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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, February 7, 2020

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A USGS HVO geologist measures the height of the growing tephra cone around fissure 8 during Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption. See Volcano Watch below. USGS photo by A. Klesh




A WATER BOTTLING PLANT NEAR WAILOA RIVER in Hilo received a "No go" for the second time from the Windward Planning Commission on Thursday. The plan came back before the commission after the developers went to court with new findings and the court sent the proposal back for reconsideration. The water bottling plant would have been located near the Wailoa River State Recreation Area.
     Another water bottling plant was proposed for the old sugar mill site in Pāhala but the property purchasers have yet to move on their tentative approval from the Planning Commission.

     Leading the charge against the Hilobottling plant is Kaʻū's Planning Commissioner John Replogle. During the earlier proceedings, Replogle joined public opposition and moved that the Windward Planning Commission kill the request for a Special Management Area permit for the developers, Piʻilani Partners. Commissioners voted five to one to deny the SMA. The developers appealed the decision to the courts, providing what they called new, supportive information for their plan.

John Replogle, Kaʻū's Planning Commissioner, expresses his opinions
on water bottling plant. Photo from Big Island Video News
     Replogle said, "Giving private business access to our water, so they can enrich themselves, is not reasonable or beneficial use to our natural resource or to our people. I see nothing in the application that is in the public trust or interest." Replogle contended that drilling into the aquifer would introduce risks to the water supply. He also noted that worldwide there is "a scrambling by corporate business and wealthy individuals to grab up and control all remaining natural resources at the expensive of people who live in the region."
     See more on the Hiloand Kaʻū bottling plant plans at kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/search?q=water+bottling.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PROTECTING COMMUNITY TELEVISION is the goal of legislation supported by U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono. The Protecting Community Television Act, S. 3218, would preseve funding for community television stations, "which educate and inform viewers across Hawaiʻi," according to a statement from Hirono's office.

     In Hawaiʻi, community television stations Nā Leo, Hōʻike, Akakū, and ʻŌlelo broadcast across Hawaiʻi Island, Kauaʻi, MauiCounty, and Oʻahu, respectively. These stations rely on franchise fees paid by cable companies "to provide invaluable coverage of local news and other content," Hirono said. Examples of programming are: live streaming of official State of Hawaiʻi governmental meetings, county meetings, cultural events and festivals, cooking shows, sports, and other programs.

     In August 2019, the Federal Communications Commission changed long-standing rules to allow cable companies to subtract the value of certain "in-kind" contributions from the total amount the cable operator pays in franchise fees to the local community—fees used to support community television stations.
     Hirono contends:  "This change will force local governments to choose between funding these community television stations and other vital community resources like libraries or schools, a result that will almost certainly decrease the funding available to community television stations. S. 3218 reverses this harmful FCC decision by reaffirming that franchise fees that cable companies pay to local governments can only be collected in monetary form, and cannot include in-kind contributions.
     "Local programming allows everyone from students to seniors to broadcast their stories. Olelo has certified over 19,000 community members as local producers, ensuring that community members can tell their own stories in their own way."

     Said Hirono, "Community television stations provide an opportunity for diverse voices across our community to be heard. From students interviewing their elected officials to streaming local cultural festivals, community television provides an essential outlet for Hawaiʻi residents to engage directly with their neighbors. I support the Protecting Community Television Act because storytelling and recording our history is essential, and we must protect our local programs accordingly."

     Last month, ʻŌlelo organized the 14th annual Youth Capitol Commentary during the State Legislature's opening day. This year, 60 students from 14 Oʻahu schools conducted 131 interviews of lawmakers, the public, the Governor, and the Lieutenant Governor. The student interviews will air for five hours across ʻŌlelo platforms.

      Jaylee Canoy, a junior leader at ʻŌlelo's NanakuliMediaCentersaid, said, "As a youth who's been involved with ʻŌlelo Community Media since second grade, I've been empowered with the knowledge, skills and more importantly the confidence to make a difference in my community through public access. Now in the 8th grade, I'm equipped to be an access producer, a mentor, and a leader to other students while giving back to my community in assisting my elders technically so they, like me, have the confidence to stand for their beliefs to make a difference on important issues that matter to them and our community via ʻŌlelo Community Media."

     Sanford Inouye, President and CEO of ʻŌlelo, said, "Under the new FCC rule, thousands of community access media organizations across the nation may have their operating budgets slashed. Olelo has taught keiki and kūpuna how to use new technology for decades, empowering communities to create and distribute programs that inform and engage. This rule can effectively kill hyper-local media, and the ability for local voices to share stories and coverage by and for their own communities. The Protecting Community Television Act will allow stations like Olelo to continue to provide government accessibility and community engagement."

     J Robertson, Hōʻke: Kauaʻi Community Television Managing Director, said, "Hōʻike provides our island residents with classes, equipment, and educational programs with expert advice so that everyone has the ability and the right to share and tell their stories on the cable system. These are the intimate stories – featuring arts and entertainment, spiritual guidance, health and wellness, sports, public affairs, environmental issues, and, most importantly, as a spotlight on the showcase of cultural activities and entities on our island. Protection and support for community television is critical."

     Jay April, Akakū CEO, said, "For nearly fifty years, public access community television stations like Akakū have been a beacon of free speech where anyone can come talk story, most of it local. Public access television keeps us informed, educated and meaningfully engaged with one another, even with many communities in Hawaiʻi separated by water. On behalf of many thousands of supporters of public access television in Maui Nui and Hawaiʻi, we applaud Senator Hirono for her sponsorship of S.3218, the Protecting Community Television Act, which ensures public television can continue to be the vital resource it has been for decades to come."
     The Protecting Community Television Act has received endorsements from numerous national organizations, including the National Association of Counties, National League of Cities, United States Conference of Mayors, National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors, Alliancefor Community Media, TeleCommUnity, and others.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Kathleen Ho
KATHLEEN HO IS APPOINTED DIRECTOR of the Office of Environmental Quality Control in the state Department of Health by Gov. David Ige.

     Ho has extensive experience as deputy attorney general in environmental law and served as deputy attorney general in the Health Division from 1992. In addition, Ho was adjunct professor at William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and deputy corporation counsel for the City and County of Honolulu. She has also worked in private practice in Honolulu, and served as advisor to OEQC and the Environmental Council.

     Ho is a graduate of the University of San Francisco where she earned a B.S. in Biology. She also earned her Juris Doctor degree from the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Franciscoand her LLM in Environmental Law from Lewis and ClarkLawSchoolin Portland, Oregon.

     Ige said, "Kathleen has years of experience working in environmental law alongside a wide range of stakeholders. She is highly qualified and will serve the state well in leading and managing the OEQC."

     Ho said, "I am honored and grateful that Governor Ige has nominated me to serve as the Director of the Office of Environmental Quality Control. I look forward to continuing my service to the people of Hawaiʻi."
     Ho's appointment is subject to Senate confirmation. Her start date has not yet been determined. If confirmed, Ho replaces Scott Glenn who has been appointed as chief executive officer of the Hawaiʻi State Energy Office.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LOVE THE ARTS FUNDRAISER GALA for VolcanoArtCenterwill be held tomorrow, Saturday, Feb. 8, The theme of the 12th annual event is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. The evening also features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions will provide attendees an opportunity to bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions.
     Tickets are $70, $65 for VAC Members, and can be purchased at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or by calling (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets also provide free admission to the LTA Valentine's Day Dance held the following weekend on Saturday, Feb. 15, 6 p.m. to Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more.
     See volcanoartcenter.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

GEOLOGISTS are the focus of this week's Volcano Watch written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Carolyn Parcheta. This is a fifth installment of the People and Jobs at HVOseries from Volcano Awareness Month:

     Geologists rock!

     Continuing with the Volcano Awareness Month theme of people and their work at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, we move on to another role at HVO – that of "geologist."

     A geologist studies the Earth. This includes the study of rocks and the ways in which they form. Specifically, HVO geologists specialize in the numerous forms of volcanic rocks – liquid and solid lava flows and explosive deposits, such as ash. 

     As lava cools and solidifies, it can take the form of ʻaʻā or pāhoehoe – Hawaiian words used worldwide by volcanologists. Solid volcanic rock can also occur as particles, ranging from fine ash and Pele's hair to vehicle-sized lava bombs and blocks. In between, there are Pele's tears (droplets of volcanic glass), scoria and reticulite (forms of basaltic pumice), and spatter (clots of molten lava).

Instruments on the edge of Puʻu ʻŌʻō gather important information for monitoring volcanic activity but "feet on the ground" geologists are also required. USGS photo
     Geologists also try to understand the past to better anticipate the future. As liquid lava turns to solid volcanic rock, it records the processes that formed the rock. Through field observations and petrologic and petrographic analyses, physical and chemical information can be found in the rock at various scales, from micro-sized crystals to lava flows that are kilometers (miles) long.
     The HVO geology team studies how volcanic rocks form, how lava erupts and solidifies, and how explosions are triggered. We study how and when the surface of a volcano is created and how and why disturbances such as faulting and collapses happen. We also assess the hazards of eruptions and rock breakage.
     The general approach to using geologic data on a volcano is to reconstruct how the volcano formed. We then use this information to model or forecast how the volcano could behave in the future.

     Maintaining HVO's camera network is one of the geology team's critical jobs. HVO's current network consists of 22 live web cameras and 1 time-lapse camera covering 45 percent of the Kīlauea lava-flow hazard zone 1 area and 36 percent of the Mauna Loa lava-flow hazard zone 1 area. The camera network provides real-time monitoring of areas that cannot be staffed 24/7. This allows us to track changes in critical areas so that we always know what the volcano is doing.
     HVO's geology group is responsible for the camera network, but it takes many others to keep the network running. HVO engineers help build the camera systems and provide the power systems that keep them running. HVO IT staff ensure that our cameras can transmit images to the website.

     Cameras cannot, however, replace "boots on the ground" observations by geologists in the field. How much time we spend in the field depends on volcanic activity. During this relatively quiet time on Kīlauea, we're in the field 1-2 days per month. During the 2018 eruption, HVO geologists were in the field 7 days per week.

     During an active eruption, our field work tasks include collecting lava samples, tracking a lava flow's growth and advance rate, and assessing if hazards in the affected area have increased or decreased. In both eruptive and non-eruptive times, we also examine older deposits in a continuing study of the island’s volcanic history.

     There is no "typical" field day for HVO geologists – our work is determined by what information is needed. For instance, prior to 2018, we tracked Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō lava flows, as well as the growth of lava deltas, looking for signs of impending collapses or potential explosions. During the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption, we measured how fast lava flowed through the fissure 8 channel and checked the boundaries of the lava channel to assess their stability.

     Our field work produces many detailed measurements, enabling us to accurately assess volcanic hazards. Examples include monitoring how heat is progressing away from the 2018 dike in lower Puna and measuring the rise of water in the Halemaʻumaʻu crater lake with a laser rangefinder.
Working on the edge as a geologist or other HVO scientist. USGS photo
     HVO geologists also spend time in the office. That's when we analyze and interpret data collected in the field and write reports that are ultimately published. To help interpret geologic data, we use several computer programs, some of which help us create the maps posted on HVO's public website. Other programs help us create 3-dimensional models of volcanic features, or help us calculate and model lava flow behavior, explosion behavior, and collapse processes.

     There's rarely a dull moment for HVO's geology team, which is why we enjoy our work. The job of a geologist definitely rocks!

     This is the final article about HVO people and jobs in the Volcano Awareness Month 2020 series, but additional HVO teams may write about their work in future Volcano Watch articles.

     Volcano Activity Updates

     Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL. Monitoring data over the past month showed no significant changes. Rates of seismicity were variable but within long-term values. Sulfur dioxide emission rates were low at the summit and below detection limits at Puʻu ʻŌʻō and the lower East Rift Zone. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continued to slowly expand and deepen.

     Areas of elevated ground temperatures and minor gas release are still found in the vicinity of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone fissures. Gases include steam (water) and small amounts of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. These conditions are expected to be long-term. Similar conditions after the 1955 eruption continued for years to decades.

     Mauna Loa is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption is certain.

     Four earthquakes with three or more felt reports occurred in the Hawaiian Islands this past week: a magnitude-3.3 quake 3 km (2 mi) southeast of Fern Acres at 39 km (24 mi) depth on Feb. 5 at 8:32 p.m., a magnitude-2.8 quake 8 km (5 mi) northeast of Pāhala at 32 km (20 mi) depth on Feb. 4 at 8:37 p.m., a magnitude-4.2 quake 7 km (4 mi) south of Volcano at 8 km (5 mi) depth on Feb. 2 at 8:37 p.m., and a magnitude-3.0 quake 20 km (12 mi) southeast of Volcano at 7 km (4 mi) depth on Jan. 30 at 1:51 a.m.
     Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvofor past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Boys Basketball

Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
Swimming
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 8, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
SATURDAY, FEB. 8

16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


SUNDAY, FEB. 9

Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


TUESDAY, FEB. 11

Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12
O Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu  Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Nāʻālehu Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


ONGOING
Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, February 8, 2020

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Starting early, keiki strolls a baby through the volleyball scene at Kaʻū District Gym on Saturday as players from five to
16 years compete in their age groups through Sunday. Miloliʻi-Kaʻū Volleyball Club sponsors the event to raises money
 to take the club to national tournaments in Las Vegas and Phoenix. To donate, see more below. Photo by Julia Neal
KAʻŪ'S REP. IN CONGRESS IS UP IN THE PRESIDENTIAL POLLS, according to a message today from the campaign of Tulsi Gabbard. It reports on two polls in New Hampshire where Gabbard has been campaigning from town to town, surf spots to snowboard slopes.
     The CNN-University of New Hampshire poll puts her at 6 percent, in fifth place above Amy Klobuchar.
     According to Tulsi 2020, the Caledonian Record newspaper, which has covered six counties in northeastern New Hampshire since 1837, took a poll with the question, "The New Hampshire Democratic Primary is Feb. 11. Who in this list of candidates would you like to see win the Primary?" The poll showed Gabbard leading in a landslide with 70.4 percent naming her preferred nominee. Bernie Sanders followed Gabbard with 9.4 percent, Pete Buttigieg with 5 percent, and Andrew Yang and Joe Biden tied at 2.2 percent, according to Tulsi 2020.
     Gabbard was not included in Friday night's national debate among candidates for the Democratic Party nomination. The Federalist reported that Gabbard supporters carried signs outside of the debate in Manchester, New Hampshire, chanting "Let Tulsi Speak." She declined to attend but released a statement: "You can call this by many names: Media bias. Election interference. Political gamesmanship by the Democratic establishment. But regardless of motive, the end-result is that the
American people lose. They lose the ability to hear directly from a candidate with a broad, inclusive message for change. They lose the opportunity to show their support and spread the message, about a dynamic, anti-establishment candidate breathing fresh life into the Democratic Party. And they lose the freedom to make educated political decisions without media manipulation."
     Gabbard claims to have held more town hall meetings in New Hampshire than any other candidate.
Supporters of Tulsi Gabbard for President protested her exclusion from the Democratic debate on Friday.
Photo from The Federalist
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AN ALERT FROM NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IS POSTED FOR KAʻŪ. It predicts very windy conditions and coastal flooding Sunday night into Monday, with winds expected to increase late in the day Sunday into Sunday night as a surface low develops to the northeast of the
islands. Depending on the exact track and strength of this low, very windy conditions are possible in some lowland areas Sunday night and Monday, along with a chance of localized wind damage.
     Coastal flooding is possible Sunday night through Monday along exposed north- and west-facing shores due to a combination of strong winds and warning-level surf.
     The greatest potential for coastal flooding impacts will be during the peak daily high tide, which will occur during the early morning hours between midnight and daybreak.
     Coastal impacts may include significant beach erosion, flooding of beaches that normally remain dry, and overwash onto vulnerable low-lying coastal roads and other coastal infrastructure.
     A Small Craft Advisory remains in effect until 6 p.m. Sunday. A Gale Watch remains in effect from Sunday evening through Monday afternoon.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PĀHALA-KAʻŪ HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI have announced their annual Las Vegas school reunion plans for June. Organizer Pricilla Kai Shimamoto, class of '66, said all alumni and friends of the school are invited, from the younger alumni to senior citizens.

Joe Tatayama, who spreads the
news of the Kaʻū High Alumni
Association. Photo by Julia Neal
     Joe Tatayama who publishes the alumni newsletter reports that events of the 2020 reunion will follow a similar format as last year, with dinner buffet on Friday night and the hors d'oeuvres stations on Saturday night; no-host bar both nights. Cost for the evening events: $80 per person for both nights. The Dinner Banquet will be held Friday, June 12 at California Hotel, ʻOhana Room, for registration and picture-taking, dinner The dinner buffet with no-host bar on Hospitality Night will be held Saturday, June 13 at Main Street Station, Pullman Room, from to  As in previous years, generous donations will be used to subsidize reunion costs to keep a reasonable registration price.
     As in previous years, rooms can be reserved at the California Hotel by direct contact. Rooms are blocked off for attendees from Wednesday June 10 to Tuesday June 16. Call 800-634-6255 and give the Pāhala-Kaʻū Reunion 2020 Group Code: AOCPAHA Reserve rooms no later than May 11. The Hawaiian Package rate includes room, tax, and three meals a day. Rates remain the same as last year: four nights, $370.00/double or $273.00/single; three nights, $340.00/double or $250.00/single; two nights, $320.00/double or $235.00/single. A $50 deposit is due at time of booking. Cancellations and changes can be made up to 48 hours before check-in. Additional nights are $80 each plus 13% tax, based on availability; no meals. All additional nights have a daily resort fee of $19.20.

     Questions? Contact: Neal Kanda: (808) 284-1066 Gary Ota: (808) 622-2900 Roxanne Gacayan: (808) 979-1180 Wanda Lau: (818) 800-9337 Eva Taylor: (713) 653-3377 or Priscilla Shimamoto: (808) 391-7901.
     Shimamoto notes that this year is the Class of '66's fifth and final year of planning and hosting the reunion. Class of '61 has volunteered to plan and host the 2021 Pāhala-Kaʻū High School Alumni Reunion in Las Vegas. She praised Glenn Kawachi and his "super skill of persuasion for gathering a group of his classmates to take the helm and continue this event which has become such a mainstay in the lives of all of us who grew up in or have connections to Kaʻū."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Tots to teens are competing in the fourth annual Miloliʻi-Kaʻū Volleyball tournament through Sunday
at Kaʻū District Gym, with 32 teams competing. Photo by Julia Neal
THE FIFTH ANNUAL MILOLIʻI-KAʻŪ VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT is underway at Kaʻū`u District Gym with play into this Saturday evening, starting again Sunday morning at 8:30 a.m into the afternoon.
     Thirty-two teams from Kona to Hilo fielded players with age categories from five to 16. The youth teams are considered key to the backbone of volleyball in Hawaiʻi, which is very successful in bringing up players to compete in high school to vie for college scholarships around the country.
     The Miloliʻi-Kaʻū program is raising money for its players to play in national tournaments in Las Vegas and Phoenix in June. To donate, call Jennifer Shibuya at 808-209-7137.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Boys Basketball

Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
Swimming
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
SUNDAY, FEB. 9

Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


TUESDAY, FEB. 11

Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


Valentine's Dance, Saturday, Feb. 15, p.m. to  Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more. volcanoartcenter.org


Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


ONGOING
Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org


Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, February 9, 2020

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Former Stampede Queen, Lorilee Lorenzo of Kaʻū, is expected to compete during this year's Panaʻewa Stampede Rodeo. 
See details below. Photo by Chuck McKeand

TRANSFERRING STATE PASTURE LANDS from the Department of Land & Natural Resources to the Department of Agriculture has support from ranchers in Kaʻū and around the state. Senate Bill 2812 passed Senate committees on Friday and is expected to go to the House of Representatives for consideration. Among ranches affected in Kaʻū are those with long histories of operation by the Galimbas, Wally Andrade, Jerry Egami, and Randy Cabral who lease their pastures from the DLNR.
     Testimony from the 34,000 acre Kapāpala Ranch between Pāhala and Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park notes that its pastures have supported food production for 160 years. "Today the Ranch provides beef in the equivalence of 3.4 million school lunches per year," writes Kapāpala partner Lani Cran Petrie in her testimony. She testifies that one reason for favoring Department of Agriculture holding pasture leases is that it likely would be able to give more reasonable rents for land producing food than would the DLNR where rents are based on "highest and best use."
Kapāpala Ranch has produced food for 160 years, supporting the
aim of food self-sufficiency. Photo by Julia Neal
     According to her testimony, the DLNR recently proposed to increase Kapāpala Ranch rent by 1,000 percent, "which would have put anyone operating an agricultural enterprise out of business." Two years of negotiations, mediation, and binding arbitration to settle the rent with the DLNR cost the Ranch the equivalent of three years of rent, she says. In the end, a University of Hawaiʻi Agricultural Extension Service range specialist and an agricultural land appraiser assessed the value of the ranch lands and the fair market rent based on pasture value was set by an arbitrator.
     The Kapāpala Ranch testimony states that last year, staff from DLNR and its Department of Forestry & Wildlife visited the Ranch and outlined its vision, which "would diminish the Ranch to one-fifth of its current capacity." Kapāpala Ranch would be included in a single "landscape scale conservation area." The state, federal, and Nature Conservancy conservation lands "would encompass Hawaiʻi Volcano's National Park at Kīlauea and fan the eastern flank of Mauna Loa from the summit continuing south to the Kahuku Unit of HVNP and back north over the Kaʻū and Kapāpala Forest Reserves." She wrote that DLNR staff members emphasized their desire to expand the conservation land in Kaʻū to be 'big, protected, and connected.'"
Kapāpala and other ranches on state land are asking for leases to
go through the state Department of Agriculture.
Photo by Julia Neal
     She cautioned that the Ranch also has a role in conservation by supporting and protecting the surrounding forest land through managing fire risk. "In my time here, there have been three major fires around the Ranch, two in the National Park at the Mauna Loa Strip and one in the Kapāpala Forest Reserve. Each fire blazed over several thousand acres. The Ranch in each case provided a buffer from the fires spreading from one conservation area to another."
     During the August 2018 fire, Kapāpala Ranch provided water to the state Department of Forestry & Wildlife and Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park fire crews to fill their pump trucks. The Kapāpala testimony notes that the "Ranch's bulldozer on the fifth day was actually able to stop the front of the fire. As a viable ranching enterprise we have built, repaired and maintain an elaborate water system which has nearly 100 mile of pipelines covering 34,000 acres (equal in size to Kahoʻolawe) with three reservoirs storing a total of 10 million gallons of water. Our reservoirs also provide water habitat to the threatened Nēnē goose while the miles of pipelines delivering water also enhance game bird and other wildlife populations."
Lani Petrie testified about the ranch's assistance
in fire protection and conserving forests around
 its pastures. Photo from Paniolo Hall of Fame
     The testimony states that in another cooperative effort with DFW, in 1990 Kapāpala Ranch "willingly gave up 1,250 acres of pasture that was better suited for native forest."
     In addition, says the testimony, the "Ranch also manages public access to the Forest Reserves through three entry points. Currently there are about 300 requests per month which our answering service handles and another 25 per month handled directly by us. Along with public access to the Reserves, we also open the Ranch during Game Bird Season for three months for the hunting public."
     According to Petrie, all of these cooperative efforts could continue, while improving food production under a lease from the  Department of Agriculture. See other testimony in Monday's Kaʻū News Briefs.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

COMPOSTING FOR FOOD AND GREEN WASTE is p

romoted in legislation that will be heard by the Committee on Agriculture and Environment tomorrow, Monday, Feb., 10. Senate Bill 3121, co-introduced by Kaʻū's senators Dru Kanhua and Russell Ruderman, would require the Department of Health to periodically update its co-composting rules, and establish a multi-tiered registration and permitting system for composting facilities. If the bill passes, composting and co-composting would be allowed in agricultural districts. Companion legislation is House Bill 2407.
     According to ZeroWasteBigIsland, "Outdated stringent DOH regulations make it difficult for small sized composting operations to operate legally. Did you know if your local public school wanted to divert food and green waste from the landfill by composting, they would have to fill out the same rigorous 200-page DOH application that an industrial commercial composting facility would fill out? And current regulations require the school to compost on a concrete pad and have a leachate (liquid runoff) collection system installed, which costs in the ballpark of $30,000.
     "SB3121 remedies this issue by requiring the DOH to establish a multi‑tiered registration and permitting system for composting facilities. If you are a small-scale composter, the permits and regulations would be easier and more lenient. Large-scale composters, with higher risks of pathogens and fires, would require more stringent permits and regulations. Overall, SB3121 would allow small-scale composting operations to have a more realistic path to legal permitting."
     Read the bill here. Written testimony is closed, but if submitted before the hearing, may still be considered.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Stream gushes under a Wood Valley stream
in January. Photo by Julia Neal
ONE OF THE MOST VOLUMINOUS RAIN EVENTS since November of 2000 hit Kaʻū in January. The National Weather Service released precipitation reports late last week, noting that Pāhala and Kapāpala Ranch received twice the regular January rainfall. Pāhala recorded 13.27 inches and Kapāpala 16.54 inches. Kahuku Ranch near Ocean View recorded 4.77 inches, which is more than 1.5 its average January rainfall. The record rains came in the first half of the month, flooding Kāwā Flats and closing Highway 11 there for a longer period than in the 2000 event that tore apart bridges and isolated Pāhala for days.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A GALE WATCH IS IN PLACE for south- and west-facing portions of Kaʻū through tomorrow evening. According to the National Weather Service, high winds and rough seas, brought in by a cold front, will impact south and west Hawaiʻi Island through mid-week. The entire state is under gale or small craft advisories.
The most voluminous water event in Kaʻū
since 2001 was this January.
Photo by Julia Neal

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LEGISLATION TO CURB HELICOPTER NOISE has been deferred in the state Senate. Senate Bill 3154, would have prohibited any tour aircraft operator from operating an aircraft near a residential property. The bill would also have required tour aircraft be fitted with Federal Aviation Administration approved flotation equipment and use an automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast system, and to comply with the National Transportation Safety Board safety recommendations. SB3154 was deferred on Feb. 3 by both the Energy, Economic Development, and Tourism Committee and the Committee on Transportation.
     Written testimony in support of the bill was submitted by four individuals and the O‘ahu Tour Helicopter Safety and Noise Inter-Action Group. Testimony against the bill was submitted by Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Activities & Attractions Association of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Helicopter Association, Paradise Helicopters, Magnum Helicopters, Jack Harter Helicopters, Inc., and the Department of the Attorney General.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PANAʻEWA STAMPEDE RODEO will be held Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. The 28th annual Hawaiʻi Horse Owners rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church will be held at  on Sunday. Horse Races will be held oat on Monday. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under.

     Kaʻū Multicultural Society will also join in the festivities by sharing their Kaʻū Paniolo Display.

     Kaʻū paniolo and paniola are training for the Panaʻewa Stampede. Competitors, rodeo clowns, and huge crowds are expected flock to the Panaʻewa Equestrian Center on the Kaʻū side of Hilo.

     One competitor expected at the event is Kaʻū's Lorilee Lorenzo, a past Queen of the rodeo and a regular participant. In 2019, Lenaia Andrade, a high school student from Nāʻālehu, won the All Around Cowgirl Award. Addie Flores, whose family owns and operates South Point Buckers, won the Youth Barrel Racing Event. Kircia Derasin of Kaʻū was crowned Rodeo Princess.

Bull Riding Winner Trisyn Kalawaia at the 26th Annual Panaʻewa Stampede 
Rodeo holds on tight, while a rodeo clown remains on alert. 
Photo by Brad H. Ballesteros

     Last year, more than 10,000 people attended the three-day event. The 185 competitors ranged in age from three to 73. The event included rodeo clowns, cultural and historical displays, leather and saddle making exhibits, and food and craft booths. Special novelty events included Hula Bulls and Bull Poker.

     The Stampede Rodeo features a wide variety of competition, including All Around Cowboy, Reserve All Around Cowboy, All Around Cowgirl, and Reserve All Around Cowgirl. Paniolo can compete in Po‘o Wai U, a traditional event that comes from tying cattle to forked tree trunks when rounding them up in Hawaiian wildlands, and Century Team Roping, where the total age of team members is a minimum of 100 years. Other events include Dummy Roping, Wahine Barrel Racing, Youth Barrel Racing, Kane-Wahine Ribbon Mugging, Sheep Riding, Youth Team Roping, Wahine Breakaway Roping, Wahine Breakaway Roping, Steer Wrestling, Open Team Roping, Junior Bull Riding, Double Mugging, Tie Down Roping, Wahine Calf Mugging, and Bull Riding.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

The Robin's Egg Nebula is a "Planetary Nebula," seen using data taken 
from the Promt/CTIO telescope in Chileby Star Shadows 
Remote Observatory and Processed by Stuart Forman. 
It shows the final stages of a sun-like star in its final death throes.

STARS OVER KAʻŪ for February 2020, by Lew & Donna Cook:

Planets and Exoplanets

     The sun had only one sunspot on Jan. 4 and none on Jan. 14, continuing its period of few or no sunspots. The sun rotates once with a period between 25 and 34 days. Why is there this range? This is because the sun is a ball of gas, not a solid object.

Venus is the "evening star", shining brilliantly in the west after sunset. Mars won't rise until after Jupiter and Saturn are both in Sagittarius, rising after and , respectively.

Constellations and Deep Sky Objects

     Orion stands high but past the meridian, but you will notice something strange about Orion. It doesn't look like it should. Betelgeuse, the star in the constellation's right shoulder, the one on your left, is much dimmer than usual. Betelgeuse is a variable star, but this is as dim as it has been in 170 years – as long as estimates have been made.

You can make estimates on your own by comparing Betelgeuse with Bellatrix, the bright star in the other shoulder. It is marked "1.6" - which is its magnitude. Another star you can compare it with is the end star – the low one on your left – on Orion's belt. It is marked "2.0" on the chart.

     Look quickly from Betelgeuse to the others: is it brighter than one but fainter than the other? About the same as one? Fainter than 2.0? Write down your estimate, making as good an estimate as you can. Repeat this activity over the next few weeks.

Robin's Egg Nebula

     The Robin's Egg nebula is an excellent look at what our sun will be doing in several billions of years. This is what it looks like (see photo, above).

How to use this map: Hold this map over your head so that the northern horizon points toward the north on the Earth. For best results, use a red flashlight to illuminate the map. If you are looking east, hold it in front of you so that east is on the bottom. For south views, south at the bottom, and for west, west at the bottom. Use this map at the times shown on in its upper left corner. Keep this page handy and show it to your keiki next month. They probably have bedtimes before the time of the chart shown here.

The constellations are presented with their 3-letter abbreviations, with their common names shown in the margins. This is done to take advantage of the truly dark skies Ka‘ū is blessed with when there is no bright moon and the skies are clear of vog. The star charts are produced from a sky Atlas program written by Jerry Hudson, who has given us permission to publish it. Thank you, Jerry.


Fridays Sunriseand Sunset times

Date                 Sunrise            Sunset

Feb.    

Feb.   14         

Feb.   21         

Feb.   28         

The times of sunrise and sunset are starting to change more than last month.

Moon Phases

Date                Moonrise             Moonset

First Quarter   

Feb.     1                           **

Full Moon      

Feb.     **

Last Quarter   

Feb.    15        

New Moon

Feb.    23           

First Quarter   

Mar.    
**next morning


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Boys Basketball

Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
Swimming
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
TUESDAY, FEB. 11

Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


Valentine's Dance, Saturday, Feb. 15, p.m. to  Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more. volcanoartcenter.org


Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


SUNDAY, FEB. 16
RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

ONGOING
Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, February 10, 2020

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A bill to ensure that milk products are labeled to prevent sellers from indicating they are produced in
Hawaiʻi instead ofthe mainland go to public hearing tomorrow. Above is a photo of Lani Moo, the character who represented the dairies that Meadow Golf formerly operated in Hawaiʻi. See more below. Photo by Peter Young
ADDING BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND URGENT CARE AT KAʻŪ HOSPITAL's Rural Health Clinic is the aim of  a bill coming up for hearing in the state Senate this Wednesday, Feb. 12. The medical facility is asking for help with testimony from the public. Senate Bill 2617 asks for up to $700,000 for fiscal year 2020-2021 "to provide support for the expansion of the Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic to improve access to urgent care and outpatient behavior health services, thereby reducing the
need for emergency services." Use of the funds would be overseen by the non-profit group that oversees both Hilo and Kaʻū Hosptials, Hawaiʻi Health Systems Corp.
Kaʻū Hospital could be open for urgent care and offer
behavioral health services if proposed funding wins
approval. Photo from Kaʻū Hospital Foundation
     Both Senators Dru Kanuha, who represents West Kaʻū, and Kai Kahele, who is a candidate for the congressional seat to represent Kaʻū were among the introducers of the bill in the legislature.
     To read the bill and submit testimony, go to SB2617 on the Hawaiʻi State Legislature website.
     The Senate Committee on Commerce, Consumer Protection will also hear testimony on expanding cardiology services at Kaʻū's sister facility Hilo Medical Center, with a second cardiac catheter lab, and to help with loan repayment for healthcare professionals.
See sample testimony supporting SB 2814 to fund the second cardiac cath lab bill. See a YouTube video making the case of the second cath lab.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A TRUTH IN LABELING BILL CONCERNING MILK will go to hearing tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 11 in the state House of Representatives. Introduced by Chair of the Health Committee John Mizuno, House Bill 1663 would require any processed milk or milk product to be entirely produced in Hawaiʻi in order to label it "with any item or slogan that might imply that the milk or milk products are produced locally."
     The bill follows the state Health Department, in 2017, temporarily ordering Meadow Gold to cease sales of its two percent reduced fat milk shipped from the mainland after recording coliform levels nearing 15 times the allowed maximum. According to Meadow Gold, the milk was safe to drink but could have spoiled faster with the higher coliform count.
     The measure would also require "all United States mainland milk shipped to and sold in Hawaiʻi to be single pasteurized only and comply with all handling, transportation, and distribution requirements of the federal Food Safety Modernization Act, including handling procedures, temperature verifications, and proper refrigerated transportation of all perishable foods." Read more and testify online.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Land in yellow would be transferred to the Department of Agriculture, a measure opposed by
the Department of Land & Natural Resources, which now manages the leases to Kaʻū
ranchers. Map from DLNR
KEEPING PASTURE LANDS OWNED BY THE STATE under management of the state Department of Land & Natural Resources is the aim of testimony from the DLNR chief. Suzanne Case, who chairs the Board of Land & Natural Resources and heads up DLNR, gave testimony to the state Senate last week regarding Senate Bill 2812, which would transfer management of 93,000 acres
of state owned lands leased for pasture to the state Department of Agriculture. More than a third of that land is in Kaʻū. Deadline for DLNR to transfer the lands to Department of Agriculture would be June 30, 2021.
     The bill would also add the "care and production of pasture lands" to the state law's definition of agricultural activities. Agriculture would be defined as "care and production of livestock,  pasture lands, livestock products, poultry, or poultry products, or apiary, horticultural, or floricultural products, or the planting, cultivating, and harvesting of crops or trees, including tree farms." 
     Case writes that DLNR desires to keep the leases "because of the high natural resource value of certain pasture lands. Some pasture lands are remnant native forests that have never been plowed and contain native and endangered plants and wildlife. They adjoin or are near forest reserves and, as a result, have great potential for reforestation, and/or are important in providing access to other public lands for management, traditional gathering, and public recreation including hunting and trails."
     She includes a flyer entitled Importance of Pasture Lands to DLNR’s Mission and says that a separate piece of legislation, Senate Bill 2914, could relieve concerns of local ranchers who assess that they could better negotiate their leases with the Department of Agriculture. The legislation would give the DLNR more latitude in negotiating new leases with existing ranchers.
     In her quest to keep the leases with DLNR, Case writes, "Positive advancement in carbon sequestration challenges, wildlife management, wildfire protection and forest health concerns can be best managed by the Department  (DLNR) through mutually beneficial practices with ranching, wildlife protection, and native forest restoration. Mandating the transfer of these lands to DOA for pasture purposes will severely undermine the potential for reforestation and other natural resource protection uses of the land. For these reasons, the Department respectfully urges the Legislature not to pass this bill, and instead support Senate Bill 2914 and House Bill 2358 and allow the select pasture leases to remain under the Department’s management."
     The Chair of the Board of Agriculture, Phyllis Shimabukuro-Geiser, testified that she supports the bill to transfer pasture lands to the Department of Agriculture.
     SB 2812 passed two Senate Committees last Friday and a companion bill is not yet scheduled for a hearing in the House. However, the Senate bill is expected to pass over and to be considered. See the SB 2812. See its companion, House Bill 2577.
     See more in upcoming Kaʻū News Briefs and in the Feb. 9 Kaʻū News Briefs.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CHILDCARE AND EDUCATION FOR KEIKI OF KAʻŪ COFFEE PICKERS will be the topic of a meeting of Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation.
     Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it."
     Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Image from National Weather Service
MOST OF KAʻŪ IS UNDER A FLOOD ADVISORY through this evening, Monday, Feb. 10,  according to the National Weather Service. Rain rates of 1 to 3 inches per hour, moving onto leeward slopes in fast moving showers, are forecast to continue through the evening. NWS urges the public to stay away from streams, drainage ditches, and low lying areas prone to flooding. Rainfall and runoff will also cause hazardous driving conditions due to ponding, reduced visibility, and poor braking action, states NWS. "Do not cross fast flowing or rising water in your vehicle, or on foot. Turn around, don't drown."
     A small craft advisory is in effect for all Hawaiian waters. Kaʻū's west-facing shores are also under a high surf warning.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A DOWNED POWER LINE CLOSED HIGHWAY 11 this morning near the 62 mile marker, close to Nāʻālehu Police Station. Both lanes were closed to traffic for about two hours, as was the station. Motorists were advised to use Kaʻalaiki Rd. as an alternate route.


     Another shutdown of Hwy 11 in Kaʻū today was caused by a fallen tree.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CONSERVATION COUNCIL FOR HAWAIʻI has welcomed Moana Bjur as its new Executive Director. She took the helm of Hawaiʻi's oldest wildlife conservation organization in early February and will lead the organization "as it confronts the many challenges facing Hawaʻi's native wildlife and the ecosystems they depend upon," says the announcement.
Jonee Peters, Operations and Events Director; Les Welsh, 
National Wildlife Federation Associate Director for 
the Pacific and Director of Conservation Partnerships; 
and Moana Bjur, Executive Director.
     A Native Hawaiian descendant of Kawaihapai on the North Shore of Oʻahu, Bjur has more than 20 years of experience working across public, private and non-profit organizations developing and implementing conservation, environmental, education and community engagement programs for participants in school, camp, conference and professional settings in Hawaiʻi. Before joining CCH, she served as the Assistant Executive Director at Waimea Valley, an educational non-profit with a mission to preserve and perpetuate human, cultural and natural resources of Waimea Valley on Oʻahu.
     Dr. Rachel Sprague, Conservation Council's Board President, said, "CCH has a long-standing history as a voice for our imperiled native species, and we look forward to Moana leading our important work ahead in protecting and restoring Hawaiʻi's native wildlife and wild places for future generations."
     Conservation Council for Hawaiʻi, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization established in 1950 is dedicated to protecting native Hawaiian plants, animals, and ecosystems for future generations. See  conservehi.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Boys Basketball

Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
Swimming
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui



Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
TUESDAY, FEB. 11

Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 



SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


Valentine's Dance, Saturday, Feb. 15, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Roaring 2020’s Dance featuring the Tin Pan Alley Cats Quintet and dance lessons.Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more. volcanoartcenter.org

Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


SUNDAY, FEB. 16
RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

MONDAY, FEB. 17 – President's Day

AdvoCATS, Monday, Feb. 17, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org

ONGOING
Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, February 11, 2020

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NOAA's Hiʻialakai was the busiest ocean dive platform among all NOAA research ships. It is out of commission but
will be replaced by Oceanographer, a state of the art research vessel with a homeport in Hawaiʻi. Photo from NOAA
NOAA'S NEW STATE OF THE ART OCEAN RESEARCH VESSEL will be stationed in Hawaiʻi, according to an announcement today from Congressman Ed Case. He said construction of the ship Oceanographer should be complete in 2023 as part of rebuilding the nation's oceanographic fleet. The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration named Oceanographer after one of NOAA's original research vessels.
     From its base in Hawaiʻi, Oceanographer will carry out world-leading research throughout the Pacific. Oceanographer is one of two brand new NOAA ships that Case says, "will ensure that our country can continue with the vital research necessary to research and preserve our marine world that while still largely unknown is so vital to the present and future of our planet."
     Case's efforts toward rebuilding NOAA's fleet and assuring Hawaiʻi continues to lead the nation's marine research efforts began during his first month back in Congress last January. He explained that  NOAA advised that the 35-year old, aging research ship Hiʻialakai, homeported in Hawaiʻi, was to be decommissioned. It served many missions, becoming the busiest ocean research dive platform for research and carrying out such studies as monk seal and humpback whale and coral reef surveys from Kaʻū to the Northwest Hawaiian Islands.
     Case said that, as a new member of the House Appropriations Committee's Commerce, Justice, & Science Subcommittee, which oversees all NOAA funding, he prioritized overall recapitalization of NOAA's aging fleet, a short-term replacement of Hi‘ialakai, and homeporting of the next new NOAA ship in Honolulu.
     "In partnership with the rest of the delegation, especially Sen. Brian Schatz who sits on the Senate's counterpart appropriations subcommittee, we were successful in all three priorities. This will assure not only that Hawaiʻi will retain its world-leading role in oceanographic research but that the federal funding and high-quality jobs that come with it continue," said Case.
The Hiʻialakai, in service for 35 years, will be replaced by one of the world's leading ocean research
vessels, to be built in the U.S. with completion date projected for 2023. Photo from NOAA
     The Oceanographer will be the first of two ships now under design for the fleet. The second ship, the Discoverer, will be assigned a homeport at a future date. Case said NOAA expects to award contracts for the construction of the ships by the end of the year. Both will be built in the United States. Construction timelines and target launch dates for the vessels will be confirmed after the shipbuilding contracts have been awarded.
     NOAA currently has a fleet of 15 research and survey ships operated by NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, and crewed by NOAA's Commissioned Officer Corps and civilian professional mariners. Each year, NOAA ships conduct more than 100 missions to collect data critical for nautical charts, fishery quotas, exploration of the nation's 4.3-million-square-mile Exclusive Economic Zone, storm surge modeling, and climate research.
     Read the NOAA plan to upgrade its research fleet.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Church buildings on Tutuila, the largest island in the American Samoa 
archipelago. An AP article reports that many residents of American Samoa 
are concerned that a federal judge's recent ruling in Utah, saying those born 
in the U.S. territory should be recognized as U.S. citizens, could threaten 
faʻa Samoa, the Samoan way of life, which includes cultural traditions like 
prayer curfews, communal living, and a belief that the islands' 
lands should stay in Samoan hands. Tisa Faʻamuli via AP

U.S. CITIZENSHIP FOR AMERICAN SAMOANS is the subject of an ongoing court battle.
     Many born in American Samoa who live there, in Hawaiʻi, and on the U.S. mainland, desire birthright citizenship. Others, including the government of the U.S. territory of American Samoa, oppose the idea that anyone born there could automatically become a U.S. citizen.
     An Associated Press article reports that U.S. District Judge Clark Waddoups, in December, ruled to grant citizenship to three people living in Utah, born in American Samoa, who sued to be recognized as citizens. He said they are entitled to birthright citizenship under the 14th Amendment.
     On Friday, the U.S. government filed an appeal to Waddrup's ruling, contending that automatic citizenship is a decision for Congress. The government of the territory of American Samoa followed up with an appeal on Monday. "We look forward to showing the Court of Appeals that Judge Waddoup's decision is incorrect as a matter of law and needlessly dismissive of Samoan's self-determination rights," said Michael Williams, a WashingtonD.C. lawyer representing American Samoa's government.

     American Samoan citizens are granted the status of "U.S. National." American Samoans pay income tax to the U.S government, but can't vote in federal elections except for their non-voting member of the U.S. House of Representatives. They also can't run for public office in the U.S. outside of American Samoa, or work jobs that require U.S. citizenship.
     The AP article reports that "automatic citizenship" supporters claim the approximate 155,000 American Samoan nationals who live in the states – three times as many as live in the territory – would benefit from citizenship.
Dancers representing Hawaiʻi and the Samoas join to form a link at a 
ceremony celebrating the launch of a new fiber-optic cable 
in Pago PagoAmerican Samoa, in 2009. AP photo/Fili Sagapolutele
     Opponents to birthright citizenship for American Samoans contend that faʻa Samoa – the Samoan way of life – would be harmed. Faʻa Samoa includes "cultural traditions like prayer curfews, communal living, and a belief that the islands' lands should stay in Samoan family hands," according to the AP article.
     The U.S. does not claim ownership of any land in American Samoa.
     U.S. building codes and regulations do no apply there. Most American Samoan land is owned communally; within villages, extended families live together on communal lands. Matai, chiefs, are elected to oversee land. Most property in Samoa is not allowed to be sold to anyone with less than 50 percent Samoan ancestry.

     In 2018, American Samoan Sailau Timoteo ran for Hawaiʻi House of Representatives but learned she was ineligible - not a U.S. citizen. She told AP she didn't know being born in American Samoa gave her "second-class status."

     American Samoa's non-voting U.S. House delegate, Amata Coleman Radewagen, introduced a bill in 2019 to make citizenship easier for American Samoans. The bill would allow nationals to become citizens without having to leave American Samoa, as is currently required. American Samoans also would no longer have to take a citizenship test, and there would be a hardship waiver for application fees. The bill is pending in the Natural Resources Committee with a likely hearing in the year ahead, said her spokesman, Joel Hannahs.


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Security camera still of the suspected culprit in a vandalism event at
Cooper Center in Volcano on Dec. 5.
HELP IDENTIFY THE CULPRIT WHO DAMAGED COOPER CENTER in Volcano on Thursday, Dec. 5. Hawaiʻi Police Department released a photo caught on surveillance equipment at approximately , showing someone damaging the window of the Cooper Center Book Store.
     HPD asks anyone with information on the identity of the suspect to call Officer Michael Sailer at the Pāhoa Police Station number (808) 965-2716 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311.
     Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential. The Crime Stoppers TV Program is available on-demand from Nā Leo TV.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Boys Basketball

Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
Swimming
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui



Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 



SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


Valentine's Dance, Saturday, Feb. 15, p.m. to  Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more. volcanoartcenter.org


Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


SUNDAY, FEB. 16
RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

MONDAY, FEB. 17 – President's Day

AdvoCATS, Monday, Feb. 17, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org



TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.

ONGOING
Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, February 12, 2020

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The Great Crack with Mauna Loa in view. NPS Photo/Janice Wei
THE FUTURE USE OF THE GREAT CRACK in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, between Pāhala and Volcano, will be the subject of a talk story meeting at Pāhala Plantation House. The Park released a statement today saying it wants to hear from the community and will host the meeting on Thursday, March 19 at 5:30 p.m. at Pāhala Plantation House at 96-3209 Maile St.
     The Park acquired the 1,951-acre Great Crack, a geologically rich and rugged area on the remote Southwest Rift Zone of Kīlauea volcano, in 2018. A statement from the Park says, "The area is mostly barren lava rock, with no surface water, few trees, and little shade, but it is a superb example
Close up of the Great Crack with a Kipuka in the distance.
NPS Photo/Janice Wei
of the geologic dynamism of the area. The Pacific Ocean borders this exposed, windward shoreline.
     "The Park is working to create a long-term plan for managing the Great Crack area. It was designated as potential wilderness in 1978 while under private ownership. Over the years, various commercial developments were proposed by the previous landowners, including a space launch facility, but none were implemented."
     The public may also submit comments via mail or email to the Park superintendent: Attention: Superintendent, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawai‘i National Park, HI 96718. Email havo_superintendent@nps.gov.
     The Park statement says that "The mission of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is to protect, conserve, and study the volcanic landscapes, and associated natural and cultural resources and processes, and to facilitate safe public access to active volcanism, diverse geographic settings, and wilderness for public education and enjoyment."
Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park staff survey coastline at Great Crack looking towards Ka Lae. 
NPS Photo/Janice Wei
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A STATE REP. FROM HAWAIʻI ISLAND PROPOSES MORE LEGISLATIVE ACCESS FOR RURAL PEOPLE. Rep. David Tarnas, who represents North Kona and Kohala, released a statement today, saying, "Have you ever felt frustrated by having to fly all the way to Oʻahu just to have your voice heard at the State Capitol? Or have you submitted written testimony but been unable to speak or answer questions from legislators during legislative hearings?"
State Rep. David Tarnas' bill to offer citizens the opportunity to testify live
from Hawaiʻi Island passed all committees in the House of Representatives.
     His bill addressing these challenges to legislative access passed its final hearing today in the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. HB1153 HD1 SD2 would improve public access to the legislative process by establishing a remote legislative access program that would allow individuals to present oral testimony at legislative committee hearings through remote testimony. After many years of persistent requests by neighbor island legislators and advocates, this is the first time such legislation has passed all its committees in both the House and Senate.
     The legislation received broad public support, including from Hawaiʻi Alliance of Nonprofit Organizations, Common Cause Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Government Employees Association, Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce, and Hawaiʻi County Mayor Harry Kim. If this bill is passed, Hawaiʻi's new remote legislative access program will place the state alongside just two others, Alaska and Nevada, which have instituted remote testimony programs.
     Tarnas said that "Remote legislative access will help neighbor island residents actively participate in the legislative process without incurring the significant, and often prohibitive, costs of air travel, lodging, and time off work, just to have their voices heard at the Capitol. This bill would not only increase engagement by allowing people who experience economic or physical obstacles to participate in the State legislative process, but will also reduce carbon emissions from air travel, supporting the State's climate change mitigation goals."
     HB1153 HD1 SD2 now goes to the entire Senate for a vote, and then to a joint House-Senate Conference Committee, in which the House and Senate conferees negotiate to agree on an identical version of the bill, which would then return to the House and Senate for a final vote. See HB1153
HD1 SD2.

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Yang and Gabbard on Tulsi 2020 South Carolina Facebook.
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE TULSI GABBARD FINISHED AHEAD OF ANDREW YANG IN THE NEW HAMPSHIRE PRIMARY on Tuesday. With 3.3 percent of the votes, Gabbard took seventh, followed by Yang's 2.8 percent and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick's 0.4 percent.
      After the New Hampshire Primary, both Yang and Patrick dropped out of the race for President. Gabbard moved on to South Carolina where Wednesday morning she was the only presidential candidate on the campaign trail. In Charleston, she told reporters, "I know our path forward lies in continuing to be able to reach out directly to voters and deliver our message about I'm the best candidate to defeat Trump in November."
     In the New Hampshire Primary, Bernie Sanders came in first with 25.7 percent of the votes, followed by Pete Buttigeig with 24.4 percent, Amy Klobuchar with 19.8 percent, Elizabeth Warren with 9.2 percent, Joe Biden with 8.4 percent, and Tom Steyer with 3.6 percent.
      Neither Gabbard, Yang nor Patrick received any delegates from the New Hampshire Primary.
Gabbard remains rural Hawai`i's member of the U.S. House of Representatives.


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Tawhiri windmills at South Point are a step toward net-zero carbon admissions. Photo by Julia Neal
LEGISLATION REQUIRING NET-ZERO CARBON EMISSIONS by 2050 in the U.S. was introduced into the U.S. Senate this week by Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz. The Hawaiʻi senators were joined by 31 other Democrats and Independents. They said that their Clean Economy Act, supported by numerous unions, and environmental, health, and scientific groups, responds to concerns from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and leading climate scientists who warn of catastrophic consequences if global temperatures rise by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. Recent reports from the UN warn that global action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to date has not been sufficient to keep global temperatures below that threshold.
     The Act would direct the Environmental Protection Agency to find a path to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions within 30 years at minimal cost, while maintaining public health and workforce training as priorities. The bill would require EPA and other federal agencies to partner with state, local, and private climate plans. It would set benchmarks for climate targets in 2025, 2030, and 2040. 

Electric vehicle charge station at Kaʻū District Gym. Photo from bigislandev.org
     Hirono, a member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, said, "The devastating consequences of climate change in Hawaiʻi are clear, and that is why we were the first state in the country to commit to achieving a carbon neutral economy by 2045, which includes 100 percent renewable power. The Clean Economy Act spurs similar bold action across the country by setting a goal of achieving net-zero U.S. greenhouse gas production by 2050. The bill also requires a focus on public health, innovative and equitable access to worker training, and enhancing America's global competitiveness, all of which will be essential to address the broad impacts of climate change."

     Lea Hong, Hawaiʻi State Director for The Trust for Public Land, said, "The Clean Economy Act will create healthier and more equitable communities, while growing our competitiveness. Its goals are consistent with the State of Hawaiʻi's own sustainability goals for clean energy transformation in the Aloha+ challenge, and I thank Senator Hirono for her leadership in moving the country quickly toward net-zero greenhouse gas emissions."

     Colin Yost, Volunteer Chair of the Sierra Club of Hawaiʻi, said, "The Sierra Club of Hawaiʻi applauds Senator Hirono's enthusiastic support of the Clean Economy Act as an important means to address the Climate Crisis. Clean energy innovation in Hawaiʻi has demonstrated that the goals of the Clean Economy Act are achievable and will improve the economy and the environment."

     Isaac Moriwake, Managing Attorney of the Earthjustice Mid-Pacific Office, said, "Hawaiʻi has been helping lead the way to a 100 percent clean, carbon-neutral future, and now our entire nation needs to rise to this challenge before it's too late. The science is clear that the clock's ticking on climate catastrophe, yet this administration continues to wage its war on our planet's future on behalf of the dirty energy sources of the past. Senator Hirono's legislation would give our nation a fighting chance to move to the kind of equitable and just clean energy economy we need to pass a healthy planet on to future generations. We're grateful for her efforts and look forward to working with her and her colleagues to ensure it passes."

Electric vehicle charge station blessed last year at Punaluʻu Bake Shop. Photo from Hawaiian Electric Co.
     The Clean Economy Act is endorsed by the United Steelworkers, Utility Workers Union of America, Service Employees International Union, American Federation of Teachers, American Rivers, BlueGreen Alliance, Center for American Progress, Clean Water Action, Climate Reality Project, Defend Our Future, Earthjustice, Environment America, Environmental Defense Fund,
Green the Church, Hispanic Access Foundation, Interfaith Power & Light, League of Conservation Voters, Moms Clean Air Force, National Wildlife Federation, Natural Resources Defense Council, Sierra Club, Trust for Public Land, Union of Concerned Scientists, Voices for Progress, Wilderness Society, World Wildlife Fund, Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments, American Lung Association, American Public Health Association, Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, Coalition for Environmentally Responsible Economies, and others.
Hirono has called for national action to combat climate change. She is a cosponsor of the Green New Deal (Senate Resoultion 59), and the Good Jobs for 21st Century Energy Act (Senate Bill 2185) to provide tax incentives and federal grants to help create high-paying clean energy jobs with high labor standards. She also introduced the Next Generation Electric Systems Act (S. 2380) to modernize the electric grid to accommodate high amounts of renewable power through a federal grant program.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KAʻŪ SUPPORTERS OF THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, which serves Ocean View, Nāʻālehu, and Pāhala, along with other sites round the island, are invited its 8th Annual Youth of the
Year recognition gala on Saturday, March 7, at the Hilo Hawaiian, Moku Ola Ballroom from 5 p.m. to 8:30pm.
     The Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island will honor the late Barry Taniguchi, whose KTA stores sponsor much outreach into the Kaʻū community. The Club will also honor Gerald De Mello, who along with Taniguchi, will be recognized for community involvement, leadership, and significant contributions made towards the strengthening of Hawaiʻi Island communities.
     The evening will include dinner and drinks, entertainment, and light humor, along with recognition of  outstanding youth, including the Boys & Girls Club Youth of the Year.
     Sponsorships, including the purchasing of sponsorship tables, donating silent and live Auction items, and individual ticket sales are available. To donate and buy tickets, call Kaʻū board member Julia Neal at 808-928-9811 or email mahalo@aloha.net. See more about the Boys & Girls Club at www.bgcbi.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Boys Basketball

Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
Swimming
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui



Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 8, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe

Tuesday, March 17, , host Pāhoa

Saturday, March 21, , @Keaʻau

Saturday, March 28, , host Hilo

Wednesday, April 8, , @Honokaʻa

Saturday, April 11, , host Kamehameha

Saturday, April 18, , host Kohala

Wednesday, April 22, , host HPA

Wednesday, April 29, , BIIF Div II Semi Finals

Saturday, May 2, BIIF DIV II Finals

Wednesday-Saturday, May 13-16, HHSAA
Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Tuesday, March 10, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe

Wednesday, March 18, , @Pāhoa

Saturday, March 21, , @Keaʻau

Saturday, March 28, , host Hilo

Tuesday. April 7, , @Honokaʻa

Saturday, April 11, , host Kamehameha

Saturday, April 18, , host Kohala

Friday, May, 2 p.m., BIIF DIV II Semi Finals

Saturday, May 2, , BIIF DIV II Finals

Wednesday-Saturday, May 13-16, HHSAA
Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Wednesday, March, 6 p.m., @Hilo

Tuesday, March 10, , host Makualani

Friday, March 13, , host Konawaena

Tuesday, March 24, , host Kamehameha

Tuesday, March 31, , @Kohala

Thursday, April 2, , host Keaʻau

Tuesday, April 7, , @Honokaʻa

Friday, April 10, , @Ehunui

Friday, April 17, , host Kealakehe

Wednesday, April 22, , @Waiakea

Friday, April 24, , host HPA

Monday, April 27, , BIIF Div II First Round

Tuesday, April 28, , BIIF Div II Semi Finals

Wednesday, April 29, , BIIF Div II Finals

Thursday-Saturday, May 7-9, HHSAA on Oʻahu
Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 14, , @Hilo

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 28, , @Waiakea

Saturday, April 4, , @Keaʻau

Saturday, April 11, , BIIF at Kona

Saturday, April 18, , BIIF at Hilo
Track

Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 28, , @Waiakea

Saturday, April 4, , @HPA

Saturday, April 11, , @Keaʻau
Saturday, April 25, , @Keaʻau


UPCOMING
SATURDAY, FEB. 8

16th Annual Love the Arts Volcano Arts Center Fundraiser Gala, Saturday, Feb. 8, p.m. Theme is The Roaring 2020s, highlighted by unique decorations, decadent food, fine wines and beer, and dancing. Features appearances by members of Harmony on Tap and opera singer D'Andrea Pelletier. Live and silent auctions: bid on artwork, jewelry, hotel stays, restaurants, local products, services, and gift certificates to businesses and attractions. Tickets $70, $65 VAC Members. Purchase at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in the village or Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, online at volcanoartcenter.org/classes-and-workshops/purchase-tickets-to-vac-events, or (808) 967-8222. Gala tickets provide free admission to LTA Valentine's Day Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15. volcanoartcenter.org


SUNDAY, FEB. 9

Kaʻū Clean-Up with Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund, Sunday, Feb. 9, and Saturday, March 21. Volunteer spaces limited. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.


TUESDAY, FEB. 11

Music in the American Wild, Tuesday, Feb. 11; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. The American Wild Ensemble was formed to celebrate and tour America's national parks. They've performed in unconventional venues, from caves to mountaintops, commissioning new works and performing them in site-inspired and site-specific locations. Attend an evening concert with ensemble directors Emlyn Johnson (flute) and Daniel Ketter (cello) as they present a contemporary classical program featuring new works by Hawai‘i resident and Hawai‘i-born composers. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12

Ki‘i Carving Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 12,  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Hawaiians carved ki‘i (statues) to represent forces of nature, gods, guardians and the spirit world. Acclaimed artist James Kanani Kaulukukui, Jr. will share his expertise and the essential role these ki‘i played in Hawaiian society. With a carrot, you'll learn how to make your own ki‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


Community Dance, Friday, Feb. 14, 7-10p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Minors allowed with supervision only. Alcohol-free event. Variety of music. Snacks provided; additional pūpū welcome. Free. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


Valentine's Dance, Saturday, Feb. 15, p.m. to  Learn the Charleston, the Lindy Hop, and more. volcanoartcenter.org


Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


SUNDAY, FEB. 16
RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

MONDAY, FEB. 17 – President's Day

AdvoCATS, Monday, Feb. 17, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org



TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.


SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26

Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.

Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


Ash Wednesday Service at St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 


FRIDAY, FEB. 28

Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association Annual Health Conference, Friday, Feb. 28, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Register in advance: 808-928-0101.


SATURDAY, FEB. 29

Hawaiian Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count, Saturday, Feb. 29 and March 28, , orientation included. Register at oceancount.org. Locations in Kaʻū are: Kaʻena Point in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, and Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park. Participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whale activity from the shoreline.


Mixed Media Photo Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Feb. 29,  The class is slated for beginner to intermediate students. volcanoartcenter.org



Count Our Bats to Save Our Bats Potluck Party, Saturday, Feb. 29,  at Manuka State Park. Bat monitoring party to count endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bats. Open to the public, for all ages. Bring potluck dish. BBQ refreshments, "batty" games, and door prizes on offer. Organized by Friends of the Kaʻū Bats. Contact Linda Morgan, Community Coordinator, 808-785-2058.

ONGOING
Beginning Improv for Adults, Thursday, through Feb. 13, p.m. to  "Learn to live more in the moment, think on your feet, let go of self-judgment, bring more joy in your life, and recapture your playful spirit in the 6-week workshop series with improv legend Keli Semelsberger." Attendance to all 6 classes is not required – classes may be attended individually. No prior experience is necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Fill Out the Survey for Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan 2020, from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, by Friday, Feb. 14. The survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at  surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.


RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

Clay – High Fire!, Sunday, through Feb. 23,  or p.m. to  8-week morning or afternoon pottery series with Erik Wold. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, February 13, 2020

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A 1988 Classic Tiffany Coupe was among the exotic entries in the Ocean View Classic Car Show last year that
raised money for Ocean View Community Association. Owner Ted Wakeman said it's one of 100
showroom cars built by Classic Motor Carriages in Miami. The coupe came to Oʻahu
in 1988. See details on this year's event, below. Photo by Annie Bosted

HIGH SURF APPARENTLY SWEPT TWO SHORE FISHERMEN OUT TO SEA Wednesday evening at Honuʻapo-Whittington Beach Park. The missing men have been identified as 63-year old James Oyama, of Nāʻālehu, and 37-year old Jay Jara Oyama, whose car and fishing gear were found by responders in the surf zone along the shore. Three helicopters, an airplane, and a Coast Guard Cutter are involved in the search.
     The Hawaiʻi County Police Department and Fire Department responded to a call from a family member this morning before dawn. The family member expressed worry that the Oyama's were not home from their shore fishing expedition on Wednesday night.
     After searching the shore and finding the car and fishing gear, Hawaiʻi County contacted the Coast Guard, which launched the Coast Guard Cutter Joesph Gerczak (WPC 1126) from its homeport in Honolulu to join the search. Charles Turner, command duty officer with Coast Guard Sector Honolulu, asked that anyone with information that "may assist us with the search is asked to call the command center at 808-842-2600." 
The waters off Honuʻapo where search parties are looking for two shore
 fishermen who apparently were swept out to sea
in heavy surf. Photo by Julia Neal
     According to a statement from the Coast Guard, the search crews include: Hawaiʻi County Fire Chopper 1; Hawaiʻi County Fire Department on the shore; Hawaiʻi County Police; a Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules airplane, and two Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopters.
     The National Weather Service had issued a High Surf Advisory that includes the area.
     
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

GIVE INPUT ON THE MULTI-HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN for Hawaiʻi County by Friday, Feb. 14. The Civil Defense survey is anonymous and will be used to develop portions of the plan, which is the County's hazard and risk assessment for natural disasters. The Plan will include proposed projects to mitigate potential loss of life and property. Fill out the survey at surveymonkey.com/r/HawaiiCountyHMP. Learn more at hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/multi-hazard-mitigation-plan-2020. For further information, call the Civil Defense Agency at 935-0031.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS REMAIN FREE OF THE NEW CORONAVIRUS, according to the state Department of Health. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense issued a statement today: "In a continual effort to prevent the virus from entering Hawaiʻi, State Health and State Transportation officials, together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, continue to monitor and screen inbound passengers at Honolulu International Airport for any individuals that may have been affected by the virus."

COVID-19, the newest identified coronavirus, has spread
from animals to humans since late 2019. CDC image
     Sen. Brian Schatz and colleagues wrote a letter to the federal Department of Health & Human Services to "establish clear guidelines… for state and local governments to receive federal reimbursement for costs they incur as part of the federal response to the current deadly coronavirus outbreak. Many state and local health departments and hospitals have helped support the transportation and quarantine efforts, and it is important they be notified of the criteria by which the department will ask them to document and report what resources they contributed to the federal response for reimbursement."
     There are facilities near 11 U.S. airports, including HNL, equipped to handle Americans evacuated from China to be quarantined for two weeks. On Thursday, the 15th person with the new coronavirus infection reentered the U.S. That person is quarantined in Texas. No one is quarantined in Hawaiʻi.
     The World Health Organization reported today that there are more than 65,000 cases globally, mostly in China. All but three of the more than 1,300 deaths have occurred in China.
     The state DOH continues to encourage the public to take preventive measures seriously: Get a flu shot. Wash hands with soap and water; use alcohol-based hand sanitizer where soap is not available. Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth. Avoid close contact with those who are sick. Stay home if you are sick. Cover coughs and sneezes with tissue and wash hands afterward. Clean and disinfect frequently-touched objects and surfaces. Healthy and well individuals are not recommended to wear face masks.


     This week, WHO announced the official name COVID-19 for the novel coronavirous that originated in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China.

     Find further information through the state DOH at 974-6001 or 211, or at health.hawaii.gov.

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BENEFICIARIES OF THE HAWAIIAN HOMES ACT OF 1920 should have the same protections from foreclosures as other people leasing and purchasing homes in Hawaiʻi, according to a County Council Resolution. The resolution supports state Senate Bill 2526 and SB2826, which would require the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands to develop and implement a loan servicing manual, subject to commission approval, to standardize loan loss mitigation policies, procedures, and methods.
     Both bills clarify that DHHL shall not cancel a lease solely based on a loan default of delinquency unless all loan loss mitigation procedures are exhausted pursuant to the loan servicing manual. In addition, SB 2526 would require appraisals of improvements and grants the authority to DHHL to authorize second loans on homestead leases by approved lenders.
     The Legislature approved foreclosure protections for the general public in 2011, with  Act 48, but similar protections are not included in the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act.


     Should County Council Resolution 487-20 pass, Hawaiʻi County would join with Maui and Kauaʻi counties to urge approval of the Senate bills. Input is welcome at the Hawai‘i County Council meeting in on Wednesday, Feb. 19 at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center in Kona. Testify in person in Kona, or via videoconference at the Council's courtesy sites in Nā‘ālehu, Pāhoa, Kapa‘au, Waimea, and Hilo. The resolution was waived out of committee for placement directly on the Council agenda.

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A lineup of classic bikes at the Ocean View Community Center provided a fun event for the community last year,
and funds for OVCA. Photo by John Vose
OCEAN VIEW CLASSIC CAR & BIKE SHOW at Ocean View Community Center has been announced. It will be held Saturday, March 28, Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Three classic cars captivated the attention of car lovers. The red 1965 Corvette Sting Ray has been owned for 44 years
by Tony Page, a Ranchos resident. The blue coupe is a 1972 Volvo 1800 ES owned by Les Garbis who lives in HOVE.
The paint job on the large black van is familiar to customers of Ocean View Auto Parts, one of ten businesses that
donated prizes for the inaugural show. Photo by Annie Bosted
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LOVE THE ARTS VALENTINE'S DAY DANCE: THE ROARING 2020s will be held Saturday, Feb. 15, to  at VolcanoArtCenter's Niʻaulani Campus in VolcanoVillage. Hawaiʻi Island's vintage jazz and swing musical group, the Tin Pan Alleycats, will perform the biggest hit songs of the 1920s. Angela Beck and Andrea Gill of the Hilo Hep Cats will teach 1920s dance steps such as the Charlestonand Lindy Hop during the band's breaks at and Period costumes are encouraged.

     The announcement states the Tin Pan Alleycats are dedicated to showcasing this vibrant musical heritage because "The songs of 'the Roaring Twenties' are full of dynamic energy," says Hal Glatzer, guitarist and vocalist of the group. "They were on the cutting edge then, and yet they still pack a punch today." Glatzer's previous bands, including Le Hot Club de Hilo and The Hot Shots, have been popular across Hawaiʻi Island for more than ten years.

     Tin Pan Alleycat pianist and singer Leslie Harlib said, "These songs celebrate women who had just gotten the vote, and felt free to 'bob' their hair and wear short skirts. And they were generally opposed to the prohibition of alcohol, too. They did all this with syncopated rhythms and outrageously clever lyrics. They are songs that make dancers jump for joy and audiences, even today, go wild." Harlib has been featured many times on Hilo's Black & White Nights, and has recently performed solo at the Blue Dragon, and at Gertrude's in Kona.

     Asked about the 'Twenties by VAC, Jean Pierre Thoma said, "Oh, I remember the gala parties at Gatsby's mansion. What great bands we had! Well, the Tin Pan Alleycats are in that tradition: recreating the hot music of the 'Roaring Twenties.'" Thoma has played woodwinds in bands big and small, all over the island, and is perhaps best known as leader of The Jazztones, and the Jazz in the Forestconcert series at VAC.

     To Mark Caudill, violinist of the group, "The twenties means economic prosperity and artistic freedom, which you can feel in the songs. They are the foundation-stones of jazz, and are still so widely performed that they're popularly called 'standards.'" Caudill has played violin since age seven, but admits, "I didn't fall in love with the standards until I was in my forties. Now, I can't get enough!"
     Tickets for this event are $15, $10 for VAC members, or free with a Love the Arts: The Roaring 2020s ticket from Saturday, Feb. 8. Purchase tickets online at volcanoartcenter.org/event/love-the-arts-valentines-day-dance-the-roaring-2020s/?instance_id=13341.

Flows from Mauna Loa over the last 175 years. See article, above,
asking for input on hazard mitigation plans for the county.
USGS map
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MAUNA LOA is not erupting. The mauna's Alert Level is ADVISORY, its Aviation Color Code is YELLOW. Rates of deformation and seismicity have not changed significantly over the past week and remain above long-term background levels.
     During the past week, Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory seismometers recorded 31 small-magnitude earthquakes beneath the volcano's upper elevations. The strongest was a magnitude-2.9 event on 9 February, at approximately 13 kilometers (~8 miles) below the surface - slightly deeper than other earthquakes of the past week. Most events occurred at shallow depths of less than 5 kilometers (~3 miles) beneath the surface of the volcano.
     Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show continued slow summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly.
     For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Boys Basketball

Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu
Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA
Swimming
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
FRIDAY, FEB. 14 – Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day Buffet, Friday, Feb. 14, p.m. , Crater Rim Café at Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees are Prime Rib Au Jus, Lemon Butter Fish with Tropical Salsa and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake. Adults $35.95, $17.95 children 6 to 11 years old. Military ID card holders and in-house guests: Adults $28.76, $14.36 children 6 to 11 years old. No reservations required. Located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more information call 967-8365 after 


SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


Love the Arts Valentine's Day Dance: The Roaring 2020s, Saturday, Feb. 15,  at Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Hawaiʻi Island's vintage jazz and swing musical group, the Tin Pan Alleycats, will perform the biggest hit songs of the 1920s. Angela Beck and Andrea Gill of the Hilo Hep Cats will teach 1920s dance steps such as the Charleston and Lindy Hop during the band's breaks at  and  Period costumes are encouraged. Tickets are $15, $10 for VAC members, or free with a Love the Arts: The Roaring 2020s ticket from Saturday, Feb. 8. Purchase tickets online at volcanoartcenter.org/event/love-the-arts-valentines-day-dance-the-roaring-2020s/?instance_id=13341.


Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at  on Saturday,  on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held  Sunday. Horse Races held  Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


SUNDAY, FEB. 16
RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

MONDAY, FEB. 17 – President's Day

AdvoCATS, Monday, Feb. 17, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org



TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

ONGOING
RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.





Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, February 14, 2020

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The critically endangered Portulaca sclerocarpa, ‛Ihi mākole. See more below. Photo by David Eikhoff
ILLICIT DRUGS, WEAPONS, AND AMMUNITION were confiscated from a property off of Coconut Drivein Hawaiian Ocean View Estates on Wednesday. During the execution of search warrants, officers recovered a total of 11.1 grams of crystal methamphetamine, 176.9 grams of dried marijuana, 56 marijuana plants, a .30-06 rifle, a .22 caliber rifle, a .357 caliber revolver, and 19 rounds of ammunition.

     Officers arrested and charged 64-year-old Edward Asuncion with promotion of a dangerous drug in the 1st degree and promotion of a dangerous drug in the 2nd degree.
     Officers also arrested and charged 72-year-old Cecelio Asuncion with commercial promotion of marijuana in the 1st degree, commercial promotion of marijuana in the 2nd degree, promotion of a detrimental drug in the 3rd degree, six counts of firearm ownership/possession prohibited and possession of a firearm with intent to facilitate the commission of a felony.
     Bail was set at $15,000 for Edward Asuncion and $55,250 for Cecilio Asuncion. Neither parties posted bail. They appeared yesterday in Kona for their initial court appearance.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Assistant Coach Duane Pua, left, with Luke Watson of the Kaʻū wrestling
team. Wilson will head to Oʻahu next week for the state championship.
Photo by Clarissa Pua
KAʻŪ HIGH WRESTLING TEAM MEMBER LUKE WATSON HEADS TO THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP on Oʻahu next weekend. Wilson traveled to Konawaena on Feb. 8 to compete in the Big Island Interscholastic Federation wrestling tournament. Wilson had to win at least two matches to qualify for the state champion tournament.
     Starting off strong, Wilson won his first match. His second match was a loss. In his third match, Wilson triumphed against a wrestler from Waiakea, in a 23 second match with a pin. Watson, nick named Kalo, pounded the third match, earning a bronze metal for placing 4th in his weight division.
     Watson is mentored this season by Assistant Coach Duane Pua, aka Mana. Coaching at his alumni, stated Pua, "has been an amazing opportunity to mentor great athletes, let alone mentoring Luke Watson. Luke has been disciplined, listening on how to strategize and counter to come out a winner." Coach Pua said he is very proud of Watson making it this far, and heading to states. "Go represent Boy. May you do well on Oʻahu; continue to make Kaʻū proud."

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THERE ARE NO COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI, according to state authorities. State Department of Health today reported a case of caronavirus in a man who visited Hawaiʻi – between Jan. 28 and Feb. 3 on Maui and Feb. 3 and 7 on Oʻahu – but is not believed to have contracted the virus in Hawaiʻi. Upon his return home to Japan, he was confirmed to have COVID-19.
     In a statement today, Hilton Grand Waikikian said a former guest was diagnosed with COVID-19 after leaving the state and that he "is now under medical care" in Japan. The hotel chain announced it is “responding based on our existing public health protocol and the latest guidance from medical professionals and public health authorities. We continue to closely monitor updates from the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and are staying in close communication with the Hawaiʻi Department of Health."

A medical diagram of a coronavirus structure. Image from Wikipedia
     In a press conference today, Gov. David Ige assured the public that the state is prepared for this situation and taking the proper safety precautions. Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority continues to work with DOH, state and county government officials, and the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention to monitor the situation.

     No regularly scheduled direct flights between WuhanChina and Hawaiʻi are allowed at this time. China Eastern Airlines suspended its flights between Shanghai and Daniel K. Inoyue InternationalAirport on Feb. 3. It was the only carrier with a direct flight to Hawaii (six times a week). HNL will continue to receive flights carrying passengers from China. This includes enhanced screening procedures and the capacity to quarantine passengers, if needed: dhs.gov/news/2020/02/02/dhs-issues-supplemental-instructions-inbound-flights-individuals-who-have-been-china.
     The CDC expects more cases of the coronavirus in the U.S. but says the risk of infection for Americans remains low. With the U.S. declaring a public health emergency, foreign nationals who have recently traveled to China will not be allowed into the U.S.,other than immediate family members of US citizens and permanent residents, until further notice. In addition, U.S. citizens coming back into the country who have visited China within the past two weeks may have to undergo a mandatory quarantine of up to 14 days, along with anyone who is showing symptoms of coronavirus.
     The U.S. Coast Guard will deny entry to the U.S any passenger vessels carrying passengers that have been to China, excluding Hong Kong and Macau, within the past 14 days. Non-passenger commercial vessels that have been to, or have crew that have been to, China – excluding Hong Kong and Macau – with no sick crew members will be allowed entry to the U.S., but crew must remain aboard the vessel.

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PANAʻEWA STAMPEDE RODEO BEGINS TOMORROW at , Saturday, Feb. 15 at the Panaʻewa Equestrian Center on the Kaʻū side of Hilo. Held annually, this 28th Hawaiʻi Horse Owners rodeo is held Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. The rodeo begins at  on Sunday and Monday, with Cowboy Church held at  on Sunday and horse races held at  on Monday. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under.

     Kaʻū paniolo and paniola, and rodeo clowns, are training for the Panaʻewa Stampede. Huge crowds are expected flock to the event; last year saw over 10,000 attendees over three days. Kaʻū Multicultural Society will also join in the festivities by sharing their Kaʻū Paniolo Display.

     The event includes a wide variety of events for competitors of all ages. Rodeo clowns, cultural and historical displays, leather and saddle making exhibits, and food and craft booths will be on offer. Crowds are frequently wowed by special novelty events; last year's events included Hula Bulls and Bull Poker.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE STORY OF AN ENDANGERED PLANT DEFYING THE ODDS is the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory affiliates USGSPacificIslandEcosystemsResearchCenterresearch ecologist Stephanie Yelenik and USGS California Volcano Observatory research geologist Jennifer Lewicki:

     Endangered plant survives volcanic hotspot, but is challenged by invasive species.

     Portulaca sclerocarpa, also known as ‛Ihi mākole, is a critically endangered small succulent plant in the purslane family (Portulacaceae). It only occurs on the Island of Hawai‘i and on a small islet off the coast of Lanā‘i. It can be found in various sites in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, including the Puhimau thermal area.

     The Puhimau thermal area, located in the upper East Rift Zone of Kīlauea Volcano has been an area of scientific interest since it was first detected around 1938. Sometime in the mid-1930s, heat and gases migrated to the surface as magma intruded to shallow depths beneath the area. Since then, changes in the chemistry of emitted gases have been associated with additional magma intrusions. Therefore, the Puhimau thermal area may be a potentially valuable site for monitoring the movement of magma in the East Rift Zone. Today, the Puhimau thermal area is about 50 acres (0.2 sq km) in size with hot (as high as about 200 degrees Fahrenheit, or 93degrees Celsius), steaming soils.

This Portulaca sclerocarpa, ‛Ihi mākole, individual (center) surrounded by invasive grass 
species is a critically endangered plant. The small metal tag to the right notes the plant's 
permanent identification number for long-term monitoring purposes. A WEST Systems 
fluxmeter (chamber at top) measures carbon dioxide emissions on the soil surface 
and a probe (black handle at bottom) measures soil temperature. 
USGS photo by Stephanie Yelenik, November 2019

     While there used to be over 4,000 individual Portulaca plants in the Puhimau thermal area in 1983, there are now fewer than 30 naturally occurring individuals. Because of this, National Park Service staff have grown Portulaca in a greenhouse and worked on various planting projects in the area. Unfortunately, these manually planted individuals also seem to survive in low numbers, and the National Park finds itself wondering which sites might be best for future Portulaca plantings.

     USGS biologists have been working with the National Park Service to try to better understand what is negatively affecting Portulaca, reasons that its growth may be limited, and what habitats are best for planting success. This led to a recent collaboration between USGS geologists at HVO and USGS biologists at the PacificIslandEcosystemsResearchCenter. The study focused on how gas release at Puhimau may have been affected by the 2018 eruption of Kīlauea, and how the changing nature of the hotspot might affect Portulaca survival and growth. Recent fieldwork explored the soil carbon dioxide outgassing and temperatures that these small plants experience, as well as bulk chemistry and isotopic composition of released gases.

     It turns out that Portulaca can survive at soil temperatures up to 155 degrees Fahrenheit (68 degrees Celsius), although they may prefer lower temperatures. Competition by invasive grasses introduced in the 1980s, as well as feeding on seed capsules by invasive rodent species, may be leading to low population growth rates. This creates a bit of a conundrum, because the grasses cannot live in the very hot soils, but then grass-free sites may be too warm for the native Portulaca. On the other hand, seeds that fall into thick grassy patches probably face too much competition for water. Protective wire cages, which were installed around the plants, have failed to keep mice from eating seed capsules. This may help explain the lack of seedlings growing around adult plants over time.

Retired USGS botanist Linda Pratt, USGS research geologists Patricia Nadeau and Jennifer Lewicki, and USGS chemist 
Tamar Elias (left to right) are part of a team investigating a critically endangered succulent plant, Portulaca 
sclerocarpa, in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park's Puhimau thermal area. Invasive species, like the broomsedge grass 
shown here, may contribute to low Portulaca population growth rates. USGS photo by Stephanie Yelenik, November 2019

     In addition, Puhimau soils tend to be quite thin – only about 12 inches (30 cm) deep. Between the high temperatures and lack of depth, it is likely that soils dry out quite quickly after rainfall events. This makes susceptibility to drought and changing climates another factor that will influence the success of planting sites. Work will continue to try to bolster populations and better understand how to protect this endangered plant by creating a planting guide for managers. The recent study helps provide additional information on the different environmental stressors that Portulaca faces.

     Volcano Activity Updates

     Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL. Kīlauea monitoring data over the past month showed no significant changes. Rates of seismicity were variable but within long-term values. Sulfur dioxide emission rates were low at the summit and below detection limits at Puʻu ʻŌʻō and the lower East Rift Zone. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continued to slowly expand and deepen.

     Mauna Loa is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption is certain.

     This past week, 31 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa; the strongest was a M2.9 on Feb. 9. Deformation indicates continued slow summit inflation. Fumarole temperature and gas concentrations on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable.

     Two earthquakes with three or more felt reports occurred on the Island of Hawaiʻi this past week: a magnitude-2.6 quake 20 km (12 mi) south of Honokaʻa at 23 km (14 mi) depth on Feb. 10 at 10:53 p.m., and a magnitude-3.3 quake 3 km (2 mi) southeast of Fern Acres at 39 km (24 mi) depth on Feb. 5 at 8:32 p.m.
     Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvofor past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, Feb. 15, , JV Jamboree at Konawaena

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
SATURDAY, FEB. 15

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Feb. 15,  Enrolling a loved one in the class or the finished scarf, created in class, makes a great Valentine's Day gift, suggests the announcement. volcanoartcenter.org


Zentangle: Basics with Ellen O'Dunn, Saturday, Feb. 15,  volcanoartcenter.org


Love the Arts Valentine's Day Dance: The Roaring 2020s, Saturday, Feb. 15,  at Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Hawaiʻi Island's vintage jazz and swing musical group, the Tin Pan Alleycats, will perform the biggest hit songs of the 1920s. Angela Beck and Andrea Gill of the Hilo Hep Cats will teach 1920s dance steps such as the Charleston and Lindy Hop during the band's breaks at  and  Period costumes are encouraged. Tickets are $15, $10 for VAC members, or free with a Love the Arts: The Roaring 2020s ticket from Saturday, Feb. 8. Purchase tickets online at volcanoartcenter.org/event/love-the-arts-valentines-day-dance-the-roaring-2020s/?instance_id=13341.


Panaʻewa Stampede, Saturday through Monday, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. Rodeo begins at n on Saturday, 11 a.m. on Sunday and Monday. Cowboy Church held 9 a.m. Sunday. Horse Races held 9 a.m. Monday. Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


SUNDAY, FEB. 16
RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

MONDAY, FEB. 17 – President's Day

AdvoCATS, Monday, Feb. 17, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org



TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.

ONGOING
RSVP for the Bicentennial Celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at  in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.


Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, February 15, 2020

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A new pest, infecting avocado trees, has been confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island. Photo from CTAHR
AVOCADO LACE BUG PEST IS ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND according to state Department of Agriculture entomologists. The discovery was made with the help of the University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources – Cooperative Extension Service, according to an announcement from DOA.
     The pest, Pseudacysta perseae, was first detected in Pearl City, Oʻahu, in December 2019 and on seedlings in retail outlets on Maui. According to Ken Love, President of  Hawaiʻi Tropical Fruit Growers, it has reached the east side of Hawaiʻi Island and he expects it to spread to Kona. The pest was one of the topics at last weekend's Tropical Fruit Growers annual meeting.
     Avocado trees and seedlings with the pest are either treated or destroyed, depending on their health and chance of recovery, and whether they could spread the infestation to other avocado trees.

Adult and nymph stages of avocado lace bugs. 

Photo from CTAHR
     Avocado lace bugs feed on the leaves of avocado trees and extract nutrients from foliage, causing gradual destruction of the leaves. The lace bug does not feed on the fruit itself but causes green to yellowish blotches on the leaves. Heavily damaged leaves become dry, may curl or drop prematurely, and may cause reduction in fruit yields. The bug is also known to feed on red bay and camphor on the U.S. Mainland.

     Adult lace bugs are about 2 millimeters long with black heads and mostly black bodies, with a black stripe across the width of their lacy wings. Immature avocado lace bugs can range in color from reddish to dark brown to black, depending on life stage. The eggs are black and look like specks of excrement, and may be found in clusters on the undersides of the leaves.

     CTAHR-CES extension agents are currently working to determine effective treatment plans for various levels of infestations in Hawaiʻi.

Bottom of infected leaf. Photo from CTAHR
     The pest was described in Florida in the early 1900s and has spread through the southeastern U.S.and into California. It is also found in the Caribbean, Central and South America, and Portugal. It has not been determined how the lace bug was introduced in Hawaiʻi.

     Possible infestations should be reported to HDOA's Plant Pest Control Branch at hdoa.ppc@hawaii.gov. Photos of the damage to avocado plants would also be helpful in identifying the cause. To view the Avocado Lace Bug flyer and field guide, go to hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/ppc/new-pest-advisories/.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FOUR NOMINEES FOR THE JUDICIAL VACANCY in the Circuit Court of the Third Circuit for Hawaiʻi Island have been selected by the Judicial Selection Commission. The commission has investigated the backgrounds and qualifications of the applicants and submitted the list of nominees to Gov. David Ige on Friday, Feb. 14. The position has been vacant since the retirement of Circuit Judge Greg K. Nakamura in November.
     Jeffrey A. Hawk currently serves as an attorney and per diem judge of Family Court, Third Circuit. He earned his law degree from the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, and is the recipient of the 1996 Bernard Levinson Award for Best Constitutional Law Paper. He also has a B.A. in English from the University of CaliforniaBerkeley.
Top of infected leaf. Photo from CTAHR
     William B. Heflin is a partner and attorney at the law firm of Alcain Naniole & Heflin. He is a graduate of the William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa. He has an A.A. in Liberal Arts from Honolulu Community College and a B.A. in History from Sopha University in Japan, where he also earned a 1st degree black belt in Aikido.

     Peter K. Kubota is an attorney in private practice with his own firm – Peter K. Kubota, Attorney at Law. He earned his Juris Doctor degree from the William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa. He also attended the University of Oregon and earned a B.B.A in Finance at UH-Mānoa College of Business.

     Jeffrey W.S. Ng is a senior trial deputy public defender with the state of Hawaiʻi. He has a Juris Doctor degree from the William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa. He earned a B.A. in Economics from the University of Michigan.
     The governor will interview each nominee and is seeking public comment on the governor's website at governor.hawaii.gov. Ige has 30 calendar days, or until Mar. 15, to make his appointment, which is subject to Senate confirmation.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE COAST GUARD CALLED OFF THE SEARCH today for the two fishers presumed swept off the shore of Honuʻapo Wednesday night. The missing fishers are James Oyama, 63, and Jay Jara, 37. Jara is a family friend of the Oyamas.

     Cmdr. Benjamin Gates, Deputy Sector Commander, Coast Guard Sector Honolulu, said "Pending any further developments, we've suspended the active search for these men. Suspending a search without a positive resolution is never easy. Our condolences go out to the families and friends of James and Jay."
     Anyone with information about the missing fishers that may assist in finding the fishers is asked to call the Sector Honolulu command center at 808-842-2600.
     Responders conducted 28 separate searches and covered nearly 1,000 square nautical miles in their combined effort to find the two men.
     Involved in the search were: Hawaiʻi County Fire "Chopper 1" helicopter crew; Hawaiʻi County Fire ground teams; Hawaiʻi County Police; Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules airplane crew; two Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crews; four U.S. Marine Corps Forces Pacific UH-1 Huey and Cobra helicopter crews; crew of the Joseph Gerczak.

     Hawaiʻi County Dispatch relayed information to the Coast Guard at 7 a.m. on Thursday, reporting the two fishers overdue after receiving a report from a family member at 5:46 a.m. Oyama and Jara reportedly went fishing at 5 p.m. in street clothes on Wednesday at Whittington Beach Park on the southeast side of the island and were expected back before midnight. Responders located both the fishers' vehicles in the beach park and their gear onshore in the breaking surf zone.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PHOTOGRAPHING TRAFFIC AT RED LIGHTS could be a reality in Hawaiʻi. The House Judiciary Committee yesterday voted to approve HB1676 HD1, which would establish a three-year photo red light imaging pilot program. The bill now goes to the House Finance Committee for further consideration.

     The bill authorizes any impacted county to administer the photo red light imaging detector system pilot program. It also establishes a pilot program account as a special account within the general fund. The bill requires proceeds of fines to be expended in the county from which they were collected for operation of the photo red light imaging system program. The pilot program would sunset on June 30, 2023.
     The committee found that the prevalence of motorists who violate Hawaiʻi's traffic laws, particularly those who fail to stop at red lights, has greatly increased. These violations endanger the lives of motorists, pedestrians, and other highway users and compound the already hazardous conditions on Hawaiʻi's roads and highways.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A DRIVER'S EDUCATION CLASS for 15 to 18-year-olds will be held at OceanViewCommunity Center starting Sunday, Feb. 16. The class runs 30 hours over two weeks. Call instructor David Seipel at 808-990-2406 for information about costs and detailed schedule information.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

RSVP FOR THE BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF KAUAHAʻAO CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, in Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at 10 a.m., followed by pot-luck fellowship at 11:30 a.m. in the large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP With the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

GOV. DAVID IGE TRAVELED TO JAPAN TO PROMOTE EXPANDED TRAVEL TO HAWAIʻI today. He will attend a series of meetings, including on how to make access easier through pre-clearance flights from Japanto Hawai‘i and the U.S.He will also meet with key stakeholders of the Thirty Meter Telescope to provide updates on the project.

     Approximately 1.5 million visitors come to Hawai‘i annually, spending about $2.5 billion a year.
     Lt. Gov. Joshua Green will serve as acting governor until Gov. Ige returns on Tuesday, Feb. 18.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
SUNDAY, FEB. 16
RSVP for the Bicentennial celebration of Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, Punaluʻu. Celebration begins at ; pot-luck fellowship at  in large pavilion at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park. For more information and to RSVP with the number of people attending, contact Debbie Wong Yuen, Kahu at Kauahaʻao Church, at 808-928-8039.

MONDAY, FEB. 17 – President's Day

AdvoCATS, Monday, Feb. 17, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org



TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.


SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org


ONGOING
Sharp Turns – The Creative Art of Woodturning, Volcano Art Center Gallery exhibit, featuring the works of Aaron Hammer and Mark and Karen Stebbins, continues daily, , through Feb. 16.967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, February 16, 2020

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Apply for help  paying for repairs of flash flooding damage to farms and ranches in Kaʻū. See details, below.
Photo by Julia Neal
THE FUNDRAISER FOR HOʻOMALU KAʻŪ on Thursday, March 8, will include not only a concert by esteemed internationally acclaimed musicians. Provided with sales of tickets will be a copy of the booklet Native Plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest.
     The Hawaiʻi International Music Festival concert will be held Sunday March 8, 6:30 p.m. at Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest. Performers will be: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist. Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.
     Operations Manager for the festival, Taylor Yasui, states, "We are excited to showcase the music and stories of acclaimed international and local artists, which adds to the unique and diverse musical landscape we have here in Hawaiʻi. Each year, HIMF strives to build upon our mission of presenting unique interdisciplinary classical music events and educational outreach programs for the community of Hawaiʻi."
     Hoʻomalu is a community nonprofit based in Nāʻālehu,  committed to protecting archaeological, cultural, and historical treasures of Ka‘ū. Its mission statement says the organization vows "to perpetuate, protect, and conserve the lands, knowledge, cultures and history of Kaʻū and its people." This mission statement inspired the donation of 14.992 acres of land on the main highway in the Manuka area of the District of Kaʻū, to the organization in 2011. The property contains a near-pristine Native Hawaiian dryland forest and is adjacent to the State of Hawaiʻi's Manuka Natural Area Reserve.
     Board President Wendy Vance said that "Believing that education is one of the keys to involving people in conscientious conservation, this booklet was conceived as a guide to 15 of the dominant trees, shrubs and vines in the Hoʻomalu Kaʻū dryland forest. While there are many more species to be found in dryland forests throughout the islands, this booklet describes some of the many plants growing at the Hoʻomalu site located about 1,800 feet above sea level on Māmalahoa Highway near Kaʻū's border with South Kona. The Hawaiian name, the scientific name, plant description, Hawaiian medicinal uses, cultural information, and propagation techniques are included for each species."
     Hoʻomalu was recently awarded stewardship of the Kahua Olohu, the ancient Makahiki grounds in Nāʻālehu, acquired by the County of Hawaiʻūi through its Public Access, Open Space, and Natural Resources Preservation Fund.
     An additional 772 acres located in Kāwala ahupua‘a, Ka‘ū Moku, have been placed in a Conservation Easement dedicated in perpetuity to agricultural and cultural preservation uses. Hoʻomalu Kaʻū will co-hold the easement with The Aka Kahakai Trail Association.
     Hoʻomalu's Board of Directors is comprised of: Wendy Scott-Vance, President; Charmaine Keanu, Vice President; Keoni Fox, Secretary/Treasurer; Willie Iaukea, Director;  Lehua Lopez-Mau, Director and Blossom DeSilva, Director.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PRESIDENT'S DAY is a federal holiday, observed tomorrow across the U.S. Post offices, banks, and state and federal offices will be closed.

Shawn Beckwith, 11th grader at Kaʻū High, will
compete in the state championship for
wrestling next weekend, on Oʻahu.
Photo by Jazzmine Beckwith
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KAʻŪ HIGH WRESTLING TEAM MEMBER SHAWN BECKWITH HEADS TO THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP on Oʻahu next weekend. Beckwith traveled to Konawaena on Feb. 8 to compete in the Big Island Interscholastic Federation wrestling tournament. Teammate Luke Wilson is also going to compete – see Friday'sKaʻū News Briefs.
     Beckwith moved with his family from Kona to Nāʻālehu after his freshman year at Konawaena. His father, Justin Tooker, wons South Point Plumbing. His mother, Jazzmine Beckwith, told The Kaʻū Calendar that Shawn's "favorite part of playing is winning, and he is excited because he gets to go to states. He qualified because not many other kids were in his weight class. He lost his first match and won his second at BIIF, so he would have qualified regardless of wins." She said Shawn's hobbies are mainly wrestling, and other sports like soccer and judo. He owns a dirt bike that he rides quite frequently."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI COUNTY AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS MAY BE ELIGIBLE for Emergency Conservation Program Assistance. An announcement from Hawaiʻi County Farm Service Agency states that farms and ranches suffering severe damage from flash flooding in the Pāhala and Windward areas of the County may be eligible for assistance under the Emergency Conservation Program, administered by FSA.
Flash flooding in Kaʻū last month was the highest on
record since November of 2000. Photo by Julia Neal
     To be eligible, the natural disaster must create new conservation problems that, if untreated, would: be so costly to rehabilitate that Federal assistance is or will be needed to return the land to productive agricultural use; is unusual and is not the type that would recur frequently in the same area; and affected the productive capacity of the farmland impair or endanger the land.
     A producer qualifying for ECP assistance may receive cost-share levels not to exceed 75 percent of the eligible cost of restoration measures. Eligible socially disadvantaged and beginning farmers and ranchers can receive up to 90 percent of the eligible cost of restoration. No producer is eligible for more than $500,000 cost sharing per natural disaster occurrence.
     The following types of measures may be eligible: removing debris from farmland; grading, shaping, or releveling severely damaged farmland; and restoring permanent fences; restoring conservation structures and other similar installations.

     Producers who have suffered a loss from a natural disaster may contact the local FSA County Office and request assistance today through Friday, March 13. To be eligible for assistance, practices must not be started until all of the following are met: an application for cost-share assistance has been filed; the local FSA County Committee or its representative has conducted an onsite inspection of the damaged area; and the Agency responsible for technical assistance, such as the Natural Resource Conservation Service, has made a needs determination, which may include cubic yards of earthmoving, etc., required for rehabilitation.

     For more information about ECP, please contact FSA at 808-933-8381 or visit fsa.usda.gov/hi.
     The FSA Hawaiʻi County Committee is comprised of Michelle Galimba, Chair; Charles Onaka, Vice Chair; and Roger Uchima, Member. The next meeting will be held Friday, March 13 at Contact the office to confirm meeting date and time, as budget constraints may limit the committee's ability to meet each month.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN for the Hawaiʻi Conservation Alliance and Society for Conservation Biology, Oceania, joint conference, Ola Ka ʻĀina Momona: Managing for Abundance. The conference will be held Monday, Aug. 31 through Thursday, Sept. 3 at Hawaiʻi Convention Center in Honolulu.

     Students are "strongly encourage" to submit an abstract. "This is a great opportunity to participate in a professional conference in Honolulu." Students will be eligible for awards with cash prizes. Scholarships are also available for students to greatly reduce registration fees and provide travel stipends for neighbor island residents.

     Abstract submissions from working professionals are also welcome.

     Abstracts are due Friday, Feb. 28.

     The Conference Organizing Committee is soliciting abstract for symposia, forums, workshops, trainings, and individual oral or poster presentations under the following six tracks: Cultural Values and Practice in Conservation, Capacity in Conservation; Global Change & Challenges; Putting Research into Practice; New Technologies and Research in Conservation; and Place-based Conservation.
     "Integrated, multi-disciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches to research and management are increasingly relying on community involvement, founded on multiple knowledge systems, and emphasizing biocultural knowledge. Proposals that demonstrate these innovative approaches are highly encouraged," states the announcement. See the Call for Proposals for full descriptions and to submit.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE LAST DAY OF THE 28TH ANNUAL PANAʻEWA STAMPEDE RODEO is tomorrow, Monday, Feb. 17 at the Panaʻewa Equestrian Center on the Kaʻū side of Hilo. The Hawaiʻi Horse Owners' event will feature horse races at , with the rodeo beginning at 11 a.m. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under.

     See Kaʻū paniolo and paniola, rodeo clowns, cultural and historical displays, leather and saddle making exhibits, and food and craft booths will be on offer. See HawaiiRodeoStampede.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
MONDAY, FEB. 17 – President's Day

AdvoCATS, Monday, Feb. 17, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org



Panaʻewa Stampede, through Monday, Feb. 17. Rodeo begins at  on Monday, with horse races held at  at Panaʻewa Equestrian Center just outside of Hilo. Rodeo competitors from Kaʻū and around the island will be joined by rodeo clowns and other entertainers. Tickets are $8 pre-sale, $10 at the gate, free for keiki 12 and under. HawaiiRodeoStampede.com


TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.


SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org


ONGOING
Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at noon. Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, February 17, 2020

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Over 1,000 participants, families, and volunteers enjoyed Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach last year during the annual ʻO Kaʻū
Kākou Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive. Deadline to sign up for this year's event is
Wednesday at noon. Learn how, below. Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
SUBMIT TESTIMONY ON THE HELICOPTER NOISE ACT. Called RETURN SERENITY AND SAFETY TO HAWAIʻI, Senate Bill 2649 will be the subject of public decision making by the Commerce, Consumer Protection, & Health Committee on Thursday. Feb. 20, at the state capitol. Written testimony is due by Wednesday morning before ; submit online at capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=2649&year=2020.
     The legislation would require tour helicopters in the state to keep their noise footprint out of all occupied properties. The noise from helicopters has been an ongoing issue for residents of Kaʻū, especially those close to Volcano.
     The legislation would also require tour helicopters to add safety measures: FAA-approved floatation devices and an Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast device which tracks all helicopter flights in an area to help avoid crashes and to help find downed craft.
     Tour helicopters that do not follow these rules would be denied new or renewal of permits, or have their permits taken away, and they would not be allowed to operate in Hawaiʻi.
     Bob Enrst, president of Hawaiian Island Coalition Mālama Pono, HICOP, shared his testimony that he wrote to the committee: "This legislation will return serenity and safety to all occupied properties in Hawaiʻi." He said the Federal Aviation Authority has "failed to implement" National Transportation Safety Board recommendation regarding flotation on all tour helicopters, and that the recommendation "was implemented because of Hawaiʻi fatalities from tour helicopters." He said the FAA has failed to require tour helicopters to be equipped with and operate ADS-B.
     Ernst also said the FAA's last hearing in Hawaiʻi on the subject was in August of 2018, that the FAA's failure to attend further public roundtable meetings has led to them ending, and that when the FAA did attend meetings, no action was taken regarding public input. He said, "The FAA has abdicated all responsibilities and duties regarding tour copters in Hawaiʻi."

     Ernst said the Return Serenity and Safety to Hawaiʻi Act "will definitely improve the quality of life for those on the ground but will also benefit the tour copter operators in that all complaints will stop, crashed copters will not sink therefore passengers will not drown, operation locations will be known so first responders can find wreckage quicker, and the tour copter operators can continue their businesses unhindered."
     See more at hicop.org.

     Written testimony from the Transportation Committee hearing on Jan. 29 state was almost entirely in support of the bill, mostly from individuals and neighborhood communities on other islands.

     Another bill, SB3154, covers basically the same issues. The Transportation and the Energy, Economic Develpoment, & Tourism Committees deferred that bill on Feb. 3. Written testimony for that bill was very much the other way, with only four in support. Testimony against the bill was submitted by Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Activities & Attractions Association of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Helicopter Association, Paradise Helicopters, Magnum Helicopters, Jack Harter Helicopters, Inc., and the Department of the Attorney General.

Paradise Helicopters carried residents, scientists, and documentarians
over the 2018 Kīlauea eruption flows. Photo from Tropical Visions Video
     Calvin Dorn, of Paradise Helicopters, said he opposed SB3154 because the bill overrides FAA rules already in place. He said flotation devices "are not a panacea for helicopter operations and can lead to overreliance on equipment that can fail."He also said that the NTSB "takes years to determine the cause of accidents and comes up with broad recommendations that may or may not be applicable to operations in Hawaii. The incorporation of all NTSB safety recommendations would place an unnecessary financial burden on operators and may not improve safety in Hawaiʻi. The requirement for ADSB does not address any specific safety program or reduce helicopter noise." He also said that tour aircraft in Hawaiʻi "are required to fly at a minimum of 1,500 feet above the ground over residential areas."
     Dorn said his company employs 100 people throughout the state, and that "helicopters make noise but also provide jobs and an environmentally safe way for our visitors to see the beauty that is Hawaiʻi. No roads, no bathrooms, no trails, no introduction of invasive species are needed for helicopters and airplanes to conduct aerial tours. What we provide for Hawaiʻi is jobs and an activity for visitors and local families as well as supplemental helicopter support in times of Natural Disaster."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Award winning coffee farmer Lorie Obra said she supports childcare 
for Marshallese coffee workers in Kaʻū. Photo from alohagrown

ATTEND THE PUBLIC MEETING OF KEIKI O PALEHUA ʻOHANA on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 18 at in the Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St.in Pāhala.

     Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development, and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation, which runs Tūtū & Me.

     Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it."
     Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Members of the Mochida family wait in Hayward, California, for their 
"evacuation" bus. Each wears an ID tag. The family operated a nursery 
and five greenhouses in Hayward
Photo from National Archives, Dorothea Lange, May 8, 1942

THE SHORT FILM MINIDOKA: AN AMERICAN CONCENTRATION CAMP will be shown tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 18 at  held at Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address on Japanese American internment during World War II.

     "Most people are unaware that Kīlauea Military Camp in the Park was also used as a Japanese internment camp during World War II," states the announcement. The newly released 30-minute film "reveals how unconstitutional imprisonment not only turned lives upside down but continues to ripple through generations and serves as a warning today.

     "On February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which led to the exclusion and unjust incarceration of 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents of Japanese ancestry living in the United Statesduring World War II. Today, the National Park Service protects and collaboratively manages some of the former internment camps including ManzanarTule LakeMinidoka, and Honouliuli."

     Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor.

Risa and Yasubei Hirano and their son George posed in front of an American 
flag. Risa is holding a photograph of her son Shigera in uniform. The Hiranos 
were held at the Colorado River internment camp during World War II. This 
image "captures both the patriotism and the deep sadness these proud 
Japanese Americans felt," states the National Park Service caption. 
Public domain via National Archives

     From the National Park Service website: "This was all the time Japanese American families had to pack all their belongings. Forced from their homes, they could only bring what they could carry. They had no idea where they were going or for how long. The National Park Service preserves the places where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II. Follow the stories of their relocation, internment, and resettlement."
     For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.
     After Dark in the Park is one of many programs sponsored by the Friends of Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park.

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SIGN UP BY WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 AT FOR ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU'S 12TH ANNUAL FISHING TOURNAMENT AND CANNED FOOD DRIVE. The event will be held this Saturday, Feb. 22. Last year's tournament had over 275 keiki entrants, and the shores held almost 1,000 participants and volunteers. Those fishing in the ocean catch, measure, and release their catches.
The shores of Punaluʻu will be flooded with keiki catching and releasing
handpole-caught fish this Saturday. Sign up by noon on Wednesday.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
     The free tournament, held each year at Punaluʻu Black Sand Beach Park Pavillions, is a huge draw for Kaʻū residents. Whole families make a day of it. Keiki as young as one year old up to age 14 can register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up a registration form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773.

     All attendees are encouraged to bring canned or non-perishable food to the event. "One can, if can. If no can, no can."

     Fishing guidelines are: a parent or legal guardian must accompany keiki at all times; handpole fishing with barbless hooks only; personally owned hand poles are allowed; hand poles, gear, and bait are provided; no chumming or using palu (bread, mackerel, etc.) allowed; all fishing is catch and release.

Keiki as young as one year old can participate in the free 12th annual
  ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive.
OKK photo
     Tournament check-in is 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Welcome and rules announcement is Poles, gear, and bait are handed out at Fishing time runs from to Free lunch is provided for all attendees, no matter the age, from noon to 12:30 p.m. Awards and prizes are handed out at 1 p.m.; keiki must be present to win. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Special prizes are awarded to the top three largest catch in each of five categories: Largest Kupipi, Largest Po‘opa‘a, Largest Hinalea, Largest Āholehole, and Most Caught.
     Other sponsors of the event include Department of Land and Natural Resources Enforcement Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Barbless Circle Hook Project, Marine Wildlife Program, County of Hawaiʻi, S. Tokunaga Store in Hilo, and Suisan Company, Ltd.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena
Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe
Track

Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
TUESDAY, FEB. 18
Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana Meeting on Childcare and Education for Keiki of Kaʻū Coffee Pickers, Tuesday, Feb. 18, 4 p.m., at Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room at 96-1219 Kamani St. in Pāhala. Organizer Laura Diaz said special guests aiming to help with the project will be Glenn Sako of county Department of Research & Development and Daniel Goya, of Partners in Development Foundation. Diaz said, "We need your input, ideas, and support to move forward with this program ; we're ready to open doors but need everyone's cooperation to do it." Keiki O Palehua ʻOhana is designed to help the Marshallese community care for young children while working on Kaʻū Coffee farms.

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp Short Film, Tuesday, Feb. 18, KīlaueaVisitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The special After Dark in the Park program will address Japanese American internment during World War II. Following the movie, National Park Service Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese Americans here following the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. For more information on Japanese American confinement during World War II, visit nps.gov/subjects/internment/index.htm.


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.


SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org


ONGOING
Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, February 18, 2020

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Hawaiian monk seal pupping season approaches. See guidelines and information about how best to help protect one of
Hawaiʻi's endangered, endemic mammals, below. Photo from Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response
SEN. MAZIE HIRONO CALLED U.S. FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL WILLAM BARR TO RESIGN today. She and other Senators accused him of being involved in an "ongoing campaign to erode the independence of immigration courts," including changing court rules to allow more political influence over decisions and promoting partisan judges to the Board of Immigration Appeals. The Senators' letter reads: "The administration's gross mismanagement of these courts" will do "lasting damage to public confidence in the immigration court system."
     In addition, more than 2,000 former Justice Department officials have also called on Barr to resign. Hirono said, "The President and his handmaiden Bill Barr are politicizing the Justice Department to go after his enemies. To watch my Republican colleagues twist themselves into a pretzel to lend cover to @realDonaldTrump is showing the American people how bankrupt the Republican party is.

     "Serving as Attorney General of the United Statesis a sacred trust and Bill Barr has repeatedly betrayed that trust by politicizing the Department of Justice in service of Donald Trump. It is long past time for his resignation.
     "Immigration judges should be allowed to be fair and independent, not instruments of @realDonaldTrump's cruel, anti-immigrant campaign. The Trump administration's assault on immigration courts undermines the ability of asylum seekers and immigrants to get a fair hearing.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr.
Photo from ABC
     "Since I called for AG Barr to resign in 2019, he's shown no sign of independence as he continues to act as the attorney for @realDonaldTrump, not the people. With this administration it seems the rule of law, our independent judiciary, and checks and balances are out the window."

     Last week, Pres. Donald Trump tweeted complaints about U.S. Prosecutors' recommendation for a seven to nine year sentence for his longtime adviser Roger Stone. Stone was convicted of lying to Congress, witness tampering, and obstructing a congressional investigation. Trump Called it "a horrible and very unfair situation. The real crimes were on the other side, as nothing happens to them. Cannot allow this miscarriage of justice!"

     After the tweet, the U.S. Attorney's Office filed for a shorter sentence, stating the original sentence "does not accurately reflect the Department of Justice's position on what would be a reasonable sentence in this matter." After the filing, all four prosecutors on the Stone case withdrew from the case, and the Washington, D.C., Assistant U.S. Attorney, resigned.
     Afterward, Trump tweeted that Barr took charge of a case "that was totally out of control and perhaps should not have even been brought." Barr said Trump's tweets about DOJ "make it impossible for me to do my job and to assure the courts and the prosecutors in the department that we're doing our work with integrity."

     Hawaiʻi Sen. Brian Schatz said, "We need to hear from the Attorney General. This scandal grows. The DOJ itself appears to have been corrupted by a President who rewards his friends and punishes his enemies. Media should treat this like a potentially explosive abuse of power even if this takes more than ten seconds to explain.

     "It is nearly impossible to find a benign explanation for this. The DOJ [Investigator General] needs to investigate, and the House and Senate should conduct hearings to find the paper trail and hear from the AG under oath.
     "So for those of you who with a day job, here's what happened: Roger Stone gets recommended for 7-9 years for his crimes. Trump tweets that it's unfair. DOJ then intervenes to reduce the prison term, something that is literally never done. 3 prosecutors just resigned in protest.
     "Bill Barr is demonstrating his independence just like the Astros learned their lesson, and just like Republicans will protect pre-existing conditions," said Schatz.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

COVID-19 coronavirus is seen in yellow, emerging from cells (in blue and pink) cultured in the lab. This image is from 
a scanning electron microscope at National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-RockyMountain Laboratories.

TO CONTAIN CORONAVIRUS, MORE COORDINATION OF GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IS NEEDED, said Sen. Brian Schatz today. Interviewed on MSNBC, he gave examples of the federal administration having difficulty steering the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. He characterized the go-between individuals in the Trump administration as "bumbling incompetents."

     Schatz talked about Hawaiʻi specifically, as a place where people were destined for quarantine after exposure to the virus overseas. He talked about planes with these people in the air with no firm destination for a quarantine center. Hawaiʻi officials also had no idea how many planes were headed to Hawaiʻi or when they were arriving, nor how many people to expect. First, they were told to place quarantines in the civilian population, to which Hawaiʻi Attorney General Claire Connors said, "No way," Schatz related. Then, quarantinees were to be taken to a secure facility at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, but the Department of Defense said "No," said Schatz. He said that in the few hours they had to make arrangements, it was "nuts."

     Schatz said the Trump administration is "incompetent" and that state governments like Hawaiʻi "are cleaning up the mess." He said the good news is that "on the ground, things are safe in Hawaiʻi and elsewhere across the country, but it's not because of anything the Trump Administration has done – it's been in spite of it."
This image from a scanning electron microscope shows, in orange, the 
coronavirus that causes the disease COVID-19. The virus was isolated 
from a patient in the U.S.and is seen here emerging from the surface 
of cells — in gray — cultured in the lab. Image from NIAID-RML

     Schatz said the Trump administration "doesn't much care about science" or governing, and that they find such subjects "boring." He said this has led to the defunding of programs that are supposed to help prevent a global pandemic, such as the nine percent cut to funding for the Centers for Disease Control, and the Trump budget that would halve the U.S.'s funding of the World Health Organization. He also brought up that the top global health position on the National Security Council was vacant for about two years before the position was "cut."

     Schatz is in a group of U.S. Senators, including Mazie Hirono, working to clearly establish the process for states to receive federal reimbursement for costs from COVID-19 containment efforts.

     The number of cases in the U.S.of the virus is still 15. There are more than 72,500 cases of COVID-19 in China. More than two dozen other countries also have confirmed cases. The death toll is nearly 2,000 people, mostly in China.

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IN LOSS OF POPULATION, HAWAIʻI ranks fifth in the nation, according to the career website Zippia. It recently named the top ten states for 2017-2018, for percentage of residents who moved to another state. New York ranked first in population loss, losing 307,000 residents - 1.57 percent in a year - followed by New Jersey, West Virginia, and Louisiana.
     Hawaiʻi ranked fifth with a loss of 7,047 residents, with 0.5 percent of the population leaving the islands. According to Zippia, Hawaiʻi residents headed out for California, Texas, Nevada, Washington, and North Carolina.
     The fastest-growing state is Arizona, which gained 155,376 residents a 2.17 percent population increase in 2017-2018. See Zippia.com.

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A Hawaiian monk seal pup, left, and its mom bask in the sun on the sand on a Hawaiian shore. The endangered,
endemic mammals' pupping season will begin soon. Photo from Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response
HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL PUPPING SEASON is coming up. Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response asks the public to watch for the endangered mammals and document their activities. National Oceanographic & Atmospheric Administration states that, while Hawaiian monk seals can give birth at any time of year, many pups in the past three or four years have been born during the spring and summer.
     Hawaiʻi Marine Marine Animal Response gives an overview:

     Monk seals are born weighing about 25-35 pounds, are black in color, and nurse on land for about five to seven weeks. During that time, it is important to minimize disturbance as much as possible to ensure the mother remains with her pup and the animals develop a normal mom-pup relationship. This ensures the pup gets the nutrition it needs to fuel proper development and is given the best chance at long-term survival.
     Only about 300 Hawaiian monk seals remain in the main Hawaiian Islands, so every pup is important. Giving mom-pup pairs space can help support population recovery for Hawaiian monk seals.
A young pup is held close by its mom on the sand. Hawaiian monk seals,
one of only two endemic mammals in Hawaiʻi - both are endangered - need
protection from harm and disturbances in order to survive and thrive
as a species. Photo from Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response
     It is very important to never feed a Hawaiian monk seal. After five to seven weeks, the mom leaves the pup on its own. If young monk seals are fed by humans during this time, they may not learn how to hunt for themselves. This lowers the animals' chance of survival.
     Mother seals can be very protective of their young and are more likely to exhibit territorial behavior with a pup. For both animal and human safety, humans are asked to stay at least 150 feet away from Hawaiian monk seals, to stay behind any fencing or signs,  and to listen carefully to the instructions of HMAR personnel on sites. This helps keep the seals wild.

     To minimize traffic and potential disturbances at pupping sites, specific pupping locations are typically not announced by HMAR or NOAA.
     If a mom and pup are seen on a beach with no signage, fencing, or HMAR personnel present, please call the HMAR hotline immediately at (888) 256-9840. This number is also used to report any monk seal sightings, and for turtles, dolphins, or whales that may be in distress. To report seabirds in distress please call (808) 687-7900.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See Christy Lasseter & Friends tomorrow night at Kīlauea Visitor Center
Auditorium. Courtesy photo
ATTEND THE NĀ LEO MANU (HEAVENLY VOICES) HAWAIIAN MUSIC CONCERT with Christy Lassiter & Friends tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb. 19 at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium in HawaiʻVolcanoes National Park. Seating begins at 6:30 p.m., concert starts at 7 p.m. The Park announcement states: "This talented trio plays traditional Hawaiian music and have performed together for several years. They are devoted to the perpetuation of the old Hawaiian songs they grew up hearing in their homes. The use of guitar, ‘ukulele, bass and three-part harmonies create a memorable and enjoyable musical experience. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A WIND ADVISORY is in effect for Kaʻū and most of Hawaiʻi Island through Thursday, Feb. 20 at according to the National Weather Service. The public should expect northeast winds of 20 to 35 miles per hour, with gusts over 50 mph.
     Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense said today that the public: should secure outdoor items such as tents and outdoor furniture. Motorists, especially in high profile vehicles, are urged to drive with caution. Be aware of downed trees, utility disruptions, and that road closures may occur without notice. Stay clear of downed utility lines and report any to authorities.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19

Concert with Christy Lassiter & Friends, Wednesday, Feb. 19; seating begins at , concert starts at  at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Part of the Nā Leo Manu (Heavenly Voices) Hawaiian music concert program. Free; Park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo


THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.


SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org


WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26

Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.

Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


Ash Wednesday Service at St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 


FRIDAY, FEB. 28

Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association Annual Health Conference, Friday, Feb. 28, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Register in advance: 808-928-0101.


SATURDAY, FEB. 29

Hawaiian Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count, Saturday, Feb. 29 and March 28, , orientation included. Register at oceancount.org. Locations in Kaʻū are: Kaʻena Point in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, and Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park. Participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whale activity from the shoreline.


Mixed Media Photo Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Feb. 29,  The class is slated for beginner to intermediate students. volcanoartcenter.org



ONGOING
Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


Register for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at . Event takes place Saturday, Feb. 22,  Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, PāhalaElementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers will include: Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at Universityof Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30 and are available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, February 19, 2020

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Keiki can sign up for the Kaʻū Children's Business Fair, to be held in March. See more below. Above, Alysha Gacayan
offered her photos last year, featuring images of Kaʻū. The Avenue family purchased a turtle image.
Photo by Julia Neal
EXPANDING EARLY EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES for three and four year olds is the goal of bill in the state House of Representatives. The House Committee on Lower & Higher Education and the Committee on Finance heard testimony on Tuesday from groups and individuals in a joint hearing on HB 2543 HD 1. The bill would increase funding for early learning schools and expand the number of school facilities "in areas they are needed the most," says a statement from the House.
     Higher & Lower Education Chair Justin H. Woodson said the early education bill is part of a joint economic package introduced by the House and Senate, and supported by Gov. David Ige 's Administration to address Hawaiʻi's cost of living obstacles. The joint working class economic 
package is designed to tackle the issues highlighted in the Aloha United Way sponsored
report, ALICE: A Study of Financial Hardship in Hawaiʻi.
     Finance Committee Chair Sylvia Luke said most of the testimony is in support with families in desperate need of more early education availability. Luke said providing expanded early education for young children can reduce the cycle of poverty for parents who cannot work because they must stay home to care for their young children. Subsequently, those children don't get the early learning they
need to become better educated citizens, she said. The bill includes:
     Requiring Department of Education to adopt a standardized assessment model for all kindergarten students. It would require parents or guardians of public school kindergarten students to disclose information on the child's prior child care program or prekindergarten attendance to determine areas
with the highest need for prekindergarten and child care programs;
     Expanding the Preschool Open Doors Program eligibility from four-year-old children to all children who are three to four years old or will not be at least five years old on or before July 31 of the current school year. It also would establish the Preschool Open Doors Trust Fund with annual reporting regarding the revenues and expenditures of the fund;
Early education can break the cycle of poverty, according to ALICE:
A Study of  Financial Hardship in Hawaii.
     Establishing a program in the Department of Human Services to award grants for preschools and to fund positions for the Preschool Open Doors Program. It would appropriate funds for the Department of Human Services to expand its information technology system for the purpose of managing information on prekindergarten attendance and child care need and to contract for and operate preschool and child care programs;
     Establishing the Early Learning Coordinator position within the Office of the Governor. The Early Learning Coordinator would  have the responsibility of reaching the goal of providing all children who are 3 to 4 years old, or will not be at least five years old on or before July 31 of the current school year, with enrollment in a preschool program by the year 2030;
     Appropriating funds for the University of Hawaiʻi's ʻImiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo to build classrooms for Hawaiian language immersion pre-kindergarten programs. The bill would appropriate funds for building early learning services classrooms on public library property.
     Committee members will review the testimony and return for decision making at 2 p.m. Tuesday, February 25.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SIGN UP KEIKI FOR KAʻŪ CHILDREN'S BUSINESS FAIR, to be held Saturday, March 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pāhala Community Center. This second annual event features young entrepreneurs between the ages of seven and 18. They share their talents by selling handmade items and services. One application may be submitted for each business. Children can sign up for booth space at no charge. Children working as a group submit one application that includes each child's information; no more than three children per business.
Addy Jensen, last year, offered photographs of flowers grown at Hawaiian 
Flowers on South Point Road. Photo by Julia Neal

     The fair started as Acton Children's Business Fair last year in Kaʻū; it "inspires children to discover their inner entrepreneur." It is "the largest entrepreneurship event for kids in North America," according to promoters, and the one-day market "gives children the opportunity to showcase their very own businesses."
     Last year, Kaʻū saw keiki participate, with offerings from hand made signage, photography of nature and greenhouse flowers, to jewelry, variously decorated brands of "slime," food and drink, cookies, and sweet and sour libations. The venue was River of Life Church in Pāhala. The program was open to everyone of all faiths. Children who presented their products came from home schooling, Volcano School of Arts & Sciences, and public schools. Students ran their own booths, booths, accepting money, with some using Square to take credit cards. They explained their ideas, and their execution and pricing, to customers.
Eli Crook makes specialty signs as his business start-up last year.
 Photo by Julia Neal
     The Kaʻū Children's Business Fair guidelines are designed to give children the experience of selling a product or service. Parents of younger children (under eight years old) may sit in the booth, but the children should be responsible for set up, customer interaction, and sales. Parents may aid a child, but the child runs the business.
     The original Acton Children's Business Fair in Austin Texas in 2007 was founded by Jeff and Laura Sandefer, and other families who wanted to spark a sense of wonder and entrepreneurship in their children. Seven youth entrepreneurs hosted around 25 attendees. The event grew over the years to 115 entrepreneurs and 1,500 attendees at the Acton Children's Business Fair in Austin.
     Learn more about participating at childrensbusinessfair.org/pahala. Visit Kaʻū Children's Business Fair's Facebook event page facebook.com/KAUCBF/. RSVP to the event at facebook.com/events/925342784527676/. Text KAUKIDSFAIR to 31996 for updates and information (message and data fees may apply).

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

URGING PEOPLE TO COME TO A PĀHALA MEETING ABOUT THE UPCOMING CENSUS COUNT, the County of Hawaiʻi sent out a message today. The 2020 Kick-Off Event will be held from 9 a.m. to noon next Wednesday, Feb. 26 at Pāhala Community Center.
     "The public is invited to learn about Census 2020 at this free event hosted by the County of
Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development." Doors open at 9 a.m. The program begins at 9:30 a.m., with a County Proclamation followed by a presentation by Hawaiʻi Island's Census Representative. A question and answer period will round out the meeting, which ends at noon.
     "Census results have an impact on planning and funding for health clinics and highways, fire departments and disaster response, education programs such as Head Start and college tuition assistance, and so much more.," says the County statement. "The 2020 Census is more than a population count. It's an opportunity to shape the future of your community."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KAI KAEHELE won the endorsement of the Congressional Progressive Caucus PAC. The political arm of the Congressional Progressive Caucus announced its endorsement today. The state Senator is running for Tulsi Gabbard's seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. She announced earlier that she will not run, as she if focusing on her campaign for U.S. President. The congressional district serves Kaʻū and all of rural Hawaiʻi.
     "On behalf of the Congressional Progressive Caucus PAC, I am proud to announce our endorsement of Sen. Kai Kahele," said Congressman Mark Pocan, Congressional Progressive Caucus PAC Co-Chair. "We believe in Kai; his values, vision, talent, enthusiasm, and character. We have no doubt that he will continue to work tirelessly on behalf of the people of Hawaiʻi's Second Congressional District and be a true champion of progressive values here in Congress."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe

Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Tuesday, March 10, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe

Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Wednesday, March, 6 p.m., @Hilo

Tuesday, March 10, , host Makualani

Friday, March 13, , host Konawaena

Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 14, , @Hilo

Track
Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea


UPCOMING
THURSDAY, FEB. 20
2020 U.S. Census Workshop, Thursday, Feb. 20, p.m. to , Pāhala Gym Multipurpose room. Dinner and light refreshments will be provided. Census takers pay is $20/hour. Gas is reimbursable. Eligible applicants will be at least 18 years old, have a valid Social Security Number, and pass a criminal and background check. Those with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits will have their Census income counted as exempt. See 2020census.gov/en/jobs.html for more and to apply.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.


SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration closed today at . Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org



SUNDAY, FEB. 23
Kaʻū Portuguese Exhibit, Sunday, Feb. 23 at Carvalho Park in Hilo from  to  Exhibit by Kaʻū Multicultural Society.

ONGOING
Aloha Kidney in Kaʻū, Thursday afternoons, p.m. to , through Feb. 20, Kaʻū Resource Center, 96-3126 Puahala St. in Pāhala. The free class series on Chronic Kidney Disease lead by retired kidney doctor Ramona Wong. Bring a pen and whomever cares/cooks/shops for the person(s) with CKD. See alohakidney.com. Call (808) 585-8404 to enroll.

Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers are Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30, available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, February 20, 2020

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Learn advanced means of keeping bees at a workshop this weekend. See details below. Photo by Julia Neal

A BILL TO ALLOW LARGER GREENHOUSES AND SHADE HOUSES, without building permits, passed the state House of Representatives this week. HB 2192 HD1, introduced by Hawaiʻi Island Rep. David Tarnas, proposes to increase the maximum area, from 20,000 to 60,000 square feet, for each agricultural shade cloth structure, cold frame, or greenhouse that is qualified for an exemption from building permit and building code requirements. 


     "This bill supports Hawaiʻi's local food production and sustainability goals by making it easier for local farmers to build modern greenhouses without having to go through a lengthy and costly permitting process," said Tarnas.
Kaʻū Valley Farms nursery uses greenhouses similar to the 
ones in the bill. Photo by Lee Neal

     HB2192 received public support from the Department of Agriculture, Hawaiʻi County Councilman Tim Richards, Hawaiʻi Farm Bureau, Ulupono Initiative, Hawaiʻi Farming LLC, Big Island Produce Asset Holdings LLC, Hawaiʻi Aquaculture & Aquaponics Association, and one individual. 

     Testifiers in support of HB2192 stated that the bill is necessary to support local producers to make farming more profitable and productive across Hawaiʻi. "We believe that opening the door to new investments in agricultural infrastructure will directly support more local food production and an economically robust homegrown agriculture industry, which strengthens our community with fresh, healthy food," said Amy Hennessey, Senior Vice President of Communications and External Affairs at Ulupono Initiative.

     HB2192 House Draft 1 is the first of Rep. Tarnas' 2020 bills to pass Third Reading in the House this session. HB2192 now crosses over for consideration in the Senate. 


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AFTER WEDNESDAY'S DEMOCRATIC DEBATE WITHOUT TULSI GABBARD, and without her receiving invitations to CNNTown Hall meetings, her presidential campaign released a statement: "Despite complete media blackouts and DNC bias, Tulsi is still climbing in the polls."


     The statement contends that Gabbard is beating a billionaire, "who is quite literally outspending us 16 to one. Not only are we beating him in the polls, but we're also outraising him 12 to one on grassroots donations." The Tulsi 2020 group also states that "nearly half of primary voters" still haven't decided who they want to vote for. Her campaign message is that "the establishment elite and its allies in the media have been trying to count us out — by ignoring us, attacking us, and moving the goalposts — since the very moment we launched. They feel threatened by Tulsi, whose support cannot be bought and whose message cannot be influenced... Can you imagine what this election would look like for Tulsi if she was given anything close to the kind of media treatment that's been handed to candidates favored by the establishment? Or if she had even a small fraction of the hundreds of millions already spent by the billionaire candidates?
     "We don't have to imagine, we know from our own work on the ground that when voters from ALL parties learn about Tulsi and hear her message for the people, they get it. They see someone with integrity, honesty and a new hopeful vision for the country we all love. A candidate with the firsthand experience necessary to be commander in chief on Day One."

     The EmersonCollege poll, Feb. 16 to 18, presented by the Gabbard campaign, shows Gabbard in seventh among sampling of primary and caucus voters, with Bernie Sanders in the lead, Joe Biden second, followed by Michael Bloomberg, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, and Amy Klobuchar.

     "Would you vote for your candidate or is there a chance you would vote for someone else?" The poll showed more than 50 percent undecided.
     The billionaire in third place is Michael Bloomberg and the billionaire behind Gabbard in this poll is Tom Steyer.


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THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY WILL HOLD A PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY VOTE AMONG ITS MEMBERS ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4 to determine assignment of delegates to the National Convention where the Democratic candidate for President will be named.
     Those who want to participate must be registered to vote in the state of Hawaiʻi and registered with the Democratic Party by Sunday, March 8 to vote by mail. Those who join the party between Monday, March 9 through April 4 can vote at polling stations on April 4. The Kaʻū polling station for Democrats will be at Ocean View Community Center at 92-8924 Leilani Circle. Other locations around Hawaiʻi Island are at Keaʻau Elementary School, HiloIntermediateSchool, KealakeheHigh School , or WaimeaElementary School. The polling places are open from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

     All ballots for the primary should be mailed by Saturday, March 28 to assure delivery to the Democratic Party of Hawaiʻi's Honolulu post office box on or before April 4 at    

     To register to vote online, see olvr.hawaii.gov/register.aspx. To register to be a member of the Democratic Party of Hawai‘i online or print and mail in an application, see hawaiidemocrats.org/join.
     The Democratic Party has decided to put its delegates behind presidential candidates through a process called rank choice voting. Voters select a first, second, and third favorite candidate.
     A candidate must receive at least 15 percent of the votes to earn a delegate. 
     When the ballots are tabulated, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. The second choices of those who voted for the first eliminated candidate are added to the remaining candidates' vote totals. Then, the candidate with the fewest votes after that second tabulation is eliminated. The next choice of those who voted for the second eliminated candidate are then added to the remaining candidates' vote totals and the candidate with the fewest votes after that third tabulation is eliminated.
     The ranked choice tabulation and elimination rounds continue until all the remaining candidates have at least 15 percent of the votes. Delegates to the Democratic National Convention are then awarded to the remaining candidates proportionally to their final vote tally. Learn more at hawaiiRCV2020.org.


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KUPU CARE PALLIATIVE PROGRAM RECEIVED A $25,000 GRANT from the Max and Yetta Karasik Family Foundation. Serving East Kaʻū from Volcano to South Point, and all of East Hawaiʻi, the program is run by Hawaiʻi Care Choices, formerly Hospice of Hilo.
     In an announcement, Development Manager Keith Greer said, "Since 2012, Kupu Care has set a strong foundation for palliative care in East Hawaiʻi and this grant, combined with a new partnership with United Health Care, will help reinvigorate this program.
     "Palliative Care is an emerging medical specialty and many people don't know if it is right for their loved one; if they see their family member becoming less responsive, difficulty getting in and out of the bed or wheelchair, or they are visiting the emergency room more frequently, Palliative Care may be able to help."
     Patients remain under the care of their own physicians in Kupu Care, and get an extra layer of support from the Kupu Care team. Hawaiʻi Care Choices provides Palliative, Hospice, and Bereavement Care services to all of East Hawaiʻifrom Laupāhoehoe Point to South Point.


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AN ADVANCED BEEKEEPING CLASS will be held Saturday, Feb. 22 and March 21 from to in Hilo. The address will be provided upon registration. Experienced beekeepers are invited to participate in this workshop series about apiary expansion and management. Presented by Bee Love Apiaries, there is no cost to attend; however, registration is required in advance due to limited space. RSVP by contacting Jen Rasmussen at 808-640-0278 or jennyabach@gmail.com.


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Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Wrestling

Fri., Feb. 21 HHSAA

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe
Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea

Tuesday, March 10, , @Konawaena

Saturday, March 14, , host Kealakehe
Boys Volleyball

Friday, Feb. 21, , Preseason at Christian Liberty

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Wednesday, March, 6 p.m., @Hilo
Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 14, , @Hilo
Track

Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea


UPCOMING
FRIDAY, FEB. 21

Mardi Gras Dinner Fundraiser for St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Friday, Feb. 21, Paradise Circle-Mauka. Doors open at  and dinner is served p.m. to  Dinner includes Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Cornbread, Drink, and Dessert. Tickets at the door, $8 per person, $15 for two, and $20 for family.


SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration closed Wednesday, Feb. 19. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org



SUNDAY, FEB. 23
Kaʻū Portuguese Exhibit, Sunday, Feb. 23 at Carvalho Park in Hilo from  to  Exhibit by Kaʻū Multicultural Society.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26

Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.

Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


Ash Wednesday Service at St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 


ONGOING
Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers are Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30, available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, February 21, 2020

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Nāhuku, Thurston Lava Tube, reopened today after almost two years of closure. During the closure, long, delicate roots
from ‘ōhi‘a trees and large colonies of white microbial matter grew in the tube. Visitors are urged not to touch the
lava tube walls or the roots. See more below. Photo from NPS/Janice Wei
SELF-MONITORING FOR CORONAVIRUS ARE FOUR HAWAIʻI ISLAND RESIDENTS, among 56 statewide. The State of Hawaiʻi COVID-19 Joint Information Center announced Friday afternoon that an additional person is in quarantine. However, none have reached the standard of symptoms to be tested for the Coronavirus by the National Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. The news release from the state says, "Currently, there are no cases of COVID-19 identified in Hawaiʻi. The state Department of Health is actively preparing for possible cases and working with state, county, and federal partners including the medical community in Hawaiʻi."
     Those self-monitoring were directed through an airport screening of passengers landing in Hawaiʻi from China. Self-monitoring means staying home from work, school, and other public places, and watching for symptoms.

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NĀHUKU, THURSTON LAVA TUBE, REOPENED TWENTY-FOUR/SEVEN, after being closed for 657 days. The popular walk-through lava tube has been closed since May 4, 2018, following the 6.9-magnitude earthquake and four months of destructive eruptive and seismic activity at Kīlaueathat caused its summit crater to collapse. Nāhuku will be open 24 hours a day, and will be lit from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Visitors must bring a flashlight and extra batteries if visiting before 8 a.m. or after 8 p.m.
Rocks fell from the ceiling and new cracks appeared in Nāhuku during the 
2018 eruption. Photo from NPS/Janice Wei
     Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Acting Superintendent Rhonda Loh said, "We are overjoyed that we can again welcome visitors back to Nāhuku. We appreciate the public's understanding and support during this long road to recovery following the intense volcanic activity of 2018, and urge everyone to be mindful of potential risks when entering any lava tube."

     During the eruption, several large rocks were dislodged from the lava tube's ceiling, and new cracks appeared. A National Park Service geomorphologist, mining engineer, and other specialists surveyed Nāhuku. They determined it could be reopened if safety mitigations were met. Two crack monitors were installed, and a low-hanging rock is visibly marked off to prevent head injuries. Drainage was improved to reduce standing water on the cave's floor, and the electrical line to the bathroom was replaced.

     The Federal Highway Administration inspected park roads after the eruption and determined the parking configuration at Nāhuku was unsafe and should be addressed. As a result, the stalls perpendicular to Crater Rim Drivehave been eliminated. There are now 14 stalls parallel to Crater Rim Drive, plus two accessible stalls and two stalls for commercial tour vans. Parking is limited to 30 minutes, and there is a new passenger loading and unloading area. Visitors can also park at alternate sites, including Devastation Trail and Kīlauea Iki Overlook.

Replacing the electric line inside the lava tube was one repair needed 
to reopen the tube to the public. Photo from NPS/Janice Wei
     During the closure, long, delicate roots from ‘ōhi‘a trees that grow on top of the lava tube grew down through the ceiling to touch the floor in some areas. There are also large colonies of white microbial matter on the lava tube walls. Visitors are urged not to touch the lava tube walls or the roots. These unique natural features have likely reappeared due to the absence of people for more than a year.

     Nāhuku was discovered in 1913 by Lorrin Thurston, a local newspaper publisher and advocate for the establishment of the national park. The name Nāhuku, protuberances, possibly refers to the lava stalactites that once covered its ceiling,  but have disappeared due to souvenir collectors. The National Park Service urges the public to "Help protect this incredible resource by not touching the walls or delicate tree root systems hanging down. Use only your eyes and feet to experience the lava tube – and ears! The scenic trail at Nāhuku winds through native forest, and endemic birds like ‘apapane, ‘amakihi and ‘ōma‘o are often heard and seen in this area."

     Additional disaster recovery continues in Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park, which sustained significant damage from the 60,000 earthquakes that shook Kīlaueabetween April 30 and Aug. 4, 2018. The Park's recovery progress is regularly updated on the Park website.


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See results and more photos from last weekend's 28th annual Panaʻewa Stampede Rodeo, below.
Photos by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
RESULTS ARE IN FOR PANAʻEWA STAMPEDE RODEO, held at the Panaʻewa Equestrian Center on the Kaʻū side of Hilo. This 28th Hawaiʻi Horse Owners rodeo is held yearly on President's Day weekend: Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.

     Kaʻū paniolo and paniola, competitors from all over the island, came to showcase their skills in a wide variety of events. Huge crowds flocked to the event; last year saw over 10,000 attendees over three days. Rodeo clowns, cultural and historical displays – including the Kaʻū Paniolo Display from Kaʻū Multicultural Society – leather and saddle making exhibits, and food and craft booths were open for attendees to enjoy.
Presentation of the flags.
Photo by Solomon Sanoria
     Announcers were Al Cabral, JJ Harrison, and Lu Faborito. Rodeo Clowns were JJ Harrison and Rider Kiesner. Andrew Yanagi and Ty Kauai were the bull fighters. Rodeo Queen was Paige Rapoza. Her court were Kryslynn Nabarro and Lelana Arruda.

     The result are here:

     All Around Cowboy is Trisyn Kalawaia. He took first in Poʻo Wai U, first in Double Mugging with Ethan Awa, first in Tie Down Roping, second in Steer Wrestling, fourth in Youth Team Roping with Kelvin Medeiros, fifth in Kane-Wahine Ribbon Mugging with Kalia Medeiros, ninth in Open Team Roping with Westin Joseph, and 15th with Korey Medeiros,

     All Around Cowgirl is Lai Bertelmann. She took first in Wahine Breakaway, third in Wahine Double Mugging with Ester Benanua, fifth in Kane-Wahine Team Roping with Clancy Aku, sixth in Youth Team Roping with Lilia Keakealani, and seventh in Kane-Wahine Ribbon Mugging with Kaleo Simmons.

     In PoʻoWai U, a traditional paniolo event, Trisyn Kalawaia placed first with a time of 19.09, Kaili Brenneman placed second at 20.09, and Geoy Purdy placed thirs at 27.72.

     In Wahine Barrel Racing, Alohi Blackstead placed first with a combined time of 54.69, second place was Kalia Medeiros at 57.5, and third was Caithlynn Rae Cabral-Ah Sing at 58.11. Kaʻū's Lorilee Lorenzo placed fourth in the event, with a combined time of 60.

Poʻo Wai U. Photo by Solomon Sanoria 
of Wyrmfyre Productions
     In Youth Barrel Racing, first place was taken by Hilinaʻi Gouveia with a combined time of 57.02, Kylee Ann Holland took second at 61.30, and Addie Rose Flores took third at 64.69.

     In Kane-Wahine Ribbon Mugging, Ryan Sanborn and Denicia Derasin finished in first at 17.0, Shannon Benevides and Ty Kauai finished second at 19.15, and Lenaia Andrade and Kaili Brenneman finished fourth at 19.32.

     In Wahine Double Mugging, Kassey Hanoa and McKella Akana took first place in three rounds at a combined time of 278.25, Shannon Benevides and Lenaia Andrade took second in two rounds at a combined time of 102.15, and Ester Benanua and Lai Bertelmann took third in two rounds at a combined time of 126.87.

     In Double Mugging, first was taken in 31.25 seconds by Trisyn Kalawaia and Ethan Awa, second in 37.62 by Rodney Kuahiwinui and Kalai Llanes, and third in 42.56 by Troy Wood and Aki Smith.

     In Wahine Breakaway, Lai Bertelmann finished first with a combined time of 6.91 in three rounds, Kellsea Medeiros in second with a combined 10.62 in two rounds, and Lauren Santiago in third with a combined 11.7 in two rounds.

Flaming whips. Photo by Solomon 
Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
     In Kane-Wahine Team Roping, Weston Joseph and Kassey Hanoa placed first in three rounds with a combined time of 49.72, Aryka Diego and Bobby Boy Maneul placed second in two rounds at 16.47, and Ethan Awa and Makayla Awa placed third in tow rounds at 18.19.

     In Century Team Roping, first place was taken by Mac Castillo and Wayne Miranda at a total time of 31.56 in three rounds, second by Mike Smith and Bobby DeMattos at 47.33 in three rounds, and third by Wayne Miranda and Gilbert Smith at 15.82 in two rounds.

     In Youth Team Roping, Kalia Medeiros and Rusty Wilbur took first in a combined time of 18.91 in three rounds, Weston Joseph and Kalia Medeiros took second in 14.62 in two rounds, and Weston Joseph and Bobby Boy Manuel took third at 19.47 in two rounds.

     In Open Team Roping, first place was taken by Jordan Gomes and Dusty Miranda at 12.3, second by Shawn Aguiar and Chris Awa at 12.72, and third by Makayla Awa and Ethan Awa at 13.71.

     In Dummy Roping, Saraiya Iranaon took first with a time of 4.28, Lucia Miranda took second at 4.47, and Aubrie Hashimoto-Llanes took third at 4.94.

A bull plots on how to throw his rider.
Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
     In Tie Down Roping, first place went to Trisyn Kalawaiatook with a combined time of 52.44, second to Kaili Brenneman with 58.63, and Gregg Menino with 64.19.

     In Steer Wrestling, Westin Joseph took first at 11.1, Trisyn Kalawaia took second at 12.47, and Ty Kauai took third at 22.95.

     In Sheep Riding, first place went to Lawaiʻa Martinez at 62, second to Kauaʻi Pieper at 59, and third to Asher Rai Lyons at 58.

     In Calf Riding, no keiki completed the actual ride. Based on the longest ride of 4.47 seconds, sponsor HHO, Inc. gave the buckle to Colty Boy Mandaloniz.

     In Junior Bulls, Eli Higa finished first with a 73 score.

Nancy Cabral, Stampede organizer
Photo by Solomon Sanoria 

     The bulls won the Bull Riding competition – no paniolo could ride their bull.
     For more information, contact Nancy Cabral at 808-937-1004. See HawaiiRodeoStampede.com.

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THE $47.32 BILLION STATE OPERATING BUDGET PASSED the House of Representatives this week and passed the first reading in the state Senate. It would fund Hawaiʻi state government through June of 2022.

     The budget is tens of millions of dollars short of Gov. David Ige's request. However, some of his unfunded programs for homelessness, affordable housing, and in education would be funded through separate bills.

     HB2200 HD1 would appropriate: $7.962 billion for Fiscal Year 2020 and $8.133 billion for FY2021 to the General Fund. It would provide $15.564 billion for FY2020 and $15.656 billion for FY 2021 for all other funding. Highlights include:
     Department of Land and Natural Resources would receive $725,000 for motor vehicles and equipment at State Parks statewide; $100,000 for the final phase of the Historic Preservation digitization project; $1,600,000 for Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death surveys and control; and $2,100,000 for lifeguard services contracts at State Parks statewide.
Team Roping. Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
     Department of Agriculture would receive $1,113,400 for the Pesticides Division to establish a pesticide disposal program, and $2,386,316 for Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle and other pest programs.
     Department of Education would receive $750,000 for Title IX Phase II training and two positions for the Teacher Mentor Program for entry-level special education teachers.
     Department of Education Libraries would receive $1,000,000 for security services, $500,000 for repairs and maintenance, and $250,000 for library books and materials.
          Department of Transportation would receive $1,207,100 for traffic signal maintenance on Hawaii Island.
     University of Hawaiʻi would receive $1,500,000 for mental health services systemwide; $1,000,000 for security services at community colleges; and $907,400 and five positions for operations and maintenance of community college facilities.
Barrel Racing.
Photos by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
     Department of Health would receive $1,671,152 for three positions and operating costs to allow the state family planning programs flexibility to fully serve Hawaiʻi's families; $2,500,000 for the Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver Administrative Claiming Special Fund; $150,466 to create a Newborn Screening State Evaluation Program Project; $5,000,000 for the Deposit Beverage Container Special Fund to assist in timely payment of contracts; and $30,240 for one Office Assistant for support at the Hawaiʻi Island district health office.

     Department of Labor and Industrial Relations would receive $1,000,000 for unemployment insurance modernization.
     Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism would receive $200,000 from the Energy Security Special Fund for the Greenhouse Gas Sequestration Taskforce.
     Department of Human Services would receive $155,000 for one IT Enterprise Officer to oversee all of Human Services IT modernization initiatives; $950,000 for the Business Process Redesign of the Child Protective Service's system; and $76,951 for one program specialist position with additional expenses, for the Commission on the Status of Women.
A paniola urges her horse to fly through Hilo
Equestrian Center. Photo by Solomon Sanoria
     Department of Public Safety would receive four additional Human Resources staff to speed up the processing and hiring of Adult Corrections Officers and State Sheriffs; nine intake positions to implement Act 179, SLH 2019 which requires the department to produce a risk assessment and bail report in three days; $800,000 for contracted medical and mental health services; ten full time and one half-time Registered Nurse positions for 24-hour nursing coverage at community correctional facilities on Hawaiʻi, Maui, and Kauaʻi islands; and $205,000 for communications equipment for the Airport Sheriff's Division.

     Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs would receive $250,000 for the Public Utilities Commission to gain additional expertise on matters relating to major energy dockets and $131,860 for one staff attorney position to address increasing consumer fraud and protection cases.

     Department of Defense would receive positions and funds to process FEMA disaster reimbursements, and $125,000 to pave parking lot of Hawaiʻi State Veterans Cemetery.


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Team Roping. Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
GIVE INPUT ON BILLS TO FUND HEALTH SERVICES AT KAʻŪ RURAL HEALTH CLINIC, HiloMedicalCenter, and in Kona. The Senate Ways & Means committee will hold a hearing that includes four "priority" bills for this island's medical services at on Tuesday, Feb. 25. Written testimony – no oral testimony will be accepted – is due by on Monday, Feb. 24. Go to capitol.hawaii.gov/submittestimony.aspx, sign in or create an account to submit testimony, and use the bill numbers, below. Testimony sent by U.S.mail will not arrive in time to be considered.

     Senate Bill 2617 would appropriate $700,000 to the Hawaiʻi Health Systems Corporation to expand the Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic to improve access to urgent care and outpatient behavioral health services.
Four off the floor, racing through the stadium.
Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
     SB 2814 would fund equipment and construction of a second full-time catheterization laboratory at HiloMedicalCenter, which serves Kaʻū and all of Hawaiʻi Island, lessening the need for patients to be flown to Maui or Oʻahu for interventional cardiac care. The care "stops heart attacks in progress and reduces long term cardiac disability for the people of Hawaiʻi Island," states HMC. The Center performed over 400 cardiac catheterizations in 2019, but project they will need to perform more than 500 this year. The imaging equipment in the existing cath lab is shared between cardiology, interventional radiology, and vascular surgery cases. Funding requested would be a "one- time infusion," stated the Center, as the second cath lab "will be fiscally self-sustaining."
     SB 2618 SD1 would fund purchase of a vehicle, equipment, and personnel for one advanced life support ambulance based in Makalei, Kona.
The crowd blurbs as this young paniola directs her mount. Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THIS WEEK'S PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE DREW THE FOLLOWING FROM KAʻŪ'S REP IN CONGRESS who is running for President. Tulsi Gabbard's campaign sent out the following: "In 2016, with Debbie Wasserman-Schultz at the helm, the Democratic National Committee did everything they could to make sure Hillary Clinton was the party's nominee. Tulsi thought the voters should select the candidate, not the party establishment. So she stepped down as Vice-Chair of the DNC to endorse Bernie Sanders. In 2020, with Tom Perez in charge, they've manipulated the rules to let billionaires pay to play, keep grassroots candidates off the debate stage and failed to conduct a fair and honest caucus in Iowa.
A steer kicks off the ground when roped.
Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
     "Now, Trump is using the party's poor leadership as evidence that the Democratic Party is unfit to lead the country. DNC insiders and the powerful elite like to pay lip service to 'democratic reforms.' Yet, they continue to oppose reforms Tulsi is advocating for including open primaries and getting rid of superdelegates — reforms that would transfer power from party insiders to the voters.
     "Why the hypocrisy? Because the establishment thinks elections should serve them, not you. Despite the establishment's blackout of our campaign, we are continuing to take our message forward and take our campaign directly to the people."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

This steer is having none of it during this Team Roping.
Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
NATIVE HAWAIIANS CAN APPLY FOR AN EMERGENCY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE GRANT through the Kahiau Community Assistance Program. This funding program, run by The Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, provides one-time emergency financial assistance up to $2,000 to Native Hawaiian beneficiaries facing hardship due to an unexpected crisis. Visit hawaiiancouncil.org/kahiau for more information and to apply.


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SAMMY FO, well known for hula in Kaʻū and beyond, is featured on this week's Kapa Café, which was aired this morning on KAPA radio. The 25 minute interview with music of her late husband, the renowned Buddy Fo, will be archived on Hawaiʻi News Now. Sammy Fo grew up in Hawaiʻi, studied ballet and danced hula in New York, and teamed up with Buddy Fo for shows in Las Vegas, around the country, and in Maui, where Buddy was also a radio celebrity and the two produced a multicultural dance show at Maui Plantation . Kaʻea, of KAPA, does the interview.

Barrel Racing. Photo by Solomon Sanoria
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APPLY FOR A PROJECT MANAGER POSITION with Hawaiʻi Trust for Public Lands. This full-time position is based in Honoluluoffice and focuses on the organization's Sustainable Hawaiʻi program, which addresses conservation efforts affecting food, forests, and water resources.
     Qualified candidates will have a Bachelor's degree; a minimum of 3 to 4 years project-related or equivalent land trust, non-profit, real estate experience; professional experience working in Hawai‘i; and familiarity with Hawai‘i landscapes, history, and politics.
     The position requires moderate travel to the neighbor islands and occasional travel to the mainland. Evening and weekend work can be expected. See the position description for more information.


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Big crowds come each of three days to the annual Panaʻewa Stampede Rodeo.
Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
THE KAʻŪ PORTUGUESE EXHIBIT will be shown by Kaʻū Multicultural Society Sunday, Feb. 23, at CarvalhoPark in Hilofrom to The exhibit tells stories of those who sailed to Hawaiʻi on a journey that took them across the Atlantic, around the southern point of South America, and across the vast Pacific to their new island home.
Steer fights horse and paniolo.
Photo by Solomon Sanoria of Wyrmfyre Productions
     The first ship was the Priscilla, which arrived Sept. 30, 1878, with 120 Madeira Islanders. The second ship left Funchal on April 23, 1879, took exactly four months to cross the Atlantic Ocean, round Cape Horn, and sail across the Pacific to Honolulu. Among the passengers were Manuel Nunes, Augusto Dias, Jose do Espirito Santo, and Joao Fernandes, who are credited with introducing the ʻukulele to Hawaiʻi.
     Many of the Portuguese settlers worked at the sugar companies in Kaʻū. They became ranchers, paniolo and leaders in the Catholic Church.
     Portuguese names, like Amaral, Andrade, Baruz, Da Silva, De Silva, Enos, Fontes, Freitas, Francis, Frances, Gomes, Gouveia, Joseph, Lorenzo, Louis, Manoa, Marques, Medeiros, Manuel, Oliveira, Pedra, Pestano, Silva and Vierra are well known in Kaʻū, with many families of Hawaiian and Portuguese ancestry.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball

Saturday, March 7, , @Waiakea

Wednesday, March 11, , @Konawaena
Boys Baseball

Wednesday, March 4, , host HPA

Saturday, March 7, . @Waiakea
Boys Volleyball

Wednesday, Feb. 26, , host Christian Liberty

Wednesday, March, 6 p.m., @Hilo
Judo

Saturday, Feb. 29, , @Kealakehe

Saturday, March 7, . @Kealakehe
Track

Saturday, March 14, , @Waiakea

Saturday, March 21, , @Konawaena


UPCOMING
SATURDAY, FEB. 22

Free CERT Basic Training, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.


ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's 12th Annual Keiki Fishing Tournament and Canned Food Drive, Saturday, Feb. 22,  Registration closed Wednesday, Feb. 19. Poles, gear, and bait, and lunch for all, provided. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Keiki one to 14 years old register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. Bring one can per person for food drive. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773. okaukakou.org


Fused Glass Basics Workshop with Claudia McCall, Saturday, Feb. 22,  volcanoartcenter.org



SUNDAY, FEB. 23
Kaʻū Portuguese Exhibit, Sunday, Feb. 23 at Carvalho Park in Hilo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Exhibit by Kaʻū Multicultural Society.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26

Hū (Kukui Nut Top) Demonstration, Wednesday, Feb. 26 from  at Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Early Hawaiians devoted much of their time to games, amusements and relaxing. Top spinning was an absorbing activity for children and making hū (kukui-nut top) was equally engaging. Join rangers and staff from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association as they share their knowledge and love of one of the most popular traditional arts of Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes'‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops.

Visit nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm for additional planning details. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo


Ash Wednesday Service at St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 


FRIDAY, FEB. 28

Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association Annual Health Conference, Friday, Feb. 28, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Register in advance: 808-928-0101.


SATURDAY, FEB. 29

Hawaiian Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count, Saturday, Feb. 29 and March 28, , orientation included. Register at oceancount.org. Locations in Kaʻū are: Kaʻena Point in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, and Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park. Participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whale activity from the shoreline.


Mixed Media Photo Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Feb. 29,  The class is slated for beginner to intermediate students. volcanoartcenter.org



ONGOING
Register for a Free CERT Basic Training Course, four Saturdays starting Feb. 22 through March 14 from  at Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team encourages community participation and provides support to emergency response organizations when the need arises. Four consecutive classes are a 27-hour FEMA certification course. Sign up by emailing hawaiicert@gmail.com. Bill Hanson, 808-937-2181, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense/hawai-i-county-cert.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hawaiʻi International Music Festival, Sunday March 8, , Pāhala Plantation House. The concert will feature music that will celebrate native plants of the Kaʻū Dryland Forest and will raise funds for Hoʻomalu Kaʻū.

     Performers are Maya Hoover, Hawaiʻi based Mezzo-Soprano at Professor at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Jonathan Korth, Hawaiʻi based Pianist and Professor at UH-Mānoa; and Joshua Nakazawa, Cellist from Hawaiʻi Symphony. They will be joined by the three HIMF co-founders: Amy Shoremount-Obra, Internationally Acclaimed Metropolitan Opera Soprano; Eric Silberger, Internationally Acclaimed Prize-Winning Virutuoso Violinist; and Carlin Ma, Multi-Media Artist and Pianist.

     Tickets are $30, available at kauconcert.bpt.me. See himusicfestival.com for more.


Register for Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

Sign Up to Vend at the New ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Nāʻālehu Farmers Market, Wednesdays,  at the site of the old Fruit Stand, mauka of Hwy 11 in Nāʻālehu. Vending focuses on Kaʻū products, including mushrooms from the new farm in Nāʻālehu, fresh breads, vegetables, fruits, and other products. The market may offer music in the future, and there are plans to acquire picnic tables for market goers. Call Manager Sue Barnett at 345-9374 to sign up.

Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences.
     See webscorer.com/register?raceid=206844&fbclid=IwAR3oW9xsDz-C-e9yba1vSHNLczaaL86d2osh__CkWrJKdGnCkc5piQEL2kU to register.

     Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
     Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.

     Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
     Half Marathonwill start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.


Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment, features classes on block printing, lauhala weaving, ti leaf lei making, and more. A free guided Cultural Forest Tour, and a Mele and Hula ‘Auana performance are also slated. Visit the website events calendar for the full lineup. volcanoartcenter.org

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


   

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, February 22, 2020

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A celebration of Christianity in Hawaiʻi, the life of Henry ʻOpukahaʻia, and the 200th anniversary of Kauahaʻao
Congregational Church, was held last Sunday at Hokuloa Church above Punaluʻu Black Sand Beach.
See more photos and learn more, below. Photo from Kahu Debbie Wong Yuen
ANOTHER CALL TO SUBMIT TESTIMONY CAME FROM KAʻŪ HOSPITAL this weekend to support a bill that would appropriate $700,000 to the Hawaiʻi Health Systems Corp. to expand Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic in Pāhala. It would improve access to urgent care and outpatient behavioral health services. The state Senate Ways & Means Committee will hold a hearing on the matter this Tuesday, Feb. 25 at 12:40. p.m. in Honolulu. Send testimony online at Senate Bill 2617(SSCR2745) and check the bill's status and other testimony submitted. Testimony is due on Monday at 12:40 p.m.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SUBMIT TESTIMONY ON THE FOOD HUB PILOT PROGRAM to the 2020 Hawaiʻi Legislature by Monday, Feb. 24 at  House Bill 1892, introduced by Kaʻū Representatives Richard Creagan and Richard Onishi, passed all the hearings in the House. Its companion, Senate Bill 2722 SD1, introduced by east Kaʻū Sen. Russell Ruderman, will go to its last public hearing in the Ways and Means committee on Tuesday.
     The legislation would require the state Department of Agriculture to establish a five-year food hub pilot program to increase access to local food. It would provide for the award of grant funding by qualified applicants wishing to establish or expand food hubs. Food Hubs serve to process locally produced foods to make them ready for consumers, with cleaning, sorting, grading and packaging for market. They can also manufacture value added foods, like jellies and jams from local fruits or poi from kalo. Numerous farmers organizations submitted testimony in support, including the Hawai`i Ulu Cooperative, which helps growers process and sell breadfruit.
         SB 2722 SD1 passed the Ways and Means Committee hearing. All testimonies for the Food Hub pilot program have been positive from diverse stakeholders including the Hawai`i Farm Bureau, Hawai`i Farmers Union United, state Department of Agriculture, the Ulupono Initiative, and many family farmers and their food hubs.
Kahu Debbie Wong Yuen opening the service.
Photo from Debbie Wong Yuen
     Register or login in at capitol.hawaii.gov to submit testimony online. Testimony mailed to support the bill will not arrive in time to be considered. 


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HENRY ʻOPUKAHAʻIA AND 200 YEARS OF CHRISTIANITY IN HAWAIʻI were celebrated last Sunday at Henry ‘Opukahaʻia Memorial Chapel, Hokuloa Church, perched above Punaluʻu Bay. The celebratory service concluded with a fellowship potluck at Punaluʻu Black Sands Beach Park.
     Kahu, pastor at Kauahaʻao Congregational Church, Debbie Wong Yuen opened the service.
     Deborah Lee, a descendent of ʻOpukahaʻia responsible for bringing his bones back to Hawaiʻi, blessed Marques Maran of Oʻahu, who read from the Scripture in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi and English.
     Meli Akimseu-Oshiro from Hilo performed a special Christian hula/sign language dance to Who Am I. Pastor Kaeʻo DeCoite, of Maui, related the story of ‘Opukahaʻia, the first Christian from Hawaiʻi.
Meli Akimseu-Oshiro, left, performed a Christian hula/
sign language dancePhoto from Debbie Wong Yuen
     Born in 1792 near Ninole, ‘Opukahaʻia died on Feb. 17, 1818 in Cornwall, Connecticut, before he had the chance to return to his homeland to bring the Gospel of Jesus Christ. It was ‘Opukahaʻia who inspired the American Protestant mission to come to Hawaiʻi to share the Gospel. On April 4, 1820, the first Mission arrived on the sailing ship Thaddeus and anchored in Kona.
        The ninth American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions group arrived on May 21, 1841, sailing on the Gloucester. On board was Rev. John Davis Paris, who founded Kauahaʻao Congregational Church in Waiʻōhinu in November of 1841.

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HAWAIʻI FOCUSES ON ENCOURAGING ELECTRIC VEHICLES to prevent pollution of some of the cleanest air in the nation. However, in California, where vehicles are required to go through an emissions check to make sure they are less polluting, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced today that the state will sue Pres. Donald Trump for revoking California's "authority to regulate auto emissions. If the president thinks he can stop the states from taking action on climate change, he is dead wrong."
Pastor Kaeʻo DeCoite shared an inspiring message of 
the life of Henry ʻOpukahaʻia. 
Photo from Debbie Wong Yuen
     Newsom said, "I'm proud to say California has made serious progress fighting climate change during my term as governor. Unfortunately, at every turn, the Trump administration has attempted to block that progress. They have gutted environmental protections and denied climate science – all to line the pockets of Big Oil. In one of his latest attacks on the planet, Trump rolled back federal greenhouse gas standards."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN for Ola Ka ʻĀina Momona: Managing for Abundance, the Hawaiʻi Conservation Alliance and Society for Conservation Biology-Oceania joint conference. The conference will be held Monday, Aug. 31 through Thursday, Sept. 3 at Hawaiʻi Convention Center in Honolulu.

     Abstracts are due Friday, Feb. 28. Submit at hawaiiconservation.org/conference/2020-call-for-proposals/.
     Online abstract reviewers are also being sought; apply by Thursday, March 5th.

     Students are "strongly encourage" to submit an abstract. "This is a great opportunity to participate in a professional conference in Honolulu." Students will be eligible for awards with cash prizes. Scholarships are also available for students to greatly reduce registration fees and provide travel stipends for neighbor island residents.

Deborah Lee blessing guest Scripture Reader,
Marques Maran. Photo from Debbie Wong Yuen
     Abstract submissions from working professionals are also welcome.

     Abstracts for symposia, forums, workshops, trainings, and individual oral or poster presentations are wanted in six tracks: Cultural Values and Practice in Conservation