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


    Indigo Fundamentals Workshop, Saturday, Feb. 1 at  Indigo dyeing with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp. volcanoartcenter.org


    Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training with Tim Tunison, Saturday, Feb. 1, 1-3p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 2

    Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at  with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


    TUESDAY, FEB. 4

    Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo



    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13,  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16. A live woodturning demonstration at VAC will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1, from  to 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū. Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano from University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa faculty; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based pianist from UH-Mānoa; Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Soprano with the Metropolitan Opera; Virutuoso Violinist Eric Silberger; and Carlin Ma, Pianist. Tickets will be available soon and information on tickets will soon be found on the HIMF website: himusicfestival.com.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Risa and Yasubei Hirano and their son George posed in front of an American flag. Risa is holding a photograph of her 
    son Shigera in uniform. The Hiranos were held at the Colorado Rivercamp, and this image "captures both the 
    patriotism and the deep sadness these proud Japanese Americans felt," states the National Park Service caption. 
    See more below. Public domain via National Archives

    THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT will be overhauled and Hawaiʻi's Congressional delegation is asking for a deadline extension for public comments. Sen. Mazie Hirono, Sen. Brian Schatz, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, and Rep. Ed Case are among more than 150 members of Congress asking for the extension.
         In calling for the White House's Council on Environmental Quality to extend the comment period, they noted that over the last five decades, NEPA has set rules for environmental impact assessments


    conducted by federal government agencies regarding actions that the federal government proposes to fund, execute, or permit. "This process ensures that potential negative consequences to the environment due to proposed federal activities are considered, and that input from the affected communities are considered before final approval," says a statement from the group.
         The Trump Administration proposes significant changes like removing the requirement that cumulative impacts be assessed, which removes consideration of climate change impacts. The proposed rule makes a series of other changes that "would significantly harm the environment and open the door to corporate influence. These dramatic changes, if finalized, will result in one of the biggest overhauls of NEPA in its history, and is yet another example of the Trump Administration favoring special interests over the environment and public health," according to a statement from Hirono's office.

         In the letter, the members of congress wrote, "We urge you to extend the comment period to a duration commensurate with the scope and gravity of changes that CEQ proposes. Given that this is an unprecedented rewrite of the existing regulations and will impact proposed federal agency decisions for years to come, any public comment period less than six months would be unreasonable.

         "The sweep of changes proposed in this rulemaking necessitates a long conversation about the proposed rule and the best way forward, if there is any, given the weaknesses in the rulemaking process and policy considered to date." The letter can be downloaded here.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Satellite imagery shows the slow reinflation of Kīlauea and
    the East Rift Zone. Photo from Big Island Video News
    KILAUEA'S SUMMIT AREA AND THE EAST RIFT ZONE ARE REFILLING WITH MAGMA, according to Tina Neal. The U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge gave an update on the volcano last night during After Dark in the Park.
         Neal said that an interferogram, from radar satellite imagery, showed how Kīlauea and "a broad region in the middle-east rift zone [is] inflating or reflecting this accumulation underground."

         She said gas emissions from Kīlauea are "at the lowest level they've been in a long time. Just last week, we've measured only 40 tons a day of sulfur dioxide coming out of the summit. In the lava lake time, the numbers were up around 5,000 tons per day. So, the magma is deep enough that we're not seeing a lot of sulfur dioxide at the surface."

    Photo from Big Island Video News
         Neal said the green body of water and volcanic elements in Halemaʻumaʻu crater is now a football field wide (about 160 feet or 53 yards), two football fields long (about 720 feet or 240 yards), and more than 75 feet deep. She said HVO scientists think "at this point, we won't have explosions from magma/water interaction unless magma rises very rapidly into the lake. We have seen no sign of that happening and we would expect to see changes before that happens, and even then we're not sure – given the geometry and the volume – that there would actually be explosions, but it is a possibility we have to consider.

         "Especially after the New Zealand eruption a few weeks ago," said Neal, referring to the unexpected eruption of Whakaari volcano on Dec. 9 which killed more than 20 people and severely injured at least 25, "people have asked if that could happen here and our answer is that it's a very different system here. This is a much leakier volcano. There's no sign that the system is sealing and pressurizing under some sort of impermeable cap, like happened at that WhiteIsland volcano in New Zealand."

    Tina Neal said the water in Halemaʻumaʻu is expected to rise to the blue circle, above. Photo from Big Island Video News
         Neal explained that the lake in Kīlauea is not at sea level, giving the possible interaction "a different composition. The rocks are of a different chemistry, so the minerals precipitating are not high in silica and they're not likely to clog up the pore spaces in the same way.

         "So the short answer is we don't think we have a WhiteIsland situation developing here, but we can't completely rule out the possibility that there will be sudden steam explosions at some point. So this is something we're considering as we go forward."
         Neal says it is "possible we'll have many years of quiet before the next eruption. Many years. A year; five years. Its hard to say. Based on past patterns, following big events like 2018 it's most likely that the next eruption would be in the summit area. That's about all we can say with certainty."


         See the presentation at Big Island Video News.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Members of the Mochida family wait in Hayward, California, for their 
    "evacuation" bus. Each wears an ID tag. The family operated 
    a nursery and five greenhouses in Hayward. Photo from 
    National Archives, Dorothea Lange, May 8, 1942
    THE SHORT FILM MINIDOKA: AN AMERICAN CONCENTRATION CAMP will be shown at  on Tuesday, Feb. 18. The special After Dark in the Park program on Japanese American internment during World War II will be held at Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

         "Most people are unaware that Kīlauea Military Camp in the Park was also used as a Japanese internment camp during World War II," states the announcement. The newly released 30-minute film "reveals how unconstitutional imprisonment not only turned lives upside down but continues to ripple through generations and serves as a warning today.

         "On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which led to the exclusion and unjust incarceration of 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents of Japanese ancestry living in the United Statesduring World War II. Today, the National Park Service protects and collaboratively manages some of the former internment camps including ManzanarTule LakeMinidoka, and Honouliuli."
    Contemporary photo of Minidoka National 
    Historic Site entrance. NPS photo

         Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor.

         From the National Park Service website: "This was all the time Japanese American families had to pack all their belongings. Forced from their homes, they could only bring what they could carry. They had no idea where they were going or for how long. The National Park Service preserves the places where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II. Follow the stories of their relocation, internment, and resettlement." For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.
         After Dark in the Park is one of many programs sponsored by the Friends of Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE LAND & WATER CONSERVATION FUND is under attack, according to League of Conservation voters. The organization notes that the fund brings in $900 million annually to the federal government to support land and water conservation from revenue generated from offshore oil and gas projects. League of Conservation Voters
    released a statement today saying money that's supposed to go to national and locally managed parks, "ends up being siphoned into other projects. Last year, Congress only approved using $495 million of it. It should be a scandal."
        The League announced that it is "hearing that members of the House are organizing for a floor vote to secure mandatory funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. If this passes it's huge — it's permanent funding for parks around the country."
          However, "We're not sure we have the votes. Environmental groups are organizing to push for full funding. We're mobilizing to flood House and Senate offices with letters. We're organizing activists in key states. The group suggests contacting U.S. Senators and House members immediately. See https://p2a.co/IjGRmwt?p2asource=C4GAWMNEPA

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditationand more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    THURSDAY, JAN. 30

    Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – -Pāhala Community Center. 928-3102


    The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.


    Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – Cooper CenterVolcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org


    FRIDAY, JAN. 31
    Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

    SATURDAY, FEB. 1
    Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45a.m. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

    Indigo Fundamentals Workshop, Saturday, Feb. 1 at  Indigo dyeing with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp. volcanoartcenter.org


    Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training with Tim Tunison, Saturday, Feb. 1, 1-3p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 2

    Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at  with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


    TUESDAY, FEB. 4

    Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
    OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Wednesdays beginning Feb. 5, 8a.m.-2p.m. at the future Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed.
         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.


         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13,  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16. A live woodturning demonstration at VAC will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1, from  to 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.


    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū. Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano from University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa faculty; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based pianist from UH-Mānoa; Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Soprano with the Metropolitan Opera; Virutuoso Violinist Eric Silberger; and Carlin Ma, Pianist. Tickets will be available soon and information on tickets will soon be found on the HIMF website: himusicfestival.com.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Makahiki season in Kaʻū will be discussed at the Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park tomorrow
    at 9:30 a.m. Photo by Nohea Kaʻawa
    RISK OF THE 2019 NOVEL CORONAVIRUS IS LOW in Hawaiʻi, even thought the World Health Organization declared a global health emergency and the U.S. government recommended refraining from travel to China. The government also confirmed the first case of transmission of the virus from one person to another inside this country. The New York Times reported that Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said, "We understand that this may be concerning. But our assessment remains that the immediate risk to the American public is low."
         The office of Governor David Ige, issued a statement today, saying there are "no reported cases" of 2019-nCoV in Hawaiʻi. Hawai‘i Department of Health is working with state, county, and federal partners – including the medical community and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – to actively prepare for possible cases, reads the statement.
         2019-nCoV originated in Wuhan, China, and there are more than 6,000 cases with 132 confirmed dead in China. At least 17 countries have reported illness, with at least five reported cases in the U.S., among people who traveled to  China, says the governor's statement. 
         Yesterday, the CDC reported that active airport screening of all incoming passengers from Wuhan, Chinais being expanded from five major U.S.airports – SFO, LAX, JFK, ATL, and ORD – to all 20 U.S.airports with CDC quarantine stations. This includes DanielK.InouyeInternationalAirport in Honolulu, with its quarantine station managed by the CDC and Customs and Border Protection.
         The governor's office advises those who have become sick after travel to China, particularly HubeiProvince, do the following:

         Seek medical care right away. Before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.

         Stay home. Except for seeking medical care, avoid contact with others.

         Do not travel while sick.

         Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
         Wash hands often with clean soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.

         State Health Director Bruce Anderson said, "The Hawai‘i Department of Health is working closely with our emergency response network to put proactive measures in place to protect our residents and visitors. Because Hawai‘i is a major travel destination, planning and preparing for possible outbreaks is an ongoing activity. The emergence of the 2019 coronavirus in Wuhan and its potential to spread to areas outside of China poses an increased threat to travelers and Hawai‘i residents and we've ramped up our efforts.

         Andersonsaid DOH advises that people not travel to China"at this time. Various areas in Chinahave been placed under quarantine by the Chinese government, and travel within the country is either completely prohibited or significantly curtailed to prevent the spread of this disease."

         Dr. Sarah Park, State Epidemiologist, said, "We investigate all reports of persons with potential 2019 novel coronavirus infection to quickly identify persons with likely infection as well as those who may have been exposed to them." She said testing is only available at CDC in Atlanta, Georgia.

         DOH also recommends that everyone get vaccinated for influenza to reduce the number of flu cases in Hawai‘i clinics and hospitals. "This will help reduce confusion as persons with influenza will have signs and symptoms like 2019-nCoV. DOH strongly recommends that residents six months and older protect themselves against flu by receiving the seasonal influenza vaccination," reads the statement.


         National Public Radio reported that, since October, more than 8,000 people in the U.S. have died from influenza viruses already recognized, and that the 2018-2019 flu season saw more than 34,000 deaths.
         For more information on public health preparedness activities in Hawai‘i visit health.hawaii.gov/prepare/about-us/office-of-public-health-preparedness/. For information on the 2019-nCoV outbreak, including information for clinicians and public health professionals, visit the following websites:


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    Sen. Brian Schatz
    "FRAUGHT WITH REAL PERIL" is how Sen. Brian Schatz described a statement from Pres. Donald Trump's attorney Alan Dershowitz during the impeachment hearings this week. Dershowitz said, "If a president does something which he believes will help him get elected in the public interest, that cannot be the kind of quid pro quo that results in impeachment."

         Said Schatz, "It is sometimes difficult to separate the daily noise from the truly dangerous stuff. But this idea is fraught with real peril.
         "They are saying that abuses of power in order to get re-elected could be considered in the national interest and therefore not impeachable. If that doesn't worry you I just don't know what to say.
         "On the one side, the House Managers established that the President abused his power to coerce a foreign government to announce a fake investigation into his political opponent. The other side asserts that such an abuse of power is not impeachable. So, both sides!"

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    BE SAFE AND DON'T BREAK THE LAW WITH DRUNKEN DRIVING this Super Bowl weekend, is the message from Hawaiʻi Police Department:
         "When Super Bowl LIV kicks off, will you be prepared? The Hawaiʻi Police Department will be. Whether you're cheering for the San Francisco49ers or Kansas City Chiefs, every Super Bowl party must start with a game plan that prevents drunk driving.

    Breathalyzers can help indicate if someone has had too much
    alcohol to drive.
         Drunk driving kills. In 2019, there were 25 fatality crashes on Hawaiʻi Island, and impairment was a factor in twelve of them. You know that many Super Bowl parties will involve alcohol, so play it smart by having a winning game plan in place to not drink and drive.
         We will all win on Super Bowl Sunday if we follow these keys to the game:

         Know the Rules: It's illegal to drive with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. When it comes to drinking and driving, law enforcement doesn't throw a yellow flag; they throw the book at you. You'll get pulled over, arrested, and prosecuted. Your wallet takes a big hit, too: the average DUI court case costs approximately $10,000.

         Play It Safe: Defenses win championships; your best defense is to plan a safe ride. Have a sober friend or family member drive you home. Call a cab, ride a bus, or contact a rideshare program. Just be a winner and choose a safe ride and take it to the house.

         Be a Party MVP: Volunteer to be a designated driver. Let your team know that you’ll be there for them when the party's over with a safe, sober ride home. 

         If You've Been Drinking, You're Benched: There's no place on the road for anyone who has been drinking. If someone tries to drive after drinking, tell them to ride the bench until you help them find a sober ride home. If you're hosting the party, you're the head coach. Make the right call: take their keys before they drink and drive.

         We're all on the same team when it comes to preventing drunk driving. And, however you or your guests travel on Super Bowl Sunday, always buckle up. Your seat belt is your best defense in any vehicle crash.
         We hope it's a great game and that you enjoy it — safely — with friends and family. Remember: Fans Don't Let Fans Drive Drunk.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    KAʻŪ RURAL HEALTH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION will hold its 21st annual Health Conference and G to 
         This year's theme is A Kaʻū High School Student Perspective on Resiliency. The keynote speaker will be Derick Kurisu, Vice President of KTA Stores Hawaiʻi. Kaʻū High School Youth will speak. Invited guests include Hawaiʻi County Mayor Harry Kim, Lt. Gov. Josh Green, and Kaʻū's County Council Member Maile David.

         At the event, there will be student art exhibits, an auction, free health screenings, informational booths, and door prizes.
         Register in advance at Kaʻū Resource Center, 808-928-0101.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MAUNA LOA VOLCANO is not erupting. The mauna's Alert Level is ADVISORY and Aviation Color Code is YELLOW. Rates of deformation and seismicity have not changed significantly over the past week and remain above long-term background levels.
         During the past week, HVO seismometers recorded 107 small magnitude earthquakes beneath the upper elevations of the volcano; the strongest was a magnitude-2.3 earthquake on January 23. Most earthquakes occurred at shallow depths of less than 5 km (~3 miles) beneath the volcano's surface.
         Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show continued slow summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly.
         For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.



    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    MAKAHIKI: A CELEBRATED SEASON will be discussed at this month's Coffee Talk at the Visitor Center of Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on Friday, Jan. 31, 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
    A Makahiki relay, to open the season, takes runners around
    the island each year. Photo by Clarissa Pua
         Makahiki is recognized and observed by many as a time to revel in Hawaiian culture with games, competition, and ceremony, and has come to be regarded as a time of peace and rejuvenation, states the announcement from the Park. In addition, Makahiki held immense importance as a method of time keeping, and was a major influence on the practices of farming, fishing, the division of resources, and even the political workings of the ruling chiefs.
         Kahakaʻio Ravenscraft works at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park through their partner Hawaii Pacific Parks Association, providing cultural demonstrations for visitors to the Park's "royal grounds." He dedicates his work to perpetuating ‘ike Kupuna (ancestral practices) through the study of kālai kiʻi (sculpture), moʻokūʻauhau (genealogy), and moʻoʻōlelo (story-telling), as well as malama ‘iwi kupuna (care of traditional burial practices). Through his endeavors, Kahakaʻio seeks to empower others to connect to ancestral wisdom and become stewards of their place with the values of aloha ‘āina and mālama honua, states the announcement.
         Coffee Talk at Kahuku is an opportunity to get to know the Park and neighbors, and join an informal conversation on a wide variety of topics. Bring coffe or purchase Kaʻū coffee from HPPA at the event. Entrance to Kahuku Unit is located on Hwy 11 near mile marker 70.5, on the mauka (mountain) side of the road.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditationand more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    FRIDAY, JAN. 31
    Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

    SATURDAY, FEB. 1
    Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45a.m. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


    Indigo Fundamentals Workshop, Saturday, Feb. 1 at  Indigo dyeing with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp. volcanoartcenter.org


    Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training with Tim Tunison, Saturday, Feb. 1, 1-3p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 2

    Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at  with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 



    TUESDAY, FEB. 4

    Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo

    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
    OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Wednesdays beginning Feb. 5, 8a.m.-2p.m. at the future Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

    THURSDAY, FEB. 6

    Hula Voices, Thursday, Feb. 6,  Presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho. volcanoartcenter.org



    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 
         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13,  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16. A live woodturning demonstration at VAC will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1, from  to 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū. Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano from University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa faculty; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based pianist from UH-Mānoa; Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Soprano with the Metropolitan Opera; Virutuoso Violinist Eric Silberger; and Carlin Ma, Pianist. Tickets will be available soon and information on tickets will soon be found on the HIMF website: himusicfestival.com.

    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    The impeachment trial of U.S. Pres. Donald Trump takes place in the U.S. Senate, where it was voted today to disallow
    witnesses in proceedings which are expected to conclude by next Wednesday. Photo from PBS
    REACTIONS TO FRIDAY'S U.S. SENATE VOTE TO EXCLUDE WITNESSES from next week's impeachment trial of Pres. Donald Trump sparked reactions from Hawaiʻi's senators.
         Sen. Mazie Hirono said, "We are witnessing the coronation of @realDonaldTrump, with Mitch McConnell holding the crown and Republicans holding his train. Our country is in great danger. @realDonaldTrump already had few constraints on his behavior and now there will be even fewer. He's been let off the hook by Republicans. But he's not going to be set free by the American people." She said Trump is "focusing on: attacking immigrants, cutting Social Security, [and] getting rid of protections for those with pre-existing conditions. Stay tuned as he becomes more emboldened than ever."
         Sen. Brian Schatz said, "No witnesses means no exoneration. If John Bolton has something to say it needs to be said before Wednesday at  when Republicans vote to acquit the President without conducting a trial."


         Trump was impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives, but the trial to remove him is conducted in the U.S. Senate, with the Supreme Court Chief Justice overseeing the procedure. With Republicans dominating the Senate, the vote is expected to leave Trump in office. with the decision on whether to keep him in office left up to voters in the 2020 election.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    SAFETY FOR SENIORS AND HELPING ELDERLY TO AGE AT HOME with support services are top priorities of the state House-Senate package of bills submitted this session by Kūpuna Caucus. Kūpuna Caucus consists of 54 House and Senate members and community organizations, government agencies, and individuals concerned about well-being of seniors in Hawaiʻi communities.
         Rep. Gregg Takayama, House co-convener of the Kūpuna Caucus, said, "These measures are aimed at meeting the increased needs of our seniors, who this year comprise fully one-fifth of our state population. We're also concerned about a seeming increase in crimes against senior citizens, the most vulnerable members in our community."
         Sen. Sharon Moriwaki, Senate co-convener of the Kūpuna Caucus, said, "Our package, while continuing to support programs to keep our kūpuna healthy and aging in their own homes, also aims at helping our most vulnerable – caring for those with dementia, supporting the Long-Term Care Ombudsman serving 15,000 elders in long term care facilities, and stiffening penalties for those who would attack or exploit our seniors."
         Kūpuna Caucus measures can be read through links below with opportunities to submit testimony:
         HB 1874, SB 2334 - Increases penalties for violent and financial crimes against elderly. Standardizes definition of elderly as age 60.
         HB 1873, SB 2340 - Establishes outreach program to inform medical professionals that care planning services for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias is a covered benefit under Medicare.
         HB 1865, SB 2339 - Requires Health Department to establish an Alzheimer's disease and related dementias training program for care workers who deal with patients and clients.
         HB 1866, SB 2335 - Requests $550,000 to continue the Health Aging Partnership program to improve the health and well-being of kūpuna.
     HB 1867, SB 2342 - Requests $2 million to continue implementation of the Kūpuna Caregivers program to assist working family caregivers.
         HB 1868, SB 2338 - Lowers the age a person can be exempt from jury duty from 80 years of age to 75.
         HB 1869, SB 2341 - Allows a disability parking permit for persons with a disability that requires special accommodations to enter and exit their vehicle but does not impair the ability to walk.
         HB 1870, SB 2336 - Requires the 30-day lapse or termination notices for long-term care policies to be sent by certified mail or commercial delivery service instead of first-class mail.
         HB 1872, SB 2337 - Requests funds for the office of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman for six full-time specialists; two each on Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi, and one each on Kauaʻi and Maui.
         HB 1871, SB 2333 - Requests $100,000 to update the five-year comprehensive long-term care plan issued in 2012.
         Read the Kūpuna Caucus Package Report. See State Executive Office on Aging. Connect with the Hawai`i State Health Insurance Program that helps people with Medicare.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
    HAWAIʻI INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL will be held Sunday March 8, at Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that celebrates native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū , an organization dedicated to "perpetuating, protecting, and conserving the lands, health, knowledge, culture, and history of Kaʻū and its people."

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.
         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.comfor more.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    RURAL HOMEOWNERS are encouraged to apply to Habitat for Hawaiʻi Island for home repairs or improvements. The non-profit was awarded funds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Housing Services through the 2019 Housing Preservation Grant. Habitat Hawaiʻi Island will use funds to remove health or safety barriers, perform critical home repairs, and/or improve accessibility for a family member with a dis

    ability of rural homeowners on Hawaiʻi Island. Hilo town homeowners are not eligible.
         Apply for assistance by contacting Jane Mireles, Family Services Manager, at  (808) 331-8010 or jane.mireles@habitathawaiiisland.org. Applications are due by Saturday, February 29.
         Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island, an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, is an equal opportunity housing provider and employer.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    STEAM VENTS IN HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES will be without a parking lot Monday, Feb. 3 from 8 a.m. to noon for little fire ant treatment. Only the Steam Vents parking lot and the trail from the parking lot to Wahinekapu (Steaming Bluff) will be closed; Wahinekapu and Crater Rim Trail will remain open. If it rains, a backup date is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 5 at the same time.
    Invasive Little Fire Ants are on their way to being eradicated from Hawaiʻi
    Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo
         LFA detections have decreased by at least 99 percent at Steam Vents since the park began treating the area in February 2019. In 2018, LFA were abundant and readily observed on vegetation and along the edge of the parking lot. In September 2019, park pest control workers found LFA on just 0.1 percent of bait stations.
         Park Ecologist David Benitez said, "We are making great progress, and only small, isolated LFA populations remain. Our work will continue until LFA are no longer found, and we will continue to monitor this and other high risk sites throughout the park to detect and remove newly arrived LFA before they spread. We are thankful for the public's support, and remind visitors to help by checking their gear and vehicles for LFA before coming to the park."
         Pest control workers will treat Steam Vents every four to six weeks and the park will announce the temporary closures in news releases, on the park website, nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes, and via social media. The goal is to completely eliminate the ants from the area. This will be the ninth treatment cycle at Steam Vents.
         For more information on LFA, how to control them and how to prevent spreading them, visit littlefireants.com.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    SATURDAY, FEB. 1
    Stewardship at the Summit, Saturday, Feb. 1 and 15 and Friday, Feb. 7, 21, and 28. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45a.m. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


    Indigo Fundamentals Workshop, Saturday, Feb. 1 at  Indigo dyeing with Wai‘ala Ahn and Justin Tripp. volcanoartcenter.org


    Forest Work Day and Plant Identification Training with Tim Tunison, Saturday, Feb. 1, 1-3p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 2

    Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at  with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


    TUESDAY, FEB. 4

    Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
    OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Wednesdays beginning Feb. 5, 8a.m.-2p.m. at the future Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

    THURSDAY, FEB. 6

    Hula Voices, Thursday, Feb. 6,  Presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho. volcanoartcenter.org



    FRIDAY, FEB. 7
    Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū - Community Mtg. and 
    Membership Drive
    , Friday, Feb. 7,  at the Nāʻālehu Community Center. Topics include revival of annual Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, to be held Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member should also come to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization. Contact Terry-Lee Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.

    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13,  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16. A live woodturning demonstration at VAC will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1, from  to 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū. Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano from University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa faculty; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based pianist from UH-Mānoa; Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Soprano with the Metropolitan Opera; Virutuoso Violinist Eric Silberger; and Carlin Ma, Pianist. Tickets will be available soon and information on tickets will soon be found on the HIMF website: himusicfestival.com.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Hawaiian petrels hatch from eggs in burrows high on Mauna Loa. Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park will monitor them
    by helicopter from elevations of 5,500 feet to 9,000 feet this Tuesday, Feb. 4 and Wednesday, Feb. 5. See more below.
    Photo by Andre Raine from American Bird Conservancy
    HELP IN EXPANDING HEART AND CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS is sought by Hilo Medical Center which serves Kaʻū Hospital. When the 2020 Hawaiʻi State Legislative session opened on Wednesday, Jan. 15, representatives of the health care facilities made the rounds at the Capitol to thank legislators for their support and inform them of funding needs to expand the cancer center and cardiology services. This session, the Kaʻū and Hilo hospital staff is following Senate Bill 2535, introduced by Sen. Kai Kahele, and is asking for community support through testimony to the Legislature. The measure would appropriates funds to improve health care services related to cardiac care at Hilo Medical Center.
         Last year, more than 400 cardiac catheterizations were performed by the Hilo team of cardiologists. See the YouTube video making the case for a second cath lab. See Senate Bill 2535 with its link to give testimony.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    FEBRUARY IS HEART MONTH. Kaʻū Hospital and Hilo Medical Center support the campaign to encourage people to become as familiar with their blood pressure as they are with their height and weight.
         Community First and Japanese Chamber of Commerce recently featured interventional cardiologist, Dr. Jamison Wyatt, and Director of the Ornish Lifestyle Medicine Program and Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, Marisa Salmoiraghi. They shared health implications of high blood pressure, and explained cardiology services provided at Hilo Medical Center through its facilities and through Kaʻū Hospital.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    CHECKING UP ON PETRELS, the endangered Hawaiian ʻuaʻa - seabirds that fish in the ocean and nest in the lower alpine and subalpine slopes of Mauna Loa at elevations as high as 9,000 feet, is one of the missions of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park in February.
         This Tuesday, Feb. 4, and Wednesday, Feb. 5, a crew will monitor petrels by helicopter at elevations of 5,500 feet to 9,000 feet between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. The crew will look for burrows where petrels nest after years out at sea. Scientists estimate they can fly and forage more than 6,000 miles in two weeks before returning to their nests.
         Other Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park flight plans for February 2020:
         Monday, Feb. 3, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., to fly transects above the Kahuku Unit in Ka‘ū between 1,800-ft. and 5,000-ft. elevation to monitor Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death and take aerial imagery of cultural landscape structures.
         Tuesday, Feb. 4; Wednesday, Feb. 5; and Wednesday, Feb. 19, between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m., for fence equipment and material transport to the Kahuku – Ka‘ū Forest Reserve boundary between 5,000- and 5,500-ft. elevation.
    Hawaiian petrel, the ʻuaʻa. Photo by Jim Denny from American Bird Conservancy
         Tuesday, Feb. 18 and Thursday, Feb. 20, between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m., to haul camp gear to and from the university Volcano Research Station and ‘Ōla‘a-Koa Unit for ungulate monitoring and control between 3,500- and 4,000-ft. elevation.
         Tuesday, Feb. 18, between 8 a.m. and noon, to survey and control invasive Guinea grass along Keauhou trail, from the coast to 2,000-ft. elevation.
         In addition, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation.
         The park regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather. A statement from the Park says its management requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE FINAL INSTALLMENT OF VOLCANO AWARENESS MONTH'S VOLCANO WATCH stories covers the jobs of seismologists. It is written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory seismologist Brian Shiro:
    People and Jobs at HVO, Part Four: The Shaky Work of HVO Seismologists

         When I was seven years old, I won my county's earthquake safety poster contest. I remember going to a special award luncheon with the mayor, who complimented my work and gave me an "Earthquake in a Can" toy. Little did I know how much that event would influence my life.

         Flash forward to almost 35 years later. I am now part of the seismic team at USGS HVO. As a professional seismologist, I monitor and study earthquakes to understand volcanoes and help keep people safe. It's a profoundly rewarding job.

    Geophysicist Brian Shiro, manager of the USGS HVO seismic network, was 
    part of HVO's team that installed several new stations on Kīlauea Volcano's 
    lower East Rift Zone to monitor earthquakes during the 2018 eruption. 
    The station they installed here, ERZ1, was eventually overrun by 
    lava, but it provided important data while it lasted. USGS photo

         HVO seismologists take turns being on-call each week. The on-duty seismologist tracks earthquake activity each day and must be ready to respond to hazardous earthquakes or to significant changes in seismic activity at our volcanoes.

         A typical response might involve an alarm that goes off in the middle of the night for a Hawaiʻi earthquake that is magnitude-4 or greater. As part of the local community, I am just as affected by seismic hazards as any resident, so I quickly roll out of bed, communicate with colleagues, and get to work analyzing the earthquake.

         Although computers automatically detect earthquakes, a human must review the data to ensure accurate characterization of the event. With many data streams to check, the duty seismologist spends up to an hour reviewing data before updating the earthquake solution online. This is why the magnitude and location for an earthquake can sometimes change from the initial posting. See our past Volcano Watch article about this for more info, volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_volcano_watch.html?vwid=458.

    A seismometer records earthquake activity. USGS photo
         It's important to get earthquake information accurate as quickly as we can, especially if an event poses a shaking or volcanic hazard. During Kīlauea's 2018 eruption, I was glued to my chair analyzing earthquakes in near-real time as magma moved eastward towards Leilani Estates and later erupted from multiple fissures. The reviewed earthquake locations helped us pinpoint where eruptions were more likely – and less likely – to occur.

         The day-to-day office work between volcanic crises varies depending on each seismologist's particular responsibilities and the current volcanic or seismic activity. Some of us primarily analyze and publish earthquake information, while others are mainly involved with interpretation and research.

         HVO seismic analysts spend most of their time sifting through the earthquakes that occur each day, manually evaluating them, and publishing them to the USGS online earthquake catalog, earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/. It takes a keen eye to "pick" the arrival times of the P- and S-waves recorded at each seismic station and re-calculate the hypocentral parameters (location, depth, and magnitude) for each earthquake.

         Over HVO's decades-long history, the way seismologists have gone about this task has evolved a lot. My pre-computer forebearers measured seismic wave arrival times and amplitudes on paper seismograph records and figured out the location of earthquakes on a map using a ruler and string. Although the physics has not changed, our tools certainly have. We've traded paper and rulers for computer monitors and mice.

    Earthquakes can cause small to major damage. Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National
    Park is still recovering from the quakes during the 2018 eruption.
    USGS photo
         The art of "timing" earthquakes in this fashion develops over years of experience. It forms from a combination of knowing how seismic waves travel through the Earth, acquiring requisite computer skills, and practicing to consistently identify signals properly. I first learned how to do this 20 years ago in graduate school but am always learning new things as science progresses.

         In my role as HVO's seismic network manager, I also monitor the state of health of the seismic stations operating in the field. If a station goes down, I try to figure out why and address the problem. As a manager, I also spend a lot of time on administrative tasks like planning, writing reports, purchasing equipment, and coordinating with outside partners.

         Being part of a multidisciplinary team monitoring dynamic volcanoes is both challenging and exciting for me. As the field of volcano seismology continues to develop, we continually learn new things to advance our understanding and improve public safety.

         Just as our tools have changed with time, our methods continue to evolve. In the future, artificial intelligence algorithms will likely help us characterize earthquakes, but there will always be a seismologist to develop and implement these tools.

         Perhaps a seven-year-old child today will be that future seismologist.

    Every dot represents earthquake activity. Each one is reviewed by a
    seismologist. USGS image
         This article is the fourth in a series of articles about HVO's people and jobs during Volcano Awareness Month 2020. Next week, HVO geologists write about their work.

         Volcano Activity Updates

         Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL. Kīlauea monitoring data showed no significant changes in seismicity and ground deformation. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remain low. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen.

         Mauna Loa is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption is certain.
         This past week, 107 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa; the strongest was a M2.3 on Jan. 23. Deformation indicates continued slow summit inflation. Fumarole temperature and gas concentrations on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable.

         Four earthquakes with three or more felt reports occurred in the Hawaiian Islands this past week: a magnitude-3.3 quake 15 km (9 mi) southeast of Volcano at 5 km (3 mi) depth on Jan. 30 at 1:51 a.m.; a magnitude-3.8 quake 16 km (10 mi) southwest of Leilani Estates at 6 km (4 mi) depth on Jan. 29 at 12:23 p.m.; a magnitude-2.8 quake 14 km (9 mi) southeast of Hōnaunau-Nāpō‘opo‘o at 5 km (3 mi) depth on Jan. 25 at 10:22 a.m.; and a magnitude-2.8 quake 5 km (3 mi) northeast of Pāhala at 34 km (21 mi) depth on Jan. 24 at 4:52 a.m.

         HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity. Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    SUNDAY, FEB. 2

    Super Bowl Party, Sunday, Feb. 2, Lava Lounge at Kīlauea Military Camp. Doors open at  with kick-off at , 'til pau. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


    TUESDAY, FEB. 4

    Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
    OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Wednesdays beginning Feb. 5, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., mauka on Hwy 11 at the old Nāʻālehu Fruit Stand and future home of the Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

    THURSDAY, FEB. 6

    Hula Voices, Thursday, Feb. 6, p.m.  Presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho.  volcanoartcenter.org



    FRIDAY, FEB. 7
    Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū - Community Mtg. and 
    Membership Drive
    , Friday, Feb. 7,  at the Nāʻālehu Community Center. Topics include revival of annual Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, to be held Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member should also come to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization. Contact Terry-Lee Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.

    SATURDAY, FEB. 8

    16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m.  Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org



    ONGOING
    Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m.  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or  Eight-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. - 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Livestock husbandry would be included in the new farmer training program proposed in the Hawaiʻi Legislature.
    See more below. Photo from Hubbles Hog Heaven
    CHINA-HAWAIʻI FLIGHTS ARE SUSPENDED. Lt. Gov. Josh Green, formerly a physician in Kaʻū, made the announcement today for the State of Hawaiʻi. He said that all direct flights are canceled. However, on Friday, the federal government announced that Oʻahu's Daniel K. Inouye Airport will be one of seven locations in the U.S. where flights will be redirected to check people showing symptoms of Coronavirus. Passengers would be examined and quarantined on Oʻahu, where the federal Center for Disease Control plans to conduct health screenings.
    China Eastern Air is stopping the only direct flights
    between China and Hawaiʻi, starting Monday.
    Photo from China Eastern Air
         Green said state government "is prepared. We will be spending 24/7 on this to make sure that whatever steps are necessary to be taken, to keep our people safe, we will do." He said that a military base will likely be chosen for quarantines of about two weeks.
         Republican state Rep. Gene Ward said the federal government is playing "Russian Roulette" with Hawaiʻi's economy by making it a stopover to check for passengers for Coronavirus. He said it could encourage fear in people who would refrain from vacationing in Hawaiʻi, even though there have been no cases here. "Half of our economy gets decimated if we have just a handful of tourists."
         The only direct flights between China and Hawaiʻi are on China Eastern Air six days a week. The last flight before the suspension arrives Monday.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    NEW FARMER TRAINING is the aim of a bill in the Hawaiʻi Legislature, supported by two of Kaʻū's legislators and Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. SB2709 would fund a five-year beginning farmers training program to be administrated by the state Department of Agriculture. It was introduced by east Kaʻū Sen. Russel Ruderman and colleagues. Its companion bill in the state House of Representatives, HB1894, was introduced by west Kaʻū's Rep. Richard Creagan and colleagues.
    Hawaiʻi Farmers Union encourages testimony to the Hawaiʻi Legislature to support new farmer training.
    Photo from Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United
         The bill says the legislature find it is necessary to support beginning farmers by partnering with nonprofit organizations, to provide training opportunities. "The legislature further finds that applicable nonprofit organizations, especially those in rural areas, lack sufficient resources to expand existing training programs. The legislature believes that a beginning farmer training program could increase farming in the state, ensure the continued use of well-developed farming methods, and provide for the cultivation of new farming methods."
         The justification for the bill contends that "new and aspiring farmers face a myriad of challenges, including acquiring adequate production, and business knowledge and skills, and accessing the tools necessary to evaluate their resources and develop feasible farming and business plans. However, the State lacks qualified farming method teachers and funding for beginning farmer training. Further, although the United State's Department of Agriculture provides funding for beginning farmers, this funding is limited and unreliable.
         "The legislature believes that the future of the state's farming industry, food supply, and agriculture is reliant upon increasing and diversifying the number of new farmers in the state; introducing regenerative farming methods into the state; enhancing the long-term viability of farm businesses; utilizing and building upon existing beginning farmer training methods; providing opportunities for potential farmers who are socially or financially disadvantaged; and increasing support for beginning farmers who already own or manage a farm, and have farmed for five years or less."
    Skills in planting, tending harvesting, and the business of farming would be taught through the new program.
    Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
         The plan calls for implementing "strategies to increase the number of new farmers in the state, with a focus on recruiting low-income persons, disabled persons, and military veterans." It would assist qualified farmer training providers seeking federal and county funding to expand their training offerings.
         The bill defines a beginning farmer as one who is "eligible for training for a maximum of one year; qualifies for Hawaiʻi resident tuition or provides proof that the beginning farmer has been farming for no more than five years; maintains satisfactory academic progress; and demonstrates an interest in pursuing a career in the state's agricultural industry."
         Trainees would learn skills in planting, tending, cultivating, and harvesting various types of crops; and raising livestock and poultry. The training program would teach soil health; agricultural business operations, including workforce issues, regulatory compliance, and general operations; and industry analysis of the agricultural industry and related markets.
         To testify, link to the Senate Bill SB2709 and the House Bill HB1894.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    GIVE INPUT ON A RESOLUTION TO REDUCE HERBICIDE USE in Hawaiʻi County on Tuesday, Feb. 4 at Hawaiʻi County Council's Committee on Agriculture, Water, Energy, and Environmental Management will hear testimony and hear a progress report from County Administration in the Hilo Council chamber, 25 Aupuni Street, Suite 1401. Interested members of the public are encouraged to testify in person in Hilo, or via videoconference at the Council's courtesy sites in Nā‘ālehu, Pāhoa, Kapa‘au, Waimea, and Kona.

         The legislation is introduced "In an effort to reconcile the expressed public priority of reducing herbicide use," after Bill 101, to stop use of 23 herbicides on county land, was vetoed last year by Mayor Harry Kim. The council did not have enough votes to counter the veto. Resolution No. 475-20 would "move toward eliminating herbicide exposure to the public by reducing its use on land managed by the County."
    2019 Mosaics in Science intern MyLynn Phan displays
    her curriculum in Washington, D.C. NPS Photo
         The new approach proposed "encourages the establishment of a vegetation management advisory commission that could investigate solutions, generate ideas for workable legislation that balances risks and benefits, and would draw on a wide variety of expert advice to help the Council and the Administration make good decisions," states the announcement from the council.


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    TOMORROW IS THE LAST DAY TO APPLY for Mosaics of Science, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position. The internship is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend is provided and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
         The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 

         The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
    A 4.2 earthquake south of Volcano and a small quake at
    Pāhala shook the communities this evening.
    USGS map
         For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A 4.22 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE shook southeast Hawaiʻi Island at 8:37 p.m. Sunday. The epicenter was 4.35 miles south of Volcano Village. Depth was 4.3 miles. Shaking was felt as far away as North Kona. Immediate "Felt" reports indicated the quake was "light to moderate." No damage nor tsunami alerts were reported as of 9:20 p.m.
         Numerous earthquakes have been shaking the Pāhala and Volcano areas during the last two weeks. See volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_earthquakes.html.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    TUESDAY, FEB. 4

    Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
    OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Wednesdays beginning Feb. 5, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., mauka on Hwy 11 at the old Nāʻālehu Fruit Stand and future home of the Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

    THURSDAY, FEB. 6

    Hula Voices, Thursday, Feb. 6, p.m. Presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho. volcanoartcenter.org

    FRIDAY, FEB. 7
    Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū - Community Mtg. and 
    Membership Drive
    , Friday, Feb. 7,  at the Nāʻālehu Community Center. Topics include revival of annual Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, to be held Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member should also come to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization. Contact Terry-Lee Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.

    SATURDAY, FEB. 8

    16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 9

    Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    See the drone footage taken by University of Hawaiʻi researchers with a permit from NOAA, showing a humpback 
    whale calf shortly after birth. Video from University of Hawaiʻi.
    AN ABUNDANCE OF HUMPBACK WHALE MOTHERS AND CALVES in Hawaiian nearshore waters was reported today by Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, which notified ocean users to keep a safe distance.
         Humpback whale season in Hawaiʻi runs from about November through May, although whales may be encountered in limited numbers during other months. Thousands of humpback whales return to Hawaiian waters each year to breed, give birth, and nurse their young.
         With recent reports of multiple mother/calf pairs in Hawaiʻi, ocean users are reminded to keep a safe distance from these annual visitors. Collisions with vessels are a risk to both the animals and humans.
         Boaters are reminded to post a lookout at all times throughout the year, not just when whales are visiting Hawaiian waters. An extra set of eyes scanning the waters ahead and to the side of a boat can prevent collisions with marine life, obstructions, divers, and other vessels. Slower speeds may also reduce the risk of collisions with the animals.
    Humpback mother and calf within 20 minutes of birth last year, as
    captured by a crew from University of Hawaiʻi.
    Photo from University of Hawaiʻi
         Humpback whales are protected in Hawaiʻi. Federal regulations prohibit approaching within 100 yards of whales when on the water, and 1,000 feet when operating an aircraft. These and other regulations apply to all ocean users, including vessel operators, kayakers, paddle boarders, windsurfers, swimmers, and divers throughout the Hawaiian Islands.
         Ed Lyman, Natural Resources Specialist for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, said, "Ocean users are a great resource in helping monitor the humpback whales in the sanctuary and nearby waters. By locating distressed animals, reporting, and providing the initial documentation and assessment on the animal, ocean users are the foundation of our conservation efforts."
         The National Marine Sanctuary staff urges those who come across an injured or entangled marine mammal to maintain the required safe distance and call the NOAA Marine Mammal Hotline at 1-888-256-9840 immediately, or the U.S. Coast Guard on VHF channel 16. If reporting a suspected approach zone violation, call the NOAA Fisheries Enforcement Hotline at 1-800-853-1964. Additional guidelines and safety tips can be found at hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov.
         The sanctuary is administered by a partnership of NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawaiʻi through the Division of Aquatic Resources. The sanctuary works to protect humpback whales through research, education, conservation and stewardship. See Facebook.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park will receive a half million dollar upgrade in
    its air cleaning, cooling, and heating system, with installation from March into summer. NPS photo
    CLIMATE CONTROL FOR Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will be improved, the project running from March into summer. The $571,450 contract, with funding from entrance fees, is awarded to Regal Service Co. It includes a major air conditioning system installation to improve the comfort and safety of visitors and employees inside the busiest facility in the park.
    Work on the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) project is scheduled to start in early March with a completion date in summer 2020, although dates are subject to change. Visitors and tour operators will
    experience some disruption in services, but Kīlauea Visitor Center will remain open, and the Park and its non-profit partner, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, are working to minimize impacts.
         Tentative dates are below with updates on the park website:
         March 4 – 25, 2020: The Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association park store in Kīlauea Visitor Center will close and relocate to an alternate location nearby. Details such as location and operating hours will be shared once they are finalized.
         March 16 – 20: New front doors will be installed, visitors may be directed to enter and exit Kīlauea Visitor Center through the auditorium door.
         March 26 – June 30: The auditorium will be closed, but the visitor center will remain open. Park films, including Born of Fire, Born of the Sea, will not be shown. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will continue to be shown on a television in the exhibits area, and is available online for free download. Some After Dark in the Park and other special auditorium programs will be rescheduled, or relocated to Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus.
         In addition to providing a comfortable temperature in the most-visited facility in the park, the new HVAC system will be equipped with air purifiers that reduce sulfur dioxide and other harmful volcanic gases when Kīlauea erupts again.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Infographic from ballbearingsmag.com
    ADDRESSING THE UNDERLYING CAUSES OF BULLYING by servicing needs of the homeless and LGBTQIA+ communities is the focus of three bills introduced into the 2020 Hawai‘i Legislature. Rep. Ryan Yamane introduced the following:

         HB2038 would establishes a two-year mobile facilities pilot program for the Department of Human Services to purchase, staff, and operate mobile facilities on Department of Education property to provide services including laundry, showers, oral hygiene, and food for homeless children and their family members. The bill passed the House Human Services & Homelessness and Lower & Higher Education committees last Thursday.

         HB2483 is about bullying and requires all entities that provide educational or recreational activities to youths to establish, maintain, and enforce written policies and procedures on bullying, harassment, and retaliation, and provide staff with appropriate annual training, regardless of whether the entity receives any government funding. The bill passed the House Human Services & Homelessness and Lower & Higher Education committees last Thursday.

         HB2037 establishes the Hawaiʻi State Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Plus Commission and the Hawaiʻi State Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Plus Commission Trust Fund. The bill passed the House Committee on Human Services & Homelessness on Wednesday.

         Yamane said, "My commitment to tackling the issue of bullying has led me to discover that the two groups most frequently targeted in these acts are members of the homeless population and of the LGBTQ+ community. We have talked to students and community members who share our deep concerns of the impact of bullying on our children. I hope these measures will help ensure our children have a safe place to learn, play, and grow.
         Michael Golojuch, Jr., Chair of the LGBT Caucus of the Democratic Party of Hawaiʻi, said, "Far too often when people look at bullying it is only addressed after the fact but with these bills they look at how to try to stop bullying before it starts and address the causes. They address the needs of Hawaiʻi's most vulnerable community the homeless to LGBTQIA+ community. We at the LGBT Caucus are really appreciative of Representative Yamane's leadership in introducing these bills."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
    The inaugural Volcano's Ōhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon donated a potion of its proceeds to research on Rapid Ōhiʻa Death
    and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. Photo from Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon
    REGISTRATION FOR VOLCANO'S ʻŌHIʻA LEHUA HALF MARATHON and shorter races is open. Competitors can sign up online through Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. Added to the half are a 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences.
         The Half Marathon will start at , with the other distances to follow shortly after. The Keiki Dash will begin at on the grounds where the other races begin. The race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in VolcanoVillageat The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. Run through a beautiful ‘ōhiʻa forest with scenic views of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa.
         Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
    Baby ʻōhiʻa were given as prizes to overall and age group winners at
    last year's race. Photo from Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon
         Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration. Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10.
         All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
         Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27, at the race start.

         Last year, overall and age group winners won baby ʻōhiʻa trees as their prizes.
         See webscorer.com/register?raceid=206844&fbclid=IwAR3oW9xsDz-C-e9yba1vSHNLczaaL86d2osh__CkWrJKdGnCkc5piQEL2kUto register.
         The race is held the same weekend as the second annual Experience Volcano Festival, which hosts an array of events spanning the whole of Volcano Area, from AkatsukaOrchidGardensto the Volcano Winery, with a concentration of activities in the heart of historic VolcanoVillage. Experience art, nature, food, music, and more. See experiencevolcano.com.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    TUESDAY, FEB. 4

    Spotlight on Artist Diana Miller, Tuesday, Feb. 4 at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This program will highlight the works of local artist and part-time park
    ranger, Diana Miller. From her early days as an art major, to her career with the U.S. Air Force painting nose-art on aircraft, to her works celebrating native Hawai‘i, learn what inspires this local artist. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo

    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
    OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Wednesdays beginning Feb. 5, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., mauka on Hwy 11 at the old Nāʻālehu Fruit Stand and future home of the Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

    THURSDAY, FEB. 6

    Hula Voices, Thursday, Feb. 6, p.m. Presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho. volcanoartcenter.org

    FRIDAY, FEB. 7
    Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū - Community Mtg. and 
    Membership Drive
    , Friday, Feb. 7,  at the
    Nāʻālehu Community Center. Topics include revival of annual Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, to be held Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member should also come to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization. Contact Terry-Lee Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.

    SATURDAY, FEB. 8

    16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 9

    Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.

    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb.
    22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Kauahaʻao Congregational Church will host a bicentennial celebration at the Henry ʻOpukahaʻia Memorial Chapel
    above Punaluʻu Beach on Sunday, Feb. 16. See more below.
    THE STATE OF THE UNIONfrom Pres. Donald Trump today drew comments from most of the Hawaiʻi congressional delegation:
         Sen. Brian Schatz said, "Tonight the president had an opportunity to bring people together during this dark time. Unfortunately, what we heard was the same divisiveness that has defined his presidency. While there may be a chance for compromise on infrastructure, the address offered no real solutions to the challenges we face. Nevertheless, I will continue to look for common ground in the Senate, and fight the administration when they undermine American values."

         Sen. Mazie Hirono said, "The current #StateofHealthCareis under attack. @realDonaldTrumphas used all three branches of government to sabotage our health care system and threaten coverage for vulnerable Americans. Health care is a right, not a privilege for the wealthy.”
         Rep. Ed Case said, "I yearned for the speech of a President to a divided nation recognizing deep disagreements, acknowledging differing views and offering a united way forward, but instead I heard the stump speech of a candidate chasing votes at the expense of even deeper division."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Render of the 2019 novel coronavirus by scientificanimations.com
    HAWAIʻI COUNTY CIVIL DEFENSE SENT OUT A CORONAVIRUS ALERT at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, confirming there are no cases in Hawaiʻi but stating the county is "working closely with key agency partners to ensure timely and accurate information about the coronavirus." An informational pamphlet will be available Friday.
         There are no more direct flights between China and Hawaiʻi after today, but Honolulu International Airport is one of seven selected U.S. airports to receive flights with people who need quarantine for the virus. Lt. Gov. Josh Green, a physician who practiced years ago in Kaʻū, said, "Hawaiʻi did not volunteer HNL to be a designated airport for U.S. citizens returning from China… We don't like it any more than anybody else. The federal government decided that because we have CDC capacity at our airports and because we are strategically located in between Asia and the mainland U.S. that we should be one of the seven… Nonetheless, we worked diligently over the weekend to prepare and continue to do so.
         "We will only be seeing returning people to the United States. Of course, anybody that lives in Hawaiʻi, we're going to welcome them home, but if they've been in the region they will have to be quarantined for two weeks," possibly in their own homes, Green said. "We're putting a lot of different safety areas and safety plans in place so I don't want people to be too concerned. But we will be totally transparent so people will know what's going on as far as any planes that come here, exactly if we've had any cases, which we have not had any, and exactly what people need to do to avoid contamination or exposure to any virus."

         Republican state Rep. Gene Ward said he is reaching out to the White House to request that Hawaiʻi be taken off the of the list of locations designated to for diversion of flights from China in order to screen passengers. He said it could hurt Hawaiʻi's tourism industry.

         CDC reminds the public to "Wash hands, cover mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, stay home from work or school if sick, avoid close contact with sick individuals, and see your doctor if feeling ill."
         Daily updates on 2019-nCoV issues that may affect those in Hawaiʻi will be provided by Civil Defense. For more info, call Civil Defense at 935-0031, or DOH at 974-6001 and after-hours at 211.

    Red areas show where the 2019-nCoV is confirmed. Hawaiʻi is a small, light pink spot in the middle, on the far left.
    CDC map

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    A HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN IS IN THE WORKS AND KAʻŪ RESIDENTS ARE SOUGHT TO HELP WITH INPUT, according to a release from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense today. The county has developed developed Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan. Fill out the survey at surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP.
         The county statement says that public participation and feedback "are a vital part of the hazard mitigation planning process." The survey closes Friday, Feb. 14. The Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property.
         The Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan is required to be eligible for FEMA funds and must be updated every five years. The Plan is designed to be closely related to and influence the County's General Plan and the Emergency Operations Plan. To keep up to date with the project, sign up for event notifications, visit hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020.
         For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.

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    THE BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF KAUAHAʻAO CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH is announced for Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. The celebration will begin at , followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.
    Dedication plaque inside the Henry ʻOpukahaʻia Memorial Chapel above Punaluʻu Beach.

         Guest speaker at this bicentennial celebration will be Pastor Kaʻeo Decoite from Maui. Descendant of Henry ‘Opukahaʻia, Deborah L. Lee - who followed the dreams she repeatedly had that Henry wanted to come home to his homeland, and brought ‘Opukahaʻia 's remains back to Hawaiʻi in 1993 - will also share in the celebration. ‘Opukahaʻia was reinterned at Kahikolu Congregational Church in Napoʻopoʻo.
         The celebration will focus on the commemoration of 200 Years of Christianity in Hawaiʻi. The celebration will also be held in remembrance of ‘Opukahaʻia, the first Christian from Hawaiʻi, who was born in 1792 near Ninole. He died on Feb. 17, 1818 in CornwallConnecticut, before he had the chance to return to his homeland to bring the Gospel of Jesus Christ. It was ‘Opukahaʻia who inspired the American Protestant Mission to come to Hawaiʻi to share the Gospel. On April 4, 1820, the Thaddeus arrived and anchored in Kona. The ninth ABCFM company arrived on May 21, 1841, on the Gloucester. On board was Rev. John Davis Paris, who founded Kauahaʻao Congregational Church in Waiʻōhinu in November of 1841.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    DON'T BREAK YOUR CAMPAIGN PROMISE is the message from 38 U.S.Senators, including Sen. Mazie Hirono. In a letter to Pres. Donald Trump, senators asked Trump to retract comments he recently made at an international meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Trump said he could support cutting such earned benefits as Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security.

         Hirono said Trump's comments "could pave the way for massive cuts to retirement income and health care benefits that workers have earned and paid into throughout their careers." She said the cuts would have a "major impact" in Hawaiʻi: 19.1 percent of residents receive benefits from the Social Security Administration, 21.2 percent are enrolled in Medicaid, and 18.9 percent are enrolled in Medicare.
         The senators wrote: "As a presidential candidate, you promised the American people that you would not cut Social Security, Medicare, or Medicaid. In fact, you criticized your political opponents for failing to make the same promise. Not only have you broken that promise, you have waged an all-out assault on Medicaid. Attempting to make up the trillion-dollar deficit created by your tax law on the backs of hard-working Americans would be a betrayal to all who consider these programs a lifeline. American workers who for decades have paid into Social Security and Medicare should not be forced to relinquish their health and retirement security to pay for your tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans and largest corporations."

    Sen. Mazie Hirono speaking in Washington, D.C. about
    healthcare last year. Photo from Hirono
         In 2019, Hirono reintroduced the Protecting and Preserving Social Security Act for the fifth time. The legislation would "restore fairness in contributions, while also increasing benefits for seniors and others," according to Hirono. She said the bill would phase out the cap on contributions into Social Security from wealthy Americans, so that everyone pays into the program at the same rate for the entire year. She said it would extend the solvency of the Social Security Trust Fund nearly 20 years, to 2053, while also allowing for a change in how benefits are calculated that better reflects the costs that seniors face and thereby increasing monthly benefits.

         In 2017, Hirono lobbied for an amendment cosponsored by 32 of her colleagues to that year's budget resolution that sought to prevent major changes to Medicare or Medicaid without a supermajority in the Senate. While the amendment received bipartisan support, it failed on a 49-47 vote. She listed harmful amendments as raising the eligibility age, modifying eligibility requirements, or privatizing and voucherizing the program. Social Security is already protected by a similar provision in law.

         Hirono and 15 other Senate Democrats also introduced the Medicare and Medicaid Protection Act, modeled on her budget amendment, that would permanently set a supermajority voting threshold in law "in order to provide additional guards to these vital health care programs against Republican attacks during the budget reconciliation process," said a statement from Hirono's office.
         Download the signed letter to Trump here.


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    THE NEW FARMERS MARKET IN NĀʻĀLEHU has drawn more than 20 vendors for its inaugural day, tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb. 5, reports its manager Sue Barnett. She said the vending will focus on Kaʻū products, with mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, and fresh breads, along with vegetables, fruits, and other products. She said ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, which sponsors the market on its land mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu, may offer music in the future and acquire picnic tables for market goers. The hours are each Wednesday from to Barnett said there is room for more vendors - up to 36. Call Barnett at 345-9374.


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    HAWAIʻI ISLAND FRUIT GROWERS will head to a statewide conference from Sept. 28 to Oct. 3. The 30th Hawaiʻi International Tropical Fruit Conference, Keeping It Local, marks three decades of promoting sustainable fruit production in the AlohaState. The conference will be held at the Maui Economic Opportunity building in Wailuku and continues with five gatherings: on Hawaiʻi Isalnd in Hiloand Kona, and on Molokai, Oʻahu, and Kauaʻi.

         Geared to farmers, educators, orchard managers, and proponents of sustainable agriculture, the multi-day conference is presented by the statewide Hawaiʻi Tropical Fruit Growers and open to the public.

         The 2020 conference offers a lineup of visiting researchers and agricultural experts sharing information and breakout sessions on a variety of topics.

    ʻUlu, breadfruit, will be the focus of a presentation by HTFG Exec. Dir.
    Ken Love. Photo from ʻUlu Co-Op
         Gabriel Sachter-Smith will give the keynote titled Global Banana Diversity with Dr. Noa Kekuewa Lincoln. HTFG Executive Director Ken Love will offer presentations on Breadfruit in Hawaiʻi - Past and Present and New Fruit Cultivars, Varieties, and Species for Hawaiʻi.

         Also in the works are farm tours.
         The conference is made possible with the support of Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture and Hawaiʻi County Department of Research and Development.     

         Registration forms and fee schedule are available at HTFG.org or by contacting Love at kenlove@hawaiiantel.net or Mark Suiso at suiso@aloha.net.
         Marking its 31st year, HTFG was incorporated in 1989 to promote tropical fruit grown in Hawaiʻi. It is a statewide association of tropical fruit growers, packers, distributors and hobbyists dedicated to tropical fruit research, education, marketing and promotion. See HTFG.org.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball
    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Boys Basketball

    Wed., Feb. 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Soccer

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

    Swimming

    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    UPCOMING
    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5
    OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Wednesdays beginning Feb. 5, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., mauka on Hwy 11 at the old Nāʻālehu Fruit Stand and future home of the Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

    THURSDAY, FEB. 6

    Hula Voices, Thursday, Feb. 6, p.m. Presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho. volcanoartcenter.org

    FRIDAY, FEB. 7
    Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū - Community Mtg. and 
    Membership Drive
    , Friday, Feb. 7,  at the Nāʻālehu Community Center. Topics include revival of annual Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, to be held Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member should also come to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization. Contact Terry-Lee Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.

    SATURDAY, FEB. 8

    16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 9

    Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


    TUESDAY, FEB. 11

    Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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    Sister School sisters from Nakaminato Senior High in Ibaraki Prefecture in Japan have fun with a Kaʻū High student
    yesterday during a gathering of students, administrators, and sponsors. See more below.  Photo by Julia Neal










    COUNTY CIVIL DEFENSE SENT OUT TEXTS AND ROBO CALLS TODAY regarding the new coronavirus that has many people quarantined across the globe. The message confirmed, once again, no cases in Hawaiʻi and said the Centers for Disease Control "does not currently recommend use of facemasks among the the general public."
         A coronavirus informational pamphlet is expected to be distributed starting Friday to schools, senior centers, libraries, and county offices.
         "An inaccurate claim of an infected person at Hilo Medical Center was posted on social media on Tuesday," states the Civil Defense message. "Help us prevent the spread of misinformation."
         Phone numbers listed to confirm information are Civil Defense at 935-0031, state Department of Health at 974-6001, and Department of Health After-hours line at 211.
         International news services report that in China, the death toll from coronavirus passed 560, with the number of infections reaching more than 28,018 victims. Outside of China, coronavirus reached 260 victims in 31 countries, with two deaths.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    NAKAMINATO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS received a warm welcome at sister Kaʻū High School on Tuesday, with lei, gifts, and words of friendship. Organizer Myra Jean Sumida, a Kaʻū High alumnus, said that students from Nakaminato are staying in Kaʻū family homes for three nights, with another three nights at condominiums at Sea Mountain at Punaluʻu.
         The visitors come from a three-year high school about 80 miles north of Tokyo in the coastal community of Ibaraki Prefecture. Their school has 50 teachers and an enrollment of 500 students. Their visit is designed as a Hawaiʻi Island cultural and educational tour. 
    Calligraphy is a cultural exchange with Nakaminato High.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         In exchange, 15 Kaʻū High students will visit Japan from May 30 to June 9, to be hosted by the students from Nakaminato High. Kaʻū High students, led by teacher Aina Akamu, will travel by plane, train, and bus. It is the third year of student exchange with Nakaminato.
         The exchange has grown from Nakaminato students staying one night to six nights in Kaʻū.
         Wayne Kawachi, President of ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, one of the sponsoring organizations, said he too traveled to the sister school.
         Kaʻū students have been raising money for their trip to Japan through culinary activities, selling food at community events, and seeking donations.
         The Sister Schools Agreement says that "Kaʻū High School and Pāhala Elementary School in the United States of America and Nakaminato School in Japan make agreements for becoming sister schools in order to build friendship between both schools.
         "We hope that this agreement strengthens the ties of our friendship more than before, and that it does much to promote a better mutual understanding between the United States of America and Japan.
    ʻO Kaʻū Kākou President Wayne Kawachi helped to organize the student
    exchange between Kaʻū and Japan. A student trip to Japan will be
    led by Kaʻū High teacher Aina Akaum (left).
    Photo by Julia Neal   
         "Both schools will make efforts to contribute to friendly relationships between the United State of America and Japan. ... will continue to exchange materials such as letters, works of students, and photographs or anything that promotes mutual understanding. Both schools will continue to communicate with each other and make further efforts to bring about the development and happiness of both schools. Both schools will make efforts to strengthen the ties of friendship  through mutual visiting of teachers, students, and parents, if they have a chance to do so."
         Students who traveled here from Nakaminato Senior High School are: Miho Kawasaki, Miku Murata, Tomonoshin Shiba, Rune Nakazawa, Ai Tsururta, Nonoka Sueyasu, Riara Sugiyama, and Konoka Hagiya. Faculty from Nakaminao traveling with the students are Vice Principal Kazuhiro Shoji, business teachers Masato Naritomi and Naoyuki Toyama, and English teacher Maiko Suzuki.
         To donate, contact Wayne Kawachi of ʻO Kaʻū Kākou at 808-937-4773.

    Eight visiting Japanese students and their mentors received lei and gifts from Kaʻū students. Photo by Julia Neal
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Tūtū and keiki plant a seedling in an egg shell.
    Photo by Barbara Sabrin
    AN ORGANIZATION, CALLED SOMETHING GOOD IN THE WORLD, AND TŪTŪ & ME are are brining garden-based workshops to preschoolers in Nāʻālehu.

         On Jan. 27, Auntie Barbara Sarbin, Educational Program Director of Something Good, led a workshop with children and caregivers, to bring alive the theme of Kokua, by showing how eggshells and calcium help the soil to make healthy vegetables. Each child planted a seedling in an eggshell, and decorated the eggshell with a face. Every family got to take home the seedling to transplant, within the eggshell, into the soil at home.


         Sarbin told The Kaʻū Calendar, "By eating healthy herbs and veggies that have absorbed calcium through their roots, the children can also grow healthier, as calcium helps them to build stronger bones and teeth. To demonstrate how strong eggshells are, students piled heavy books on top of eggshells and created their own 'eggsperiment,' estimating how many books it would take to turn the shells into a mosaic."
        Sarbin said she is looking forward to February's collaboration on Monday the 10th, when she will bring "the wonder of honeybee products" to share with Tūtū & Me keiki and caregivers. Sign up with Tūtū & Me to participate.
    Tūtū & Me participants learn how to plant a seedling.
    Photo by Barbara Sabrin
         Something Good in the World is a nonprofit, charitable, children's educational organization. Something Good's mission is to provide a safe and enhancing environment wherein children may be promoted to achieve their highest potential in learning and development, and to prepare them toward becoming responsible human beings ready to take on the challenges of life. Something Good's funding comes primarily from family foundations and individual contributions, as well as national garden grants. Grants for its work in Hawai'i allow the group to offer periodic farm and garden-based workshops for children, teachers, and families free of charge. Tūtū & Me, PāhalaElementary School, Nāʻālehu Elementary School, and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences are all examples of places that have welcomed Something Good's workshops in the past few years. The group has also led workshops for the homeschooling co-op that is based at OceanViewCommunity Center. See somethinggoodintheworld.org.
    A father and his keiki plant a seedling in an egg
    shell as part of January's Tūtū & Me collab with
    Something Good in the World.
    Photo by Barbara Sabrin
         Tūtū & Me is a free service to Kaʻū families with keiki, birth to five years old, through Partners in Development, a non-profit focused on using traditional Hawaiian values in contemporary settings in underserved communities to help meet developmental needs of pre-school-aged children and support grandparents and other care-givers in that task. See more in Ongoing Events about local program offered by Tūtū & Me. See pidf.org.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    THE SPRING SPORTS SEASON BEGINS THIS WEEKEND, with the first of two Junior Varsity Softball Jamborees at Konawaena.
         Girls Softball, Boys Baseball, and Boys Volleyball run through May and have a mix of "home" and "away" games. Judo and Track run through April, and have only "away" events.
         See the full schedule:

    Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

    Girls Softball

    Saturday, Feb. 8, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

    Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena

    Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe

    Tuesday, March 17, , host Pāhoa

    Saturday, March 21, , @Keaʻau

    Saturday, March 28, , host Hilo

    Wednesday, April 8, , @Honokaʻa

    Saturday, April 11, , host Kamehameha

    Saturday, April 18, , host Kohala

    Wednesday, April 22, , host HPA

    Wednesday, April 29, , BIIF Div II Semi Finals

    Saturday, May 2, BIIF DIV II Finals

    Wednesday-Saturday, May 13-16, HHSAA


    Boys Baseball

    Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

    Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

    Tuesday, March 10, , @Konawaena

    Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe

    Wednesday, March 18, , @Pāhoa

    Saturday, March 21, , @Keaʻau

    Saturday, March 28, , host Hilo

    Tuesday. April 7, , @Honokaʻa

    Saturday, April 11, , host Kamehameha

    Saturday, April 18, , host Kohala

    Friday, May, 2 p.m., BIIF DIV II Semi Finals

    Saturday, May 2, , BIIF DIV II Finals

    Wednesday-Saturday, May 13-16, HHSAA


    Boys Volleyball

    Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

    Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

    Wednesday, March, 6 p.m., @Hilo

    Tuesday, March 10, , host Makualani

    Friday, March 13, , host Konawaena

    Tuesday, March 24, , host Kamehameha

    Tuesday, March 31, , @Kohala

    Thursday, April 2, , host Keaʻau

    Tuesday, April 7, , @Honokaʻa

    Friday, April 10, , @Ehunui

    Friday, April 17, , host Kealakehe

    Wednesday, April 22, , @Waiakea

    Friday, April 24, , host HPA

    Monday, April 27, , BIIF Div II First Round

    Tuesday, April 28, , BIIF Div II Semi Finals

    Wednesday, April 29, , BIIF Div II Finals

    Thursday-Saturday, May 7-9, HHSAA on Oʻahu


    Judo

    Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

    Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

    Saturday, March 14, , @Hilo

    Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena

    Saturday, March 28, , @Waiakea

    Saturday, April 4, , @Keaʻau

    Saturday, April 11, , BIIF at Kona

    Saturday, April 18, , BIIF at Hilo


    Track

    Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

    Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena

    Saturday, March 28, , @Waiakea

    Saturday, April 4, , @HPA

    Saturday, April 11, , @Keaʻau
    Saturday, April 25, , @Keaʻau


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA


    Boys Basketball

    Wed., Feb. 5 BIIF at Kealakehe

    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu


    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena

    Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA


    Swimming
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui


    UPCOMING
    THURSDAY, FEB. 6

    Hula Voices, Thursday, Feb. 6, p.m. Presents an engaging, intimate talk story session with Hawai‘i Island kumu hula and features Volcano musician Joe Camacho. volcanoartcenter.org

    FRIDAY, FEB. 7
    Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū - Community Mtg. and 
    Membership Drive
    , Friday, Feb. 7,  at the Nāʻālehu Community Center. Topics include revival of annual Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, to be held Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member should also come to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization. Contact Terry-Lee Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.

    SATURDAY, FEB. 8

    16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions.
         Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 9

    Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


    TUESDAY, FEB. 11

    Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations.
         Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

    Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, HokuloaChurch, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    King Kamehameha's Golf Ball, the Doppler Radome along Kalaʻaiki Road between Nāʻālehu and Pāhala,
    on the ground today for replacement of its pedestal. Photo by Julia Neal

    THE SOUTH SHORE HAWAIʻI DOPPLER RADAR IN KAʻŪ that collects critical information for NOAA weather forecasts, FAA flight management, and the Department of Defense, received a major upgrade today. The radome was lifted by a giant crane from its pedestal and lowered to the ground. A crew from TSS Solutions and Hawaiian Crane replaced the pedestal and lifted the radome back on its perch in the paturelands along Kalaʻaiki Road between Nāʻālehu and Pāhala on the slopes of Mauna Loa.
    Young Brothers shipped the crane from 
    Honolulu to work for one day to drop and lift 
    the Radome and pedestal at the Doppler site 
    between Nāʻālehu and Pāhala. 
    Photo by Julia Neal
         A message from the National Weather Service said that starting on Monday, Feb. 3, the Nāʻālehu Radar "will be down for an extended period. The outage involves the replacement of the pedestal or the stem that holds the antenna dish, and other associated hardware components. To get to the pedestal, the protective covering, or the radome, will be removed first. This is a labor intensive and delicate process. At this time, the return-to-service date is slated for [Saturday] Feb. 22."
         National Weather Service noted that inclement weather could delay the return-to-service date for the doppler radar in Kaʻū. However, the dropping of the radome, the replacement of the pedestal and the lifting of the radome into position went smoothly this morning, with barely a breeze under misty skies.
         The giant Hawaiian Crane will be on its way to Hilo on Friday to ride a Young Brothers barge to return to its home base on Oʻahu and the old pedestal will be shipped to the mainland for refurbishment.
    An oiler and crane operator from Hawaiian
     Crane assisted with the operation today at the
    Doppler site in Kaʻū. Photo by Julia Neal

         NOAA, FAA, and the Department of Defense are cooperating to refurbish and upgrade Doppler sites around the nation and in foreign countries where the U.S. operates them. Replacing the pedestals with refurbished ones and upgrading the electronics, communications, and other Doppler site components are expected to give the Doppler units at least another 20 years of service at a much lower cost than installing new ones.
         Following completion of the renovation of the Kaʻū Doppler system over the next two weeks: the crews will move to the Kohala site and on to Doppler stations on Kauaʻi and Molokaʻi. Once the Kaʻū Doppler is returned to service, its work can be seen at radar.weather.gov/ridge/radar.php?rid=hwa.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A crew from TSS Solutions, which is refurbishing Doppler
    sites operated by the federal government, removed the old
    pedestal and installed the new one along Kalaaiki 
    Roadin Kaʻū today. Photo by Julia Neal

    THE END OF THE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL of Pres. Donald Trump led to both of Hawaiʻi's senators making statements. Trump was acquitted Wednesday by the U.S. Senate, with votes of 52 to 48 on charges of abuse of power and 53 to 47 on charges of obstruction of Congress.
         Voting stayed mostly to party lines. Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders, running for Democratic nominee in the 2020 Presidential race, voted Trump "guilty" on both articles of impeachment. All Democrats voted Trump guilty. Sen. Mitt Romney was the only Republican to vote Trump "guilty" of the abuse of power accusation. Romney said, "With my vote I will tell my children and their children that I did my duty. What the president did was wrong. Grievously wrong."
         Before the vote, Sen. Brian Schatz spoke of "The American experiment" as a "radical" notion for its promise of "equal justice" and "equal protection" under the law. "It imagined a cumbersome system in which tyranny could be avoided by the constant struggle between elected and appointed leaders, and it intentionally sacrificed speed, efficiency, and convenience to avoid abuses of power.
         "And so it is with unending regret that I see what is happening. I grieve for the Senate, an institution both hallowed and flawed, an elite place in the worst sense of the word, and yet still the main place where American problems are to be solved."
         He said millions of Americans "have formed a basic expectation about how a trial is to function, based on hundreds of years of law, and based on commonsense. And so, make no mistake, what the Senate did was an affront to the basic idea of a trial." He accused Republicans in the Senate trial of turning the impeachment process  into "a cover-up."
    Sen. Brian Schatz
         Said Schatz, "As I look at the Republican side of the Chamber, I know this moment in history has made their particular jobs extraordinarily difficult – requiring uncommon courage. They have to risk the scorn of their voters, their social circle, their colleagues, and their president, in order to do the right thing. And they didn't.
         "On one level, I knew this would be the likely outcome. But the bitter taste of injustice lingers in my mouth. And on behalf of everyone who couldn't get away with an unpaid traffic fine, is in jail for stealing groceries to eat, who can't get a job because of medical debt – I say – shame on anyone who places this president – any president – above the law. The president is not above the law, no one is above the law. The president is guilty on both counts."
         He said the Constitution "gives extraordinary powers to the President under Article II – and that makes sense because without a powerful magistrate the government couldn't function," but that the president "could be controlled, to greater or lesser degrees, by the legislature, the judiciary, and the voters. But the framers [of the Constitution] didn't contemplate this level of polarization, when even in the face of the overwhelming evidence of high crimes, one party would not just exonerate him for it but in fact ratify these crimes.
         "I do not think we are in danger of the impeachment process becoming routine. I think we are in much greater danger of making the impeachment process moot. And if so, God help us all. But all is not lost. We remain a government of, by, and for the people. If people across the country find this as odious to our basic values as we do, in eight months, the American public can render its own verdict on the United States Senate."

    Sen. Mazie Hirono
         After the vote, Schatz said, "Thank you, Mitt. You have restored my faith in the Senate and the idea that putting country over party is still possible." Schatz remarked that Romney "reminds us that it is not impossible to do the right thing, it's just hard. That putting country over party isn't just a slogan, it's our solemn obligation. That individuals who have courage and conviction can change history, and have an obligation to try.
         Schatz said he is "Proud to be a Democratic Senator today. Grateful to the people of Hawaiʻi for letting me perform these duties. Happy that Mitt Romney was a profile in courage. For everyone out there feeling awful – I understand, and I do too. We just need to win the election. It was always that."
         Watch his whole speech here: facebook.com/SenBrianSchatz/videos/483458019271358/.
         Sen. Mazie Hirono said, in a speech on the floor of the United States Senate, before the vote, " I will vote to convict and remove President Donald Trump for abusing his power and obstructing Congress. It's time for the Senate to uphold its Constitutional responsibility by convicting this president and holding him accountable.
    Sen. Mitt Romney
         "Donald Trump was already a danger to this country. We've seen it in his policy decisions – from taking away health care from millions of Americans – to threatening painful cuts to Social Security and Medicare – to engaging in an all-out assault on immigrants in this country.
         "Today, we're called to confront a completely different type of danger – one that goes well beyond the significant policy differences I have with this president. If we let Donald Trump get away with extorting the president of another country for his own personal, political benefit, the Senate will be complicit in his next corrupt scheme. Which country will he bully or invite to interfere in our elections next? Which pot of taxpayer money will he use as a bribe to further his political schemes?"
         She said that, in normal times, "the Senate – conscious of its awesome responsibility – would meet this moment with the appropriate sobriety and responsibility to conduct a full and fair trial. That includes calling appropriate witnesses and subpoenaing relevant documents – none of which happened here. In normal times, the Senate would have weighed the evidence presented by both sides and rendered impartial justice. And in normal times, having been presented with overwhelming evidence of impeachable acts, the Senate would have embraced its Constitutional responsibility to convict the president and remove him or her from office.
         "But as we've learned too often over the past three years, these are not normal times. Instead of fulfilling its duty later today, the United States Senate will fail its test at a crucial moment for our country by voting to acquit Donald J. Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress."
         Watch her whole speech here: twitter.com/maziehirono.

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    Concrete helps protect native soil and plants from being swept away with flood waters. Photo from Kaʻū Soil & Water
    KEEP DEBRIS OUT OF WATERWAYS is the message from Kaʻū Soil & Water Conservation District. Kaʻū Soil & Water recently conducted its annual inspection of the Nāʻālehu Flood Control Watershed Project. Kaʻū Soil & Water works in partnership with Hawaiʻi County Department of Public Works Highways Division and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.
         The flood structure was constructed to convey floodwaters through the village of Nāʻālehu to a disposal area on the porous lava formations in the range lands below the highway. Before this watershed project was constructed, "devastating flash flooding" was seen throughout the Nāʻālehu community, Jennifer Lopez Reavis, District Supervisor and Conservation Aide of Kaʻū Soil & Water, told The Kaʻū Calendar.

    Members of Kaʻū Soil & Water Conservation District inspect the Nāʻālehu
    Flood Control Watershed Project. Photo from Kaʻū Soil & Water
         "This project not only protects the homes in the community, but also prevents soil erosion and washing out of agricultural crops and infrastructure that are important to the farming and ranching community of Kaʻū," said Reavis.

         Kaʻū Soil & Water conducts annual inspections of the project to reassure the community of its safety and asks citizens to "be mindful of where they dispose their trash, green waste cuttings, logs, and any other waste. Unlawful dumping in any intermittent waterway – gulch, stream, etc. – will likely cause obstruction in the watercourse and could potentially accumulate at culverts and bridges, resulting in the clogging of these water control structures, therefore preventing the natural water flow and further resulting in flooding and erosion."

    This dry gulch helps direct flood waters away from homes and businesses.
    Photo from Kaʻū Soil & Water
         The flood control structure was developed in the mid 1960s. It is located mauka of Highway 11, above Punaluʻu Bake Shop off of Kaʻalaiki Road, and makes its way down between the lower Nāʻālehu subdivision and Nāʻālehu Park. The project consists of a concrete chute, debris basin, reinforced concrete-lined channel, transition section, and 840 feet of unlined channel.
         Reavis said she would like to  thank the Department of Public Works Highways Division, USDA National Resources Conservation Service and Kaʻū Soil & Water Conservation District directors and staff "for their dedication, support, and annual operations and maintenance of this watershed project."
         Contact Reavis at 808-933-8350 with questions.

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    NEW COMMUNITY GROUP FRIENDS OF THE KAʻŪ BATS will hold a Count Our Bats to Save Our Bats potluck party on Saturday, Feb. 29, at ManukaState Park. The bat monitoring party's purpose is to count endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bats at dusk, when they are active and visible. In a recent email, Kaʻū Resident Sandra Demoruelle stated the count will help save the endangered species.
         Open to the public, for all ages. Bring potluck dish. BBQ refreshments, "batty" games, and door prizes on offer. Contact Linda Morgan, Friends of the Kaʻū Bats Community Coordinator, at 808-785-2058.

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    A BROCHURE ADDRESSING CORONAVIRUS FOR HAWAIʻI ISLAND, expected Friday, was released early by county officials. Download a PDF of the four-page brochure at hawaiicounty.gov/our-county/coronavirus.

         The brochure details information already addressed by official channels, like what the 2019-nCoV virus is - as far as is known, as it is a newly identified virus. How the virus spreads, symptoms, how to protect from getting the virus, and what to do if showing symptoms is detailed. Also included is what the government is doing to protect the community.
         New information addresses the virus' vaccine status: there is no vaccine, as the virus is too new to science.
         Also addressed is if pets are susceptible to or able to carry 2019-nCoV. The virus, states the brochure, is believed to have originated with animals, crossed to humans, and is now being transmitted between humans. "There is no reason to believe animals or pets in Hawaiʻi or elsewhere in the U.S.might be spreading the virus."
         Addresses of online resources, and the 211 Aloha United Wayinfo line, are also provided.

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    MAUNA LOA VOLCANO is not erupting. The mauna's Alert Level is ADVISORY, Aviation Code is YELLOW. Rates of deformation and seismicity have not changed significantly over the past week and remain above long-term background levels.
         During the past week, HVO seismometers recorded 134 small magnitude earthquakes beneath the upper elevations of the volcano; the strongest was a magnitude-2.4 earthquake on Feb. 3. Most earthquakes occurred at shallow depths of less than 5 km (~3 miles) beneath the volcano's surface.
         Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show continued slow summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly.
         For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

    Mauna Loa's Southeast Rift Zone this afternoon. USGS webcam image
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    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Girls Basketball

    Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA

    Boys Basketball

    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

    Wrestling

    Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena

    Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

    Swimming
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui


    Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

    Girls Softball

    Saturday, Feb. 8, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Boys Volleyball

    Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

    Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

    Judo

    Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe


    UPCOMING
    FRIDAY, FEB. 7
    Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū - Community Mtg. and 
    Membership Drive
    , Friday, Feb. 7,  at the Nāʻālehu Community Center. Topics include revival of annual Prince Kūhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, to be held Saturday, March 28 at Nāʻālehu Park, from  to  The event will feature music and hula, food, arts and crafts, and Hawaiian cultural activities. Anyone wanting to be a vendor, host a booth, and become a member should also come to the meeting. The annual membership dues are $10 per person or organization. Contact Terry-Lee Shibuya at terrylshibuya@gmail.com or treasurer Kehau Ke at hunneygurl15@gmail.com.

    SATURDAY, FEB. 8

    16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions.
         Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 9

    Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


    TUESDAY, FEB. 11

    Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

    Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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    A USGS HVO geologist measures the height of the growing tephra cone around fissure 8 during Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption. See Volcano Watch below. USGS photo by A. Klesh




    A WATER BOTTLING PLANT NEAR WAILOA RIVER in Hilo received a "No go" for the second time from the Windward Planning Commission on Thursday. The plan came back before the commission after the developers went to court with new findings and the court sent the proposal back for reconsideration. The water bottling plant would have been located near the Wailoa River State Recreation Area.
         Another water bottling plant was proposed for the old sugar mill site in Pāhala but the property purchasers have yet to move on their tentative approval from the Planning Commission.

         Leading the charge against the Hilobottling plant is Kaʻū's Planning Commissioner John Replogle. During the earlier proceedings, Replogle joined public opposition and moved that the Windward Planning Commission kill the request for a Special Management Area permit for the developers, Piʻilani Partners. Commissioners voted five to one to deny the SMA. The developers appealed the decision to the courts, providing what they called new, supportive information for their plan.

    John Replogle, Kaʻū's Planning Commissioner, expresses his opinions
    on water bottling plant. Photo from Big Island Video News
         Replogle said, "Giving private business access to our water, so they can enrich themselves, is not reasonable or beneficial use to our natural resource or to our people. I see nothing in the application that is in the public trust or interest." Replogle contended that drilling into the aquifer would introduce risks to the water supply. He also noted that worldwide there is "a scrambling by corporate business and wealthy individuals to grab up and control all remaining natural resources at the expensive of people who live in the region."
         See more on the Hiloand Kaʻū bottling plant plans at kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/search?q=water+bottling.


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    PROTECTING COMMUNITY TELEVISION is the goal of legislation supported by U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono. The Protecting Community Television Act, S. 3218, would preseve funding for community television stations, "which educate and inform viewers across Hawaiʻi," according to a statement from Hirono's office.

         In Hawaiʻi, community television stations Nā Leo, Hōʻike, Akakū, and ʻŌlelo broadcast across Hawaiʻi Island, Kauaʻi, MauiCounty, and Oʻahu, respectively. These stations rely on franchise fees paid by cable companies "to provide invaluable coverage of local news and other content," Hirono said. Examples of programming are: live streaming of official State of Hawaiʻi governmental meetings, county meetings, cultural events and festivals, cooking shows, sports, and other programs.

         In August 2019, the Federal Communications Commission changed long-standing rules to allow cable companies to subtract the value of certain "in-kind" contributions from the total amount the cable operator pays in franchise fees to the local community—fees used to support community television stations.
         Hirono contends:  "This change will force local governments to choose between funding these community television stations and other vital community resources like libraries or schools, a result that will almost certainly decrease the funding available to community television stations. S. 3218 reverses this harmful FCC decision by reaffirming that franchise fees that cable companies pay to local governments can only be collected in monetary form, and cannot include in-kind contributions.
         "Local programming allows everyone from students to seniors to broadcast their stories. Olelo has certified over 19,000 community members as local producers, ensuring that community members can tell their own stories in their own way."

         Said Hirono, "Community television stations provide an opportunity for diverse voices across our community to be heard. From students interviewing their elected officials to streaming local cultural festivals, community television provides an essential outlet for Hawaiʻi residents to engage directly with their neighbors. I support the Protecting Community Television Act because storytelling and recording our history is essential, and we must protect our local programs accordingly."

         Last month, ʻŌlelo organized the 14th annual Youth Capitol Commentary during the State Legislature's opening day. This year, 60 students from 14 Oʻahu schools conducted 131 interviews of lawmakers, the public, the Governor, and the Lieutenant Governor. The student interviews will air for five hours across ʻŌlelo platforms.

          Jaylee Canoy, a junior leader at ʻŌlelo's NanakuliMediaCentersaid, said, "As a youth who's been involved with ʻŌlelo Community Media since second grade, I've been empowered with the knowledge, skills and more importantly the confidence to make a difference in my community through public access. Now in the 8th grade, I'm equipped to be an access producer, a mentor, and a leader to other students while giving back to my community in assisting my elders technically so they, like me, have the confidence to stand for their beliefs to make a difference on important issues that matter to them and our community via ʻŌlelo Community Media."

         Sanford Inouye, President and CEO of ʻŌlelo, said, "Under the new FCC rule, thousands of community access media organizations across the nation may have their operating budgets slashed. Olelo has taught keiki and kūpuna how to use new technology for decades, empowering communities to create and distribute programs that inform and engage. This rule can effectively kill hyper-local media, and the ability for local voices to share stories and coverage by and for their own communities. The Protecting Community Television Act will allow stations like Olelo to continue to provide government accessibility and community engagement."

         J Robertson, Hōʻke: Kauaʻi Community Television Managing Director, said, "Hōʻike provides our island residents with classes, equipment, and educational programs with expert advice so that everyone has the ability and the right to share and tell their stories on the cable system. These are the intimate stories – featuring arts and entertainment, spiritual guidance, health and wellness, sports, public affairs, environmental issues, and, most importantly, as a spotlight on the showcase of cultural activities and entities on our island. Protection and support for community television is critical."

         Jay April, Akakū CEO, said, "For nearly fifty years, public access community television stations like Akakū have been a beacon of free speech where anyone can come talk story, most of it local. Public access television keeps us informed, educated and meaningfully engaged with one another, even with many communities in Hawaiʻi separated by water. On behalf of many thousands of supporters of public access television in Maui Nui and Hawaiʻi, we applaud Senator Hirono for her sponsorship of S.3218, the Protecting Community Television Act, which ensures public television can continue to be the vital resource it has been for decades to come."
         The Protecting Community Television Act has received endorsements from numerous national organizations, including the National Association of Counties, National League of Cities, United States Conference of Mayors, National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors, Alliancefor Community Media, TeleCommUnity, and others.


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    Kathleen Ho
    KATHLEEN HO IS APPOINTED DIRECTOR of the Office of Environmental Quality Control in the state Department of Health by Gov. David Ige.

         Ho has extensive experience as deputy attorney general in environmental law and served as deputy attorney general in the Health Division from 1992. In addition, Ho was adjunct professor at William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and deputy corporation counsel for the City and County of Honolulu. She has also worked in private practice in Honolulu, and served as advisor to OEQC and the Environmental Council.

         Ho is a graduate of the University of San Francisco where she earned a B.S. in Biology. She also earned her Juris Doctor degree from the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Franciscoand her LLM in Environmental Law from Lewis and ClarkLawSchoolin Portland, Oregon.

         Ige said, "Kathleen has years of experience working in environmental law alongside a wide range of stakeholders. She is highly qualified and will serve the state well in leading and managing the OEQC."

         Ho said, "I am honored and grateful that Governor Ige has nominated me to serve as the Director of the Office of Environmental Quality Control. I look forward to continuing my service to the people of Hawaiʻi."
         Ho's appointment is subject to Senate confirmation. Her start date has not yet been determined. If confirmed, Ho replaces Scott Glenn who has been appointed as chief executive officer of the Hawaiʻi State Energy Office.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    LOVE THE ARTS FUNDRAISER GALA for VolcanoArtCenterwill be held tomorrow, Saturday, Feb. 8, The theme of the 12th annual event is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. The evening also features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions will provide attendees an opportunity to bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions.
         Tickets are $70, $65 for VAC Members, and can be purchased at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or by calling (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets also provide free admission to the LTA Valentine's Day Dance held the following weekend on Saturday, Feb. 15, 6 p.m. to Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more.
         See volcanoartcenter.org.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    GEOLOGISTS are the focus of this week's Volcano Watch written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Carolyn Parcheta. This is a fifth installment of the People and Jobs at HVOseries from Volcano Awareness Month:

         Geologists rock!

         Continuing with the Volcano Awareness Month theme of people and their work at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, we move on to another role at HVO – that of "geologist."

         A geologist studies the Earth. This includes the study of rocks and the ways in which they form. Specifically, HVO geologists specialize in the numerous forms of volcanic rocks – liquid and solid lava flows and explosive deposits, such as ash. 

         As lava cools and solidifies, it can take the form of ʻaʻā or pāhoehoe – Hawaiian words used worldwide by volcanologists. Solid volcanic rock can also occur as particles, ranging from fine ash and Pele's hair to vehicle-sized lava bombs and blocks. In between, there are Pele's tears (droplets of volcanic glass), scoria and reticulite (forms of basaltic pumice), and spatter (clots of molten lava).

    Instruments on the edge of Puʻu ʻŌʻō gather important information for monitoring volcanic activity but "feet on the ground" geologists are also required. USGS photo
         Geologists also try to understand the past to better anticipate the future. As liquid lava turns to solid volcanic rock, it records the processes that formed the rock. Through field observations and petrologic and petrographic analyses, physical and chemical information can be found in the rock at various scales, from micro-sized crystals to lava flows that are kilometers (miles) long.
         The HVO geology team studies how volcanic rocks form, how lava erupts and solidifies, and how explosions are triggered. We study how and when the surface of a volcano is created and how and why disturbances such as faulting and collapses happen. We also assess the hazards of eruptions and rock breakage.
         The general approach to using geologic data on a volcano is to reconstruct how the volcano formed. We then use this information to model or forecast how the volcano could behave in the future.

         Maintaining HVO's camera network is one of the geology team's critical jobs. HVO's current network consists of 22 live web cameras and 1 time-lapse camera covering 45 percent of the Kīlauea lava-flow hazard zone 1 area and 36 percent of the Mauna Loa lava-flow hazard zone 1 area. The camera network provides real-time monitoring of areas that cannot be staffed 24/7. This allows us to track changes in critical areas so that we always know what the volcano is doing.
         HVO's geology group is responsible for the camera network, but it takes many others to keep the network running. HVO engineers help build the camera systems and provide the power systems that keep them running. HVO IT staff ensure that our cameras can transmit images to the website.

         Cameras cannot, however, replace "boots on the ground" observations by geologists in the field. How much time we spend in the field depends on volcanic activity. During this relatively quiet time on Kīlauea, we're in the field 1-2 days per month. During the 2018 eruption, HVO geologists were in the field 7 days per week.

         During an active eruption, our field work tasks include collecting lava samples, tracking a lava flow's growth and advance rate, and assessing if hazards in the affected area have increased or decreased. In both eruptive and non-eruptive times, we also examine older deposits in a continuing study of the island’s volcanic history.

         There is no "typical" field day for HVO geologists – our work is determined by what information is needed. For instance, prior to 2018, we tracked Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō lava flows, as well as the growth of lava deltas, looking for signs of impending collapses or potential explosions. During the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption, we measured how fast lava flowed through the fissure 8 channel and checked the boundaries of the lava channel to assess their stability.

         Our field work produces many detailed measurements, enabling us to accurately assess volcanic hazards. Examples include monitoring how heat is progressing away from the 2018 dike in lower Puna and measuring the rise of water in the Halemaʻumaʻu crater lake with a laser rangefinder.
    Working on the edge as a geologist or other HVO scientist. USGS photo
         HVO geologists also spend time in the office. That's when we analyze and interpret data collected in the field and write reports that are ultimately published. To help interpret geologic data, we use several computer programs, some of which help us create the maps posted on HVO's public website. Other programs help us create 3-dimensional models of volcanic features, or help us calculate and model lava flow behavior, explosion behavior, and collapse processes.

         There's rarely a dull moment for HVO's geology team, which is why we enjoy our work. The job of a geologist definitely rocks!

         This is the final article about HVO people and jobs in the Volcano Awareness Month 2020 series, but additional HVO teams may write about their work in future Volcano Watch articles.

         Volcano Activity Updates

         Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL. Monitoring data over the past month showed no significant changes. Rates of seismicity were variable but within long-term values. Sulfur dioxide emission rates were low at the summit and below detection limits at Puʻu ʻŌʻō and the lower East Rift Zone. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continued to slowly expand and deepen.

         Areas of elevated ground temperatures and minor gas release are still found in the vicinity of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone fissures. Gases include steam (water) and small amounts of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. These conditions are expected to be long-term. Similar conditions after the 1955 eruption continued for years to decades.

         Mauna Loa is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption is certain.

         Four earthquakes with three or more felt reports occurred in the Hawaiian Islands this past week: a magnitude-3.3 quake 3 km (2 mi) southeast of Fern Acres at 39 km (24 mi) depth on Feb. 5 at 8:32 p.m., a magnitude-2.8 quake 8 km (5 mi) northeast of Pāhala at 32 km (20 mi) depth on Feb. 4 at 8:37 p.m., a magnitude-4.2 quake 7 km (4 mi) south of Volcano at 8 km (5 mi) depth on Feb. 2 at 8:37 p.m., and a magnitude-3.0 quake 20 km (12 mi) southeast of Volcano at 7 km (4 mi) depth on Jan. 30 at 1:51 a.m.
         Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvofor past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Boys Basketball

    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Wrestling

    Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
    Swimming
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

    Girls Softball

    Saturday, Feb. 8, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Boys Baseball

    Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

    Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

    Boys Volleyball

    Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

    Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

    Judo

    Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

    Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

    Track
    Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

    Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


    UPCOMING
    SATURDAY, FEB. 8

    16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


    SUNDAY, FEB. 9

    Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


    TUESDAY, FEB. 11

    Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12
    O Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu  Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Nāʻālehu Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

    Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


    FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

    Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


    RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


       

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    Starting early, keiki strolls a baby through the volleyball scene at Kaʻū District Gym on Saturday as players from five to
    16 years compete in their age groups through Sunday. Miloliʻi-Kaʻū Volleyball Club sponsors the event to raises money
     to take the club to national tournaments in Las Vegas and Phoenix. To donate, see more below. Photo by Julia Neal
    KAʻŪ'S REP. IN CONGRESS IS UP IN THE PRESIDENTIAL POLLS, according to a message today from the campaign of Tulsi Gabbard. It reports on two polls in New Hampshire where Gabbard has been campaigning from town to town, surf spots to snowboard slopes.
         The CNN-University of New Hampshire poll puts her at 6 percent, in fifth place above Amy Klobuchar.
         According to Tulsi 2020, the Caledonian Record newspaper, which has covered six counties in northeastern New Hampshire since 1837, took a poll with the question, "The New Hampshire Democratic Primary is Feb. 11. Who in this list of candidates would you like to see win the Primary?" The poll showed Gabbard leading in a landslide with 70.4 percent naming her preferred nominee. Bernie Sanders followed Gabbard with 9.4 percent, Pete Buttigieg with 5 percent, and Andrew Yang and Joe Biden tied at 2.2 percent, according to Tulsi 2020.
         Gabbard was not included in Friday night's national debate among candidates for the Democratic Party nomination. The Federalist reported that Gabbard supporters carried signs outside of the debate in Manchester, New Hampshire, chanting "Let Tulsi Speak." She declined to attend but released a statement: "You can call this by many names: Media bias. Election interference. Political gamesmanship by the Democratic establishment. But regardless of motive, the end-result is that the
    American people lose. They lose the ability to hear directly from a candidate with a broad, inclusive message for change. They lose the opportunity to show their support and spread the message, about a dynamic, anti-establishment candidate breathing fresh life into the Democratic Party. And they lose the freedom to make educated political decisions without media manipulation."
         Gabbard claims to have held more town hall meetings in New Hampshire than any other candidate.
    Supporters of Tulsi Gabbard for President protested her exclusion from the Democratic debate on Friday.
    Photo from The Federalist
    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    AN ALERT FROM NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IS POSTED FOR KAʻŪ. It predicts very windy conditions and coastal flooding Sunday night into Monday, with winds expected to increase late in the day Sunday into Sunday night as a surface low develops to the northeast of the
    islands. Depending on the exact track and strength of this low, very windy conditions are possible in some lowland areas Sunday night and Monday, along with a chance of localized wind damage.
         Coastal flooding is possible Sunday night through Monday along exposed north- and west-facing shores due to a combination of strong winds and warning-level surf.
         The greatest potential for coastal flooding impacts will be during the peak daily high tide, which will occur during the early morning hours between midnight and daybreak.
         Coastal impacts may include significant beach erosion, flooding of beaches that normally remain dry, and overwash onto vulnerable low-lying coastal roads and other coastal infrastructure.
         A Small Craft Advisory remains in effect until 6 p.m. Sunday. A Gale Watch remains in effect from Sunday evening through Monday afternoon.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    PĀHALA-KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI have announced their annual Las Vegas school reunion plans for June. Organizer Pricilla Kai Shimamoto, class of '66, said all alumni and friends of the school are invited, from the younger alumni to senior citizens.

    Joe Tatayama, who spreads the
    news of the Kaʻū High Alumni
    Association. Photo by Julia Neal
         Joe Tatayama who publishes the alumni newsletter reports that events of the 2020 reunion will follow a similar format as last year, with dinner buffet on Friday night and the hors d'oeuvres stations on Saturday night; no-host bar both nights. Cost for the evening events: $80 per person for both nights. The Dinner Banquet will be held Friday, June 12 at California Hotel, ʻOhana Room, for registration and picture-taking, dinner The dinner buffet with no-host bar on Hospitality Night will be held Saturday, June 13 at Main Street Station, Pullman Room, from to  As in previous years, generous donations will be used to subsidize reunion costs to keep a reasonable registration price.
         As in previous years, rooms can be reserved at the California Hotel by direct contact. Rooms are blocked off for attendees from Wednesday June 10 to Tuesday June 16. Call 800-634-6255 and give the Pāhala-Kaʻū Reunion 2020 Group Code: AOCPAHA Reserve rooms no later than May 11. The Hawaiian Package rate includes room, tax, and three meals a day. Rates remain the same as last year: four nights, $370.00/double or $273.00/single; three nights, $340.00/double or $250.00/single; two nights, $320.00/double or $235.00/single. A $50 deposit is due at time of booking. Cancellations and changes can be made up to 48 hours before check-in. Additional nights are $80 each plus 13% tax, based on availability; no meals. All additional nights have a daily resort fee of $19.20.

         Questions? Contact: Neal Kanda: (808) 284-1066 Gary Ota: (808) 622-2900 Roxanne Gacayan: (808) 979-1180 Wanda Lau: (818) 800-9337 Eva Taylor: (713) 653-3377 or Priscilla Shimamoto: (808) 391-7901.
         Shimamoto notes that this year is the Class of '66's fifth and final year of planning and hosting the reunion. Class of '61 has volunteered to plan and host the 2021 Pāhala-Kaʻū High School Alumni Reunion in Las Vegas. She praised Glenn Kawachi and his "super skill of persuasion for gathering a group of his classmates to take the helm and continue this event which has become such a mainstay in the lives of all of us who grew up in or have connections to Kaʻū."


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Tots to teens are competing in the fourth annual Miloliʻi-Kaʻū Volleyball tournament through Sunday
    at Kaʻū District Gym, with 32 teams competing. Photo by Julia Neal
    THE FIFTH ANNUAL MILOLIʻI-KAʻŪ VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT is underway at Kaʻū`u District Gym with play into this Saturday evening, starting again Sunday morning at 8:30 a.m into the afternoon.
         Thirty-two teams from Kona to Hilo fielded players with age categories from five to 16. The youth teams are considered key to the backbone of volleyball in Hawaiʻi, which is very successful in bringing up players to compete in high school to vie for college scholarships around the country.
         The Miloliʻi-Kaʻū program is raising money for its players to play in national tournaments in Las Vegas and Phoenix in June. To donate, call Jennifer Shibuya at 808-209-7137.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Boys Basketball

    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Wrestling

    Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
    Swimming
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

    Girls Softball

    Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

    Boys Baseball

    Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

    Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

    Boys Volleyball

    Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

    Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

    Judo

    Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

    Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

    Track
    Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

    Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


    UPCOMING
    SUNDAY, FEB. 9

    Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


    TUESDAY, FEB. 11

    Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

    Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


    FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

    Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


    SATURDAY, FEB. 15

    Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


    Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


    Valentine's Dance, Saturday, Feb. 15, p.m. to  Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more. volcanoartcenter.org


    Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


    RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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    Former Stampede Queen, Lorilee Lorenzo of Kaʻū, is expected to compete during this year's Panaʻewa Stampede Rodeo. 
    See details below. Photo by Chuck McKeand

    TRANSFERRING STATE PASTURE LANDS from the Department of Land & Natural Resources to the Department of Agriculture has support from ranchers in Kaʻū and around the state. Senate Bill 2812 passed Senate committees on Friday and is expected to go to the House of Representatives for consideration. Among ranches affected in Kaʻū are those with long histories of operation by the Galimbas, Wally Andrade, Jerry Egami, and Randy Cabral who lease their pastures from the DLNR.
         Testimony from the 34,000 acre Kapāpala Ranch between Pāhala and Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park notes that its pastures have supported food production for 160 years. "Today the Ranch provides beef in the equivalence of 3.4 million school lunches per year," writes Kapāpala partner Lani Cran Petrie in her testimony. She testifies that one reason for favoring Department of Agriculture holding pasture leases is that it likely would be able to give more reasonable rents for land producing food than would the DLNR where rents are based on "highest and best use."
    Kapāpala Ranch has produced food for 160 years, supporting the
    aim of food self-sufficiency. Photo by Julia Neal
         According to her testimony, the DLNR recently proposed to increase Kapāpala Ranch rent by 1,000 percent, "which would have put anyone operating an agricultural enterprise out of business." Two years of negotiations, mediation, and binding arbitration to settle the rent with the DLNR cost the Ranch the equivalent of three years of rent, she says. In the end, a University of Hawaiʻi Agricultural Extension Service range specialist and an agricultural land appraiser assessed the value of the ranch lands and the fair market rent based on pasture value was set by an arbitrator.
         The Kapāpala Ranch testimony states that last year, staff from DLNR and its Department of Forestry & Wildlife visited the Ranch and outlined its vision, which "would diminish the Ranch to one-fifth of its current capacity." Kapāpala Ranch would be included in a single "landscape scale conservation area." The state, federal, and Nature Conservancy conservation lands "would encompass Hawaiʻi Volcano's National Park at Kīlauea and fan the eastern flank of Mauna Loa from the summit continuing south to the Kahuku Unit of HVNP and back north over the Kaʻū and Kapāpala Forest Reserves." She wrote that DLNR staff members emphasized their desire to expand the conservation land in Kaʻū to be 'big, protected, and connected.'"
    Kapāpala and other ranches on state land are asking for leases to
    go through the state Department of Agriculture.
    Photo by Julia Neal
         She cautioned that the Ranch also has a role in conservation by supporting and protecting the surrounding forest land through managing fire risk. "In my time here, there have been three major fires around the Ranch, two in the National Park at the Mauna Loa Strip and one in the Kapāpala Forest Reserve. Each fire blazed over several thousand acres. The Ranch in each case provided a buffer from the fires spreading from one conservation area to another."
         During the August 2018 fire, Kapāpala Ranch provided water to the state Department of Forestry & Wildlife and Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park fire crews to fill their pump trucks. The Kapāpala testimony notes that the "Ranch's bulldozer on the fifth day was actually able to stop the front of the fire. As a viable ranching enterprise we have built, repaired and maintain an elaborate water system which has nearly 100 mile of pipelines covering 34,000 acres (equal in size to Kahoʻolawe) with three reservoirs storing a total of 10 million gallons of water. Our reservoirs also provide water habitat to the threatened Nēnē goose while the miles of pipelines delivering water also enhance game bird and other wildlife populations."
    Lani Petrie testified about the ranch's assistance
    in fire protection and conserving forests around
     its pastures. Photo from Paniolo Hall of Fame
         The testimony states that in another cooperative effort with DFW, in 1990 Kapāpala Ranch "willingly gave up 1,250 acres of pasture that was better suited for native forest."
         In addition, says the testimony, the "Ranch also manages public access to the Forest Reserves through three entry points. Currently there are about 300 requests per month which our answering service handles and another 25 per month handled directly by us. Along with public access to the Reserves, we also open the Ranch during Game Bird Season for three months for the hunting public."
         According to Petrie, all of these cooperative efforts could continue, while improving food production under a lease from the  Department of Agriculture. See other testimony in Monday's Kaʻū News Briefs.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    COMPOSTING FOR FOOD AND GREEN WASTE is p

    romoted in legislation that will be heard by the Committee on Agriculture and Environment tomorrow, Monday, Feb., 10. Senate Bill 3121, co-introduced by Kaʻū's senators Dru Kanhua and Russell Ruderman, would require the Department of Health to periodically update its co-composting rules, and establish a multi-tiered registration and permitting system for composting facilities. If the bill passes, composting and co-composting would be allowed in agricultural districts. Companion legislation is House Bill 2407.
         According to ZeroWasteBigIsland, "Outdated stringent DOH regulations make it difficult for small sized composting operations to operate legally. Did you know if your local public school wanted to divert food and green waste from the landfill by composting, they would have to fill out the same rigorous 200-page DOH application that an industrial commercial composting facility would fill out? And current regulations require the school to compost on a concrete pad and have a leachate (liquid runoff) collection system installed, which costs in the ballpark of $30,000.
         "SB3121 remedies this issue by requiring the DOH to establish a multi‑tiered registration and permitting system for composting facilities. If you are a small-scale composter, the permits and regulations would be easier and more lenient. Large-scale composters, with higher risks of pathogens and fires, would require more stringent permits and regulations. Overall, SB3121 would allow small-scale composting operations to have a more realistic path to legal permitting."
         Read the bill here. Written testimony is closed, but if submitted before the hearing, may still be considered.

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    Stream gushes under a Wood Valley stream
    in January. Photo by Julia Neal
    ONE OF THE MOST VOLUMINOUS RAIN EVENTS since November of 2000 hit Kaʻū in January. The National Weather Service released precipitation reports late last week, noting that Pāhala and Kapāpala Ranch received twice the regular January rainfall. Pāhala recorded 13.27 inches and Kapāpala 16.54 inches. Kahuku Ranch near Ocean View recorded 4.77 inches, which is more than 1.5 its average January rainfall. The record rains came in the first half of the month, flooding Kāwā Flats and closing Highway 11 there for a longer period than in the 2000 event that tore apart bridges and isolated Pāhala for days.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    A GALE WATCH IS IN PLACE for south- and west-facing portions of Kaʻū through tomorrow evening. According to the National Weather Service, high winds and rough seas, brought in by a cold front, will impact south and west Hawaiʻi Island through mid-week. The entire state is under gale or small craft advisories.
    The most voluminous water event in Kaʻū
    since 2001 was this January.
    Photo by Julia Neal

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    LEGISLATION TO CURB HELICOPTER NOISE has been deferred in the state Senate. Senate Bill 3154, would have prohibited any tour aircraft operator from operating an aircraft near a residential property. The bill would also have required tour aircraft be fitted with Federal Aviation Administration approved flotation equipment and use an automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast system, and to comply with the National Transportation Safety Board safety recommendations. SB3154 was deferred on Feb. 3 by both the Energy, Economic Development, and Tourism Committee and the Committee on Transportation.
         Written testimony in support of the bill was submitted by four individuals and the O‘ahu Tour Helicopter Safety and Noise Inter-Action Group. Testimony against the bill was submitted by Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Activities & Attractions Association of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Helicopter Association, Paradise Helicopters, Magnum Helicopters, Jack Harter Helicopters, Inc., and the Department of the Attorney General.

    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    PANAʻEWA STAMPEDE RODEO will be held Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. The 28th annual Hawaiʻi Horse Owners rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church will be held at  on Sunday. Horse Races will be held oat on Monday. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under.

         Kaʻū Multicultural Society will also join in the festivities by sharing their Kaʻū Paniolo Display.

         Kaʻū paniolo and paniola are training for the Panaʻewa Stampede. Competitors, rodeo clowns, and huge crowds are expected flock to the Panaʻewa Equestrian Center on the Kaʻū side of Hilo.

         One competitor expected at the event is Kaʻū's Lorilee Lorenzo, a past Queen of the rodeo and a regular participant. In 2019, Lenaia Andrade, a high school student from Nāʻālehu, won the All Around Cowgirl Award. Addie Flores, whose family owns and operates South Point Buckers, won the Youth Barrel Racing Event. Kircia Derasin of Kaʻū was crowned Rodeo Princess.

    Bull Riding Winner Trisyn Kalawaia at the 26th Annual Panaʻewa Stampede 
    Rodeo holds on tight, while a rodeo clown remains on alert. 
    Photo by Brad H. Ballesteros

         Last year, more than 10,000 people attended the three-day event. The 185 competitors ranged in age from three to 73. The event included rodeo clowns, cultural and historical displays, leather and saddle making exhibits, and food and craft booths. Special novelty events included Hula Bulls and Bull Poker.

         The Stampede Rodeo features a wide variety of competition, including All Around Cowboy, Reserve All Around Cowboy, All Around Cowgirl, and Reserve All Around Cowgirl. Paniolo can compete in Po‘o Wai U, a traditional event that comes from tying cattle to forked tree trunks when rounding them up in Hawaiian wildlands, and Century Team Roping, where the total age of team members is a minimum of 100 years. Other events include Dummy Roping, Wahine Barrel Racing, Youth Barrel Racing, Kane-Wahine Ribbon Mugging, Sheep Riding, Youth Team Roping, Wahine Breakaway Roping, Wahine Breakaway Roping, Steer Wrestling, Open Team Roping, Junior Bull Riding, Double Mugging, Tie Down Roping, Wahine Calf Mugging, and Bull Riding.


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    The Robin's Egg Nebula is a "Planetary Nebula," seen using data taken 
    from the Promt/CTIO telescope in Chileby Star Shadows 
    Remote Observatory and Processed by Stuart Forman. 
    It shows the final stages of a sun-like star in its final death throes.

    STARS OVER KAʻŪ for February 2020, by Lew & Donna Cook:

    Planets and Exoplanets

         The sun had only one sunspot on Jan. 4 and none on Jan. 14, continuing its period of few or no sunspots. The sun rotates once with a period between 25 and 34 days. Why is there this range? This is because the sun is a ball of gas, not a solid object.

    Venus is the "evening star", shining brilliantly in the west after sunset. Mars won't rise until after Jupiter and Saturn are both in Sagittarius, rising after and , respectively.

    Constellations and Deep Sky Objects

         Orion stands high but past the meridian, but you will notice something strange about Orion. It doesn't look like it should. Betelgeuse, the star in the constellation's right shoulder, the one on your left, is much dimmer than usual. Betelgeuse is a variable star, but this is as dim as it has been in 170 years – as long as estimates have been made.

    You can make estimates on your own by comparing Betelgeuse with Bellatrix, the bright star in the other shoulder. It is marked "1.6" - which is its magnitude. Another star you can compare it with is the end star – the low one on your left – on Orion's belt. It is marked "2.0" on the chart.

         Look quickly from Betelgeuse to the others: is it brighter than one but fainter than the other? About the same as one? Fainter than 2.0? Write down your estimate, making as good an estimate as you can. Repeat this activity over the next few weeks.

    Robin's Egg Nebula

         The Robin's Egg nebula is an excellent look at what our sun will be doing in several billions of years. This is what it looks like (see photo, above).

    How to use this map: Hold this map over your head so that the northern horizon points toward the north on the Earth. For best results, use a red flashlight to illuminate the map. If you are looking east, hold it in front of you so that east is on the bottom. For south views, south at the bottom, and for west, west at the bottom. Use this map at the times shown on in its upper left corner. Keep this page handy and show it to your keiki next month. They probably have bedtimes before the time of the chart shown here.

    The constellations are presented with their 3-letter abbreviations, with their common names shown in the margins. This is done to take advantage of the truly dark skies Ka‘ū is blessed with when there is no bright moon and the skies are clear of vog. The star charts are produced from a sky Atlas program written by Jerry Hudson, who has given us permission to publish it. Thank you, Jerry.


    Fridays Sunriseand Sunset times

    Date                 Sunrise            Sunset

    Feb.    

    Feb.   14         

    Feb.   21         

    Feb.   28         

    The times of sunrise and sunset are starting to change more than last month.

    Moon Phases

    Date                Moonrise             Moonset

    First Quarter   

    Feb.     1                           **

    Full Moon      

    Feb.     **

    Last Quarter   

    Feb.    15        

    New Moon

    Feb.    23           

    First Quarter   

    Mar.    
    **next morning


    To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Boys Basketball

    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Wrestling

    Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
    Swimming
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

    Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

    Girls Softball

    Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

    Boys Baseball

    Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

    Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

    Boys Volleyball

    Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

    Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

    Judo

    Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

    Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

    Track
    Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

    Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


    UPCOMING
    TUESDAY, FEB. 11

    Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


    WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

    Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


    FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

    Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


    SATURDAY, FEB. 15

    Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


    Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


    Valentine's Dance, Saturday, Feb. 15, p.m. to  Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more. volcanoartcenter.org


    Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


    SUNDAY, FEB. 16
    RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

    ONGOING
    Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


    RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


    Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

    Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

    Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


    Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

    PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

    Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

         Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

         Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


    Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

    Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

    T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

    Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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    A bill to ensure that milk products are labeled to prevent sellers from indicating they are produced in
    Hawaiʻi instead ofthe mainland go to public hearing tomorrow. Above is a photo of Lani Moo, the character who represented the dairies that Meadow Golf formerly operated in Hawaiʻi. See more below. Photo by Peter Young
    ADDING BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND URGENT CARE AT KAʻŪ HOSPITAL's Rural Health Clinic is the aim of  a bill coming up for hearing in the state Senate this Wednesday, Feb. 12. The medical facility is asking for help with testimony from the public. Senate Bill 2617 asks for up to $700,000 for fiscal year 2020-2021 "to provide support for the expansion of the Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic to improve access to urgent care and outpatient behavior health services, thereby reducing the
    need for emergency services." Use of the funds would be overseen by the non-profit group that oversees both Hilo and Kaʻū Hosptials, Hawaiʻi Health Systems Corp.
    Kaʻū Hospital could be open for urgent care and offer
    behavioral health services if proposed funding wins
    approval. Photo from Kaʻū Hospital Foundation
         Both Senators Dru Kanuha, who represents West Kaʻū, and Kai Kahele, who is a candidate for the congressional seat to represent Kaʻū were among the introducers of the bill in the legislature.
         To read the bill and submit testimony, go to SB2617 on the Hawaiʻi State Legislature website.
         The Senate Committee on Commerce, Consumer Protection will also hear testimony on expanding cardiology services at Kaʻū's sister facility Hilo Medical Center, with a second cardiac catheter lab, and to help with loan repayment for healthcare professionals.
    See sample testimony supporting SB 2814 to fund the second cardiac cath lab bill. See a YouTube video making the case of the second cath lab.

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    A TRUTH IN LABELING BILL CONCERNING MILK will go to hearing tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 11 in the state House of Representatives. Introduced by Chair of the Health Committee John Mizuno, House Bill 1663 would require any processed milk or milk product to be entirely produced in Hawaiʻi in order to label it "with any item or slogan that might imply that the milk or milk products are produced locally."
         The bill follows the state Health Department, in 2017, temporarily ordering Meadow Gold to cease sales of its two percent reduced fat milk shipped from the mainland after recording coliform levels nearing 15 times the allowed maximum. According to Meadow Gold, the milk was safe to drink but could have spoiled faster with the higher coliform count.
         The measure would also require "all United States mainland milk shipped to and sold in Hawaiʻi to be single pasteurized only and comply with all handling, transportation, and distribution requirements of the federal Food Safety Modernization Act, including handling procedures, temperature verifications, and proper refrigerated transportation of all perishable foods." Read more and testify online.

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    Land in yellow would be transferred to the Department of Agriculture, a measure opposed by
    the Department of Land & Natural Resources, which now manages the leases to Kaʻū
    ranchers. Map from DLNR
    KEEPING PASTURE LANDS OWNED BY THE STATE under management of the state Department of Land & Natural Resources is the aim of testimony from the DLNR chief. Suzanne Case, who chairs the Board of Land & Natural Resources and heads up DLNR, gave testimony to the state Senate last week regarding Senate Bill 2812, which would transfer management of 93,000 acres
    of state owned lands leased for pasture to the state Department of Agriculture. More than a third of that land is in Kaʻū. Deadline for DLNR to transfer the lands to Department of Agriculture would be June 30, 2021.
         The bill would also add the "care and production of pasture lands" to the state law's definition of agricultural activities. Agriculture would be defined as "care and production of livestock,  pasture lands, livestock products, poultry, or poultry products, or apiary, horticultural, or floricultural products, or the planting, cultivating, and harvesting of crops or trees, including tree farms." 
         Case writes that DLNR desires to keep the leases "because of the high natural resource value of certain pasture lands. Some pasture lands are remnant native forests that have never been plowed and contain native and endangered plants and wildlife. They adjoin or are near forest reserves and, as a result, have great potential for reforestation, and/or are important in providing access to other public lands for management, traditional gathering, and public recreation including hunting and trails."
         She includes a flyer entitled Importance of Pasture Lands to DLNR’s Mission and says that a separate piece of legislation, Senate Bill 2914, could relieve concerns of local ranchers who assess that they could better negotiate their leases with the Department of Agriculture. The legislation would give the DLNR more latitude in negotiating new leases with existing ranchers.
         In her quest to keep the leases with DLNR, Case writes, "Positive advancement in carbon sequestration challenges, wildlife management, wildfire protection and forest health concerns can be best managed by the Department  (DLNR) through mutually beneficial practices with ranching, wildlife protection, and native forest restoration. Mandating the transfer of these lands to DOA for pasture purposes will severely undermine the potential for reforestation and other natural resource protection uses of the land. For these reasons, the Department respectfully urges the Legislature not to pass this bill, and instead support Senate Bill 2914 and House Bill 2358 and allow the select pasture leases to remain under the Department’s management."
         The Chair of the Board of Agriculture, Phyllis Shimabukuro-Geiser, testified that she supports the bill to transfer pasture lands to the Department of Agriculture.
         SB 2812 passed two Senate Committees last Friday and a companion bill is not yet scheduled for a hearing in the House. However, the Senate bill is expected to pass over and to be considered. See the SB 2812. See its companion, House Bill 2577.
         See more in upcoming Kaʻū News Briefs and in the Feb. 9 Kaʻū News Briefs.

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    CHILDCARE AND EDUCATION FOR KEIKI OF KAʻŪ COFFEE PICKERS will be the topic of a meeting of Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation.
         Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it."
         Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

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    Image from National Weather Service
    MOST OF KAʻŪ IS UNDER A FLOOD ADVISORY through this evening, Monday, Feb. 10,  according to the National Weather Service. Rain rates of 1 to 3 inches per hour, moving onto leeward slopes in fast moving showers, are forecast to continue through the evening. NWS urges the public to stay away from streams, drainage ditches, and low lying areas prone to flooding. Rainfall and runoff will also cause hazardous driving conditions due to ponding, reduced visibility, and poor braking action, states NWS. "Do not cross fast flowing or rising water in your vehicle, or on foot. Turn around, don't drown."
         A small craft advisory is in effect for all Hawaiian waters. Kaʻū's west-facing shores are also under a high surf warning.

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    A DOWNED POWER LINE CLOSED HIGHWAY 11 this morning near the 62 mile marker, close to Nāʻālehu Police Station. Both lanes were closed to traffic for about two hours, as was the station. Motorists were advised to use Kaʻalaiki Rd. as an alternate route.


         Another shutdown of Hwy 11 in Kaʻū today was caused by a fallen tree.

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    CONSERVATION COUNCIL FOR HAWAIʻI has welcomed Moana Bjur as its new Executive Director. She took the helm of Hawaiʻi's oldest wildlife conservation organization in early February and will lead the organization "as it confronts the many challenges facing Hawaʻi's native wildlife and the ecosystems they depend upon," says the announcement.
    Jonee Peters, Operations and Events Director; Les Welsh, 
    National Wildlife Federation Associate Director for 
    the Pacific and Director of Conservation Partnerships; 
    and Moana Bjur, Executive Director.
         A Native Hawaiian descendant of Kawaihapai on the North Shore of Oʻahu, Bjur has more than 20 years of experience working across public, private and non-profit organizations developing and implementing conservation, environmental, education and community engagement programs for participants in school, camp, conference and professional settings in Hawaiʻi. Before joining CCH, she served as the Assistant Executive Director at Waimea Valley, an educational non-profit with a mission to preserve and perpetuate human, cultural and natural resources of Waimea Valley on Oʻahu.
         Dr. Rachel Sprague, Conservation Council's Board President, said, "CCH has a long-standing history as a voice for our imperiled native species, and we look forward to Moana leading our important work ahead in protecting and restoring Hawaiʻi's native wildlife and wild places for future generations."
         Conservation Council for Hawaiʻi, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization established in 1950 is dedicated to protecting native Hawaiian plants, animals, and ecosystems for future generations. See  conservehi.org.

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    Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

    throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

    stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

    See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

    Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

    Boys Basketball

    Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
    Wrestling

    Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
    Swimming
    Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui



    Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

    Girls Softball

    Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

    Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

    Boys Baseball

    Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

    Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

    Boys Volleyball