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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, November 2, 2020

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Whale watching season starts in November with whales traveling from Alaska and Canadian
waters to give birth in Hawai`i.  See more below, including virtual meetings on humpbacks.

Photo from Hawaiian Islands Humpback National Marine Sanctuary

THE LAST DAY TO VOTE IS TOMORROW FOR THE 2020 GENERAL ELECTION. Voting is still available,  in person, with same-day registration at two locations on Hawaiʻi Island on Tuesday, Nov. 3, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Vote in Hilo at Aupuni Center, 101 Pauahi Street, #1. Vote in Kona at West Hawaiʻi Civic Center, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy.
    For those who received ballots in the mail, but did not send them in, drop off ballots at Nāʻālehu Police Station 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. election day, this Tuesday, Nov. 3. Mailed ballots will not arrive in time to be counted, as all ballots must be received no later than Nov. 3. See more dropoff locations at
elections.hawaii.gov/voter-service-centers-and-places-of-deposit.
    See if mail-in ballots have been received at ballotstatus.hawaii.gov/ballotreceipt. See more at elections.hawaii.gov.
     While Ka`u's County Council member Maile David is already elected for another two years, and state Sen. Dru Kahuna, who represents west Ka`u into Kona, is in the middle of his term, east Ka`u and Volcano's state Senator is up for election with the retirement of Sen. Russell Ruderman. The competitors are Joy San Buenaventura and Ron Ka-ipo. 
     East Ka`u into Puna`s House of Representative race is between Richard Onishi and Susan Hughes and West Ka`u into Kona House of Representatives race is between Jeanne Kapela, Michael Last and Citlalli Johanna Decker. 
       The Mayoral Race is between Mitch Roth and Ikaika Marzo.
The U.S. House of Representatives race for rural Hawai`i is between Kai Kahele, Johnathan Ho`omananawanui, Michelle Rose Tippens, John Giuffre and Ron Burns.
      The U.S. Presidential race is between Donald Trump and Joe Biden. Vic-President candidates are Mike Pence and Kamala Harris.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Humpback whales, or koholā, are part of history, legends, and connection to the sea. The cultural and maritime
 heritage of Hawai‘i plays a role in management decisions and how the sanctuary's daily activities are
 carried out. Photo from Hawaiian Islands Humpback National Marine Sanctuary.

NOVEMBER IS THE RETURN OF HUMPBACK WHALE MONTH, with numerous virtual presentations and whale watching excursions and events. The public is invited to the Hawaiian Islands Humpback National Marine Sanctuary council virtual meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 17, from 8:30 a.m. to noon and also to help count humpback whales in January, February and March.
Whales are expected soon in Hawaiian waters.
Photo from Hawaiian Islands Humpback National Marine Sanctuary

     The sanctuary website notes that "More than half of the humpback whales in the North Pacific seasonally use the waters around the Hawaiian Islands as their principal breeding and calving wintering ground. The sanctuary's mission is to protect Hawai‘i humpback whales and this extremely important habitat through closely aligned education, research, and resource protection efforts. The sanctuary works with the community and our other partners to reduce threats to humpback whales, including through enforcement."
   Numerous online educational and cultural  presentations are set as webinars for November. They include such topics as The Occurance of Humpback Whales across the Hawaiian Archipelago revealed through Acoustics and  Changing Seas, and  Mystery of the HumpBack Whale Song. See dates, times and many more presentations and discussions here.
The annual ocean count of whales and other ocean going mammals
 takes place in January, February and March with sites in Ka`u.
Photo from Hawaiian Islands Humpback National Marine Sanctuary

     During the upcoming meeting, council members will receive presentation updates from the sanctuary superintendent, state co-manager, and will discuss voluntary vessel guidelines in the sanctuary, sanctuary research and resource protection, and the Navy which operates war games in Hawaiian waters. The council will address questions from members and the public. For a copy of the meeting agenda email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov. The virtual meeting will be held using GoToWebinar. Register in advance at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6436410636793672976
    After registering,  participants will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Public comment will be taken at approximately 11:10 a.m.  Those would like to comment during the virtual meeting, can sign up in advance by selecting "yes" during the online registration. The order of comments will be based on date and time of registration. No public comments will be audio or video recorded. Those unable  participate in the virtual meeting, may send comments to cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov.
    The sanctuary is administered by a partnership of NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawai'i through the Division of Aquatic Resources The sanctuary works to protect humpback whales through research, education, conservation and stewardship.  See the Sanctuary's  Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary: http://hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov, and NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries: http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov.
     Also see State of Hawai'i Division of Aquatic Resources: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar/

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FOUR NEW COVID-19 CASES ARE REPORTED ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND today. New cases reported  today total 78 statewide, with 65 on Oʻahu, three in Maui County, one on Kaua`i, and five residents diagnosed out-of-state. 

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Vote and Register In-Person same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy 24 hours a day, until 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 3, Election Day. See other locations here. Tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistra
tionday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here

Attend Free Virtual Hawaiʻi Book & Music Festival through Nov. 4 15th year of the festival features in-depth presentations covering a variety of topics deeply impacting the local community. Featuring Hawaiʻi Public Radio's Burt Lum, host of Bytemarks Café, on several panels. More info & schedule.

Manu, the Boy Who Loved Birds Virtual Book Release with author Caren Loebel-Fried and special guests all day Thursday, Nov. 5. Option to order books with personalized inscriptions. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222


Learn How to Help Hawaiʻi Island's Food System during the third annual Hawaiʻi Island Community Food Summit through the month of November. Sponsors of Food Summit seek to increase residents' exposure to local foods; provide opportunities for networking and engaging with fellow food system-minded community members; expose attendees to ways they can help the food system as individuals; and lay the foundation for a Food System Action Plan. The 2020 Food Summit website page provides information about sessions and corresponding registration links, with new content and sessions as the weeks progress. 
    Keynote Presentation is Friday, Nov. 6 from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., with Sarah Newcomb, a member of the Hawaiʻi Island Hawaiʻi Youth Food Council. Register here. Watch preparation videos for Food Summit on Youtube, prerecorded to give participants the most time together during live discussions on Nov. 6. When registering for live sessions, summit questions ahead of time. See more here.



Artists and Vendors, Sign Up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Saturday, Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., helps raise funds for OVCC and benefit local artists and crafters. Booths $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Free admission for attendees. Face masks required for all. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

PETFIX and Hawaiʻi Rainbow Ranger Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs Saturday, Nov. 7 in Ocean View. Microchips available. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Celebrate Veterans Day at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Marketplace property on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans will receive $15 gift certificates to use at OKK food vendors onsite. Farmer's Market will be in progress. Lucky Lizards band will play from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and Shootz band will play from 10 a.m. to noon. Masks and social distancing required. A few shade tents and chairs will be set up, first-come, first-served. Attendees are welcome to bring their own. Free watermelon will be given away to all. Food will be available to purchase from OKK Market vendors.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday Barbecue Fundraiser, Saturday, Nov. 14 in the parking lot of Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Come get barbecued turkey legs and more. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.
    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

ONGOING
New operating hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

New operating hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270. 

Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter.

Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681.Watch the Oct. 5 Debate between Mayoral Candidates Ikaika Marzo and Mitch Roth on Nā Leo TV, Spectrum Channel 54, online at naleo.tv/channel-54/, or via the free Nā Leo mobile app. Watch the mayoral forum on PBS at youtube.com/watch?v=uneuqwEPH7s.

Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care
 through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.


Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture
 through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, November 3, 2020

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Competitors Ikaika Marzo and Mayor elect Mitch Roth. Their race was characterized by their extreme kindness to
each other and their friendship. Photo from Marzo Facebook

COUNTY PROSECUTOR MITCH ROTH WILL BE THE NEXT MAYOR OF HAWAIʻI COUNTY. See more below. Residents waited late into the night for results for races for county mayor, state House of Representatives, state Senators, U.S. Representatives, and elected members of the board of Office of Hawaiian Affairs.
    State Sen. Kai Kahele, with family ties to Miloliʻi and a father who represented Kaʻū in the Hawaiʻi legislature, was clocked with 64 percent of the vote at midnight. He will travel to Washington, D.C. to set up his office in the House of Representatives. Learn more, below.
    Ed Case won with 71 percent of the vote and will go back to the U.S. House for urban Hawaiʻi. He formerly represented Kaʻū and rural Hawaiʻi, and worked on shoreline protection campaigns here.
    Joy San Buenaventura won, with 76 percent of the vote over Ron Ka-Ipo. She will go to the state House of Representatives for East Kaʻū into Puna.
    Richard Onishi won, with 70 percent of the vote over Susan Hughes. He will return to the state House of Representatives for east Kaʻū into Hilo.
    Jeanné Kapela won with 77 percent of the vote, over Michael Last and Citalli Johanna Decker. Kapela will head to the state House of Representatives for west Kaʻū into Kona.
    See more details on candidates below and in Wednesday's Kaʻū News Briefs.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ikaika Marzo and his "lifetime companion" and Campaign Manager
Selma Kettwich. Photo from Marzo Facebook
MITCH ROTH WILL BE THE NEXT MAYOR of Hawaiʻi County, with a solid lead in the first reading in the general election. Roth, from his home in Hilo, and runner up Ikaika Marzo, from Kona Country Club, had nothing but good words for one another, an attitude they maintained throughout the campaign. 
    Roth waited for results in a small backyard gathering in his rural Hilo home, while Marzo played guitar and gathered with suporters at Kona Country Club.
    Release of election results were delayed statewide by long lines in Honolulu to vote in person, even though the vast majority of people cast their ballots through a first-time, mail-in system, during an overwhelming record-setting participation in voting. 
    The number of voters statewide  topped the previous record set in 2008 when Barack Obama, who grew up in Hawaiʻi, ran for president, and previous records in 1970 and 1972 during the Viet Nam War. 
    Before results were released, Marzo's facebook showed this post: "It's all in Ke Akua's hands. It has always been. Mahalo Ke Akua for all the blessings you have given us and we leave it up to you lord. Mahalo Ke Akua!!!" 
    Marzo also posted this about his campaign manager: "I just wanted to say a big, huge mahalo to my biggest supporter and Campaign Manager – mahalo for making this campaign a success. Heart of gold, heart for the people, and heart for Hawaiʻi. You have dedicated your entire time to this campaign. 
Clyde Silva, a Pāhala resident and president of a pensioners organization
representing retired union sugar workers, gave a talk on his
support for Mitch Roth recently. See it here: 
facebook.com/mitchroth1/videos/3579934138738066.
    "You have done an exceptional job and I would not ask for anyone else. From the beginning, campaign coordinators, candidates, other campaign managers said 'it's not possible to have a lifetime companion fill the role of Campaign Manager and walk out healthy and strong on the other side... It is not a good idea,' everyone and the textbooks said. And guess what? We made it to the General Election and we have a huge chance at being successful at this election. It's all about trust, aloha, and passion. We had our struggles but nothing overwhelming. We had each others' backs from the beginning and we will continue to have each others backs no matter what life throws at us. Mahalo nui, Selma, and I love you. Grassroots campaign with love for this ‘āina and it's people will never stop. #marzoformayor.'" 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Kaialiʻi Kahele, homeboy of Kaʻū, won the right to represent Kaʻū,
and all of rural Hawaiʻi today.
ACKNOWLEDGING HIS WIN, KAIALIʻI KAHELE sent this message to supporters: "I want to personally mahalo all of you who voted in Hawaiʻi's General Election and exercised your right to make your voices heard. It has been so exciting to see the record voter turnout throughout our state and our nation! 
    "I am deeply honored and humbled to be elected to serve Hawaiʻi's Second Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives. I look forward to working hard to make each and every day better for you, the people of Hawaiʻi. I look forward to being your voice and I look forward to making you proud.
    "Each and every one of you, from Hilo to Hanalei, are important to me. We ALL share a love for these islands, and I will serve you to the utmost of my abilities and be a voice for you in Congress.
    "This is a critical time for our nation. We have been divided for far too long. We need to unite and heal these differences if we are to overcome the unprecedented challenges our country faces.
    "I am committed to working with our Congressional Delegates and leaders in Washington to tackle the tough issues and do what is right for Hawaiʻi and our country. I want to bring the spirit of unity and aloha to Washington.
    "It's time to go to work! Let's do this Hawaiʻi. Me ka haʻahaʻa."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A van loaded up with kits filled with hand sanitizer, facial tissue, and more. Read below about Boys & Girls Club 
Big Island's COVID-related Family Support Kits, tens of thousands of hot weekday meals, 
volunteers going above and beyond, and how to donate. BGCBI photo


COMMUNITY MEAL SUPPORT through Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island will continue during November. The initiative provides 878 individuals with hot meals on weekdays. The program has fed people for the eight months of the pandemic, producing over 130,000 individual hot meals that have gone to support Island keiki, kūpuna, frontline healthcare workers, rural area family households, and various homeless populations. Paniolo Country Stew was a recent hot meal. 
Keiki, kūpuna, and others in need all over Kaʻū and this island
receive hot meals on weekdays from Boys & Girls Club.
BGCBI photo
    Watch the recent segment by KHON TV featuring the 100,000+ community meal support efforts at khon2.com/coronavirus/boys-and-girls-club-of-the-big-island-serves-100000-meals-to-families-in-need/.
    Boys & Girls Club continues to assist Salvation Army resource centers, state and county-owned low-income family housing programs, the Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home, local homeless shelters based in Hilo, Puna and Kona, and struggling families that have been significantly affected by the coronavirus pandemic.
    Boys & Girls Club gives special recognition and mahalo to volunteers Mike and Julie Tulang. Since March, the Tulangs have devoted every Tuesday afternoon to help transport close to 100 hot meals out to the rural area communities of Kaʻū, assuring that families residing throughout Pāhala and Ocean View have the extra nutritional supplementation that is required. "Thank you Mike and Julie for supporting our efforts through your time, personal transportation, and the fuel you utilize without any ask of reimbursement. And thank you Mike for your continued service as one of our dedicated Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island esteemed Board member," says an announcement from BCGBI's Chief Executive Officer, Chad Cabral.
    Over 200 COVID-related Family Support Kits have been assembled and delivered to Kaʻū and West Hawaiʻi. Each kit contains family size hand sanitizer, hand soap, paper towel rolls, tissue boxes, disposable face masks and gloves, trash bags, and household disinfectant cleaner. All family support kits (having a value of $30) are provided free-of-charge, "as we know that for many struggling, affording the extras during this time may be difficult. We hope that this support effort helps to keep COVID community spread down on Hawaiʻi Island. Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island will continue our efforts to assist our most vulnerable populations throughout the coronavirus pandemic. Thank you to everyone that has contributed to this much needed and worthwhile cause," says the announcement.  
Mike and Julie Tulang volunteer to deliver over 100 hot meals
every Tuesday to those in need in Kaʻū.
BGCBI photo
    In addition to providing meals and kits, Boys & Girls Club recently provided quick response for income-challenged youth and families located in communities and housing complexes throughout Hawaiʻi Island that have had identified COVID clusters.
    To make a donation, click on their PayPal link, paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=QNVDHX44MD6CS.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SECOND SATURDAY IN VOLCANO VILLAGE is held this month on Nov. 14. Organized and promoted by Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi, the monthly event seeks to bring people into Volcano Village, keeping commerce alive and providing an event for the community, and to "celebrate and share this thriving community of artists, scientists, entrepreneurs and cultural practitioners," say the website. 
    Volcano Art Center will feature a choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. 
    Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Volcano Garden Arts& Café Ono will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques.
    
Businesses in Volcano Village can renew or apply for new membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until the end of November. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special.
    Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.
    Experience Volcano's Steering Committee will host Ross Burch, executive director Island of Hawaiʻi Visitors Bureau, to attend the Nov. 9 Zoom meeting. The goal is to explore how HVB can help market Volcano as a destination.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

GIVE INPUT ON CLEANING UP THE FORMER QUARRY FIRING RANGE inside in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. National Park Service seeks public comment on engineering evaluation and cost analysis. The cleanup will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1.
    Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online at parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?parkId=307&projectID=92898. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.
    The QFR site is located on the southeast flank of Mauna Loa, about ten miles south of Park headquarters. It is situated about 260 feet west of Highway 11. Use of the former quarry as a firing range reportedly began in 1940; the site was used in this capacity until 1982.
Old quarry firing range in the Park.
    
The non-time critical removal action is expected to address risks to human health and the environment and eliminate the need for further cleanup actions at the site. Additional documents will be added to the Administrative Record File, also available on the website, as work at the site proceeds.
    Investigations were conducted at the QFR site from 2013 to 2017. Results indicate that bullets and bullet fragments were observed within the thin layer of soil surrounding the former backstop, firing line/lanes, and other related areas. Lead, antimony, and copper were determined to be contaminants of potential concern. Potential human receptors include site workers and recreational users; potential ecological receptors include plants, soil invertebrates, birds, and mammals, including several protected wildlife species: the Hawaiian hoary bat, Hawaiian goose, Hawaiian short-eared owl, and Hawaiian hawk.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FREE COVID-19 TESTING, open to the public, will be held tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov. 4 at Keauhou Shopping Center from 9 a.m. to noon and in Hilo at Afook Chinen Auditorium parking from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

HAWAIʻI ISLAND REPORTS SEVEN NEW COVID-19 CASES today. There are at least ten people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    New cases reported statewide today total 89, with 73 on Oʻahu, three on Lanaʻi, one on Kauaʻi, and five residents diagnosed out-of-state.
    Since the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 219 people have died in the state, according to state records, none new today.
    There have been 15,318 total COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 11930 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 3,170 active cases in isolation.
    Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 13,321 cases, Maui 410, Lanaʻi 103, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 67. Eighty-nine victims are residents diagnosed while out-of-state. Statewide, 1,124 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases have been reported in the last 28 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip code 96772. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96777, and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In the last 28 days, 14 active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96737. In Hilo zip code 96720, 35 cases have been reported in the last 30 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 103 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Puako/Waikoloa zip code 96738, 23 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Pepeʻekeo zip code 96783, 26 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 9,379,590 – about 20 percent of worldwide cases. The U.S. now averages 500,000 new cases per week, up from about 300,000 a day at the beginning of October. The death toll is more than 232,553 – about 19.5 percent of worldwide deaths. 
    Worldwide, there are more than 47.34 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,212,844.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Attend Free Virtual Hawaiʻi Book & Music Festival through Wednesday Nov. 4 15th year of the festival features in-depth presentations covering a variety of topics deeply impacting the local community. Featuring Hawaiʻi Public Radio's Burt Lum, host of Bytemarks Café, on several panels. More info & schedule.

Manu, the Boy Who Loved Birds Virtual Book Release with author Caren Loebel-Fried and special guests all day Thursday, Nov. 5. Option to order books with personalized inscriptions. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Learn How to Help Hawaiʻi Island's Food System during the third annual Hawaiʻi Island Community Food Summit through the month of November. Sponsors of Food Summit seek to increase residents' exposure to local foods; provide opportunities for networking and engaging with fellow food system-minded community members; expose attendees to ways they can help the food system as individuals; and lay the foundation for a Food System Action Plan. The 2020 Food Summit website page provides information about sessions and corresponding registration links, with new content and sessions as the weeks progress. 
    Keynote Presentation is Friday, Nov. 6 from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., with Sarah Newcomb, a member of the Hawaiʻi Island Hawaiʻi Youth Food Council. Register here. Watch preparation videos for Food Summit on Youtube, prerecorded to give participants the most time together during live discussions on Nov. 6. When registering for live sessions, summit questions ahead of time. See more here.

Artists and Vendors, Sign Up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Saturday, Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., helps raise funds for OVCC and benefit local artists and crafters. Booths $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Free admission for attendees. Face masks required for all. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.



PETFIX and Hawaiʻi Rainbow Ranger Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs Saturday, Nov. 7 in Ocean View. Microchips available. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Celebrate Veterans Day at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Marketplace property on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans will receive $15 gift certificates to use at OKK food vendors onsite. Farmer's Market will be in progress. Lucky Lizards band will play from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and Shootz band will play from 10 a.m. to noon. Masks and social distancing required. A few shade tents and chairs will be set up, first-come, first-served. Attendees are welcome to bring their own. Free watermelon will be given away to all. Food will be available to purchase from OKK Market vendors.

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday Barbecue Fundraiser, Saturday, Nov. 14 in the parking lot of Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Come get barbecued turkey legs and more. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.
    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

ONGOING
New operating hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

New operating hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter.

Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681. Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care
 through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.


Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture
 through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, November 3, 2020

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This Associated Press map from 7 p.m. HST today shows Joe Biden in the lead over Pres. Donald Trump, in number
of votes and number of Electoral College votes. AP map


THE U.S. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION remains up in the air, with five states still counting votes Wednesday evening. Associated Press reported at 7 p.m. HST that Joe Biden earned an estimated 264 Electoral College votes and 50.4 percent of the vote, with 72,062,575 ballots cast in his favor. Incumbent Donald Trump had an estimated 214 Electoral College votes, at 48 percent of the vote, 68,595,653 ballots cast in his favor. A presidential candidate needs 270 Electoral College votes to win. Alaska, Nevada, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Georgia were still counting ballots, according to AP.
    Voters in Hawaiʻi cast 365,802 ballots for Biden and Kamala Harris, 63.2 percent. Trump and Mike Pence received 196,602 ballots, 33.9 percent, of the vote. About 5,000 people declined to vote for any presidential candidate, and 11,450 people voted for other candidates.
    The winner of the presidential race and their vice president will be officially selected by the Electoral College on Dec. 14 and sworn in on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021 – if all recounts and disputes are resolved by then.

Keola Lindsey will represent Hawaiʻi Island in the
Office of Hawaiian Affairs.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KEOLA LINDSEY WILL REPRESENT HAWAIʻI ISLAND on the board of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. A Kawaihae resident, he takes over for his uncle, Robert Lindsey Jr., the present trustee for Hawaiʻi Island, who will retire from his position. 
    After winning the election, Lindsey posted a simple, "Mahalo,” on Facebook,
    Lindsey won over Lanakila Mangauil, of Hamakua. The pair topped the field of 11 and are well known in the Hawaiian political world. Lindsey works for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs as its Director of Advocacy. Lindsey received 44 percent of votes and Manquail received 31.5 percent. There were 24.4 percent of voters who chose neither candidate.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

INCUMBENT KELIʻI AKINA WILL REPRESENT ALL ISLANDS on the board of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Akina, a Ph.D., is president and CEO of Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi. Grassroot's website says he is a recognized scholar, public policy spokesperson and community leader in Hawaiʻi. He has held OHA office since 2016. 
    In a Facebook post today, he said, "I am incredibly grateful to my wonderful family, friends, supporters, volunteers, and everyone who stood with us in this campaign. I commend our opponent Keoni Souza and his supporters on an excellent effort and wish him all the best. Most of all, I thank the Lord for the opportunity to serve as an OHA Trustee-at-Large. Please pray that I will always faithfully better the conditions of native Hawaiians and spread Aloha throughout our state. Mahalo for your support!"
    Akina is an expert in East-West Philosophy and ethics, has taught at universities in China and the United States, including Hawaiʻi Pacific University, and holds advanced degrees from Northwestern University and the University of Hawaiʻi. He won over Keoni Souza. Akina received 36.3 percent of votes and Souza received 31.4 percent. There were 32.2 percent of voters who chose neither candidate.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LUANA ALAPA WILL REPRESENT MOLOKAʻI AND LANAʻI on the board of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. She beat out incumbent OHA trustee and Chair Colette Machado. A former Miss Hawaiʻi, Alapa received 35 percent of votes and Machado received 26.1 percent. There were 38.9 percent of voters who chose neither candidate.

Mitch Roth will take over the mayorship from Harry Kim
on Monday, Dec. 7.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI ISLAND MAYOR MITCH ROTH WILL BE SWORN IN MONDAY, DEC. 7 at noon. Incumbent Mayor Harry Kim lost to Roth and Ikaika Marzo in the primary election, which boasted a field of 14 candidates. In the primary, Roth led with 31.4 percent, followed by Ikaika Marzo at 20.8 percent. In the general election, Roth received 56.9 percent of votes, Marzo 40.5 percent, and 2.5 percent of voters did not vote for a mayoral candidate. See more and reactions in yesterday's Kaʻū News Briefs.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

JEANNÉ KAPELA ASSUMED THE WEST KAʻŪ STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES seat on Nov. 3. As of yesterday, she represents House District 5 from Honuʻapo, though Nāʻālehu, Ocean View, and Miloliʻi, into Kona. A resident of Capt. Cook, Kapela takes over incumbent Richard Creagan's seat, who retired from public office yesterday – see story in the June 5 Ka‘ū News Briefs. Kapela won over Aloha ʻĀina Party member Citlalli Johanna Decker and Libertarian Michael Last, of Nāʻālehu. She received 68.4 percent of the votes, while Last received 13.4 percent and Decker received 6.9 percent. There were 11.3 percent of voters who chose no candidate for the seat.
    On her Facebook today, she said, "We did it. Mahalo for electing me to be your representative to the Hawaiʻi State House. Together, we made history. We embraced leadership with aloha that puts people and our planet first. We chose compassion over competition and hope over fear. This is our moment. I won't let you down."

Jeanné Kapela took over Richard Creagan's seat yesterday.

    According to a campaign statement sent to The Kaʻū Calendar, Kapela is the Prevention Education Coordinator for IMUAlliance. The statement says the organization is "one of Hawaiʻi's largest victim service providers for survivors of sex trafficking."
    According to the statement, she also serves West Hawaiʻi as a member of the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Board of Directors and as Operations Coordinator for the Kona Historical Society. She is a Lions Club of Kona member, communications chair of Konawaena High School's 100th Anniversary Committee, and Director of the Miss Kona Coffee Scholarship Competition.
    She was previously on the board of Kona Coffee Farmers Association. The statement says she served as Executive Director of UNITE Hawaiʻi, an organization devoted to ending sexual exploitation through education. Kapela worked two sessions in the Hawaiʻi legislature, for Rep. Nadine Nakamura in 2017 and for Rep. Amy Perruso in 2019. Her statement says she worked on increasing public education funding, banning use of pesticide glyphosate on public school campuses, and addressing the climate crisis.
    Kapela, 25, was born in Kona and raised on a small coffee farm in Captain Cook. She graduated from Konawaena High School in 2012. She wrote to The Kaʻū Calendar that she grew up in poverty, and "understands the importance of putting people before profit." Her campaign information says she is running "to protect our iconic agricultural and coffee industries, champion the needs of working families, deliver the schools our keiki deserve, and defend the environment from a worsening climate crisis. I am committed to advancing the common good for the community in which I was born and raised… I am dedicated to strengthening West Hawaiʻi through the spirit of public service.
    "It's time to guarantee that the workers who drive our economy are able to thrive financially, give our children a world-class education system, make the islands affordable for all who call Hawaiʻi home, and protect our ʻāina for generations to come.
Richard Creagan retired from public service. 
Kapela took his seat yesterday.
    
"Our community deserves leadership with aloha. Two years ago, my campaign started a movement to bring hope to those who need it most. Today, faced with a soaring cost of living, crumbling schools, and climate change, that movement is more urgent than ever."
    Kapela's campaign promises to raise the minimum wage to at least $17/hour, establish statewide paid family leave and sick pay programs, raise teacher pay, eliminate the gender pay gap, defend women's rights to access reproductive care, advocate for additional resources for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence, educate children about the dangers of sexual exploitation, and increase the availability of rehabilitative care for survivors of sex trafficking.
    She says she will also work to eliminate cash bail, fully fund schools, reduce standardized testing, create community schools that provide "wraparound services for vulnerable children," create affordable housing, support a single-payer healthcare insurance program, and ensure access to protective equipment, testing capacity, bed space, and essential medicine.
    Her campaign also includes initiatives to fund research on eliminating agricultural infestations, increase funding for Hawaiʻi's conservation and sustainability programs, support measures for a managed retreat from Hawaiʻi's coastlines, advocate for a carbon tax, and create a Green New Deal for the islands that "uplifts workers' prosperity and our ʻāina for generations to come."
    The statement from her campaign says that, as a Native Hawaiian woman, Kapela is committed to preserving Hawaiian culture and supporting legislation to increase Hawaiians' share of public land revenue. She wrote that she will work to ensure Hawaiian families are given access to homestead lands, defend Hawaiʻi's land and water resources from commodification, and empower indigenous voices in political decision-making.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

JOY SAN BUENAVENTURA ASSUMED THE EAST KAʻŪ STATE SENATE seat yesterday. She represents District 2, east Kaʻū and Volcano, into Puna and Hilo. Incumbent Russell Ruderman retired from public office yesterday – see story in the May 20 Kaʻū News Briefs. San Buenaventura ran against Aloha ʻĀnia party member Ron Ka-Ipo. She won 67.8 percent of the votes, he received 22.4 percent. There were 9.8 percent of voters who chose neither candidate. She retired from her District 4 state House of Representatives seat, representing Keaʻau and lower Puna, for this office. Greggor Ilagan takes that seat.
    A 30-year resident of East Hawaiʻi and resident of Keaʻau, San Buenaventura holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from the University of Nevada Las Vegas. In Las Vegas, she worked at the Environmental Protection Agency as a computer programmer and with Reynolds Electrical Engineering as a law clerk. Joy went on to receive her Juris Doctorate from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.
Joy San Buenaventura represents east Kaʻū
and Volcano in the state Senate.

    San Buenaventura was a lecturer of business law at University of Hawaiʻi Hilo. In 1991, she was appointed Per Diem District Court Judge, making her the youngest judge in Hawaiʻi at the age of 32. In one of her early court-appointed cases, she represented the first geothermal protesters opposing the proposed geothermal well at Wao Kele O Puna. In 1992 she was the first attorney to prosecute/settle a breast implant case in the State of Hawaiʻi. In 2013-2014 she took two of her clients' cases to the highest court in the state, the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court.
    San Buenaventura volunteers her time by helping the public access the courts through the Self-Help Center, and helping the public resolve their disputes amicably through Kuʻikahi Mediation Center.
She resides in a photo-voltaic powered home in Hawaiian Paradise Park with her husband, "Weldin" Sheldon Lehman.
    San Buenaventura told The Kaʻū Calendar she intended to run for re-election when she received a call from Ruderman, of his intent to not seek re-election. She says she believes that, in this tough economic time, "experienced, proven leadership is needed."
    Her first run for office unseated Faye Hanohano, "whose many publicized remarks in 2013-2014 divided Puna needlessly among racial lines." San Buenaventura says Hanohano's "divisiveness prevented Puna from getting the attention and funding it needed. In order for funding or bills to pass, the majority of both the House and Senate need to vote to pass these bills. Someone who is unable to work with the majority of the 51 members in the house and the 25 members of the Senate cannot get anything done."
    San Buenaventura says she believed that her strength as a trial attorney for 30 years would help Puna get the attention it needed. She lists some of her accomplishments as helping alleviate stand-still traffic during the afternoon rush-hour on Highway 130; advocating for funding, receiving over $50 million, for construction, including a Pāhoa roundabout "that transformed the deadliest intersection in the State highway system into the safest, with no fatalities since its creation" and helping get rid of standstill traffic in front of Keaʻau High School. She says she wants to focus on Highway 11 and alternates to Highway 11.
    When the 2018 lava crisis occurred, her campaign information says San Buenaventura "was a constant presence at non-profit meetings, volunteering at the county then FEMA disaster centers and pleading with the Governor and federal housing authorities to provide immediate housing for the displaced residents." She says her efforts led to opening senior housing placements in Pāhala and renovating abandoned Keaʻau public housing units. She brought House leadership to see the damage being done and brought House, Senate, and County leadership to a conference at her law office that August to hash out the needs of the County; and continued negotiations which led to her acquiring $60 million in state funds in the 2019 session for the county to use and to grow by using it as matching funds for federal aid.
Russell Ruderman retired from public service.
San Buenaventura took his seat yesterday.

    
Her campaign information cites her "ability to bring people together" leading House Speaker Scott Saiki to appoint her in 2019-2020 as Chair of Human Services and Homelessness. In that capacity, she says she found that, to fix chronic homelessness, "public behavioral health treatment centers are needed because the only state public mental hospital was admitting only those who are criminally insane."
    During her one term as Chair, she introduced, advocated for, and passed a series of bills "that reform our criminal justice system to immediately examine and treat those who are mentally ill" and passed funding procedures to reuse the vacant buildings on Oʻahu, at the old Kona Courthouse, and the old Hilo Hospital as behavioral treatment centers.
    San Buenaventura says she hopes to work with Aunty Jessie, Executive Director of Kaʻū Rural Health, "in supporting and extending the kūpuna telehealth project with Department of Labor; and work toward an infrastructure plan to bring a dialysis center to Kaʻū and Puna."
    San Buenaventura says she ran for senate because, with a longer term, "she can do more and be able to represent east Kaʻū and Puna mauka – some issues are intertwined with the needs of Puna makai, whom she represented." She says her experience in the legislature, especially in a leadership position of Majority Whip and House Chair, has given her the stature to deal with other department heads in speaking to them of Puna and Kaʻū issues.
    She also says, "COVID-19 will require a new look as to how Hawaiʻi can be self-sustaining. The 2020 legislative session recently passed a bill legalizing hemp which may help bring Kaʻū and Puna out of economic distress because of the worldwide demand for hemp in the creation of CBD and hemp oil. That is just one example of a new industry that the state should consider in moving forward. In the meantime, while we have Federal monies, infrastructure like fixing/expanding roads needs to be done so that people can still pay bills and the roads will be ready when full commuter traffic comes back.
    "With Young Brothers in economic distress, the issue of whether the state will subsidize or deregulate interisland shipment of goods will need to be addressed soon by experienced legislators – because no matter how many crops we grow or products we make for worldwide consumption, high shipment costs will prevent economic recovery."
    She says she hopes "to be the voice of all of Puna and east Kaʻū in the legislature as the State navigates a path forward beyond this economic crisis."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

RICHARD ONISHI CONTINUED SERVING IN THE STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES yesterday, his fifth term for District 3, which stretches from Honuʻapo and Punaluʻu to Pāhala, Volcano, into Puna and South Hilo. A Democrat, Onishi ran against Republican Susan Hughes. He received 66.7 percent of the vote. Hughes received 25.7 percent of the vote. There were 7.6 percent of voters who chose neither candidate.
    Onishi, a Hilo resident, is a member of the House Consumer Protection & Commerce Committee and the Agriculture Committee, and chairs the Tourism & International Affairs Committee. He is also a member of the House Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness, working with other legislators and officials toward recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. 
    In mid-July, he and the Kaʻū Farm Bureau helped to organize a gift of Kaʻū's Aikane Plantation Coffee to first responders. Onishi has been a speaker at Farm Bureau meetings and has been honored by the organization for his work for the agricultural community. 
Incumbent Richard Onishi continues to represent
Kaʻū in the state House of Representatives.
    During the 2020 session, despite the interruptions from the pandemic, he was a primary sponsor of 24 bills, including developing a plan to "recognize, honor, and memorialize" the legacy of Kaʻū-born Mary Kawena Pukuʻi in perpetuating Hawaiian culture.
    He has supported the Miss Kaʻū Coffee competition with donations of scholarships. His efforts to help build a larger kitchen for Volcano School of Arts & Sciences and his continuing support helped lead to the VSAS Keakealani Campus that broke ground this summer.
    Onishi was born and raised in Hilo. He and his wife, Joni, have three children. He served in the United States Army from 1973 to 1977. He earned his Bachelor of Business Administration from University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo in 1986.
    Before his election on Nov. 6, 2012, to the state House of Representatives, he worked for over 20 years for the County of Hawaiʻi as an Information System Analyst. He also worked as a lecturer at UH, a sales manager and travel consultant at Puainako Travel Service, and an operations supervisor and computer programmer for KTA.
    Onishi belongs to the Hawaiʻi Government Employees Association and American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees. His past affiliations include Big Island Computer Users Group and Hawaiʻi System 38 Computer Users Group. His community organizations include the Democratic Party, Honpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin, Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaiʻi Board, Hawaiʻi Island Adult Care Board, Hawaiʻi County Employees Federal Credit Union Board, Hilo High School Foundation Board, Hilo High School Class of '72 Reunion Committee.
    Onishi's campaign information says he pledges to "address issues and concerns and find solutions to better our communities and our future generations." His website says he promises to listen to, stay in touch, work tirelessly, and work together with constituents. His campaign information says his vision "is for our communities to be safe, healthy, economically viable, and sustainable. I will ensure our communities are a safe place to live, play, work and do business; our children receive high-quality education; our seniors (kūpuna) are cared for; our economy supports local businesses and products; our individual rights are protected; our environment is preserved; and our people have access to first-rate medical services."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PETFIX FREE SPAY AND NEUTER CLINIC FOR DOGS will be held Saturday, Nov. 7 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

HAWAIʻI ISLAND REPORTS TWENTY-ONE NEW COVID-19 CASES today. There are at least eight people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    New cases reported statewide today total 156, with 125 on Oʻahu, four on Maui, one on Lanaʻi, and five residents diagnosed out-of-state.
    Since the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 219 people have died in the state, according to state records, none new today.
    There have been 15,473 total COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 11,958 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 3,300 active cases in isolation.
    Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 13,445 cases, Maui 414, Lanaʻi 104, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 67. Ninety-four victims are residents diagnosed while out-of-state. Statewide, 1,125 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases have been reported in the last 28 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip code 96772. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96777, and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In the last 28 days, 14 active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96737. In Hilo zip code 96720, 27 cases have been reported in the last 30 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 115 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Puako/Waikoloa zip code 96738, 22 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In zip code 96743 – which includes Waikoloa, Kawaihae, Waimea, Puako, Waikui, and Akona – 11 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Pepeʻekeo zip code 96783, 27 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 9,480,242 – about 20 percent of worldwide cases. The U.S. now averages about 500,000 new cases per week, up from about 300,000 a week at the beginning of October. The death toll is more than 233,663 – about 19.5 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 48 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,224,415.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Manu, the Boy Who Loved Birds Virtual Book Release with author Caren Loebel-Fried and special guests all day Thursday, Nov. 5. Option to order books with personalized inscriptions. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Learn How to Help Hawaiʻi Island's Food System during the third annual Hawaiʻi Island Community Food Summit through the month of November. Sponsors of Food Summit seek to increase residents' exposure to local foods; provide opportunities for networking and engaging with fellow food system-minded community members; expose attendees to ways they can help the food system as individuals; and lay the foundation for a Food System Action Plan. The 2020 Food Summit website page provides information about sessions and corresponding registration links, with new content and sessions as the weeks progress. 
    Keynote Presentation is Friday, Nov. 6 from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., with Sarah Newcomb, a member of the Hawaiʻi Island Hawaiʻi Youth Food Council. Register here. Watch preparation videos for Food Summit on Youtube, prerecorded to give participants the most time together during live discussions on Nov. 6. When registering for live sessions, summit questions ahead of time. See more here.

Artists and Vendors, Sign Up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Saturday, Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., helps raise funds for OVCC and benefit local artists and crafters. Booths $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Free admission for attendees. Face masks required for all. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.



PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs Saturday, Nov. 7 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Celebrate Veterans Day at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Marketplace property on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans will receive $15 gift certificates to use at OKK food vendors onsite. Farmer's Market will be in progress. Lucky Lizards band will play from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and Shootz band will play from 10 a.m. to noon. Masks and social distancing required. A few shade tents and chairs will be set up, first-come, first-served. Attendees are welcome to bring their own. Free watermelon will be given away to all. Food will be available to purchase from OKK Market vendors.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday Barbecue Fundraiser, Saturday, Nov. 14 in the parking lot of Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Come get barbecued turkey legs and more. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Second Saturday in Volcano Village on Nov. 14 features Volcano Art Center, volcanoartcenter.org, with choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant, will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Volcano Garden Arts, volcanogardenarts.com, & Café Ono, cafeono.net, will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques. See experiencevolcano.com.

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Renew or Apply for Membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until Nov. 30. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special. Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Give Input on Cleaning up the Former Quarry Firing Range in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Engineering evaluation and cost analysis will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1. Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.
    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

ONGOING
New Operating Hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

New Operating Hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter. Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care
 through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.


Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture
 through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.


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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, November 5, 2020

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Kāwā is one of the lands preserved by the Two Percent Land Fund. Read about the passage of two proposals that 
change the way funds can be used to care for the lands, below. Photo by William Neal

VOTER TURNOUT in Hawaiʻi was the highest ever recorded in this state's General Election.
    Turnout in Hawaiʻi County reached 69.5 percent, with 88,510 people voting of 127,348 registered. Mail turnout drew 83,873 voters, 65.9 percent of those registered. In-person turnout drew 4,637 voters, 3.6 percent of those registered.
    Voter turnout in the state reached 69.6 percent on Tuesday. The General Election drew 579,165 voters of the 832,466 registered. Mail turnout drew 550,423 voters, 66.9 percent of those registered. In-person turn out was 3.5 percent of all registered voters, with 28,742 walking in at Hilo and Kona. Hawaiʻi has over 1.1 million adult residents.

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HAWAIʻI COUNTY COUNCIL TERMS WILL STAY AT TWO YEARS, with a County Charter Amendment proposal defeated in the general election Tuesday. Proponents said that it takes more than two years to plan and accomplish many goals. Opponents said that elected council members need to report to the public and be accountable every two years. The proposal would have made the terms four years, but was defeated with 47 percent of voters against it and 42 percent in favor.

Map of lands preserved under the 2 Percent Fund. County map
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com.

THE TWO PERCENT FUND THAT CONSERVES AND STEWARDS LANDS in Hawaiʻi County received a boost with the passage of two amendments to the County Charter on election day, Nov. 3. Debbie Hecht, who led the campaign to put the measures on the ballot, said she was pleased with the measures. She said the goal is for additional designated staff to help the county acquire more land for conservation, more stewardship grants for the nonprofits that care for the land, and to hire staff to provide better stewardship of county properties purchased for conservation.
    Of the 8,000 acres preserved during the last 14 years by the Public Access, Open Space & Natural Resources fund that uses 2 percent of property taxes to buy land on this island, many parcels are along the coast and most of the acreage is located in Kaʻū.
    The passage of Proposal No. 6 allows County of Hawaiʻi to use money from the Public Access, Open Space & Natural Resources Preservation Fund to pay for staff. The proposal won with 52.1 percent approval, with 35.7 percent opposed and 12.2 percent blank votes. 
    The passage of Proposal No. 10 transfers management of the fund to the county's Department of Finance from Department of Parks and Recreation. It also allows construction of trails, restrooms and other small facilities, provided they're detailed in the stewardship grants funded by the program. It also allows paying members of non-profit groups with approval by the County Department of Finance and the PONC the commission. The measure won with 44 percent approval, with 41.9 percent opposed and 14.1 percent blank votes.  
Waikapuna is preserved under the 2 Percent Land Fund. County photo
Hecht credited Hawaiʻi County Charter commissioner Sally Rice, "a champion of nonprofits," for helping to design the charter amendments for the general election ballot. Hecht pointed out that for years, only 9 percent of all money in the Two Percent Fund has gone to stewardship grants to maintain the properties.

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VOTERS IN THE GENERAL ELECTION PASSED 14 OF 16 CHARTER AMENDMENTS for County of Hawaiʻi. The full text for each Charter Amendment Proposal is available at hawaiicounty.gov/charterproposals. A copy of the County Charter is available at hawaiicounty.gov/our-county/legislative/office-of-the-county-clerk/county-charter or at the Office of the County Clerk at 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, Hawai‘i, or by calling (808) 961-8255.
    See above for details on passed proposals 6 and 10.
    Proposal 1, relating to "Technical, Linguistic, and Grammatical Revisions" of the Charter, passed with 65 percent for, 20.9 percent against, and 14.1 percent blank. This proposal will allow corrections to language in the Charter for clarity. 
    Proposal 2 will amend the Charter to require Hawai‘i County Council hold an equal number of its regularly scheduled meetings in East Hawai‘i and West Hawai‘i. Current charter language requires only quarterly meetings in the Kona judicial districts. The proposal passed with 77.2 percent for, 12.8 percent against, and 10 percent blank.
The Charter Commission, in the days before COVID. Photo by Julia Neal
    Proposal 3 will strengthen both the approach of the Department of Research and Development to encourage collaboration with various governmental stakeholders and the department's explicit focus on holistic, interdependent issues. In addition, the proposal will delete a section that is a remnant of the federal formula grant programs established in the 1960s. The proposal passed with 75.1 percent for, 11.3 percent against, and 13.6 percent blank.
    Proposal 4 authorizes the Police Commission to discipline the Police Chief and the Fire Commissions to discipline the Fire Chief. The proposal passed with 73.8 percent for, 15.8 percent against, and 10.4 percent blank.
    Proposal 7 will allow the County Council to discipline its members through temporary suspension, without pay, for disorderly or contemptuous behavior, or failure to attend three or more regularly scheduled County Council meetings without being excused by the Chair of the County Council. The proposal passed with 81.3 percent for, 8.6 percent against, and 10 percent blank. 
    Proposal 9 establishes a Disaster and Emergency Fund "for specific and limited purposes," funded one percent of real property tax revenues, state and federal grants, the federal emergency management agency, private sources and other sources of revenue. The purposes are restricted to natural or human-caused disaster or emergencies to repair county facilities and infrastructure; clean county property; provid immediate response to deal with public health and safety risks; match federal, state or private grants-in-aid to restore public property; pay for county operational expenses in certain circumstances; acquire property to mitigate potential disasters or emergencies; and administrative expenses. The proposal passed with 51.4 percent for, 36.7 percent against, and 11.6 percent blank. 
After passage of Proposal 2 on the General Election ballot, Hawai‘i County 
Council must hold an equal number of regularly scheduled meetings in 
East Hawai‘i and West Hawai‘i. Photo from Big Island Video News
    Proposal 11 clearly defines the process by which the county charter commission conducts its decennial review of the Hawaiʻi County Charter, including extending the review time. The proposal passed with 69.2 percent for, 14.9 percent against, and 15.9 percent blank. 
    Proposal 12 requires that qualifications to serve as the Corporation Counsel include being licensed to practice law for at least five years and having at least three years of supervisory experience The proposal passed with 71 percent for, 15.8 percent against, and 13.2 percent blank. 
    Proposal 13 adds water safety as a core function of the fire department, provides for additional minimum qualification requirements for fire chief selection, and clarifies fire commission powers, duties and functions. The proposal passed with 58.6 percent for, 26.2 percent against, and 15.2 percent blank.
    Proposal 14 requires that no more than a bare majority of members of County boards and commissions belong to the same political party. The proposal passed with 47.4 percent for, 37.5 percent against, and 15.1 percent blank.
    Proposal 15 requires capital improvement priorities be based on criteria aligned with the County General Plan, County community development plans, emergency expenditures, and other pertinent functional plans. The proposal passed with 69.1 percent for, 16 percent against, and 15 percent blank.
    Proposal 16 staggers terms of Board of Ethics board members, clarifies the force and effect of law of the board's rules of procedure, provides for imposition of civil fines for violations of the code of ethics, and removes transitional language. The proposal passed with 69.8 percent for, 17.7 percent against, and 12.5 percent blank.

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VOTERS IN THE GENERAL ELECTION FAILED TO PASS TWO OF SIXTEEN CHARTER AMENDMENTS for County of Hawaiʻi. The full text for each Charter Amendment Proposal is available at hawaiicounty.gov/charterproposals. A copy of the County Charter is available at hawaiicounty.gov/our-county/legislative/office-of-the-county-clerk/county-charter or at the Office of the County Clerk at 25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, Hawai‘i, or by calling (808) 961-8255.
    See above for details on failed proposal 5.
    Proposal 8 would have removed Department of Information Technology oversight of the information systems maintained by the Office of the Prosecuting Attorney and the Police Department. The proposal failed to pass with 37.5 percent for, 46.5 percent against, and 16 percent blank.

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KTA'S THANKSGIVING SAVE-A-TAPE program runs through Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 26.
    Those who save 700 points earn a free frozen 12-14 pound Norbest turkey, three lbs. of Mountain Apple brand Kalua turkey, a 1.5 lb. of miso butterfish gift pack, 20 lbs. of frozen chicken thighs, mix-and-match size of 28 oz. frozen Flav-R-Pac vegetables and 16 oz. frozen Wawona fruits, 1.5 lbs. Hamachi Tataki loins, or two lbs. 1916 EZ Peel frozen 16-20 count shrimp. Those who save 400 points earn $8 cash.
    KTA also offers several products that generate five bonus points when purchased. The last day to turn in points and receive a SAVE-A-TAPE certificate is Dec. 10. All SAVE-A-TAPE certificates must be redeemed by Jan. 12, 2021. See ktasuperstores.com/promotions.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FREE COVID TESTING tomorrow, Friday, Nov. 6 is open to the public, is scheduled in North Kona at Keauhou Shopping Center. No insurance necessary but bring insurance card if have. Distancing and masks enforced. Call Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, 808-935-0031.
    A message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense says, "Know that the virus is in our community and we must make every effort to stop the spread. Gatherings associated with the upcoming holidays and the evidence that gatherings contribute to the spread of the virus make it more important than ever to follow the preventive measures of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings of no more than ten persons. Please accept this kuleana to protect our families, friends and community, and to make Hawaiʻi Safe. 

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Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

HAWAIʻI REPORTS NO NEW COVID DEATHS for the third day in a row.
    Hawaiʻi Island reports 24 new COVID cases today. There are at least eight people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    New cases reported statewide today total 100, with 66 on Oʻahu, one on Maui, one on Kauaʻi, one on Lanaʻi, and seven residents diagnosed out-of-state.
    Since the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 219 people have died in the state, according to state records, none new today.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 15,572 total COVID cases in the state. Oʻahu has reported 13,445 total cases, Maui 414, Lanaʻi 104, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 67. Ninety-four victims are residents diagnosed while out-of-state. Statewide, 1,125 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases have been reported in the last 28 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip codes 96772. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip codes 96737 and 96777, and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In the last 28 days, in Hilo zip code 96720, 30 cases have been reported in the last 30 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 110 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Puako/Waikoloa zip code 96738, 117 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In zip code 96743 – which includes Waikoloa, Kawaihae, Waimea, Puako, Waikui, and Akona – 12 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Pepeʻekeo zip code 96783, 28 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    Know that the preventive measures are mandated by law and will be enforced by the Hawaiʻi Police Department."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 9,480,242 – about 19.5 percent of worldwide cases. The U.S. has reported more than 100,000 new cases per day for the last two days, a new record. The death toll is more than 234,876 – about 19 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 48.58 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,231,558.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Learn How to Help Hawaiʻi Island's Food System during the third annual Hawaiʻi Island Community Food Summit through the month of November. Sponsors of Food Summit seek to increase residents' exposure to local foods; provide opportunities for networking and engaging with fellow food system-minded community members; expose attendees to ways they can help the food system as individuals; and lay the foundation for a Food System Action Plan. The 2020 Food Summit website page provides information about sessions and corresponding registration links, with new content and sessions as the weeks progress. 
    Keynote Presentation is Friday, Nov. 6 from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., with Sarah Newcomb, a member of the Hawaiʻi Island Hawaiʻi Youth Food Council. Register here. Watch preparation videos for Food Summit on Youtube, prerecorded to give participants the most time together during live discussions on Nov. 6. When registering for live sessions, summit questions ahead of time. See more here.

Artists and Vendors, Sign Up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Saturday, Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., helps raise funds for OVCC and benefit local artists and crafters. Booths $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Free admission for attendees. Face masks required for all. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.




PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs Saturday, Nov. 7 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Celebrate Veterans Day at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Marketplace property on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Veterans will receive $15 gift certificates to use at OKK food vendors onsite. Farmer's Market will be in progress. Lucky Lizards band will play from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and Shootz band will play from 10 a.m. to noon. Masks and social distancing required. A few shade tents and chairs will be set up, first-come, first-served. Attendees are welcome to bring their own. Free watermelon will be given away to all. Food will be available to purchase from OKK Market vendors.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday in Volcano Village on Nov. 14 features Volcano Art Center, volcanoartcenter.org, with choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant, will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Volcano Garden Arts, volcanogardenarts.com, & Café Ono, cafeono.net, will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques. See experiencevolcano.com.

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation
 with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Renew or Apply for Membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until Nov. 30. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special. Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.

Give Input on Cleaning up the Former Quarry Firing Range in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Engineering evaluation and cost analysis will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1. Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online at parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?parkId=307&projectID=92898. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.
    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

ONGOING
New Operating Hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

New Operating Hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter. Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care
 through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture
 through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, November 6, 2020

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Fresh veggies go into Vibrant Pāhala meal bags to deliver locally grown food to the community. Photo by Katie Graham


VIBRANT HAWAIʻI FOOD DISTRIBUTION in Pāhala began today. Captains Katie Graham, of Food Corps, and Julia Neal, of The Kaʻū Calendar newspaper, along with Clyde Silva of the Pensioners Club, and James Akau and Yvette Slack, of the Pāhala Resilience Food Hub, made deliveries in the Paʻaʻau Street neighborhood and up the Hilo side of Koali Street as far as the home of coffee and banana farmer Delvin Navarro.
    Navarro provided bananas for the 50 meal bags delivered to the households. Other participating food producers were Bee Boys, Crooked C. Ranch, Mely Akau, Kaʻili Maliʻe Farms, Kuahiwi Ranch, Riley Ranch and Wood Valley Ranch. The aim is to help families during the pandemic and to connect local farmers with local households. Foods included were kale, chard, lettuce, oranges, bananas, butternut squash, beets, turnips, Kuahiwi beef, honey, pasta and mamaki tea. In each meal bag were spices and recipes from Chef Hui's Mariah Williams for Braised Beef with Carrots, Honey-Lemon Vinaigrette, Butternut Squash & Swiss Chard, and Spaghetti with Kale & Lemon.
Co-captains Katie Graham and Julia Neal take locally
grown food to the Paʻaʻau neighborhood.
Photo by Yvette Slack
    Funding comes from a County of Hawaiʻi federal Cares Act grant to Vibrant Hawaiʻi through County Council member Ashley Kierkiewicz. Vibrant Hawaiʻi issued a statement saying, "One way we're supporting Pāhala is through food resilience, and distributing 50 Nourish Pāhala meal bags for eight weeks. Each meal bag is full of ingredients sourced from Pāhala area farmers and food producers. Recipes are provided to inspire creativity in the kitchen and based on the concept - Cook What Get!"
    The Pāhala Resilience Food Hub's Nourish Pāhala program is sponsored by Vibrant Hawaiʻi, Chef Hui, County of Hawaiʻi and Suisan.
    Next Friday's Pāhala neighborhood to receive food will include the remainder of Koali Street.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

JOE BIDEN LEADS IN THE RACE FOR U.S. PRESIDENT tonight. If he wins Pennsylvania, he becomes president-elect. At 8 p.m., Biden led Donald Trump nationwide by 4,181,916 votes, with election workers still counting in Pennsylvania, Alaska, Nevada, Arizona, Georgia and North Carolina, where the count was close.
    Overall, Biden had 74,387,118 popular and 253 Electoral College votes. Trump had 70,205,202 popular votes and 214 Electoral College votes. Biden led Trump by 4,182,822 popular votes and 39 Electoral College votes. The winner must claim 270 Electoral College votes.
Pensioners Club President Clyde Silva volunteers
for Nourish Pāhala. Photo by Julia Neal
    While Alaska was expected to go for Trump, Biden predicted he would win the other undecided states. However, he only needs Pennsylvania to win, following Michigan and Wisconsin flipping from voting Republican to Democrat in this presidential election. Pennsylvania reported 3,336,887 votes for Biden versus 3,308,054 for Trump at 8 p.m.
    While Biden has called for patience to honor every legitimate vote that was cast, Trump's campaign has filed numerous lawsuits to stop counting, contending fraud. Most of the Trump suits have been rejected by the courts, as states finish counting votes and Biden's lead continues to rise.
    Sen. Mazie Hirono said, "Every vote counts. Every vote matters. We won't let anyone take our democracy away, especially not Donald Trump."
    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, "No matter what happens tonight, let's remember who we are as Americans and what unites us — life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. United we stand, divided we fall. Onward, together! #election#freedom#ALOHA"
    Sen. Brian Schatz said, "Shout out to election workers everywhere. This race is so close in so many states that every volunteer can legitimately feel like they personally, meaningfully contributed to saving the republic."
    On Thursday evening, Trump said in a press conference from the White House briefing room, "If you count the legal votes, I easily win. If you count the illegal votes, they can try to steal the election from us, if you count the votes that came in late." He claimed "fraud by Democrats and the media" was influencing the count. "They're trying very obviously to commit fraud." He said mailed-in ballot counting had been tainted. He took no questions from the press.
    Trump said he will contest the election with "a lot of litigation" and claimed there have "been a lot of shenanigans, and we can't stand for that in our country."
    NPR, MSNBC, CBS, ABC, NBC, Twitter, radio stations and more stopped broadcasting Trump before he could finish his statement, with the complaint his speech was laced with falsehoods about the election. CNN's Anderson Cooper said the president is an "obese turtle on his back, flailing in the hot sun, realizing his time is over."
James Akau delivers to Walter Wong Yuen
for a neighbor. Photo by Julia Neal
    Trump's campaign has filed lawsuits in Michigan, Nevada and Pennsylvania, claiming Republican observers do not have sufficient access to vote counting locations. Michigan and Nevada state courts dismissed the suits. A Pennsylvania state court judge ruled observers have a right to be within six feet of ballot counting. A federal judge threw out a lawsuit to stop vote counting in Philadelphia.
    Biden said yesterday, "No one is going to take our democracy away from us. Not now, not ever. America has come too far, fought too many battles, and endured too much to let that happen. I ask people to stay calm. The process is working. The count is being completed."
    "In America, the vote is sacred," he said. "It's how the people of this nation express their will. And it is the will of the voters — no one, not anything else — that chooses the president of the United States of America. So each ballot must be counted. Democracy is sometimes messy. It sometimes requires a little patience as well. But that patience has been rewarded now for more than 240 years."
    In a speech tonight, Biden said that, despite no final victory yet, he expects to receive "more than 300 electoral votes. I know watching these vote tallies on TV moves very slowly, slow — and as slow as it goes, it can be numbing. But never forget, the tallies aren't just numbers. They represent votes and voters, men and women who exercised their fundamental right to have their voice heard. What's becoming clearer each hour is that a record number of Americans of all races, faiths, religions chose change over more of the same. They have given us a mandate for action on COVID, the economy, climate change, systemic racism."
 
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FORMER SENATOR RUSSELL RUDERMAN posted a farewell message on his senatorial Facebook page on Tuesday: "Aloha and Mahalo! On this, my last day as state senator, I thank you all for the support over the years. No flowery speeches today as I know we are focused on the election. This page may disappear soon. If you want to stay in touch please contact me on my personal page. Again, Aloha, and Mahalo!"
    Joy San Buenaventura took the state Senator District 2 seat on Nov. 3. She represents east Kaʻū and Volcano, into Puna and Hilo. Contact her at 808-586-6890 or sensanbuenaventura@capitol.hawaii.gov. See capitol.hawaii.gov/memberpage.aspx?member=Sanbuenaventura&year=2020.

Keiki and adults celebrated Halloween at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Nāʻālehu Farmers Market on Saturday, Oct. 31. 
See more and photos, below. OKK photo

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ATTEND HAWAIʻI FARMERS UNION UNITED VIRTUAL WORKSHOPS for HFUU members. Virtual: Carbon Market Information Expo will be held Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. Essential Resources for Essential Workers will be held Thursday, Nov. 12 at 4 p.m. The Squeeze Chute - Examining Market Concentration in our Fragile Food System(s) will be held Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 4 p.m.

SIGN UP TO LIST LOCAL ITEMS FOR SALE for Hawaiʻi Farms Union United members attending the HFUU Virtual Convention Nov. 12-15. The Hawaii Theatre will offer a SHOP LOCAL items for sale page. Vendors must be registered for the convention in order to sell items on the SHOP LOCAL page. 
    By submitting a request to publish the information and sell the item, sellers agree that 15 percent of the total sale will be retained as a commission and 4 percent will be retained to cover transaction fees by Hawaiʻi Theatre Center. Sellers must include shipping and handling, and 4.167 percent GET, in the cost for the item. Sellers are responsible for shipping items to purchasers and paying GET. Hawaiʻi Theatre will provide sellers with the purchaser's shipping information within 24 hours of purchase.
    Use this link to enter each individual item for sale.
    Registered for the convention at hfuu.org

Japan is the first country allowed to fly into Hawaiʻi since the pandemic
shut down international travel. Gov. David Ige, Lt. Josh Green, and the
press greeted one of the arrivals today. Photo from Facebook
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI'S FIRST INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT under the Safe Travels Program brought 64 travelers from Japan today. The All Nippon Airways flight originated from Haneda Airport in Tokyo. More than 100,000 domestic travelers have arrived in the state since Safe Travels began on Oct. 15. Yesterday, Kona Airport saw 932 arrivals, 667 of them tourists.
    The pre-travel testing program for incoming travelers to Hawai‘i is part of a layered program that includes thermal screening of all passengers at arrival gates and receiving a negative nucleic acid amplification COVID test within 72 hours of departure. Those who arrive with a pending test must quarantine until a negative test result is confirmed. Travelers who test positive must take a test that detects the virus's genetic material and quarantine. Those who choose not to test must quarantine for 14 days. 
    Upon returning to Japan, travelers are subject to quarantine. Most U.S. citizens are currently restricted from traveling to Japan. 
    Gov. David Ige held a morning news conference while the passengers from Japan were clearing customs and taking mandatory steps to prevent the spread of infectious disease. He said, "Today we welcome additional visitors from Japan who are participating in the pre-travel testing program. This allows us to revive our economy while keeping our community, the people who work here, and those in the hospitality industry, safe." 


    Lt. Gov. Josh Green said, "This program helps us welcome back friends and loved ones traveling from Japan, thanks to the governor's strong leadership. We are excited to reunite people and restore some hope."
    Eric Takahata, with Hawai‘i Tourism Japan, called today a "momentous day." He said the arrival of the first international flight under the pre-travel testing program is exciting and people should be proud that the incredibly hard work of both Hawai‘i's and Japan's leaders and the hospitality industry made this possible. He also singled out the work of House Speaker Scott Saiki, Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism Director Mike McCartney, and Hawai‘i Tourism Authority President and CEO John De Fries for their coordination.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Christopher-Jay Baird has been missing
since Nov. 30, 2019.

HELP POLICE FIND A MISSING CHRISTOPHER-JAY K. BAIRD. A 38-year-old Kaʻū, Baird was last seen in Hawaiian Ocean View Estates subdivision on Nov. 302019. He is described as a local male, medium build, approximately 5'3" tall, 160 pounds, short brown hair, and brown eyes. He may also frequent the Kona area.
    Police ask anyone with any information on his whereabouts to call non-emergency at (808) 935-3311, or Officer Sayaalii Baker of Kaʻū Patrol Division at (808) 939-2520.
    Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FREE DRIVE-THRU COVID TESTING will be held in Kona tomorrow, Saturday, Nov, 7, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at West Hawaiʻi Civic Center, 74-5044 Ane Keohokālole Hwy. No testing in Hilo. No insurance necessary, but bring insurance card if have. No co-pay. Face coverings and social distancing required. For more, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

A group of celebrants at OKK's 
Halloween event during the
market last Saturday. OKK photo
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HALLOWEEN WAS CELEBRATED SOCIALLY DISTANT and with mask precautions in place at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Nāʻālehu Farmers Market on Saturday, Oct. 31. The free keiki Halloween event saw 132 children attend. Volunteers painted keiki's arms and hands with fun artwork, keiki were given pumpkins to paint and take home, free Halloween COVID masks were given out, and they were encouraged to go trick or treating around the market grounds.
Almost 300 adults also came to listen to the Lucky Lizard band, or enjoy a bite to eat, or simply show off their own Halloween costumes.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HALF-OFF SALE AT COOPER CENTER'S THRIFT AND BOOK STORE is held tomorrow, Saturday, Nov. 7.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

VOLCANO WINERY'S HOLIDAY SHIPPING SPECIAL is in effect through Dec. 31. Buyers can take 10 percent off six bottles or 20 percent off 12 bottles. Discounted shipping for six bottles is $20 for Hawaiʻi, $40 for mainland, and $75 for Alaska. Discounted shipping for 12 bottles is $25 for Hawaiʻi, $50 for mainland, and $90 for Alaska. Visit volcanowinery.com, call 808-967-7772, or go to the winery in person, 35 Piʻi Mauna Drive in Volcano.

Socially distant and wearing masks, two keiki paint pumpkins at OKK's
Halloween event during the market last Saturday. OKK photo

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ANNUAL KAMAHALO HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR will be held Friday and Saturday, Nov. 27 and 28, the two days after Thanksgiving. More than 30 vendors will be on hand with homemade, handmade and homegrown items. Besides gift items, Cooper Center Council volunteers will make hearty soups and food for hungry shoppers. The Fair is a project of the Cooper Center Council and proceeds will be used to fund community activities and projects such as the Volcano Friends Feeding Friends hot meal program. See the current newsletter for more details. Download vendor forms here.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE U.S. REPORTED MORE THAN 100,000 COVID CASES for the third day in the last week, at 121,500. More than half the states in the U.S. have recorded record virus numbers. The cumulative COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 9,727,345 – about 19.5 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 236,025 – about 19 percent of worldwide deaths – more than 1,000 new deaths each day.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

    
Hawaiʻi reports no new COVID deaths for the fourth day in a row.
    Hawaiʻi Island reports 21 new COVID cases today. There are at least 11 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    New cases reported statewide today total 122, with 87 on Oʻahu, six on Maui, one on Kauaʻi, one on Lanaʻi, and six residents diagnosed out-of-state.
    Since the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 219 people have died in the state, according to state records, none new today.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 15,691 total COVID cases in the state. Oʻahu has reported 13,596 total cases, Maui 421, Lanaʻi 106, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 69. Residents diagnosed while out-of-state,107. Statewide, 1,134 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases have been reported in the last 28 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip codes 96772 and 96777. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96737, and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In the last 28 days, in Hilo zip code 96720, 30 cases have been reported in the last 25 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 109 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In zip code 96743 – which includes Waikoloa, Kawaihae, Waimea, Puako, Waikui, and Akona – 13 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Pepeʻekeo zip code 96783, 28 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies. 
    Worldwide, there are more than 49.22 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,241,366.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Attend the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Saturday, Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., helps raise funds for OVCC and benefit local artists and crafters. Free admission. Face masks required for all. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs Saturday, Nov. 7 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday in Volcano Village on Nov. 14 features Volcano Art Center, volcanoartcenter.org, with choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant, will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Volcano Garden Arts, volcanogardenarts.com, & Café Ono, cafeono.net, will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques. See experiencevolcano.com.

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events
 Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers
 can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Renew or Apply for Membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until Nov. 30. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special. Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.

Give Input on Cleaning up the Former Quarry Firing Range in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Engineering evaluation and cost analysis will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1. Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online at parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?parkId=307&projectID=92898. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.

    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

ONGOING
COMMUNITY
New Operating Hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270. 

New Operating Hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

COVID-19 Talk Story
 on Nā Leo TV
 series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

Ocean View Community Market
, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet
 open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

FOOD
One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

FINANCES
Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter. Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program
. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

EDUCATION
Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

ʻOhana Help Desk offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

HEALTH
Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden
, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective
. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.

AGRICULTURE
Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers
 urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, November 7, 2020

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The dance of Veracruz in Mexico came to Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder’s Hoʻokupu Hula No Kaʻū Cultural Festival
 last November. See more photos below and look back at the event, canceled due to the pandemic this year, in
Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year. Photo by Julia Neal

THE FORTY-SIXTH U.S. PRESIDENT-ELECT, JOE BIDEN, promised to serve all Americans, from Trump supporters to moderates and progressives, as he made his acceptance speech Saturday night: "Folks, the people of this nation have spoken. They've delivered us a clear victory, a convincing victory for we the people. We've won with the most votes ever cast for a presidential ticket in the history of the nation. Seventy-four million." The number has since exceeded 75 million, 
A light show featuring choreographed drones flashing lights to spell out
46 to indicate the announcement of the election of the
46th U.S. President-Elect, Joe Biden.
    Winning became apparent Saturday morning when Biden took Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, and Pennsylvania to acquire the 270 Electoral College votes for the presidency. It was five days into meticulous vote-counting around the country since Tuesday, Nov. 3, Election Day.
    In response to Biden's win over Trump, Hawaiʻi's congressional delegation weighed in:
    Sen. Brian Schatz said, "The republic has been saved. The challenges within the republic remain, but at least we still have one." In a phone interview with NBC, he said, "I am going to clean the slate and be open-minded to the idea that this will open up a new era of cooperation. The real test is whether there's going to be a blockade against [a Biden] Cabinet. If there is, we know [Republicans] are deciding to go scorched earth. 
    Sen. Mazie Hirono posted to social media, "Just landed back in DC and heard the great news that @JoeBiden and @KamalaHarris will be the next President and Vice President of the United States! It's been a grueling four years, but I'm excited to get to work with Joe and Kamala to bring our country together."
    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, herself a presidential contender in the primary, posted to social media, "Joe, congratulations on your election. You promised to be president not just of those who voted for you but for those who didn't. Now it is time for unity & healing. You have the grave responsibility to do your best to make that happen. May God be with you in this noble endeavor."
President-Elect Joe Biden with Sen. Mazie Hirono. FB photo 
    While Pres. Donald Trump refused to concede, his appeals claiming fraud and illegal voting going nowhere with judges, global leaders congratulated Biden and news outlets declared Biden the winner ahead of his acceptance speech.
    The Washington Post reported that Biden has promised to rejoin the Paris Climate Accord and World Health Organization, rescind Trump's ban on immigration from Muslim-majority countries, and establish a task force to reunite children taken from their families at border crossings. He promised to reestablish the DREAMER program for young people brought to the U.S. illegally. A task force to deal with the COVID pandemic is also in the works, to be named Monday.
    Biden's Cabinet may be named around Thanksgiving, with many Trump executive orders rescinded and new policies adopted soon after Biden takes his oath on Wednesday, Jan. 20.
    During the acceptance speeches in Biden's hometown of Wilmington, Delaware on Saturday, Vice-President Elect Kamala Harris took the stage. She is the first woman,  and the first person of color to be elected to the office. Of Jamaican and Indian immigrant heritage, she wore white, the color of the women's suffrage movement.
    She quoted the late John Lewis, who said, "Democracy is not a state. It is an act." Harris pointed out that more people than ever in U.S. history came into the democratic process to campaign and vote during this election. More than 145 million people cast a ballot in this election.
Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris with Sen. Mazie Hirono and supporters. 
FB photo
 
    Neither Biden nor Harris said anything negative about the sitting President and said this is the time to heal. Biden said, "I pledge to be a president who seeks not to divide but unify, who doesn't see red states and blue states, only sees the United States. I'll work with all my heart, with the confidence of the whole people, to win the confidence of all of you. ...I sought this office to restore the soul of America, to rebuild the background of this nation - the middle class... And to make America respected around the world again. And reunite us here at home."
    See the full speech at washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/11/7/annotated-Biden-victory-speech/.
    In a statement before his speech, Biden said it's time for the U.S. "to put the anger and the harsh rhetoric behind us and come together as a nation. There's nothing we can't do if we do it together." 
    Trump said he would "not rest until the American People have the honest vote count they deserve and that Democracy demands." He posted a tweet, which was flagged by Twitter as potentially misleading: "I WON THIS ELECTION, BY A LOT!" Trump is the first incumbent president to lose reelection since 1992, when Republican George H.W. Bush lost to Bill Clinton. 
Biden is the name spelled out by a dance troupe of tiny drones in the sky,
directed from the ground at the President-Elect speech Saturday.
    The General Election revealed record-breaking voting across the U.S., with over 103 million early ballots cast. Biden's more than 75 million Popular vote count is the most ever cast for U.S. President. 
    Former President Barack Obama said the U.S. is "fortunate that Joe's got what it takes to be President and already carries himself that way."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

STATES STILL UNDECIDED were Alaska, Georgia, and North Carolina at 8 p.m. on Saturday. Alaska has three Electoral votes, North Carolina 15, and Georgia 16.  If Trump were to take all three states, he would not have enough Electoral votes nor Popular votes to win. 
    At 8 p.m., Biden held 290 Electoral votes. Trump held 214. Biden had 50.6 percent of the Popular vote, Trump 47.7 percent – a nearly three percent lead.
    If Biden takes Georgia, he would have 306 Electoral votes, the same number as Trump in 2016 when Trump lost the Popular vote but took the presidency.

Drones in the sky spell out President-Elect for the Joe Biden speech accompanying his presidential victory on .
Saturday. The event took place in Delaware.

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UP TO 25 PERCENT OF TRAVELERS ARE TESTED FOR COVID after entering Hawaiʻi County from out-of-state. This is a change from giving the fast test to every pretested person who lands. Those without a negative pretest must adhere to the mandatory 14-day self-quarantine.
    Mayor Harry Kim said the cost and lack of adequate space at the airports, to give the second test to everyone make it unsustainable.  Said Kim, "We're testing 25 percent of passengers instead, and we believe we'll still get a picture of how much spread of COVID-19 there is among incoming passengers.”
    The cost is borne by Hawai‘i County via Federal CARES Act funding.

Fungicide spraying and avoiding contamination spread are ways to fight
Coffee Leaf Rust once it infects an area. Kona and Hilo have suspected
cases, and Maui is confirmed.
Photo from Dept. of Ag
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COFFEE LEAF RUST has tentatively been found in Kona. Results are not yet confirmed for suspected CLR in Hilo and Kona, but confirmed on Maui. Andrea Kawabata of University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources urges all Hawaiʻi Islanders to "check your coffee tree leaves for signs and symptoms" of "the world's most important and devastating disease of coffee." A state guide to the fungal pathogen and submission form can be found here
Coffee Leaf Rust threatens the coffee industry in Hawaiʻi.
Photo from worldcoffeeresearch.org
    Proper application of fungicides is critical for the suppression and management of CLR, says a message from Kawabata. "Please read through the Spraying to Suppress Coffee Leaf Rust publication carefully. Fungicide product rotation is especially important for reducing the risk of CLR becoming resistant to approved products. Whenever handling, mixing, and applying pesticides, read the product label completely and follow all directions provided on the label. This is an updated publication from that you may have received earlier (Nov. 4). Please replace the old document with this newer version."
New webpage for Coffee Leaf Rust: hawaiicoffeeed.com/clr.html.
    Kawabata said she is postponing farm visits because of the risk of CLR spread. She’s asks people to follow sanitation procedures provided by USDA to reduce the spread of CLR spores to non-infected locations and farms.
    Clear photos of the upper and lower surfaces of leaves with potential CLR can be sent to Kawabata. Do not bring suspected CLR leaf samples to the Extension Office – photos only. Contact Kawabata via text 415-604-1511 or email andreak@hawaii.edu.
    Kawabata also asks that any suggestions on additional publications on CLR be sent to her for review and posting. See her CLR resource page.

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Four Kinds of ʻŌʻō, Limited Edition, giclée print by Caren Loebel-Fried.

WATCH THE VIRTUAL BOOK RELEASE of Manu, The Boy Who Loved Birds by Caren Loebel-Fried. The event, held Nov. 5, was hosted by Volcano Art Center. The award-winning author and artist, Loebel-Fried, joined some of those who helped behind the scenes with the book. They include Thane Pratt, Paul Banko of U.S. Geological Survey, Chris Farmer of the American Bird Conservancy, Noah Gomes of Kamehameha Schools, Rachel Sprague of Conservation Council for Hawaiʻi, Les Welsh of National Wildlife Federation, Joel Cosseboom of University of Hawaiʻi Press, and Julie Williams of Volcano Art Center. Watch the virtual book release presentation here. 
    An option to purchase Manu, The Boy Who Loved Birds with personalized inscriptions is available online. The public can also purchase Loebel-Fried's limited edition block prints featuring art from the book, online.

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THE U.S. REPORTED MORE THAN 100,000 COVID CASES for the fourth day in the eight days, at 122,075. The cumulative COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 9,849,420 – about 19.5 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 237,125 – about 19 percent of worldwide deaths – more than 1,000 new deaths each day for the last five days.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

    
Hawaiʻi Island reports 11 new COVID cases today. The average daily case count for Hawaiʻi Island is 8.2. There are at least 10 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    New cases reported statewide today total 128, with 108 on Oʻahu, two on Maui, two on Kauaʻi, and five residents diagnosed out-of-state.
    Since the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 220 people have died in the state, according to state records, one new today.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 15,819 total COVID cases in the state. Oʻahu has reported 13,704 total cases, Maui 423, Lanaʻi 106, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 71. Residents diagnosed while out-of-state,112. Statewide, 1,157 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases have been reported in the last 28 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip codes 96772 and 96777. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96737, and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In Hilo zip code 96720, 24 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 103 cases have been reported. In zip code 96743 – which includes Waikoloa, Kawaihae, Waimea, Puako, Waikui, and Akona – 13 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Pepeʻekeo zip code 96783, 29 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies. 
    Worldwide, there are more than 49.72 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,248,680.


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USING CUTTING EDGE TECHNIQUES TO MONITOR KĪLAUEA'S HOT WATER LAKE is the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. This week's article is by HVO technician Frank Younger:
    Innovative Monitoring of Kīlauea's Summit Water Lake
    Famous for glowing red lava and billowing volcanic plumes, Halema‘uma‘u has long inspired poets, painters and photographers to find meaning in the color and light of this dynamic landscape.
    Today, Kīlauea's current phase of activity has inspired volcanologists to experiment with cutting edge techniques to understand the dynamic colors and patterns of Halema‘uma‘u’s newest feature: a steaming hot water lake.
An HVO scientist tests a colorimeter instrument on the water lake within
Halema‘uma‘u, at Kīlauea's summit. Colorimetry is the measurement
of the wavelength and intensity of light. USGS photo by M. Patrick
    For fifteen months now, hot groundwater has been seeping into the collapse pit created by the evacuation of the 2008–2018 Halema‘uma‘u lava lake and part of the underlying summit magma chamber. Since the gaping pit and the water lake rising within are physically inaccessible, the USGS HVO uses remote techniques to monitor this changing, and potentially hazardous, environment.
    HVO uses Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS, or "drones") to collect water samples, the chemical analyses of which are snapshots of lake composition. Visual and thermal cameras keep constant watch on the lake surface and the hot fumaroles surrounding it. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) helps to reveal the lake's growing form. A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is integrated with frequent water level measurements to calculate lake depth, volume, and inflow rate. These quantitative data sets are complemented by the written accounts of HVO scientists, who document their first-hand observations in field logs.
    The lake gives strong impressions of color, pattern, and motion. When it first emerged, it was described as a pond of milky turquoise water. Later, it developed yellow hues and green shoreline margins. Today, the lake surface has lobes of rust orange water over expanses of deep brown, with patches of light brown and tan. Elongated green inflows emerge from the rocky shoreline, along which several ruddy spots have recently upwelled.
    The water surface is a mosaic in constant motion, a scene that changes by the minute and hour. Sharply defined color boundaries are often seen, accompanied by more subtle gradients and mixing. The patchwork waters may indicate zones of distinct temperature and dissolved constituents, and their movement is likely driven by differentials of density, wind, and fresh groundwater inflow. 
    As HVO scientists documented the lake's early growth and development, they recognized the need to define these valuable visual observations of color with quantitative measurements, and to help control for variable effects of lighting, personal impressions, and the color biases in cameras.  
The colorful caldera lake at Kīlauea summit. The view is from the western
rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, 1900 ft (580 m) above the water surface,
in a restricted area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
USGS photo by M. Patrick on Aug. 25.
    A colorimeter instrument, a handheld optical device that measures chromaticity and brightness, is being field-tested for this purpose. A similar type of color measurement was conducted at Aso Volcano in Japan in 2010, inspiring the techniques used by HVO. In an experiment to test its efficacy at Kīlauea, HVO scientists use a portable colorimeter to quantify visual observations and track color changes over time.
    Colorimeters are more commonly used in industries like food processing and textile manufacturing than in volcanology. Colorimetry is the measurement of the wavelength and intensity of light. The quantification of color can be divided in two parts. Brightness, or luminicity, is the quantity of light that is reflected, emitted from, or passes through an object. Chromaticity is a measurement of hue and colorfulness, independent of brightness. Colorimetry relates these variables to the human eye's sensation of color, and to our judgement of the physical stimulus of light.
    In the field, scientists make broad visual observations, then sight the colorimeter at a point of interest. The record of chromaticity and brightness builds upon hydrologic and geologic data sets, contributing insight that may help link other remote observations. Analysis of the colorimetry data from this experimental technique may help scientists explain the dynamic colors seen at the Halema‘uma‘u lake.
    Lake color changes may possibly even signal changing volcanic conditions beneath the watery depths. Water color and appearance changes have been observed at other active crater lakes around the world. For example, at Aso Volcano in Japan in 2003, Yudamari lake changed from blue green to solid green before an eruption occurred at the lake bottom.
    While we don't know if the water lake within Halema‘uma‘u would have a similar color change prior to an eruption, it is a potential indicator that HVO scientists will be looking for and tracking as part of routine monitoring in the post-2018 collapse era of Kīlauea activity.

Discovered in July of 2019, the lake in Halema‘uma‘u began as a small, green pond. USGS photos


    Volcano Activity Updates
    Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL (https://www.usgs.gov/natural-hazards/volcano-hazards/about-alert-levels). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.
    Kīlauea monitoring data for the month of October show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see https://www.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/k-lauea-summit-water-resources.
    Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.
    This past week, about 42 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper-elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths of less than 8 kilometers (about 5 miles). Global Positioning System measurements show long-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations and fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit remain stable. Webcams show no changes to the landscape. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see: https://www.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna-loa/monitoring.
    There were three events with three or more felt reports in the Hawaiian Islands during the past week: a M2.6 earthquake 6 km (3 mi) N of Wai‘ōhinu at 0 km (0 mi) depth on Nov. 3 at 6:40 a.m., a M3.5 earthquake 9 km (5 mi) ENE of Pāhala at 30 km (18 mi) depth on Nov. 2 at 1:47 a.m., and a M2.9 earthquake 1 km (0 mi) W of Pāhala at 34 km (21 mi) depth on Oct. 31 at 8:25 a.m.
    HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity.
    Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

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Hula from Hoʻomaikaʻi Hula Studio at last year's Hoʻokopu No Kaʻū Cultural Festival. Photo by Julia Neal

Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
Men from Mexico City who dance Tahitian arrived in Pāhala last year with
a troupe of some 40 members of Ballet Bali Hai. Photo by Julia Neal
THIS TIME LAST YEAR, Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder was preparing for Hoʻokupu Hula No Kaʻū Cultural Festival at Pāhala Community Center. The free day-long event – canceled this year due to COVID – featured many troupes of dancers from across Hawaiʻi and the world. Many Hawaiian musicians graded the stage. Attendees could also learn about Hawaiian agricultural and aquaculture practices, building traditional Hawaiian houses and instruments, and see other cultural demonstrations and workshops. Games, and foods and crafts for sale, were also on offer.
    The theme was appreciation of cultures worldwide, and the welcoming of those from afar who study Polynesian music and dance. Kumu Debbie Ryder and her husband Kawehi founded the festival on Lanaʻi, and established a cultural exchange with Hawaiian dancers and musicians from Kaʻū who traveled there. After five years, the festival moved from Lanaʻi to the grounds of Pāhala Plantation House, which it quickly outgrew, and on to Pāhala Community Center. The Ryders now live and work in Kaʻū with the schools and community, teaching Hawaiian dance, music, agriculture, and other cultural practices.
Making poi at last year's Hoʻokopu No Kaʻū Cultural Festival. 
Photo by Julia Neal
    
Dance troupes included more than 30 members of Ballet Bali Hai of Mexico City under Clara Snell; Hoʻomakaʻi Hula Studio of Oʻahu under Kumu Hula Shona LamHo; Hālau Hula O Leionalani of Kaʻū under Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder; Hālau Ola O Kalani of Kaʻū under Kumu Hula Moses Kahoʻokele Crabbe; Kawehileimamoikawekiu o Kohala ogf Kohala under Kumu Hula Lorna Lim; Uluhaimalama of Hilo under Kumu Hula Emery Acerat; Aloha Pumehana/Vero Cruz Mexican Dances of Mexico under Professor Vero Ramirez; Hālau Kahanuola of Virginia under Instructor Keiko Alva; UH-Hilo's Filipino Dance Ensemble; UH-Hilo's Samoan Dance Ensemble; and Taiko Drummers under Paul Sakamoto.
A keiki dancer and singer watches on as Shona Lam Ho's
hālau performs last year. Photo by Julia Neal
    
Musicians included Keaiwa, Times 5, Victor Chock, Steven Sioloa, Wailau Ryder & Friends, Kaleo Maoli, and Shootz.
    Cultural demonstrations included making poi by hand on stone poi pounders, and preparing kukui nuts and sea salt. Hawaiian medicine and nutritious food for heart health were on display. Kiko Johnson-Kitagawa, of Honuʻapo, displayed his outrigger canoe. Expert Wally Ito and Pam Lota Fujii helped educate the public about local seaweed and the limu's nutritional and cultural value. Crafts for sale included handmade Polynesian drums by the master, Ika Vea, and lei from the kumu of Hoʻomakaʻi.
    Among those who attended were Mayor Harry Kim and Kaʻū-Keaʻau-Pāhoa District School Superintendent Keoni Farias. Both said they were inspired by the Hawaiian culture presented at the festival.
    See hookupukau.com.

Women of Mexico Citywho dance Tahitian in Pāhala at last year's Hoʻokupu No Kaʻū. Photo by Julia Neal


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Celebrate Veterans at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Market in Nāʻālehu on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free watermelon for all attendees. Veterans receive a $15 voucher to purchase lunch from market vendors. Musical entertainment provided. Limited chairs available; bring chairs if need. Market will operate as usual.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Second Saturday in Volcano Village on Nov. 14 features Volcano Art Center, volcanoartcenter.org, with choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant, will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Volcano Garden Arts, volcanogardenarts.com, & Café Ono, cafeono.net, will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques. See experiencevolcano.com.

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting
, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.
    Attend virtual workshops: Virtual: Carbon Market Information Expo will be held Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. Essential Resources for Essential Workers will be held Thursday, Nov. 12 at 4 p.m. The Squeeze Chute - Examining Market Concentration in our Fragile Food System(s)will be held Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 4 p.m.
    Hawaii Theatre will offer a SHOP LOCAL items for sale page. Vendors must be registered for the convention in order to sell items on the SHOP LOCAL page. By submitting a request to publish the information and sell the item, sellers agree that 15 percent of the total sale will be retained as a commission and 4 percent will be retained to cover transaction fees by Hawaiʻi Theatre Center. Sellers must include shipping and handling, and 4.167% GET, in the cost for the item. Sellers are responsible for shipping items to purchasers and paying GET. Hawaiʻi Theatre will provide sellers with the purchaser's shipping information within 24 hours of purchase. Use this link to enter each individual item for sale.
    Registered for the convention at hfuu.org

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Renew or Apply for Membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until Nov. 30. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special. Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.

Give Input on Cleaning up the Former Quarry Firing Range in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Engineering evaluation and cost analysis will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1. Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online at parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?parkId=307&projectID=92898. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.

    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

ONGOING
COMMUNITY
New Operating Hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270. 

New Operating Hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

COVID-19 Talk Story
 on Nā Leo TV
 series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

Ocean View Community Market
, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet
 open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

FOOD
One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

FINANCES
Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter. Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program
. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

EDUCATION
Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

ʻOhana Help Desk offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

HEALTH
Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden
, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective
. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.

AGRICULTURE
Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers
 urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, November 8, 2020

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The new  wayside exhibit at Kīlauea Overlook has 3D models of Kaluapele (Kīlauea caldera) that reveal the
geologic changes to the summit area over time. Pictured: Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Acting Superintendent
Rhonda Loh (left); park visual information specialist Andrew LaValle (front), Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National
Park President & CEO Elizabeth Fien and  park volunteer George Jensen (right). Read details, below. NPS Photo/Janice Wei

"WE TOOK THE TIME DEMOCRACY DESERVED," said Congressman Ed Case, commenting on the days of vote counting that led to Joe Biden becoming president-elect and Kamala Harris becoming vice president-elect. On Saturday, Case, who has represented Kaʻū and now represents urban Oʻahu, said, "Now the real work begins, of charting a better path forward for all Americans, of healing a bitterly divided country, of listening to and including the almost half of our fellow Americans who chose differently.
    "This work will be profoundly difficult. But today we all can reflect with pride and humility on the resilience of our democracy and recommit ourselves each in our own way to our own role and responsibility."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE U.S. SENATE MAJORITY WILL BE DECIDED no earlier than Jan. 5, due to scheduled runoffs in both Georgia races. As of 6:30 p.m., Alaska and one of North Carolina's races were not yet called. Both races lean toward the Republican candidate. If either of Georgia's races is decided for the Republican candidate, the Senate will likely retain a Republican majority. Hawaiʻi held no U.S. Senate races this year.
    Sen. Brian Schatz tweeted today: "These Georgia Senate races will determine whether or not we can pass a new Voting Rights Act. These two Georgia Senate races will determine whether we are going to preserve ACA and protect people w pre-existing conditions if and when the SCOTUS trashes the health care law. These upcoming Georgia Senate races will determine whether or not Mitch McConnell has a veto over the Biden cabinet.
    "I'm not going to tolerate anyone suddenly finding their inner fiscal discipline now that Biden is President Elect. We need major investments to help businesses and families come out the other side of this. Policy should be expansionary for economic, moral, and health reasons. *I really enjoyed typing the words 'now that Biden is President Elect.'"

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Body Worn Cameras come to Hawaiʻi Island on Monday.
POLICE WILL USE BODY WORN CAMERAS on Hawaiʻi Island beginning Monday, Nov. 9. Hawaiʻi Police Department will roll out the new equipment in South Hilo, Kona, and Puna districts. The entire island is expected to be outfitted before the end of 2020, says an announcement from HPD. "We are enthusiastic to be able to enter a new era of technology with a tool that will assist us in making both the Community and the Department a better place to work and live in." 
    HPD released a list of frequently asked questions: What are Body Worn Cameras and what are they for? 
BWC's are small cameras that an officer wears on their body. They record interactions between the officer and community members (e.g., the public, victims, and suspects). Recordings from BWC's can be used to demonstrate transparency to the public; document statements, observations, behaviors, and other things officers may witness; and it can also help deter unprofessional, illegal and inappropriate actions by both law enforcement and the public. 
   What kind of cameras will be in use? The Department will be using the Axon Body 2, a camera that is in use by many agencies across the nation. The camera will capture 720p HD (high definition) video. 
    Who will be wearing these cameras and when will they be using them? All HPD uniformed Patrol Officers, Community Policing Officers, and Traffic Enforcement Units will receive them. Officers will activate them when they have contact with the public in a Law Enforcement capacity such as on traffic stops, during arrests, or any call they are assigned to respond to. They will stop the recording once they are done with that incident. 
    What if I call an officer to my house to report something? I don't want them filming inside my house.  Officers have received training on and will use their discretion in instances where a victim requests not to be on camera and may turn it off if asked. However, if the situation requires their taking law enforcement action, the camera will be on. 
    
If I was involved in an incident and the officer took footage during that encounter, can I have the video? 
    All formal requests for videos can be made to the Police Chief's Office. While it is not a guarantee of receiving the video, all requests will be considered and weighed. It is the goal of the Department to enter this new era of technology working with its community to ensure it becomes a safer place to work and live. 
    How long are videos kept
    All HPD BWC videos will be kept for a minimum of two years. Videos that are tied to or associated with a case will be kept for as long as is necessary until the case is adjudicated. 
    Send comments and questions to copsysop@hawaiicounty.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AN EXPANDED COVID-19 DASHBOARD was released last week. A collaboration of Hawaiʻi Emergency Management Agency and Department of Health, the dashboard updates daily at 3 p.m. It provides access to daily COVID-19 case counts, seven-day case averages, positivity rates, and the number of deaths caused by COVID-19. It also features a county-by-county summary of hospital resources, including the availability of ICU beds and ventilators. The expanded dashboard is accessible on mobile devices. 

See the state's expanded COVID dashboard.

    HI-EMA Administrator Luke Meyers said, "In addition to virus data, this new COVID-19 dashboard will provide a single site where users can find data on Hawaiʻi's economy, as well as additional information on travel, tourism and how hospitals are coping with the pandemic." HI-EMA will maintain and update the dashboard, which launched in early September, with content provided by DOH and its partners in the medical profession. 
    DOH Director Libby Char said, "What began as a health dashboard is now evolving and maturing as we continue our fight against COVID-19. Measuring our progress, preparing, and planning for our entire state involves much more than counting positive cases. We appreciate HI-EMA's work to enhance and maintain the data dashboard." 
    View the new dashboard at hawaiicovid19.com/dashboard/

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

NEW WAYFINDING SIGNS are up at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The 31 new signs were funded by Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and the National Park Foundation. Visitors who explore the summit of Kīlauea can now learn about the 2018 eruption and navigate their way between destinations on the volcano with the help of the signs. 
Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park President & CEO Elizabeth Fien (left) and Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National 
Park acting Superintendent Rhonda Loh check out the new orientation signs on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. 
NPS Photo/Janice Wei
    Many of the new signs share Hawaiian place names and directions to trails and volcanic features, like steam vents and sulfur deposits. Others include models of Kaluapele (Kīlauea caldera) that reveal the geologic changes to the summit area over time. 
    The signs were designed and installed by staff and volunteers on the Park's Interpretation & Education team. They are strategically placed around the summit of Kīlauea and on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. A new upright orientation sign will soon be installed at the Kahuku Unit, with information about the eight trails, a map and other useful information, bringing the total number of new park signs to 31. 
    Beginning in May 2018, the park and Kīlauea summit underwent a major change as magma drained from the chamber beneath Halema‘uma‘u Crater, and the caldera began to collapse, triggering 60,000 strong earthquakes and clouds of rock and ash that continued until early August 2018. The seismic activity was primarily centered near the crater, and significantly impacted Jaggar Museum and the USGS-operated Reginald T. Okamura facility, which remain closed today. While most of the Park has reopened, the 2018 eruption and caldera collapse were the most destructive eruptive events in Hawai‘i in the last two centuries. 
    Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Acting Superintendent Rhonda Loh said, "We think everyone from first-time visitors to long-time park devotees will be as pleased as we are with the beautiful new signs and the information that they convey. We deeply appreciate the support from Friends and the National Park Foundation to fund the project." 
One of the new wayfinding signs around Kīlauea summit. Pictured:
Elizabeth Fien, President & CEO of Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National
Park (front/center); Chief of Interpretation Ben Hayes (right); park
volunteer George Jensen (back) and visual information specialist
Andrew LaValle (left). NPS Photo/Janice Wei
    Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park President and CEO, Elizabeth Fien, said, "This project fits perfectly with our core mission. Having current signage in the park reduces visitor confusion and provides opportunities to learn about the momentous events of 2018 and how Kīlauea changed the park." 
    See nps.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

GUIDANCE ON HEALTH PRECAUTIONS DURING THE HOLIDAYS are issued by Hawaiʻi Department of Health: "This year, your ‘ohana's health and safety is the top priority. In Hawaiʻi, the holidays typically are a time to welcome home family members who have been away at school or host visiting friends. Unfortunately, the holiday merriment and festivities we crave are among the highest-risk scenarios for transmitting COVID-19. It’s important to keep everyone safe, especially vulnerable family members, and avoid overburdening healthcare professionals and hospitals."
    Dr. Elizabeth Char, director of health, says, "We will soon enter six weeks of the holiday season, between Thanksgiving and New Year's. If we celebrate as we always have, Hawaiʻi will see another dangerous rise in cases. We must avoid 'superspreader' events, especially if infection rates and case counts surge in our state. We all need to remain vigilant to protect our island home by avoiding large indoor gatherings, dinners or parties."


    DOH recommends all members of the public pay close attention to the number and rate of COVID-19 cases on-island or in the community to determine whether to hold a holiday gathering
    Lowest risk holiday festivities, says HPD, include virtual-only activities, events, and gatherings. "Modern technology is a great way to stay emotionally close when we're physically distant." 
    More risky festivities include small outdoor and in-person gatherings, in which individuals from different households remain spaced at least six feet apart. Participants should wear masks and come from the same local area. Do not share objects, or hug or kiss. 
    Highest risk festive activities include large in-person gatherings where it is difficult for individuals to remain spaced at least six feet apart, and people hug or otherwise touch. The risk is increased further if attendees come from different communities, towns, cities or counties. 
    Safe recommendations include celebrating outside, keeping distance with those from different households, including not kissing, hugging or touching; keeping gatherings small; serve food safely by providing individually packaged meals or bentos; and posting reminder signs: "Include messages about showing aloha without hugs and kisses, and protecting kūpuna by giving them space." 
Kaʻū Hospital's Activity Coordinator, Jessica Camba-Penera, and
Recreational Aides Justie Wroblewski and Brenda Martin,
receive a shave ice machine from OKK.
    See https://hawaiicovid19.com/safe-gatherings/.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

VIETNAM VETERAN WAYNE KAWACHI, president of OKK, encourages veterans and the public to come to ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's market in Nāʻālehu on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., to celebrate Veteran's Day. The community organization offers free watermelon to all attendees and a $15 voucher for every veteran in attendance, to purchase lunch from market vendors. Musical entertainment is also provided. Limited chairs available – first-come, first served – so bring chairs if need. The market will be operating as usual.
Stacyn Sakuma, left, whose home town is Pāhala, and
staff member at Yukio Okustu State Veterans Home,
receive a shave ice machine from OKK.
    
OKK recently donated shave ice machines to Ka’u Hospital and Okutsu State Veterans Home OKK has also been donating food, such as fresh fish, staples and snacks and drinks, to individuals in Kaʻū and frontline workers. Kawachi and others have gone fishing and donated their catch to kūpuna. They have given hot meals, coffee, and more since the pandemic began.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE U.S. REPORTED MORE THAN 100,000 COVID CASES for the fifth day in the last nine days, at 111,900. The cumulative COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 9,961,320 – about 19.5 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 237,566 – about 19 percent of worldwide deaths.
    The worldwide cumulative COVID count surpassed 50 million today. The death toll is more than 1,255,250.
    Hawaiʻi Island reports 19 new COVID cases today. The average daily case count for Hawaiʻi Island is 7.4. There are at least 10 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus. 
    New cases reported statewide today total 128, with 106 on Oʻahu, two on Maui, and one resident diagnosed out-of-state.
    Since the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 221 people have died in the state, according to state records, one new today. 
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 15,947 total COVID cases in the state. Oʻahu has reported 13,810 total cases, Maui 425, Lanaʻi 106, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 71. Residents diagnosed while out-of-state, 113. Statewide, 1,161 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

    No new cases have been reported in the last 28 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip codes 96772 and 96777. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96737, and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In the last 28 days, in Hilo zip code 96720, 23 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 85 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In zip code 96743 – which includes Waikoloa, Kawaihae, Waimea, Puako, Waikui, and Akona – 15 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Pepeʻekeo zip code 96783, 13 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. 
    Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense said today, "Hawaiʻi Island has seen an increase of positive cases in recent weeks. Most of these recent cases are not travel related which means the virus is being transmitted within the community. Data from the Department of Health shows the majority of these cases have been identified as West Hawaiʻi based. Due to this data, increased testing, especially in the Kona area is being scheduled. Remember the purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the coronavirus. By getting tested know that you are helping stop the spread of this virus.
    "This high increase of the coronavirus is of great concern and demonstrates the critical need for you to follow the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing and gatherings. Know that the preventive policies are mandated and the Hawaiʻi Police Department will continue the enforcement of these policies."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Berta Miranda and family are featured in the Taiwan International Coffee Show's promotional film. 
Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
THIS TIME LAST YEAR, Kaʻū Coffee industry representatives were headed for the Taiwan International Coffee Show. Miranda's Coffee was featured in the presentation by Islander Hawaiʻi Coffee, which released a video in Mandarin Chinese, featuring the Miranda family on their Kaʻū farm. The convention was held at the Taipei Nangang Exhibition Center.
Kaʻū Coffee was featured at the Taiwan International Coffee Show
last year. Photo from Islander Hawaiian Coffee
    
In addition, Kaʻū Coffee broker Chris Manfredi, President of the Hawaiʻi Coffee Association, and Ralph Gaston, of Rusty's 100% Kaʻū Coffee, represented Hawaiʻi Coffee Growers from throughout the state. Madeline Longorio Garcia, who worked for Kaʻū Coffee growers and often makes presentations at the Kaʻū Coffee Festival, also attended. She was named as the new Community Coordinator for the Specialty Coffee Association of America in 2019.
    See the Islander Hawaiian Coffee Video at islander-select.com.
    The Kaʻū Coffee Festival also announced its annual event from May 8-17, which was ultimately canceled due to the pandemic.
    The 2020 festival was to feature a free Paʻina Open House at Pāhala Plantation House, Kaʻū Mountain, a tour of Kaʻū Valley Farms, Kaʻū Coffee & Cattle Day, stargazing at Kaʻū Coffee Mill, the Hoʻolauleʻa at Pāhala Community Center, Kaʻū Coffee College, Kaʻū Coffee Pageant and the Kaʻū Coffee Recipe Contest.
    See kaucoffeefestival.com/events.

Enthusiasm for living and working in Kaʻū Coffee is expressed in the Islander Hawaiian Coffee video.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Celebrate Veterans at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Market in Nāʻālehu on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free watermelon for all attendees. Veterans receive a $15 voucher to purchase lunch from market vendors. Musical entertainment provided. Limited chairs available; bring chairs if need. Market will operate as usual.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday in Volcano Village on Nov. 14 features Volcano Art Center, volcanoartcenter.org, with choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant, will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Volcano Garden Arts, volcanogardenarts.com, & Café Ono, cafeono.net, will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques. See experiencevolcano.com.

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation
 with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.
    Attend virtual workshops: Virtual: Carbon Market Information Expo will be held Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. Essential Resources for Essential Workers will be held Thursday, Nov. 12 at 4 p.m. The Squeeze Chute - Examining Market Concentration in our Fragile Food System(s) will be held Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 4 p.m.
    Hawaii Theatre will offer a SHOP LOCAL items for sale page. Vendors must be registered for the convention in order to sell items on the SHOP LOCAL page. By submitting a request to publish the information and sell the item, sellers agree that 15 percent of the total sale will be retained as a commission and 4 percent will be retained to cover transaction fees by Hawaiʻi Theatre Center. Sellers must include shipping and handling, and 4.167% GET, in the cost for the item. Sellers are responsible for shipping items to purchasers and paying GET. Hawaiʻi Theatre will provide sellers with the purchaser's shipping information within 24 hours of purchase. Use this link to enter each individual item for sale. 
    Registered for the convention at hfuu.org

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Renew or Apply for Membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until Nov. 30. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special. Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.

Give Input on Cleaning up the Former Quarry Firing Range in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Engineering evaluation and cost analysis will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1. Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online at parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?parkId=307&projectID=92898. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.
    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

Homeowners, Apply for Affordable Rental Housing Tax Reduction through Dec. 31. Application, requirements and benefits are at hawaiipropertytax.com/misc.html or call the county Real Property Tax office at 961-8201 or 323-4880.

ONGOING
COMMUNITY
New Operating Hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270. 

New Operating Hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

COVID-19 Talk Story
 on Nā Leo TV
 series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

Ocean View Community Market
, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet
 open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

FOOD
One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

FINANCES
Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter. Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program
. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

EDUCATION
Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

ʻOhana Help Desk offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

HEALTH
Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden
, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective
. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.

AGRICULTURE
Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers
 urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, November 9, 2020

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Surviving ʻalalā, released into the Pu‘u Maka‘ala Natural Area Reserve since 2016, are headed back to the Keauhou Bird 
Conservation Center, where it is hoped they will teach new generations of the endangered Hawaiian crow 
to survive in the wild. Read more, below. Photo by Jacob Drucker

SUPPORT VOLCANO EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM'S EFFORTS to manage disasters until other assistance arrives. Volcano Emergency Response told The Kaʻū Calendar, "In order to address these disasters quickly and efficiently, such as hurricanes, COVID-19, and volcanic issues, we need supplies and equipment to assist the Volcano community in the event a disaster. To this end, VERP has set up a GoFundMe website to address our needs. We would be extremely grateful if you could contribute any amount that you can manage to help." See gofundme.com/volcano-emergency-response-plan. Find more information on the VERP page at thecoopercenter.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


Watch the dismantling of ʻalalā release aviaries. State of Hawaiʻi DLNR/DOFAW, San Diego Zoo Global video

ʻALALĀ AVIARIES NEAR VOLCANO HAVE BEEN DISMANTLED IN THE FOREST. Their purpose was to help endangered Hawaiian crows transition into the wild after being raised in captivity. However, only about a dozen of the 40 released in the last four years in Pu‘u Maka‘ala Natural Area Reserve survived. Those who survived have been captured in hopes that in captivity they will teach new generations of ʻalalā how to live in the forest and avoid predation. Death of the crows born in captivity and released in the forest were mainly from predation from ʻio, Hawaiian hawks. 
ʻAlalā release aviaries were dismantled last
week. State of Hawaiʻi DLNR/DOFAW,
San Diego Zoo Global photo
    For each site in the forest, a release aviary was constructed, designed to minimize disturbance to the environment. The aviaries could be dismantled, moved, and reused for the next release. The aviaries allowed the birds to acclimatize to the wild environment and meet already-released ʻalalā. 
    Last week, ʻAlalā Project members from the San Diego Zoo Global monitoring team, Hawaiʻi Division of Forestry and Wildlife, and Kupu Hawaiʻi worked together to dismantle the aviary used for the 2019 release. The aviary consisted of two chambers. The primary chamber was constructed of aluminum-framed panels of wire mesh bolted together with a net over the top. The secondary chamber featured aluminum frame panels and roof. In between the chambers, a corridor with a metal roof housed biologists who observed birds in each chamber. 
    The teams removed the roofing materials, inside perches, and predator-proof skirting around the outside, then detached all of the panels. Once the panels were detached, they were stacked into piles until all were able to be carried to a road, loaded onto a truck, and taken out of the forest, to be used for future releases of ‘alalā.
    A post from the ʻAlalā Project said it "was quite an undertaking requiring many hands!... Mahalo to all of our partners who helped in this process!"
    Wild ʻalalā can live up to 18 years, and up to 29 years in captivity. The ʻalalā who were released were about a year old at the time of each release. 
     ‘Alala have been extinct in the wild since 2002. Birds raised in Keauhou and Maui Bird Conservation Centers, managed by San Diego Zoo Global, were bred for release into the wild, starting in 2016.
    Learn more at dlnr.hawaii.gov/alalaproject.

ʻAlalā in the wild were shoeing nesting behavior before being recaptured to teach new generations how to survive
in the wild. State of Hawaiʻi DLNR/DOFAW, San Diego Zoo Global photo

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FLIGHT OPERATIONS in Hawaiʻi National Park for November are:
    Tuesday, Nov. 10, 6:15 a.m. to 8:15 a.m., for ungulate surveys and control work in the Kahuku Unit between 4,000- and 6,000-ft. elevation.
    Monday, Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to noon, for invasive guinea grass surveys and control along Keauhou Trail, from the coast to 2,000-ft. elevation. 
    Monday and Wednesday, Nov. 23 and 25, 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., for petrel monitoring on Mauna Loa from Kīlauea to 9,000-ft. elevation, and 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m, to transport camp gear to ‘Ōla‘a-Koa Unit between 3,500- & 4,000-ft. elevation. 
Survey and control of invasive guinea grass is one reason
for overflights from Hawaiʻi Volcanoes this month.
    Wednesday, Nov. 25, between 8 a.m. and noon, for invasive banana poka survey and control near Mauna Loa Road between 5,000-ft. and 6,400-ft. elevation.
    In addition, the U.S.Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation.
    The Park regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather. Management of the Park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities. 

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GUIDANCE ON STAYING SAFE DURING THE HOLIDAYS comes from Hawai’i Police Department. The public is reminded of measures to prevent being victimized. 

    "Although the COVID-19 pandemic will likely impact shopping activities, consumers must still remain vigilant of their surroundings and activities," says the announcement from HPD.     Police advise shoppers against leaving handbags or purses unattended in shopping carts, as being distracted for only a few seconds can provide thieves an opportunity to steal a handbag or purse and its contents. Instead, shoppers should maintain them on their person with the strap placed over their shoulder and bag positioned on the opposing side, with the enclosures zippered or snapped closed. 
    This also applies when shoppers are transferring items from their shopping cart to their vehicle. It is good practice to conceal purchases in the vehicle so it doesn't draw attention to would-be thieves. 
    If writing a check for payment, make an effort to conceal the check while writing as it has account information printed on it. 
    Police also recommend that, while using an ATM to withdraw money or make deposits, make sure to conceal entering the PIN and other screen activities. Do not display cash – immediately place in a bag, wallet, or pocket prior to leaving the ATM. Many ATMs have mirrors that allow users to see individuals behind them and it's suggested to use them while using the ATM.

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THE U.S. HAS REPORTED MORE THAN 10,110,000 COVID CASES since the pandemic began. For the sixth day in the last ten days, more than 100,000 cases have been reported in 24 hours – today, the increase is 1149,602. The U.S. reports about 19.5 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 238,202 – about 19 percent of worldwide deaths.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

    
Hawaiʻi Island reports four new COVID cases today. There are at least 10 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    New cases reported statewide today total 64, with 53 on Oʻahu, two on Kauaʻi, and five resident diagnosed out-of-state.
    ince the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 221 people have died in the state, according to state records, none new today.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 16,010 total COVID cases in the state. Oʻahu has reported 13,862 total cases, Maui 425, Lanaʻi 106, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 73. Residents diagnosed while out-of-state, 118. Statewide, 1,160 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases have been reported in the last 28 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip codes 96772 and 96777. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96737, and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In the last 28 days, in Hilo zip code 96720, 23 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 83 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In zip code 96743 – which includes Waikoloa, Kawaihae, Waimea, Puako, Waikui, and Akona – 16 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies.
    The worldwide cumulative COVID count is 50,869,414. The death toll is more than 1,262,413.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Celebrate Veterans at ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Market in Nāʻālehu on Wednesday, Nov. 11 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free watermelon for all attendees. Veterans receive a $15 voucher to purchase lunch from market vendors. Musical entertainment provided. Limited chairs available; bring chairs if need. Market will operate as usual.

Veterans Day Ceremony and Dinner, Kīlauea Military Camp, Wednesday, Nov. 11. Ceremony held live on KMC Facebook page at 3 p.m. Veterans Day Dinner at Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals available. Call 967-8371 for either Dine-In or Grab & Go. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95, $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib), children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday in Volcano Village on Nov. 14 features Volcano Art Center, volcanoartcenter.org, with choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant, will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Volcano Garden Arts, volcanogardenarts.com, & Café Ono, cafeono.net, will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques. See experiencevolcano.com.

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.
    Attend virtual workshops: Virtual: Carbon Market Information Expo will be held Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. Essential Resources for Essential Workers will be held Thursday, Nov. 12 at 4 p.m. The Squeeze Chute - Examining Market Concentration in our Fragile Food System(s) will be held Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 4 p.m.
    Hawaii Theatre will offer a SHOP LOCAL items for sale page. Vendors must be registered for the convention in order to sell items on the SHOP LOCAL page. By submitting a request to publish the information and sell the item, sellers agree that 15 percent of the total sale will be retained as a commission and 4 percent will be retained to cover transaction fees by Hawaiʻi Theatre Center. Sellers must include shipping and handling, and 4.167% GET, in the cost for the item. Sellers are responsible for shipping items to purchasers and paying GET. Hawaiʻi Theatre will provide sellers with the purchaser's shipping information within 24 hours of purchase. Use this link to enter each individual item for sale. 
    Registered for the convention at hfuu.org

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.

Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Renew or Apply for Membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until Nov. 30. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special. Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.

Give Input on Cleaning up the Former Quarry Firing Range in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Engineering evaluation and cost analysis will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1. Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online at parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?parkId=307&projectID=92898. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.
    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.

Homeowners, Apply for Affordable Rental Housing Tax Reduction through Dec. 31. Application, requirements and benefits are at hawaiipropertytax.com/misc.html or call the county Real Property Tax office at 961-8201 or 323-4880.

ONGOING
COMMUNITY
New Operating Hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270. 

New Operating Hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

COVID-19 Talk Story
 on Nā Leo TV
 series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

Ocean View Community Market
, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet
 open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report here

FOOD
One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Pickup through Hope DIA-mend Ministries, weekdays, 5 p.m. in the Ace parking lot in Ocean View and lunches on Mondays. In Nāʻālehu, meals distributed in front of old Nāʻālehu Theatre at 4 p.m.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

FINANCES
Apply for Utility Assistance, to pay for electricity, non-government water, or gas. Applicants must be a Hawaiʻi Island resident, at least 18 years old, lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, and not previously received assistance from other COVID-19 federal or state-funded programs. Funded by CARES Act and distributed by Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council, required documents for application are government-issued identification, income verification documents for all household members, utility statement with address of services, lease/rental agreement or mortgage document, and proof of hardship. Hardship may include, but not limited to, pay stubs documenting pre-COVID-19 income, unemployment approval letter, or layoff letter. Apply at HCEOC.net or call 808-961-2681.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program
. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19, including quitting or reduced hours to provide childcare, may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. Payments made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants
 for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19, from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class at https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

EDUCATION
Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. Contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs
 here. Registration does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families for keiki grades 1-6, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.

ʻOhana Help Desk offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. See dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.

Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.

HEALTH
Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden
, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective
. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.

AGRICULTURE
Coffee Growers are urged to take a survey on how the pandemic is affecting them by Hawaiʻi Coffee Association. Take the survey here: surveymonkey.com/r/638VWS6.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. See funding updates and resources for coffee growers, hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers
 urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website.

Read About Seed Biodiversity for Hawaiʻi's Local Food System in It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, where Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights. Read the blog.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, via free modules.


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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, November 10, 2020

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Kaʻū Coffee farmers and ranchers Phil and Merle Becker, of Aikane Plantation, recently donated this Matson container
 to ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. The Beckers ranch cattle and horses and farm coffee and tea. Photo from OKK


A HŌLUALOA COFFEE FARM HAS TESTED POSITIVE FOR COFFEE LEAF RUST, reports Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture today. Samples were collected from the farm above Kona on Halloween. Samples from Hilo, mentioned in an earlier news release, were negative for CLR. Earlier in October, CLR was detected and confirmed in the Haiku area of Maui. CLR has not been detected on other islands.
    CLR is one of the most devastating pests of coffee plants and is established in all major coffee-growing areas of the world, but had not been found in Hawaiʻi prior to last month.
    Phyllis Shimabukuro-Geiser, chairperson of the Hawaiʻi Board of Agriculture said, "Coffee is one of Hawaiʻi's signature crops, of which production was estimated to be $54.3 million in 2019. As surveys continue across the state, the Hawai`i Department of Agriculture is preparing to establish interim rules that will hopefully prevent the spread of the fungus to uninfested islands."
    Dept of Ag's Advisory Committee on Plant and Animals will hold a virtual meeting Friday, Nov. 13 at 1:30 p.m. to consider an interim rule to restrict the movement of coffee plants and coffee plant material from islands found to have CLR to islands on which the fungus has not been detected. Sign up at https://hdoa.hawaii.gov/blog/main/pqmtgs/.


    
See advisories on CLR at https://hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/ppc/new-pest-advisories/
    To report possible coffee leaf rust infestations on any island, call (808) 973-9525.
    For more information on CLR go to the UH-CTAHR webpages at https://www.hawaiicoffeeed.com/clr.html, http://www.extento.hawaii.edu/kbase/crop/Type/h_vasta.htm, or https://hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/ppc/new-pest-advisories/.

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AGRICULTURE WILL BE A KEY TO HAWAIʻI'S FUTURE ECONOMIC SUCCESS, according to Congressman-elect Kai Kahele. He said he wants to serve on the House Agriculture Committee when he goes to Washington. He and Congressman Ed Case gave a joint press conference Monday to talk about COVID, economic recovery and other issues as they prepare for the January start of the 117th U.S. Congress. They said they look toward coordinating their efforts with Hawaiʻi senators Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz.
    Kahele noted that Congressional District 2, which includes Kaʻū and all of rural Hawaiʻi, is the center for agricultural production. He said that serving on the Agriculture Committee would be important to help diversify the economy of the state. He said his view that agriculture can once again be a cornerstone to Hawaiʻi's economy "is not anything new. Many people have come before." They said "the exact same thing, but we just haven't ever done it because we fall back to tourism and the military." Kahele contended there is "so much opportunity" in agriculture. He said he wants to be "a member of Congress for Hawaiʻi 
that just grabs the bull by the horns and just is able to take agriculture to a whole other level in the state."
    Kahele also urged direct federal relief to the counties to help bolster agriculture and deal with the pandemic. With Oʻahu's urban areas receiving the bulk of the relief, rural Hawaiʻi doesn't get its fair share, according to Kahele. He said he doesn't want rural counties "left at the table or having to negotiate with the governor on how much they get. I think that is really important and critical" in future relief packages. 

Congressman-elect Kai Kahele, on a Zoom press
conference Monday with Rep. Ed Case. Photo from Facebook
    Kahele also focused on infrastructure initiatives to produce jobs and improvements for rural Hawaiʻi. He said he wants to serve on the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Concerning COVID-19, Kahele said he is looking to "a Biden administration that starts at the top, that has a consistent voice for the country in how to deal with the coronavirus." He said he looks to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and Health & Human Services agency for "clear guidance to the states in what we need to do to make sure that the health and safety and welfare of the people of Hawaiʻi and our country are first and foremost."
    Under the Trump administration, "It's obvious that that hasn't happened, and we have a surge in coronavirus cases happening all across the country," said Kahele. He predicted "a lot of hard times ahead for us" in Hawaiʻi, with more than the current ~100 cases a day. He predicted it will be difficult to control the virus until an FDA-approved vaccine is distributed. He called for a national mandate to wear masks and said that the "more protective measures that we can do for our community, and equipment that we can provide is going to be absolutely essential to minimize COVID-19."
    Kahele said he, his wife, and their children are moving to Washington, D.C. by Summer 2021. "The entire family is coming to Washington and they're super excited," said Kahele.
    Kahele is a legislator in the Hawaiʻi State Senate, where he serves as Majority Floor Leader and Chairman of the Committee on Water and Land. He also serves as a lieutenant colonel with the Hawai‘i Air National Guard, United States Air Force. Hawaiʻi's 2nd Congressional District encompasses Hawaiʻi Island, Maui, Kahoʻolawe, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kauaʻi, Niʻihau and the rural parts of Oʻahu, including Waimanālo, Kailua, Kāneʻohe, the North Shore, and Leeward.
    Watch the press conference here.

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Rep. Ed Case on a Zoom press conference Monday with 
Congressman-elect Kai Kahele. Photo from Facebook

DEALING WITH COVID-19 AND ACQUIRING FUNDING FOR HAWAIʻI, through serving on the House Appropriations Committee, are priorities expressed by Congressman Ed Case during a joint press conference Monday with Congressman-elect Kai Kahele – see story, above. Case noted that Hawaiʻi's battle with coronavirus "severely exposed many, many deep economic issues that Hawaiʻi has and the 
vulnerability that we have."
    Case applauded the election of Joe Biden for president and said it "could not come at a more critical time for our country and for our Hawaiʻi. COVID is getting worse across our country. Division and polarization is just as extreme as it was. Today in our country, unfortunately, the results of that polarization are that many folks feel like winners, but many folks feel like losers, and that's not the way it should be, but it is 
the way it is. We have to be honest about that. He said he hopes for a coronavirus relief package before 
    Donald Trump leaves office on Jan. 20, but has little optimism. "I felt the compelling needs out there in the rest of the country would lead us of all stripes in Washington, D.C., to reach an actual compromise... At the end of the day, a compromise package" may be achieved, helping small businesses in particular and large businesses to an extent; aiding state and local governments with necessary expenses, giving direct impact payments to families in need; bolstering unemployment; and supporting health care. Case predicted additional relief packages after Biden takes office. "I think it's going to take more for us to get all the way through this incredible crisis."
    Case posted to Facebook this morning, "I'm very excited to be part of a great team representing Hawaiʻi with Congressman-elect Kai Kahele in the US House for the upcoming 117th Congress. Kai took his first of many red eyes to DC last night for new member orientation and I wish him only the best."
Case has represented Hawaiʻi's District 1 in the U.S. House since January 2019 and was just re-elected to the 117th Congress for another two-year term. He previously represented Hawaiʻi's District 2, from 2002 to 2007. He currently serves on the House Appropriations and Natural Resources Committees.

Pets in Kaʻū and beyond can benefit from
free veterinary care. HIHS photo
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FREE VETERINARY CARE from Kaʻū to Hāmākua is coming thanks to Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society's new Community Pet Support Program, in partnership with John R. Peterson Foundation. The program provides basic veterinary care to pets in need, all around Hawaiʻi Island. The Community Pet Support Program includes vaccinations, routine lab tests, deworming, flea and tick preventatives, and routine health maintenance.
    First served were residents of senior housing in Kona, Kamakana Village. Next on the roster over the next two months are Nāʻālehu, Ocean View, Kohala, Laupāhoehoe, Waikoloa, Hōnaunau and Paʻauilo.
    The spay and neuter services via the Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society's Mobile "Waggin"– and at the shelters in Keaʻau, Waimea and Kona – will be expanded, to help eliminate pet overpopulation. West Hawaiʻi Humane Society is providing the funding, and providing equipment to increase the ability to rehabilitate pets coming into the shelters.
    Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society Chief Executive Officer Dr. Beth Jose said, "Thanks to Ginger Towle and the Board of Directors of the West Hawaiʻi Humane Society, we are excited to open up new appointment times to the public for free spays and neuters. Our main goal with the Community Pet Support Program is to preserve families by providing services and resources to help keep pets in homes. We would not be able to do this expanded outreach into the community without the support of the John R. Peterson Foundation."
    Catherine Chow, Chief Executive Officer of John R. Peterson 


Foundation, said, "The John R. Peterson Foundation was established in 2020 with the mission to ensure better, longer lives for companion animals. The Foundation strives to tackle and alleviate those conditions that cause animals to be placed into shelters and rescues. Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society's Community Pet Support Program tied in perfectly into mission and values." Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society is staffed with two licensed veterinarians, serving both East Hawaiʻi and West Hawaiʻi, and supported with trained, professional veterinary assistants. The veterinary team follows guidelines set by nationally-recognized organizations regarding high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter clinics. Appointments can be scheduled by visiting hihs.org and clicking on the Services Tab, then selecting Spay and Neuter or Community Vet Care or by emailing petsupport@hihs.org or calling 808-217-0154. All appointments must be scheduled in advance and are open to healthy owned dogs and cats only. Two pets per family will be accommodated. Each pet must have its own appointment. Animals other than dogs and cats, unhealthy animals, or those with 
contagious illnesses will not be accepted.
    The Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society has performed nearly 50,000 spay and neuter surgeries in the last nine years.

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Pueo Series in mixed media by Ira Ono.
VOLCANO VILLAGE ART HUI: CREATIVE ADAPTATIONS 2020 34th annual Studio Tour & Sale has been adapted to fit these challenging times. Over Thanksgiving weekend – Nov. 27-29, Friday through Sunday – participating artists will offer various ways to acquire art using safety guidelines, including online orders, scheduled appointments, and/or modified on-site studio tours.
    Many artists will continue these opportunities throughout December and beyond. Several locations plan to be open for direct sales, including Fahrenheit 2400 Glass Gallery and Volcano Garden Arts. Elizabeth Miller, Margaret Barnaby and Erik Wold plan to continue to take appointments to visit their studios. Lisa Louise Adams, Margaret Barnaby, Chiu Leong, Charlotte Forbes Perry, Joan Yoshioka and Emily Herb invite the public to visit their websites for online purchases. However, any of these plans may change due to health & safety considerations. The Hui encourages the public to contact individual artists to discover the most current available options:
    Chiu Leong – porcelain, tea, www.teahawaii.com; Elizabeth Miller – prints, cards, metalwork, lizmillerart@gmail.com; Emily Herb – pottery, sculptural clay vessels, www.emilyherb.com, Erik Wold – pottery, erikwoldpottery.square.site/; Ira Ono – treasures, 19-3834 Old Volcano Road, www.shopvga.com; Lisa Louise Adams – art, great gifts, online classes, www.lisalouiseadams.com; Margaret Barnaby – woodblock prints, www.margaretbarnaby.com; Mike & Misato Mortara – hand blown art glass, www.2400F.com; guest artist Charlotte Forbes Perry – ceramic tiles, stained glass, www.etsy.com/olaatilestainedglass; and guest artist Joan M. Yoshioka - original paintings, prints, http://drawingonnature.blogspot.com/. Out of an abundance of caution, Pam Barton, Randy Sutton, Ricia Shema, and Zeke Israel have chosen not to participate this year.
    See www.VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com or Instagram: @VolcanoArtHui for updates and individual artists' contact information. The Hui thanks the public for their valued support throughout the years.

Hand-blown glass holiday ornaments by Mike & Misato Mortara.


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BIG ISLAND GIVING TREE will have a booth at St. Jude's in Ocean View on Saturday, Dec. 12 from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Available to those in need will be free clothing, linens, shoes, household items, cleaning products, and hygiene products.

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HIGH SURF ADVISORY is in effect for all east-facing shores through Thursday. Expect strong breaking waves, shore break, and strong currents making swimming more difficult and dangerous. There are no beaches closures at this time but closures may occur without notice. Property owners that may be impacted by high surf are advised to secure property, including water vessels.

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CELEBRATE VETERANS DAY tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov. 11. 
    During ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's Market in Nāʻālehu, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., enjoy free watermelon and musical entertainment for all attendees, with veterans gifted a $15 voucher to purchase lunch from market vendors. Limited chairs available; bring chairs if need. 
    Kīlauea Military Camp will hold a live, virtual ceremony on KMC Facebook from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. At Crater Rim Café, located in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, enjoy dine-in or to-go special dinner, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations required, limited number of complimentary meals for veterans available. 
    Menu: prime rib au jus, vegetable stir fry & black bean sauce, roasted red potatoes, cheesecake, and drink. Adults $26.95; $16.95 Vegetarian Option (w/o prime rib); children 6-11 years old, $14.95. Proof of eligibility (Military ID, DD214 with photo ID, 100% DAV, or Hawaiʻi Veterans driver license) required to receive complimentary meal. Face coverings and 6 feet distancing required in common areas. KMC open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. Call 967-8371.

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COMMUNITY SPREAD OF COVID-19 is concentrated in Hawaiʻi Island residents in the Kona area. Data from Department of Health shows the majority of new cases are 40 years old or younger. Recent increases of positive cases are mostly not travel-related. Increased testing, especially in the Kona area, is being scheduled. The purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and help stop spread. 
    By getting tested, says Civil Defense, "know that you are helping stop the spread of this virus and helping to protect our families and community. This high increase of the coronavirus is of great concern and demonstrates the critical need for you to follow the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing and gatherings. Know that the preventive policies are mandated and the Hawaiʻi Police Department will continue the enforcement of these policies."
    Testing for tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov. 11, will be held at Keauhou Shopping Center and in Hilo at Afook-Chinen Auditorium. An ʻOhana food service is also scheduled in Hilo at the Afook-Chinen Auditorium.

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Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 14 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have populations less than 1,000. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Light orange is 11-50 cases. Dark

orange is 51-200 cases. Department of Health map

THE U.S. REPORTED MORE THAN 128,000 NEW COVID CASES in the last day. Since the pandemic began, the U.S. reported 10,238,243 cases – about 19.5 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 239,588 – a one-day increase of 1,386 – about 19 percent of worldwide deaths.
    Hawaiʻi Island reports four new COVID cases today. There are at least 10 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    New cases reported statewide today total 78, with 65 on Oʻahu, five on Maui, nine residents diagnosed out-of-state, and three removed from Kauaʻi.
    Since the pandemic began, 48 deaths have been reported on Hawaiʻi Island by Hawaiʻi Civil Defense. At least 222 people have died in the state, according to state records, one new today.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 16,088 total COVID cases in the state. Oʻahu has reported 13,924 total cases, Maui 430, Lanaʻi 106, Molokaʻi 17, and Kauaʻi 71. Residents diagnosed while out-of-state, 127. Statewide, 1,180 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases have been reported in the last 14 days for Volcano zip codes 96785 and 96718, and Kaʻū zip codes 96772 and 96777. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in zip code 96704, which includes Miloliʻi.
    In the last 14 days, 12 cases have been reported in Kaʻū zip code 96737. In Hilo zip code 96720, 23 cases have been reported in the last 14 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 84 cases have been reported in the last 14 days. In zip code 96743 – which includes Waikoloa, Kawaihae, Waimea, Puako, Waikui, and Akona – 16 cases have been reported in the last 14 days.
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies.
    The worldwide cumulative COVID count is 50,869,414. The death toll is more than 1,262,413.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
AdvoCATS Free Spay and Neuter Clinic will be held Wednesday, Nov. 11 at Ocean View Community Center. To make a reservation, to reserve traps, to volunteer, or with questions, e-mail Cindy Thurston at cindyt@hawaii.rr.com, or call or text (808) 895-9283. See advocatshawaii.org.

Introduction to Beadweaving, new series of beading classes with Phyllis Cullen, begins Thursday, Nov. 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Kaʻū Art Gallery First Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Sale, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Kaʻū Art Gallery (behind Ace, across from Punaluʻu Bakery, in Nāʻālehu – the old Kamaʻaina Cuts building). Free admission, face masks required for all. Contact organizer Corrine Kaupu at 808-937-1840 or kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz to vend.

Second Saturday in Volcano Village on Nov. 14 features Volcano Art Center, volcanoartcenter.org, with choice of BBQ baby back ribs or half a chicken, with sides of corn on the cob and baked beans, for $20 per plate. Pre-order on Volcano Art Center's website. All orders are grab-and-go. Pre-orders drive by at VAC's Niʻaulani Campus, tickets will be available day of event. Cash and credit cards accepted. Kīlauea Lodge Restaurant, will have all-day comfort food, for both curbside take-out and dine-in, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Volcano Garden Arts, volcanogardenarts.com, & Café Ono, cafeono.net, will be serving special plate lunches. Jewelry designer Suzie Cousins will be showcasing her collections of wearable art and demonstrating some of her techniques. See experiencevolcano.com.

Basics of Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, Saturday, Nov. 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund Public Cleanup Events Sunday, Nov. 15, cleanup and survey; and Saturday, Dec. 19, cleanup. Group sizes limited due to COVID-19 precautions and government proclamations. HWF says details are forthcoming but will be a blend of hiking, BYO-4wd, and limited HWF carpool options. Contact Megan Lamson-Leatherman at (808) 280-8124 or wild@aloha.net.

Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Annual Meeting, Sunday, Nov. 15, 9 a.m. via Zoom, meeting code 450 691 6693. No password. Attend by phone at (669) 900-6833, code 450 691 6693#. Delegates elect HFUU president, and adopt policies and bylaw amendments. Nominations for president due at meeting; send to Nominations Committee Chair, David S. Case, at casedavids@gmail.com. Review and comment on proposals. Enjoy world-class educational and musical presentations Nov. 12, 13, and 14. See hfuuhi.org.
    Attend virtual workshops: Virtual: Carbon Market Information Expo will be held Tuesday, Nov. 10 at 4 p.m. Essential Resources for Essential Workers will be held Thursday, Nov. 12 at 4 p.m. The Squeeze Chute - Examining Market Concentration in our Fragile Food System(s) will be held Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 4 p.m.
    Hawaiʻi Theatre will offer a SHOP LOCAL items for sale page. Vendors must be registered for the convention in order to sell items on the SHOP LOCAL page. By submitting a request to publish the information and sell the item, sellers agree that 15 percent of the total sale will be retained as a commission and 4 percent will be retained to cover transaction fees by Hawaiʻi Theatre Center. Sellers must include shipping and handling, and 4.167% GET, in the cost for the item. Sellers are responsible for shipping items to purchasers and paying GET. Hawaiʻi Theatre will provide sellers with the purchaser's shipping information within 24 hours of purchase. Use this link to enter each individual item for sale. 
    Registered for the convention at hfuu.org

Kīlauea Military Camp Thanksgiving Dinner, Dine-In or Grab-and-Go, for Thursday, Nov. 26 – order by Monday, Nov. 16. Choice of turkey or ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, gravy, sweet potatoes, corn on the cob, salad, pumpkin squares. $19.95 adults, $12.95 6-11 yrs old for Dine-In. Turkey dinner to go, $59.95. Ham dinner to go, $69.95. Call 808-967-8356.
Veteran Farmers can register for virtual Farmer Veteran Coalition Conference: Veterans Farming through Adversity held Nov. 18 and 19, Wednesday and Thursday. Features education, workshops, keynote speakers, panel discussions, networking opportunities, and more. $45 ($35 for coalition members). Advance registration required.

Beadweaving in the Round with Phyllis Cullen, Thursday, Nov. 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Christmas in the Country 21st Annual Wreath Exhibition opens Saturday, Nov. 21 through Thursday, Dec. 31 at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Nov. 21, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Small Businesses and Nonprofits can Apply for Reimbursement Grants through the Business Pivot Program to cover expenses up to $10,000 that they incurred implementing changes to their operations, products, and services. Grant application open until Nov. 23, as funds are available. Click here for eligibility requirements and to apply. Click here for frequently asked questions.

Holiday Open House at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Friday, Nov. 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy viewing of handmade wreaths, cider, music, door prizes, and gifts. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Volcano Garden Arts' Think X-Mas! Exquisite Gift Sale, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Nov. 27, 28, and 29 features special plate lunch at Cafe Ono. Held at 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd. See ShopVGA.netCafeOno.net, and VolcanoGardenArts.com.

Hawaiian Islands Challenge Virtual Run through Dec. 31. Registration closes Nov. 30. Individuals or teams can register to traverse some or all of 808 kilometers on six different courses, one on each main island. Register here

Renew or Apply for Membership in Experience Volcano Hawaiʻi for $20 until Nov. 30. Details available at experiencevolcano.com/2020special. Membership offers perks such as free 25-word classified ads in the newsletter. Buy, sell, trade or donate. Members can send ads to experiencevolcano@gmail.com. Deadline is the 15th of the month. Ads will publish until canceled. No artwork or logos allowed.

Give Input on Cleaning up the Former Quarry Firing Range in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Engineering evaluation and cost analysis will address surface soils impacted with heavy metals. The EE/CA document is available through Dec. 1. Executive Summary of the EE/CA and the Community Involvement Plan are available online at parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?parkId=307&projectID=92898. View them in person, by appointment only – call 808-985-6073 – at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Crater Rim Drive, in the Park, weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Electronically submit comments via the website above or writing to Ms. Danielle Foster at danielle_foster@nps.gov or Environmental Protection Specialist, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, P.O. Box 52, Hawaiʻi National Park, HI 96718.

Big Island Giving Tree will have a booth at St. Jude's in Ocean View on Saturday, Dec. 12 from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Available to those in need will be free clothing, linens, shoes, household items, cleaning products, and hygiene products.

Receive Help Signing Up for Med-Quest Health Insurance via nonprofit organizations starting Sunday through Dec. 15. Local contacts through the community organization Kalanihale include Kaʻimi Kaupilo, of Miloliʻi, who can be reached at 808-937-1310 and Donna Kekoa, of Pāhala, at 808-769-1334.
    The state's Med-Quest provides eligible low-income adults and children access to health and medical coverage through managed care plans. 
    Island of Hawaiʻi YMCA helps through Shon Araujo at 808-854-0152 and Carrie Fernandez at 808-854-0256. West Hawaiʻi Community Center assists through Beonka Snyder at 808-327-0803, Tina Evans at 808-640-8587, Charles Kelen at 808-491-9761, and Walter Lanw at 808-785-8201. Hawaiʻi Island HIV/AIDS Foundation helps through Rachelle Hanohano at 808-896-5051, Paul Thome at 858-876-5154, Melani Matsumoto at 808-854-1877, and Jennifer Reno-Medeiros at 808-333-6443.
    Kokua Services will help with virtual appointments through the Certified Assisters above.


Homeowners, Apply for Affordable Rental Housing Tax Reduction through Dec. 31. Application, requirements and benefits are at hawaiipropertytax.com/misc.html or call the county Real Property Tax office at 961-8201 or 323-4880.

ONGOING
COMMUNITY

Support Volcano Emergency Response Team's Efforts to supply a newly-developed plan to manage potential disasters in the community of Volcano until other assistance arrives. In order to address these disasters quickly and efficiently, such as hurricanes, COVID-19, and volcanic issues, supplies and equipment are needed to assist the Volcano community in the event a disaster. VERP has set up a GoFundMe website to address these needs and would be "extremely grateful" for any contribution in any amount. See gofundme.com/volcano-emergency-response-plan or the VERP page at thecoopercenter.org.

New Operating Hours for Wai‘ōhinu Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Recycling services available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. "White goods" appliance collection services will accept one appliance per resident per day. Customers need to check in with the facility attendant before dropping an appliance off at the facility. No unattended drop-offs allowed. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270. 


New Operating Hours for Ocean View Transfer Station are Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. HI-5 deposit beverage container collection will continue as usual on Saturdays only, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org website or call 961-8270.

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here for site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, streaming on Nā Leo's free mobile app, and on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coverings required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

Ocean View Community Market
, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

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