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Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, June 12, 2014

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Kealia Galimba, whose Blueberry (above) won Grand Champion in the Market Beef category last year, will show a hog at this year's 4-H Livestock Show & Sale this weekend. Photo by Becky Settlage
PREPARING FOR AN INVASION OF COFFEE RUST that is devastating Latin American coffee plantations and could make its way to Hawaiian Coffee farms? Long-term solutions could include creation of shade-grown coffee orchard environments, according to a story published in Audubon this week, saying that “the scientists worry that current solutions, such as fungicide application and developing resistant plants, focus too much on coffee alone – not on the health of the entire ecosystem.”
       The article quotes University of Michigan ecologist Ivette Perfecto saying, “Those narrow approaches tend to work in the very short term; they’re not part of a more sustainable approach to the management of coffee.” Perfecto and colleagues contend that shade-grown practices “promote a healthy web of interactions that, ideally, would naturally keep coffee rust in check,” says the story by Clara Chaisson.
A more ecological approach to growing coffee could control rust,
researchers suggest. Photo from Smartse
      Chaisson writes in Audubon that “traditional shade-grown coffee farms preserve the existing canopy layers of the forest. In addition to fostering biodiversity and maintaining complex ecological relationships between plants, fungi, insects and bats, shade-grown coffee provides critical winter habitat for migratory bird species. ...
      “But sun-grown farms have their own appeal: they can produce higher yields and bring in more money. This approach has taken off in recent years; a study published in April found that the proportion of land dedicated to shade-grown coffee has declined almost 20 percent since 1996. That switch may have unintentionally exacerbated the spread of the fungus and the scope of the problem.
      “On sun-grown coffee farms, the plants are spaced very close together, making it easier for coffee rust to spread from one to the next. Fungal spores travel unimpeded in the open air surrounding the farms. The heavy use of fungicide to combat rust also kills beneficial species like white halo fungus, which naturally attacks the coffee rust fungus.
      “The Michigan researchers suspect that the breakdown of biodiversity in coffee farming has contributed to the coffee rust epidemic, worsening its impact on sun- and shade-grown plantations alike. While cultivating plants that are resistant to the fungus is certainly a positive step, it represents only one piece of what should be a multi-pronged solution.”
Ka`u's U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard served two tours
of duty in the Middle East.
     “We need a more ecological approach,” Perfecto told Audubon. “We’ll drink (a cup of coffee) to that.” See more at audubonmagazine.org/articles/conservation/shady-endeavor-could-help-combat-coffee-rust.
     A report in Bioscience last year by Perfecto and colleagues said, “It is reasonable to suggest that the situation calls for a revitalization of what pest control specialists have come to call autonomous pest control.” 
     To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U’S U.S. REP. TULSI GABBARD, a veteran who has served two tours of duty in the Middle East, discussed the crisis in Iraq on CNN this morning. The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria is expanding its hold on Iraq, having gained control of Iraq’s second-largest city, Mosul, and threatening to invade others, including Baghdad. 
      Gabbard expressed concern about getting involved in civil wars that are complex and difficult to sort out. “Who are the bad guys?” Gabbard repeatedly asked. “You’ve got to be able to define who were helping and who were fighting for.” She suggested that, if the U.S. is concerned about ISIS, “We should focus our resources on specific threats and take them out where they are.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.


Kamrie Koi has received a Dorrance Scholarship.
Photo by Julia Neal
KA`U HIGH SCHOOL 2014 GRADUATE KAMRIE KOI is one of nine Hawai`i Island students who will begin their studies at the University of Hawai`i at Hilo this fall with Dorrance Scholarships. 
      The Dorrance Scholarship is a four-year award designed to benefit local students who are the first in their family to attend college. Each year, the program awards up to 10 students need-based scholarships of $8,000 per year to attend UH-Hilo.
      This year’s awardees are the third cohort to receive the scholarship.
      Prior to the start of fall classes, the students will take part in a custom-designed summer bridge program to help them transition from high school. They will also participate in international travel and employment preparation in subsequent summers.
      “The Dorrance family has become a valuable partner in UH-Hilo’s effort to help more students shatter that proverbial ‘glass ceiling’ by becoming the first member of their family to obtain a college education,” said Chancellor Donald Straney. “Their gift to the past, present and future cohorts will have a profound impact on the lives of those students.”
      UH-Hilo’s program is an extension of the highly successful Dorrance Scholarship Programs that have operated in Arizona for the past 14 years.
The program is credited with opening the doors of higher education while boosting graduation rates for more than 600 first-generation college students.
      For more information about the Dorrance Scholarship Programs, contact Maria Martin at 808-557-6268 or email mmartin@azfoundation.org.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

HAWAI`I COMMUNITY COLLEGE WILL OFFER A NEW SET of accelerated, online, for-credit classes leading to credential certificates beginning this August. Students will be able to study a variety of topics, including Business Foundations, Retail Foundations, Business Essentials, Entrepreneurship and Geographic Information Systems. Classes are accelerated eight-week sessions. Students will receive support services that include tutoring, academic counseling, internships and job development.
HCC Chancellor Noreen Yamane
      Hawai`i CC was one of four University of Hawai`i campuses to receive a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant to develop the classes. The grant aims to align academic programs with industry needs and increase the number of adults who attain certificates, degrees and other industry-recognized certificates.
      Grant director Jessica Yamamoto is spearheading this program and has been meeting with business leaders and Hawai`i CC faculty. “We have joined forces with industry to put in place a series of classes that will result in work-ready individuals,” said Yamamoto. “We have a great team of faculty and instructional designers, and all of their hard work will soon come to fruition. These courses have the potential to change lives on our island.”
      “This grant provides a tremendous win-win opportunity,” said Hawai`i CC Chancellor Noreen Yamane. “These new programs will provide valuable skills and college credentials to community members while giving the business community access to a more skilled workforce.”
      In addition, the grant has also accelerated Hawai`i CC’s Prior Leaning Assessment program, and adults can now earn credit for work experience. If awarded credit, students will shorten their time in school as they get on the fast track to degree completion.
      Application deadline is Aug. 1. Those interested should apply soon because classes may fill quickly.
      For more information, contact Business Program Coordinator William Tehero, Jr. at myfuture@hawaii.edu or call 808-934-2688.

THE SIXTH ANNUAL VOLCANO POTTERY SALE takes place tomorrow and Saturday, when fifteen Hawai`i Island potters display their creations. Hours tomorrow are from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Volcano Art Center’s Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village.
      For more information, see ryhpottery.com/volcano_pottery_sale or call Ron Hanatani at 985-8530.

KA`U YOUTH ARE PARTICIPATING IN Hawai`i County’s 4-H Livestock Show & Sale tomorrow and Saturday. Grant and Gavin Galimba each are showing a steer, a lamb and a hog; Kealia Galimba, a steer and a hog; Kailee Aicken, a hog; and Ua Alencastre-Galimba, a steer, a heifer and a lamb. 
      Tomorrow’s schedule features the rabbit and poultry shows. Other shows are Saturday morning beginning at 8:30 a.m. at Mealani Research Station in Kamuela.

Photo from Boone Morrison's Dance of life series. Morrison discusses the beginnings of
Volcano Art Center's dance program Saturday.
“LIKE TOTALLY ’80s” IS THE THEME at Kilauea Military Camp’s Lava Lounge in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park tomorrow at 7 p.m. Party-goers put on their best “Totally Awesome” costume and dance to the tunes of DJ Tiki. No cover charge. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 
      Call 967-8371 for more information.

KA`U FARMERS UNION UNITED meets Saturday at 5 p.m. at Ka`u Coffeehouse and Guesthouse next to the 76 gas station in Na`alehu. Malian Lahey will discuss the Economics of Value-Added Products.

DANCING AT THE SOURCE, DANCING ON THE EDGE: THE BIRTH on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at Volcano Art Center’s Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village celebrates VAC’s 40th anniversary. At this talk-story event, architect, photographer and VAC founder Boone Morrison shares history of the center and beginnings of the dance program with Earnest Morgan. Members of the original dance company, Trina Nahm-Mijo and Richard Koob, as well as Morgan’s protégé, Kea Kapahua, share dance excerpts from Morgan’s choreography, which mixed modern dance and hula movement.
      Fees are $10 for VAC members and $12 for non-members.
      For more information, call 967-8222.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.







See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.
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