Quantcast
Channel: The Kaʻū Calendar News Briefs, Hawaiʻi Island
Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 3179

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, April 22, 2020

0
0
Masks or face coverings must be worn indoors or while waiting in line outside at all CU Hawaiʻi locations, whether
patron or employee. Read about the credit union's online services. Photo from CU Hawaiʻi

THE EMERGENCY RULE REQUIRING HAND SANITIZER for all customers on the island was clarified this afternoon by Mayor Harry Kim's office. His staff released a statement saying, "Demand for hand sanitizer has surged since the COVID-19 pandemic, and establishments that lack supplies of hand sanitizer may offer an alternative to hand sanitizer by providing a place to wash hands. A wash basin or sink with soap and water would be sufficient and be in good faith compliance with the order."
     The county reported that it is "looking at all avenues to acquire supplies of hand sanitizer, including local distilleries that have switched their production lines to produce it." The press release also noted the statewide proclamation for requiring use of hand sanitizer at the entrance to stores, food take-out establishments, and many other places of business.
     The county's COVID-19 Prevention and Education Task Force promises to work with businesses to ensure employee and customer compliance. To request a visit from the task force, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
 A hand sanitizing station with a choice of alcohol, bleach, or peroxide spray greeted customers at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's
Nāʻālehu Market today. Photo by Lora Botanova
MASKS MUST BE WORN AT ALL CU HAWAIʻI FEDERAL CREDIT UNION LOCATIONS, says a message sent today. A face mask or covering must be worn by anyone entering any CU Hawaiʻi branch or when waiting in line to enter a branch. Social distancing of six feet also remains in force.

     Pāhala's window location, at 96-3208 Maile St., is open Fridays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 
     Nāʻālehu's lobby location, 95-5664 Mamalahoa Hwy, is open Mondays thru Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The walk-up ATM is open 24 Hours.
     Ocean View's location, a walk-up ATM inside Ace Hardware at 92-8691 Lotus Blossom Ln., is open Mondays through Saturdays and Sundays from to

     CU Hawaiʻi Federal Credit Union encourages the use of Online Banking and its Mobile App to make remote deposits, transfers, loan payments, reorder checks, pay bills, view e-statements, and more. See cuhawaii.com.



Masks and social distancing on Fridays at CU Hawaiʻi Federal
Credit Union's window in Pāhala. Photo by Julia Neal
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MORE SMALL BUSINESSES CAN APPLY FOR FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID. Mayor Harry Kim is urging all eligible small businesses in Hawai‘i County to apply through the Small Business Administration's Paycheck Protection Program, first established under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act. Congress has passed new legislation that includes $310 billion to replenish the fund.
     The program provides small employers with forgivable loans to maintain their existing workforce and help pay for other expenses like rent, mortgage, and utilities.

     Kim said, "I urge all small business owners in Hawai‘i County to contact a lender certified by the Small Business Administration for complete information and to apply for a PPP loan. Please take advantage of these programs to save your business and provide for your employees."

     Small businesses, sole proprietorships, independent contractors, self-employed persons, and private non-profits are eligible. The loan will be fully forgiven if the funds are used for payroll costs, interest on mortgages, rent, and utilities. At least 75 percent of the forgiven amount must have been used for payroll. Loan payments will also be deferred for six months. No collateral or personal guarantees are required. Neither the government nor lenders will charge small businesses any fees.

     Forgiveness is based on the employer maintaining or quickly rehiring employees, and maintaining salary levels. Forgiveness will be reduced if full-time headcount declines, or if salaries and wages decrease. See sba.gov/page/coronavirus-covid-19-small-business-guidance-loan-resources for more on who qualifies and how to apply. To find other business resources, visit hawaiicounty.gov/covidbusinesshelp.


 Lynn Steenburg, owner of Happy Thai Food, parked her food truck at the weekly Swap Meet in Ocean View until
the pandemic. She now relies on the OKK Nāʻālehu Market and take-out customers who call her.
 She and many others may be able to receive support from the Paycheck Protection Program, which has eased
 requirements for independent contractors and the self-employed. See Mayor Harry Kim's message above. See how to
order from Happy Thai Food at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū CalendarPhoto by Lora Botanova

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LOCAL FOOD PRODUCERS can contact Hawaiʻi Department of Education's School Food Services Branch. The branch is interested in sourcing more local produce and other food items from local food producers for their Grab-and-Go Meals for students during school closures.
     Those interested in supplying are urged to "take action NOW!" Contact Hilo Products at 808-935-1379. Check out the list of requirements for becoming a direct vendor. Contact HIDOE SFSB Farm to School Coordinator, Dexter Kishida, with questions, or for help getting connected with a distributor: dexter.kishida@k12.hi.us, 808-798-8586 (call/text).



Rodney Freitas with fresh vegetables from his farm above Pāhala, during the Wednesday OKK Nāʻālehu Market.
See Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar. Photo by Lora Botanova

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

APPLY FOR UNEMPLOYMENT AND TRACK CLAIMS on the new Hawaiʻi Department of Labor and Industrial Relations new portal. DOL installed improved software to apply for and track unemployment claims this week. Click here to for the new application portal. Click here to access the new tracking portal.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THIS IS EARTH DAY, WITH A MESSAGE FROM the team of Kai Kahele, the state Senator running for the congressional district representing Volcano, Kaʻū and all of rural Hawaiʻi:
     "Growing up in Miloliʻi, Hawaiʻi — a native Hawaiian fishing village with a rich, proud history of balanced living between humans, the land, and the sea — Kai personally understands the value of the natural resources and ecosystems we have in our home state." His team promises that Kahele "will work tirelessly to advocate for resource programs that will ensure healthy and sustainable environments for all our communities.
     "As a state Senator, Kai has authored and championed legislation to protect Hawaiʻi's aquatic life and water systems. He will fight just as hard at the federal level for environmental protections and justice for Hawaiʻi's vast natural resources in its landscapes, watershed, aquifers, and its ocean. Kai believes that climate change is a real and dangerous threat to Hawaiʻi and our national security. Through bold initiatives like Hawaiʻi Green Growth and the Aloha+ Challenge, Hawaiʻi can be a leader and a model for the rest of the world. Our children, their children, and every generation after deserve to grow up in the Hawaiʻi we grew up in. Together we can work to preserve that. Let's keep fighting."

Doris Davis, of Pāhala, sewing 30 masks for Pāhala 
senior center members. She has made 60 more
for Maui's KulaHospital and friends. 
Photo by April Joy Pitcher

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MORE THAN 90 MASKS SEWN by 88 year-old
Doris Davis, of Pāhala, are being distributed. Thirty have gone to 30 local seniors. They usually get together for meals and activities on weekdays at Pāhala Senior Center, but are unable to gather during the COVID-19 pandemic. Another 60 masks, created by Davis, have gone to Maui for the Kula Hospital and friends there.
     Davis is an artist, author, and fashion designer, using her sewn sewing machine as one of her many creative tools.
     Her activities in recent years have included the board of the Friends of Kaʻū Libraries, marching in the Nāʻālehu Fourth of July Parade, assisting at the Pāhala Senior Center, and working the reading and book sales booths at numerous community events.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI ENERGY OFFERS EARTH DAY ACTIVITIES and tips on saving energy and money. Also included are discounted prices on energy saving bulbs and devices. Hawaiʻi Energy is a ratepayer-funded conservation and efficiency program administered by Leidos Engineering, LLC (formerly SAIC) under contract with the Hawaiʻi Public Utilities Commission.

     Its hawaiienergy.comwebsite offers:

     Printable "fun and educational" activities for keiki from preschool through middle school, with high school coming soon. Offerings include mazes, word finds, coloring pages, and more. Request hard copies be sent by post by emailing hawaiienergy@leidos.com. See hawaiienergy.com/education-outreach/students.

     Home Efficiency Kits are $5 plus free shipping. The kit includes four LED bulbs, a Tricklestar power switch, a kitchen aerator, and 2 bathroom aerators. Order up to two kits at techniart.us/hawaiienergy-promo/sorry.php?zip=97006.

See hawaiienergy.com.
     Enter to win an Energy Bill Buster Kit by following instructions at EfficiencyUnlocked.org. The clues to enter give clues on how to save energy in the home.

     Appliance Rebates are available when purchasing new ENERGY STAR® refrigerators or freezers at hawaiienergy.com/for-homes/rebates/appliances. Advice for keeping new or old refrigerators or freezers include: Don't set the temperature colder than necessary. Set the refrigerator temperature between 36 F and 42 F. Set the freezer control between -5 F and +6 F. Clean the unit. Clean dust off the coils or filters. Check the rubber seals on the door. Peeking wastes energy; food cold and fresh by limiting opening the fridge.

     See hawaiienergy.com/118/earth-day-commitmentsfor more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TODAY'S CELEBRATION OF THE 50TH EARTH DAY coincides with this week's release of Hawaiian Electric's 2019-20 Sustainability Report. It predicts Hawaiian Electric will obtain at least 30 percent of its electricity sold in Hawaiʻi, Oʻahu, and Maui counties from renewable sources by the end of 2020.
     Hawaiian Electric sends electricity through most of Volcano Village and many surrounding neighborhoods. It also electrifies Pāhala, Wood Valley, Nāʻālehu, Discovery Harbour, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Kamaoa Road, South Point Road, and part of Ocean View. Alternative energy comes from roof top solar systems that feed back into the Hawaiian Electric system and also from Tawhiri's Pakini Nui Wind Farm at South Point, which generates 20.5 megawatts of renewable electricity. Tawhiri produces two-thirds of the wind energy sold to Hawaiian Electric from Hawaiʻi Island.
See view.hawaiianelectric.com/2019-2020-
sustainability-report/page/1
.
     The report says that on Hawaiʻi Island, Hawaiian Electric sourced 34.7 percent of its electricity from renewables in 2019.
     In 2018, renewable energy for Hawaiian Electric on Hawaiʻi Island topped 44 percent, and included the Puna Geothermal plant before it was overrun by lava.
     In 2017, renewable energy used by Hawaiian Electric on Hawaiʻi Island topped 57 percent, with Puna geothermal online for the entire year, providing 31 percent.
     The prediction for Hawaiian Electric power sold on Hawaiʻi Island, Maui County, and Oʻahu through 2020 includes geothermal, though it is not operating yet. It also includes in the Hū Honua biofuel plant, which has yet to produce electricity.
     The sustainability report predicts attaining statewide 100 percent renewable energy by 2045. The report notes that the state saw a 21 percent increase in solar generation in 2019. Nearly 82,000 grid-connected solar installations operate under Hawaiian Electric, generating 902MW, with 3,470 installed in 2019.
     More than 11,000 electric vehicles were registered in the state at the end of 2019 – a jump of 13.2 percent since 2018. Hawaiian Electric has installed electric vehicle charging stations in Kaʻū: one at Punaluʻu Bake Shop in Nāʻālehu and another at the Kaʻū District Gym in Pahala.
     In 2019, Hawaiian Electric's annual use of fossil fuel was down 82 million gallons from 2008, a slight rise from 2018, after geothermal went offline. More than 350 million gallons were still used each year statewide.

See hawaiienergy.com/for-homes/tips-to-save-energy.
     The report states that, by 2022, Hawaiʻi Island will have an additional 70MW from renewable energy and 240 megawatt hours of storage. Also by 2022, more than a dozen wind, solar, and battery storage projects statewide will come online; fossil fuel use in Hawaiʻi will have dropped by 60 percent since 2009, with carbon dioxide emissions down by 1.2 million tons. The utility has an additional 800MW from independent producers in the pipeline, plus more than 80,000 private rooftop solar systems in planning.

     Scott Seu, President and CEO of Hawaiian Electric, wrote, "As this report was being completed, we were seeing the first effects of the coronavirus pandemic. It's likely this will change the timelines for completion of many renewable projects being planned. Even with this new challenge, we remain fully committed in determining what Hawaiʻi's energy future will be. We will move forward together."
     See the full report at hawaiianelectric.com/clean-energy-hawaii/sustainability-report.



To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

DRIVE-THRU TESTING FOR COVID-19 was held in Hawaiian Ocean View Estates at St. Jude's Episcopal Church today. The screening was carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
See hawaiienergy.com/for-homes/tips-to-save-energy. 
     The free clinic offered on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualified those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.

     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321.
     Those visit screening clinic show photo ID, and health insurance card – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are  also asked to bring their own pens to fill in forms.
     The next screening will be Wednesday, April 29 at Nāʻālehu Community Center from to , with the same screening protocols. Wearing masks is required for everyone.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CALLERS THREATENING TO DISCONNECT ELECTRICITY ARE SCAMMERS, warns Hawaiian Electric. During the pandemic, the utility has suspended disconnection of services for failure to pay bills at least through May 17. Any call, text, email, or other communication claiming to be from Hawaiian Electric that threatens disconnection "is a scam, and customers should hang up or delete the message," states Hawaiian Electric.
     The utility encourages customers to call in, if having trouble paying their bills due to the coronavirus pandemic. Modified schedules or payment arrangements can be made. The quickest way to start the process is to send in a Payment Arrangement Request Form at hawaiianelectric.com/documents/billing_and_payment/payment_arrangement_request.pdf.

No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI ISLAND HAS THREE NEW CASES OF COVID-19 reported today. Six new cases were reported statewide by Department of Health, three on Hawaiʻi Island and three on Oʻahu, bringing the state's case count for Hawaiʻi Island to 67.     Since the pandemic began, 592 have been confirmed, as of today, with 67 on this island. Thirty-eight have been cleared as recovered, and the remaining 28 are quarantined at home and monitored by DOH. No one on Hawaiʻi Island was hospitalized or died. The state death toll is 12.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says DOH continues investigating the fast food cluster incident in Kona. So far, the outbreak "does not pose a threat to the general public. In their mission of contact tracing, to ensure speed and thoroughness, several Department of Health personnel from Oʻahu were brought in and if needed, as in all cases, your county police department stands ready to assist on request. 

Civil Defense Director 
Talmadge Magno.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     "Know that effective today stronger policies, related especially to merchants, go into effect. It is well understood that merchants may need assistance during this transitional period and the Hawaiʻi County Fire Department, who is the lead agency on prevention programs, will assist you if needed. Thank you for listening, have a beautiful Earth Day.

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense."
     Magno also thanked the organizations involved in today's drive-thru testing in Ocean View: Ali’i Health, Premier Medical Group, St. Jude's Church, and the CountyTask Force.
     In the United States, 855,255 cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about nine percent, with 78,340 recovered. The death toll is at 47,973.

     Worldwide, more than 2.63 million have contracted COVID-19. Recovery is about 27 percent, with 713,268 recovered. The death toll is 183,470.

Read online at kaucalendar.comSee our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, 
ranches, takeoutPrint edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and 
to all postal addresses throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. 
Read online at kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your business or
your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of April.

MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED for the month of April, to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

ONGOING
Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through at least the end of April. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.


The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

     The Ocean View location for May is to be announced
     The Nāʻālehu location is Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, April 23 from  to  Call 928-8208.

     The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Thursday, April 30 at  Call 933-6030.
     The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, April 29 from 11 a.m. until food runs out. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


On Call Emergency Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Fridays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 808-933-6030.

The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, April 27. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
     Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.

     Distribution in the Nāʻālehu area is at Nāʻālehu Elementary, Waiʻōhinu, and Discovery Harbour Community Center. Distribution in Ocean View is at the county's Kahuku Park, the area in front of Malama Market, and Ocean ViewCommunity Center.

     At Nāʻālehu Elementary, campus pick-up will be from 9 a.m - 9:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     The Waiʻōhinu pick-up:  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     The Discovery Harbour Community Center pick-up:  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Morning distribution at Kahuku Park for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Evening distribution at Kahuku Park for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Times for distribution in front of Malama Market are:  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Times for distribution at Ocean View Community Center are  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.

     Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
     Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.

     Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
     Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
     See ohialehuahalf.com.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 3179

Latest Images

Trending Articles





Latest Images