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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, March 25, 2020

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Takami Munnerlyn comes through a long line at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary today, where families picked up free breakfasts from 7:30 a.m to 8 a.m. and lunches from 11:30 a.m. to noon. The service for anyone 18 and younger will continue on Friday, after closing for Thursday's Prince Kuhio holiday. More than a hundred students received lunches today, the number soaring from the first day on Monday.
 See more below. Photo by Julia Neal
BANK OF HAWAIʻI WILL KEEP ITS PĀHALA BRANCH OPEN FIVE DAYS A WEEK. Early this week, Bankoh named Pāhala as one of 40 of its 60 branches that would temporarily close during the pandemic. Today, the tellers wore aloha orchid lei, gifted from a patron who heard that Wednesday was their final day of service for now. By evening, Bank of Hawaiʻi had updated its website with news that Pāhala will be spared, with reduced hours of 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. for kūpuna and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for the general public.
     According to Bankoh's website, the Kaʻū Branch is one of only four remaining open on this island. The others are Kona Branch, Kaikoʻo Branch in Hilo, and Kamuela Branch in Waimea. All four will have the same reduced hours and early time for kūpuna. The Kaʻū Branch is located on Pikake Street next to the U.S. Post Office, Longs Drugs, two food stores, and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School. See boh.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A community and visitor gathering at the ninth annual Kaʻū Coffee
Festival, with local Halau Hula O Leionalani performing. The 12th annual
event this May has been postponed or canceled due to the COVID-19
situation. Photo by Jesse Tunison/Kaʻū Coffee Fest
THE TWELFTH ANNUAL KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL IS POSTPONED, POSSIBLY CANCELLED. The message is posted on the Kaʻū Coffee Festival website. It says, "We are sad to announce that the 12th Annual Kaʻū Coffee Festival will not happen as originally planned in May of 2020. We are following the recommendations of the CDC relating to large gatherings in an effort to protect our community and kūpuna. Please check back to learn more about our plans as they develop. In the meantime, please take care of your health and enjoy Kaʻū coffee as often as possible. We promise it will brighten your day! A hui hou - The Kaʻū Coffee Festival Planning Committee."
     The festival was scheduled for ten days beginning May 8, and wrapping up with the annual Hoʻolauleʻa on May 16 and Kaʻū Coffee College on May 17. It included a kickoff dinner with music and hula at Pāhala Plantation House, a Harvest Dinner at Kaʻū Mountain Farm in Wood Valley, a Kaʻū Mountain Hike & Lunch at Kaʻū Coffee Milll, a Tour & Lunch at Kaʻū Valley Farms, Coffee & Cattle Day at Aikane Plantation, a Stargazing excursion from Kaʻū Cofffee Mill, the Kaʻū Coffee Experience for tasting local farmers' brew, and a full day of hula, music, food, and interacting with Kaʻū Coffee farmers and the larger community at Pāhala Community Center. The last day was set to be an educational event for Kaʻū Coffee farmers and coffee enthusiasts.
     The many funding sponsors include Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.
See more sponsors and background at kaucoffeefestival.com

Hawaiian Hoary Bat. Photo from NPS
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COUNT OUR BATS TO SAVE OUR BATS was theme of the recent gathering of supporters for the Kaʻū Community Bat Monitoring Project held at Manuka State Park.
     About 25 Kaʻū residents took the opportunity to find out more about ʻōpeʻapeʻa, the endangered native Hawaiian hoary bat. The attendees socialized and shared a potluck barbecue organized by Linda Morgan and Sandy Demoruelle. Bat-related activities were provided for the keiki, and bat-themed treats were in abundance. Valuable door prizes went to a lucky few. Some bat enthusiasts enjoyed the sunset in the forest while others pored over books in the new organization's library.
     "The Kaʻū Community Bat Monitoring Project is a five-year community-based pilot project to train and empower Kaʻū citizen-scientists by encouraging them to count bats and save bats through research and advocacy," wrote Morgan in a handout.
     Morgan noted that bats are mentioned in the Kaʻū Community Development Plan, including the need for the community to monitor bats and take action to ensure the future of this endangered species. She said that the new organization aims to count bats. It also plans to give input to the mitigation process, adopted by the state and federal government with funding from the Tawhiri windmill company at South Point where bats can die when flying into windmill blades. Since the Hawaiian hoary bats are an endangered species, activities that unintentionally lead to their harm and deaths require a permit and a mitigation effort.
Endangered native Hawaiian Hoary Bat enthusiasts plan to count bats and
monitor government plans to restore their habitat and reduce interaction
with windmills. Photo from Kaʻū Community Bat Monitoring Project
     A federal and state permit was issued to Tawhiri in September 2019 to allow for an estimated number of deaths over the next ten years. The estimates are 2.6 bat deaths per year, .33 Hawaiian goose (nēnē) deaths per year, and .33 petrel (ʻuaʻu) deaths per year.
     In compliance with its permit, Tawhiri committed to providing some $2.4 million over ten years to improve habitats for the bat, goose, and petrel.
     The funding will be used by U.S. Fish & Wildlife and the state Department of Land & Natural Resources. Organizers of the Bat Monitoring Project said its group is a 501C and also will seek funding for its bat education and counting projects.
     Tawhiri itself committed to reduce the deaths of bats and birds at its 111-acre site off Kamaʻoa Road with year-round low wind speed curtailment during sunset and sunrise, lighting direction and reduction, removing any standing water that may attract the three species, a 25-mph speed limit, and avoiding use of barbed wire.
     Pakini Nui has been in operation since April 2007. The facility has the capacity to produce of 20.5 megawatts of power, using 14 turbine generators, each equipped with 70-meter rotors.
Bat brownies were served at the first meeting of the bat enthusiasts.
Photo from Kaʻū Community Bat Monitoring Project
     One mitigation project is forest restoration of at least 1,200 acres of degraded, ‘ōhiʻa forest in the Kahuku Unit of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park in order to provide more habitat for the bats. Another funds the DLNR to construct a new seven-acre predatory-proof nēnē breading area. Another assists with management of a petrel colony, with fencing within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
     For more on the Kaʻū Community Bat Monitoring Project, contact Morgan at lindainhawaii65@gmail.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A $2 TRILLION FEDERAL SPENDING PACKAGE PASSED the U.S. Senate late Wednesday. It includes cash payments to Americans and extended unemployment to gig economy workers, freelancers, and employees who are furloughed. It would provide credit to industries. It is the largest economic rescue bill in U.S. history. The bill goes to the House and, if passed, to the desk of Pres. Donald Trump.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PHYSICIAN AND LT. GOV. JOSH GREEN AND U.S. REP. TULSI GABBARD led a town hall meeting today by phone to update the public and answer questions on the COVID-19 pandemic. Gabbard noted that she called for a nation-wide shelter-in-place order and co-wrote a letter to the President emphasizing the urgent need for protective gear for healthcare workers. She said $750,000 is already going to 14 health care centers across the islands.
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and Lt. Gov. Josh Green, at the 2018
Unity Breakfast after the election. HPR photo 
     Green gave an update on the latest public health status and strongly urged individuals to respect the stay-at-home guidance being issued. He said that the greater restrictions on travel to and from the state may help significantly hamper the spread of the virus. He also helped address questions about the differences between the novel coronavirus and influenza, as well as how the COVID-19 coronavirus spreads. Listen to the Telephone Town Hall.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A DISASTER AND EMERGENCY PRICING ACT was introduced today by U.S. Senators Mazie Hirono, Amy Klobuchar, and colleagues. The bill would prevent price gouging on essential services or goods during catastrophes. The bill would prohibit the sale of goods or services at overly inflated prices before or during a natural disaster, pandemic, or state of emergency, and allow the Federal Trade Commission to take legal action against sellers that try to take advantage of consumers during such crises.
     Hirono said, "We are in a national emergency, with people's resources stretched thin. It is simply unacceptable for people and companies to try to profit on the backs of consumers in dire need through sky-high prices on essential goods and services. The Disaster and Emergency Pricing Abuse Prevention Act would put an end to this practice now and in the event of future emergencies by ensuring consumers pay fair prices on essentials." The bill would allow for potential civil penalties up to $10,000 per violation.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
Free lunches soared to more than 100 today for anyone 18 and younger at the Pāhala school campus. Photo by Julia Neal
FREE BREAKFAST AND LUNCH LINES FOR KEIKI are growing at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School. The number of people served lunch who are 18 and under soared from 45 on Monday to over 100 today. Breakfasts are handed out to walk-ups and drivers with keiki in their vehicles from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. on weekdays. Lunches are handed out from 11:30 a.m. to noon on weekdays. However, tomorrow, Thursday, is the Prince Kuhio state holiday and the food service from the cafeteria will resume on Friday. It is sponsored by the state Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where students qualify for free nutrition on the campus.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.m.

ADDRESSING FOOD SECURITY during the COVID-19 pandemic is an aim of Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. The organization announced that it has launched a task force to quickly organize local food production; aggregate existing food hubs; collaborate with certified commercial kitchens, door-to-door distributors and other stakeholders; and to immediately address the economic impact of food sustainability from the global crisis.

     The task force is developing a 12 to 24 month plan for immediately supporting agricultural communities and plans to help double local food production. The plan is to aggregate food across islands into food hubs and commercial kitchens, where it will be sorted into community-supported agriculture boxes of fresh vegetables, fruit, and immune-boosting herbs. Partnering with food entrepreneurs such as chefs, caterers, and other prepared foods businesses, it will prepare family-style dishes and work with current distribution channels, including door-to-door delivery businesses.

     HFUU's members include existing operators of food hubs across the state, including the oldest known food hub in Hawaiʻi.  Data from the recent Food Hub Pilot Program – conducted by Saleh Azizi PhD, UH – states that eight existing food hubs statewide have successfully served all Department of Education schools, seven hospitals, and over 200 restaurants, with food coming from 660 small-to-medium farms with $2.7M in annual revenue. Food value chain members such as the PacificGatewayCenter, the largest commercial kitchen in the state, and distribution channels with farmers' markets and retail/restaurant outlets, are "critical to its success," according to Hawaiʻi Farmers Union.

     State Sen. Mike Gabbard, Chair of the Senate Committee on Agriculture & Environment is a Farmers Union member. He said, "In our worst fears, where global economic recession coupled with a global pandemic, is at our doorstep, and our island community is just days away from a food shortage, now is the time for action."

     Hawaiʻi is home to 7,328 farms, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture 2017 Ag census. Of the total farms, 6,561 (89 percent) are under 50 acres; 4,868 (66 percent) are under 9 acres; and 5,826 (78 percent) are family-run. HFUU is the largest statewide membership of family farming operations in Hawaiʻi, comprising 1,400 members across 13 chapters, including Kaʻū.

     Vincent Mina, state president, HFUU, said, "We exhibit the essential effectiveness of our local food systems here in Hawaiʻi, as a global example of how agricultural communities collaborate and cooperate with one another along with partnering with leaders nationally."

     HFUU is asking for community collaboration from farmers that want to sell to food hubs, as well as increase production; businesses that have commercial refrigeration; restaurants and other food entrepreneurs who want to utilize a ghost kitchen model to prepare family-style meals; logistics and food delivery organizations that can move fresh produce boxes; and others such as seed networks, funding organizations, food banks, schools, and healthcare providers.
     For more information, to join the task force and to collaborate, email food@hfuuhi.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI POLICE SERVICES, INCLUDING DISPATCH, POLICE REPORTS, TRAFFIC REPORTS, CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION, AND FIREARMS REGISTRATION, remain operational.
     Regarding police reports, records offices are closed to the public. Staff will answer questions, and accept and process requests for copies of police reports, which will be distributed by mail. To order a copy of a report or ask questions about a report, call (808) 961-2233. Police report requests can also be made through the Kaʻū district police station at (808) 939-2520.

     Applications for Permits to Acquire and Firearms Registration services Island-wide remain open and will be conducted by appointment only. To schedule an appointment in Hilo, call (808) 961-2233; in Kona, call (808) 326-4646 (ex 222). To schedule an appointment at the Kaʻū station, call (808) 939-2520.

     Traffic Services Section is closed to the public, but staff is available at (808) 961-2227. Driver's License Services are overseen by the Finance Department and not affected by these closures.

     Dispatch and the 911 system, as well as Patrol and Criminal Investigation Divisions services, continue normal operations. Call Major Samuel Jelsma of the HPD Administrative Division at (808) 961-2265 with questions.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AUTHORS AND POTENTIAL ATTENDEES of Hawaiʻi Conservation Alliance's Ola Ka ʻĀina Momona: Managing for Abundance international conservation conference have until Friday, April 3, to complete a survey on how best to proceed with conference planning for 2020. Planned for Monday, Aug. 31 through Thursday, Sept. 3 in Honolulu, the organizers are exploring options for an in-person or virtual conference. The Alliance and the Society for Conservation Biology-Oceania plan to work on a joint conference for the Pacific conservation community in 2021. Learn more at hawaiiconservation.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY HAS CLOSED ITS RESTORES temporarily, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Habitat has helped families become homeowners in Kaʻū and beyond, through family sweat equity and the organization's guidance and fundraising. Habitat operates ReStores to sell donated construction materials, furniture, and other items in Hilo, Kamuela, and Kona. A statement today says, "In order to do our part to support the health and safety of our employees, volunteers, partners and community, our ReStores and office are 'temporarily closed' effective today. Share the love with your family, friends, and neighbors, and we will get through this crisis together. If you are able, please continue to support us. We look forward to serving our beautiful island community soon." See habitathawaiiisland.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Learning how to make a lei in the Park during Merrie Monarch week 
will have to wait until next year. NPS photo

ALL HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK EVENTS for April are cancelled. These events include National Park Week, April 18 through 2

6; Kahuku Coffee Talk: The Recovery of the Kaʻū Silverswords on Friday, April 24; and a Huewai Demonstration on Wednesday, April 8.
     Also cancelled are special Merrie Monarch Festival activities on Thursday, April 16, including learning to weave lau hala, make leis, and enjoy local music.

     Stewardship of Kīpukapuaulu on Thursdays and Stewardship at the Summit on April 4, 11, 18, and 24, when volunteers help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in the Park, are cancelled.

     Ka‘ū actor-director Dick Hershberger will place a hold on bringing the renowned founder of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to life in A Walk into the Past with Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, normally held Tuesdays at 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m.

     Kahuku Unit, the free Park location in Kaʻū, is closed to all visitors.

Experiencing living history at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with Actor Dick Hershberger, who brings the 
renowned geologist and founder of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to life, is postponed until at least May.
NPS photo/Janice Wei
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

WATCH FOR MORE SCAMS during the COVID-19 pandemic, warns Hawaiian Electric. The utility sent out a statement today, stating that it is important to "remain calm as scammers are still actively trying to steal personal and financial information, and they are taking advantage of the pandemic to target customers who are stressed and panicking."
     The utility said the state recommends watching for fraudulent emails claiming to be from the Centers For Disease Control (CDC) or experts saying they have information about the virus. Verify information through trusted government websites such as www.ftc.govwww.cdc.govhealth.hawaii.govwww.who.int, etc. Do not click on links from sources you do not know as doing so may lead to computer viruses or phishing attempts. Ignore offers of goods or services for COVID-19. "There currently are no vaccines, pills, potions, lotions, lozenges, or other prescription or over-the-counter products available to treat or cure COVID-19. Scammers may still offer fake vaccines and other bogus medical products claiming to offer 'cures' for the virus. They may also offer 'get rich quick' investment schemes for unproven virus treatments," states the utility.
     Hawaiian Electric also recommends being wary of fundraising solicitations. "Do not rush into making donations whether through charities or crowdfunding sites. You should never feel rushed or pressured to donate, and never make donations in cash, by gift card, or by money wire. Be sure to do your due diligence to verify the charity's legitimacy."
     The government advises against revealing personal or financial information in email, and recommends disregarding email solicitations requesting this information. Read the full release at http://hwnelec.co/Z1s750yTqlU.


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BOTH LANES OF HWY 11 were closed this afternoon due to a downed tree at the 70 mile marker, near South Point Road. HPD states it took about an hour for highway crews to clear the tree, which was across both lanes. South Point Road remained accessible from the Nāʻālehu side.

     Shortly after that tree was cleared, another tree, plus downed power lines, closed Hwy 11 near the 68 mile mark, causing police to establish a detour through Kamaʻoa Road. Clearing the highway for traffic again took about two hours.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

DAILY COVID-19 UPDATE:

     Hawaiʻi today remained one of a dozen U.S. states with no deaths  from COVID-19. The state Department of Health reports five cases of COVID-19 confirmed on Hawaiʻi Island as of today, March 25. None are new since yesterday. Two are locals who caught the virus elsewhere. Three are non-residents.

     Throughout the state, there are 95 confirmed cases – six reported since yesterday – with five requiring hospitalization. There have been zero deaths from COVID-19 in the state.
     According to the World Health Organization, the U.S. has recorded 51,914 cases, including 9,750 reported today. There are 673 deaths, 202 reported today. Worldwide, more than 414,179 people have become victims of COVID-19, with 40,712 reported today. The death toll is 18,440, with 2,202 reported today. Check the number of cases and deaths by date and by state.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 6,250 mailboxes 

throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 

stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

See daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more at kaucalendar.com.

All Kaʻū High School and other public school sporting events are canceled until further notice, including:

Kaʻū Spring Sports Schedule

Girls Softball Cancelled

Saturday, March 28, , host Hilo

Wednesday, April 8, , @Honokaʻa

Saturday, April 11, , host Kamehameha
Boys Baseball Cancelled

Saturday, March 28, , host Hilo

Tuesday. April 7, , @Honokaʻa

Saturday, April 11, , host Kamehameha

Boys Volleyball Cancelled

Tuesday, March 31, , @Kohala

Thursday, April 2, , host Keaʻau

Tuesday, April 7, , @Honokaʻa

Friday, April 10, , @Ehunui

Judo Cancelled

Saturday, March 28, , @Waiakea

Saturday, April 4, , @Keaʻau

Saturday, April 11, , BIIF at Kona
Saturday, April 18, , BIIF at Hilo

Track Cancelled
Saturday, March 28, , @Waiakea

Saturday, April 4, , @HPA

Saturday, April 11, , @Keaʻau

Spring Break for Public Schools is extended through Thursday, April 30 for COVID-19 spread mitigation.

UPCOMING
FRIDAY, MARCH 27
CANCELLED: Stewardship at the Summit, Friday, March 27, 8:45 a.m. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Additional planning details at nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.

CANCELLED: The Lake at Halemaʻumaʻu Monthly Kahuku Coffee Talk, Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., HVNP Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

SATURDAY, MARCH 28
CANCELLED: Final 2020 Hawaiian Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary Ocean Count, Saturday, March 28, 7:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., orientation included. Register at oceancount.org. Locations in Kaʻū are: Kaʻena Point in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, and Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park. Participants tally humpback whale sightings and document the animals' surface behavior during the survey, which provides a snapshot of humpback whale activity from the shoreline.

POSTPONED: Prince Kuhio Day Hoʻolauleʻa, Saturday, March 28, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Nāʻālehu County Park. Event features Hawaiian music and cultural demos, hula, crafts, food, and more. Drug- and alcohol-free. Live entertainment from Gene Akamu and G2G, Uncle Sonny & Bro Tui, Braddah Ben, Lori Lei's Hula Studio, and more. Local personality Kurt Dela Cruz will emcee and several lucky number prizes will be announced throughout the day. Organized by local non-profit Hana Laulima Lāhui O Kaʻū. Membership $10 per year. Contact Terry Shibuya at 938-3681 or terrylshibuya@gmail.com; Trini Marques at 928-0606 or trinimarques@yahoo.com; or Kupuna Ke.

CANCELLED: Ocean View Classic Car & Bike Show, Saturday, March 28, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Owners of classic cars and bikes are encouraged to register early, as space is limited. This second annual event, a fundraiser for Ocean View Community Association, will also feature food and live music, and prizes for the most impressive cars and bikes. Contact organizers Dennis Custard at 831-234-7143 or Ron Gall at 808-217-7982 to register or for more info.

CANCELLED: Forest Work Day, Saturday, March 28, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Learn some native plants, help restore a beautiful rainforest, and get some exercise. Tim Tunison leads. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

MONDAY, MARCH 30
CANCELLED: OKK Farmers Market in Nāʻālehu, Mondays and Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the future Nāʻālehu Senior Housing Site. Contact Sue Barnett for vending, 808-345-9374.

ONGOING
Kaʻū Art Gallery is looking for local artists. Call 808-937-1840.

AdvoCATS, Saturday, April 25, Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. Reserve spot in advance. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org

Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.

     Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
     Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.

     Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
     Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
     See ohialehuahalf.com.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The visitor center is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. Park films, including Born of Fire, Born of the Sea, will not be shown. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will continue to be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the center reopens, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

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