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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, June 9, 2020

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Coffee Leaf Rust, while not yet in Hawaiʻi, is of major concern to coffee growers. See more below.
Photo from worldcoffeeresearch.org

HAWAIʻI SUPREME COURT TODAY REJECTED HAWAIʻI GAS'S RATE INCREASE. The 8.39 percent, $8.9 million increase, approved by the Public Utilities Commission, would have covered costs of importing fracked natural gas from the mainland.
     According to a statement from Life of the Land today, Life of the Land and Hui Aloha ʻĀina o Ka Lei Maile Aliʻi, as well as other community groups, sought to intervene in the ratemaking case. The PUC allowed them to participate on two issues: state's reliance on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions.
     However, during the proceeding, the PUC barred the groups from raising any issues related to the extraction, development, production, and transportation of natural gas that occurred outside the state of Hawaiʻi -- such as fracked nature gas. "The PUC also limited the group's ability to raise different issues related to greenhouse gas emissions. The PUC also failed to consider any of the impacts to traditional and customary practices of Native Hawaiians expressly raised by the Hui Aloha ʻĀina o Ka Lei Maile Aliʻi," wrote Life of the Land.
     The Supreme Court also ruled that the PUC has an obligation to protect Native Hawaiian traditional and customary practices, and a continuing obligation to protect the public trust, overruling an earlier appellate case: Molokaʻi Pub.Utils., 127 Hawaiʻi 234, 277 P.3d 328 (App. 2012).
     "The era of 'someone else will fix this' in government decision-making is over," said Life of the Land's attorney Lance D. Collins.
     Life of the Land Executive Director Henry Curtis said, "We are elated that the court affirmed the responsibility of the Public Utilities Commission to address fossil fuel externalities."
     The Court stated: "On March 5, 2018, LOL filed a 'Notice' with the PUC, challenging Order No. 35627's 'exclusion of the entire section of Act 234 [of the 2007 Legislative Session] regarding the global nature of emissions.' Act 234 established a 'Greenhouse gas emissions reduction task force' and directed it to create a 'work plan' that 'shall include but is not limited' to the following objectives: Recommendations to minimize 'leakage' or a reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases within the State that is offset by an increase in emissions of greenhouse gases outside the State."
     Act 234, 2007 Haw. Sess. Laws, at 700. LOL stated that the PUC should have also taken judicial notice of the global nature of emissions instead of limiting sub-Issue No. 1h to the Participants' interest in "a clean and healthful environment within the State's borders," and not "beyond the State's borders.
     "Appellants contend HG has quite literally 'hidden' the GHG emissions impact of its imported LNG. The 'hidden' GHG emissions impacts Appellants are concerned with include GHG emissions from the extraction, development, production, and transportation of imported LNG, which occur out-of-state, but which, nonetheless, impact Hawaiʻi due to the global nature of GHG emissions. We agree with this contention."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ENDING POLICE BRUTALITY is the goal of legislation cosponsored yesterday by Senators Brian Schatz, Mazie Hirono, Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), and 31 of their Democratic and Independent colleagues; Congressional Black Caucus Chair Karen Bass (D-Calif.), and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.). The Justice in Policing Act "marks the first comprehensive bill dedicated to ending police brutality, holding police accountable for egregious misconduct, strengthening transparency by collecting better data, and improving police practices and training to prevent discriminatory policing," says a statement from Hirono's office.
     Hirono said, "Communities of color in Americahave faced deadly racism and discrimination for centuries, including police brutality and abuse. After the horrific murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and far too many other Black Americans, millions of protestors reflecting the diversity of our country—including thousands in Hawaiʻi who marched and protested over the weekend—have come together to demand change. This legislation addresses systemic police brutality and violence with long overdue and comprehensive changes to policing in America. At this pivotal moment, we must act with urgency to move this legislation forward."   
     The Justice in Policing Act would make lynching a federal crime. It would hold police
accountable by reforming qualified immunity, amending the federal criminal statute used to prosecute police misconduct, from "willfulness" to a "recklessness" standard, improving federal pattern and practice investigations by granting the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division subpoena power and incentivizing state attorneys general to conduct such investigations; incentivizing states to create independent investigative structures for police-involved deaths through grants; and requiring DOJ to create best practices recommendations based on President Obama's 21st Century Policing Task Force.
     The legislation seeks to boost transparency by collecting stronger data of police misconduct and use of force by creating a National Police Misconduct Registry to prevent officers from changing jurisdictions solely to avoid accountability, and mandating state and local law enforcement agencies report use of force data, disaggregated by race, ethnicity, sex, disability, age, and English language.

      The Justice in Policing Act would also change police practices and training to help end racial and religious profiling and excessive use of force by requiring training on racial bias and the duty to intervene; banning no-knock warrants in drug cases; banning chokeholds and carotid holds; changing the use of force standard from whether the force was reasonable to whether the force was necessary to prevent death or serious bodily injury; limiting the transfer of military-grade equipment to state and local law enforcement; requiring federal uniformed police officers to wear body cameras; and requiring state and local law enforcement to use existing federal funds to ensure the use of police body camera.                 
     The legislation is supported by a broad coalition of civil rights organizations including Demand Progress, Lawyers' Committee For Civil Rights Under Law, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, National Action Network, National African American Clergy Network, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc., The National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, Black Millennial Convention, and the National Urban League.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Dr. Christina Kishimoto,
Hawaiʻi Department of Education Superintendent
ACHIEVING UNIVERSAL ACCESS TO TECHNOLOGY is a necessity, said Hawaiʻi Department of Education Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto in a letter to parents and guardians this week. She said the pandemic has "amplified areas of inequity, including a lack of devices in some households and inconsistent connectivity in rural communities. I want to reassure you that I am committed to achieving universal access to technology. It is no longer a luxury, but a necessity."

     She said the future of public education "will look different in classrooms and schools across our nation." Incorporating more technology and distance learning, and "widening learning channels" is in progress, she said.
     As part of this effort, DOE has distributed 12,000 devices to students statewide over the past couple of months, ordered 10,000 more to support learning over the summer, and will launch mobile learning labs to provide WiFi access "and push learning into our hard-to-reach communities. However, we cannot do this alone. The HIDOE is part of a Broadband Hui working collectively to articulate a resolution to the state's connectivity and access challenges and advance this effort."

     DOE also recently launched a multi-phase distance learning survey for teachers, secondary students, and families, to "assess other gap areas and identify where we can enhance our support." Surveys were distributed to all HIDOE teachers and eligible secondary students this week, and the family survey will be distributed in early June.
Haukea Koprivnikar of Nāʻālehu Elementary with her
school-issued Chromebook.
Photo by her mother, Maile Wedemeyer
     Said Kishimoto, "We are going to grow from this experience and apply all that we've learned to better support our students through the summer and into the fall. The HIDOE ʻohana is diligently working on plans for next school year and we are relying on the expertise of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the state's Department of Health to inform our policies and procedures.

     "Parents will undoubtedly have concerns about their children physically returning to campuses. As a parent and on behalf of our leadership team, many of whom are parents of public school students, I assure you that your child's safety and well-being is truly of the utmost importance. It will always be at the heart of every decision we make as we navigate these unprecedented times.

     "I want to personally thank you for supporting your child's education over these past few months. This pandemic has forced families to not only increase their responsibilities as caregivers but also as educators. Mahalo for working with us to deliver your child's education amid these challenging times.
     "We look forward to welcoming our haumana (students) back in the fall and will continue to communicate with you over the coming weeks regarding our plans for school year 2020-21. Stay safe and have a restful summer break."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Rep. Ed Case
ENSURING HEALTHY AND SAFETY OF AIR PASSENGERS AND THE PUBLIC is the goal of the Air Travel Public Health Emergency Act, introduced this week by Congressman Ed Case. The legislation would authorize states to implement "reasonable guidelines and restrictions" on air travel during public health emergencies, including pre-board tests and related denial of boarding.
     Case's bill would also require airlines to pay for any restrictions, such as a pre-board test requirement and implementation. It would assure that federal airport funding, "which is a major contributor to operation of the country's airports," would not be jeopardized by any state's reasonable guidelines or restrictions.

     Case said passenger air travel "is, or can be, a major vector in the spread of highly communicable diseases such as COVID-19," presenting "a serious public health risk not just to their fellow passengers but to all who come into contact with them at their destinations and upon their return to their home."

     He also said such passengers "present a serious negative economic consequence" to all aspects of travel and tourism industries, "as they destroy public confidence in the health and safety of air travel and of such destinations."
     Case said, "I believe that as the country reopens, the question of the health and safety of commercial aviation will play a major role in whether we can fully return to pre-COVID-19 rates of travel globally. Our government at all levels must take active steps to ensure the health and safety of communities, passengers and crew arising from proposed resumption of any major airline travel. If we do not do so, with maximum public health safety measures in effect, people just won't travel on airlines at anywhere near prior levels."

     Case said he introduced the measure after the Federal Aviation Administration, in response to his request for confirmation, stated that "the agency has no authority to either grant permission or prohibit a local or State unit of government to pursue such a policy" to mandate pre-board testing of airline passengers bound for Hawai‘i.

     Said Case, "The FAA's narrow interpretation of its current authority does not allow for actions focused on the broader public health consequences of passenger air travel especially in a pandemic. Unless there are other sources of authority, the law must be changed to confirm that the FAA, which has almost exclusive jurisdiction of our national airspace, not only can but must take the broader public health into account and require that reasonable guidelines and restrictions by states to protect the public be allowed."
     The FAA recommended, said Case, that he discuss the matter with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, "which is provided many authorities under the Public Health Services Act to combat the spread of communicable diseases." Case wrote to HHS Secretary Alex Azar, asking for confirmation of Hawai‘i's "authority to impose reasonable conditions" on passenger air travel to Hawaiʻi, including pre-board testing.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SUMMER FUN REGISTRATION IS STILL OPEN IN NĀʻĀLEHU to children who have completed 3rd, 4th, 5th, or 6th grade this past school year. Beginning next Monday, June 15 to Friday, July 17, from 8 a.m. to , at Nāʻālaehu Community Center in Nāʻālehu Park, the free Summer Fun program includes a snack and take home-lunch. The program at Kaʻū District Gym in Pāhala is filled.

Enrollment for Summer Fun is extended for Nāʻālehu Community Center
While there will be no Independence Day Parade this year with 
Summer Fun keiki, there will be Summer Fun at Nāʻālehu 
Community Center and Kaʻū District Gym. Photo by Julia Neal
     Parents/guardians can enroll keiki by calling the Recreation Division at 961-8740, during business hours only: No information left on voicemail will be accepted.

     Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year's Summer Fun program will be significantly modified to address the health and safety of program participants and staff. The program will adhere to all federal, state, and county-level rules and standards for safe operation, as appropriate, along with various applicable industries and organizations.
     This includes screening each morning prior to entry, a mandatory face mask/cover policy, physical distancing during program activities, and enhanced sanitization procedures. The State of Hawai‘i Department of Health's Guidelines for Child Care Facilities to Reopen or Continue Care will be incorporated.
     The Summer Fun program may be extended up to an additional two weeks, through July 31, at some or all sites, should resources become available. Participants will be notified when a determination is made for their specific program site.

     For more information contact the Recreation Division at 961-8740 or via email at recreation@hawaiicounty.gov.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

COFFEE LEAF RUST WEBINAR will be held Thursday, June 11 at Learn from Paula Garcia about "Infection and severity of coffee leaf rust, Hemileia vastatrix (Berk & Br.), and their relationship to weather variables in four locations in Puerto Rico." Register at hawaii.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5Itc-yrpj8peeD95U14Df2QfX4bVZxPFQ and enter the password: 7P3BF3.
     Andrea Kawabata of UH-Mānoa CTAHR says, "We don't currently have CLR in Hawaiʻi, but it's important to learn about his devastating disease so we are prepared. Never bring in coffee or other plant materials to Hawaiʻi without first checking with the Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture's Plant Quarantine Branch.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FREE DRIVE-THRU COVID-19 SCREENING at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held tomorrow, Wednesday, June 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group, and Pathways Telehealth.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, but six on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 27 over the last five days.
     Hawaiʻi Island has recorded no new cases in about two weeks. All 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 448 cases, Kauaʻi 21 and  Maui  County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 676 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.
     In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno thanked Hawaiʻi Food Basket and their contributors for the ʻOhana Food Drop in Ocean View today, and the Hawaiʻi National Guard and County Task Force for helping. "In moving forward, know that the Coronavirus threat is still out there and we must continue to not only follow the preventive policies to protect our community, but to get better. Please continue doing your part to stop this virus. Thank you for listening and have a safe day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2.02 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 114,000. Worldwide, more than 7.04 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 404,000.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submit comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was today, June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.
Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.




Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

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New USGS maps of Kīlauea lava flows, above, and Mauna Loa lava flows, below, come with deeper interpretations
 of history of the volcanoes from the 1700s to the 21st Century. USGS HVO map

THE 14-DAY QUARANTINE FOR PEOPLE TRAVELING FROM THE MAINLAND is extended to July 31. Gov. David Ige made the announcement today. He confirmed that the 14-day quarantine for interisland travel will be lifted on June 16.
     At an afternoon news briefing, Ige said travel will be different. Thermal screening at the airport will be required for all passengers. Anyone with a fever of 100.4 or greater will be denied boarding. Prior to arriving at the airport, travelers will fill out a form with health screening questions that asks for information to allow for contact tracing. The governor is asking for patience as the new process is implemented and indicated interisland travelers should anticipate additional time needed at state airports. The form is required for all interisland flights, even those taken on the same day. "Lifting the interisland travel quarantine is possible because of the low case levels on all islands." The governor said that, in the next few days, the state will roll out a travel website with information for interisland travelers, with forms for interisland travel.
     In respect to travelers from out of state, Ige said he recognizes its importance, but "we're not there yet and we are being cautious." He pointed to new flare-ups in key mainland markets like California, with more than 2,000 new cases yesterday. Oregon, Arizona, and Texas all are reporting highest numbers of new daily cases since the coronavirus pandemic began. "We will not reopen out-of-state travel before the end of July."
     He said his ninth Supplementary Emergency Proclamation gives him the flexibility to reopen travel when the state is ready. The governor said that many options to protect the health of Hawaiʻi residents are being considered and will involve a multi-layered approach to reduce the danger of infection spikes. He said the approach will involve screening, testing, travel to low-risk areas, contact tracing, and focusing on how to reopen in travel corridors with low circulation of the virus."Screening forms are expected to be similar to the new interisland travel forms and this process will help us refine our plans for a broader reopening of travel to Hawaiʻi," said Ige.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI BOASTS THE BIGGEST RECENT HEALTH IMPROVEMENTS in relation to COVID-19, according to a report released by WalletHub. Lower case counts and death rates indicate how safe it is to reopen economies, states the financial website. WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia, focusing on the "latest developments in each state rather than which states have been hit the hardest throughout the pandemic," seeking to "highlight which states have experienced a positive trend in their residents' health in the past few weeks."

     Hawaiʻi has the lowest death rate, lowest positive COVID-19 testing rate, and lowest estimated average number of people to whom an infected person will transmit COVID-19. Alaska ranks nearly as well as Hawaiʻi, and both states are far ahead of all other states. VermontMontana, and Idaho follow in low numbers. The highest numbers are reported for ArizonaNew HampshireNorth DakotaIowa, and Mississippi.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Hawaiʻi's House of Representatives reconvenes next week. Photo from Hawaiʻi House of Representatives

HAWAIʻI'S 2020 LEGISLATURE WILL TAKE UP POLICE REFORM when it reconvenes next Monday; June 22. HB 285 would require disclosure of identities of officers when they are suspended and make public access to information on suspended officers. Testimony on this and other police reform measures will be accepted when hearing dates are posted. Police reform is expected to be first considered by chairs of the House Judiciary and Labor and Public Employment committees.
     House Speaker Scott K. Saiki said today the House and Senate are reconvening to address outstanding issues, including the budget and COVID-19-related and emergency-type bills. "We are working with our committee chairs to prioritize legislation that must be enacted."

     The State Capitol building will be closed to the public to conform with state and federal recommendations for physical distancing and avoiding large gatherings. The public will have an opportunity to submit written testimony and to observe proceedings through livestream. Legislators and legislative staff will be allowed into the Capitol through a single entrance, where everyone will undergo a temperature check. Masks must be worn in all public spaces, physical distancing rules will be mandatory, and anyone exhibiting signs of illness will be denied entry into the Capitol.

     All House floor sessions and some committee hearings will be televised on ʻOlelo Community Television and live-streamed at capitol.hawaii.gov/broadcasts.aspx. Check olelo.org/ or capitol.hawaii.gov for the broadcast schedule.
     The Legislature recessed on March 21 due to the pandemic, reconvened on May 11, and recessed for a second time on May 22. The session is expected to adjourn sine die on July 10. For more information, go to capitol.hawaii.gov.

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Kaʻū Voices invites people to sign wave to end police brutality. Photo from Kaʻū Voices
KAʻŪ VOICES INVITES THE PUBLIC TO JOIN IN SIGN WAVING TO END POLICE BRUTALITY, this Saturday, June 13 from  to  at the intersection of Mamalahoa Hwy and South Point Road. Kaʻū Voices, a group of local residents affiliated with the Indivisibles, "is sponsoring sign waving to promote social justice. All are invited to participate in this demonstration to end police brutality," Linda Morgan of Kaʻū Voices told The Kaʻū Calendar.

     Kaʻū Voices organizes sign-waving events, participates in the Women's March each January in Hilo, and more. Members of Kaʻū Voices stood along the highway last Sunday, waving signs protesting the death of George Floyd. Video of his death in MinneapolisMN, on May 25 by a police officer sparked international protestation of racism and police brutality, especially the treatment of Blacks, in America.
     Indivisible is a nationwide movement of thousands of volunteer-led local groups that engage in progressive advocacy and electoral work.

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MORE THAN $30 MILLION MORE is awarded to Hawaiʻi by the federal government for homelessness and related impacts of COVID-19. Congressman Ed Case said Congress provided $4 billion nationally for U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development's Emergency Solution Grant program for local governments to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus among individuals and families who are homeless, receiving homeless assistance, or are at risk of becoming homeless. The funding can be used for more emergency shelters, provide hotel/motel vouchers, and provide essential services including childcare, education services, employment assistance, outpatient health services, legal services, mental health services, substance abuse treatment services, and transportation. Funds can also be used to help prevent people from becoming homeless and rapidly re-house those who become homeless.
     Case said Hawaiʻi was first issued funds from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act in April. "In this newest round of funding from the CARES Act, our communities will receive more than $30 million in federal aid from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to enable the delivery of critical programs and services to the people of Hawai‘i. This round of ESG awards will provide funding to help homeless and low-income persons to regain stability in permanent housing. The grants also provide funding for emergency and or transitional shelters and rapidly/immediately rehousing homeless persons and families."


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UPDATES ON MAUNA LOA'S AND KĪLAUEA'S GEOLOGICAL HISTORY is richly illustrated on new U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory maps. The presentation features a deeper explanation of scientists employing information from eruptions and flows.
     Mauna Loa's history is newly detailed with geologic mapping and dating of lava flows above sea level. They show that "about 90 percent of Mauna Loa's surface is covered with flows that erupted within the past 4,000 years. Hundreds of flows occurred during this time, without covering the volcano evenly. By tracing the flows back to their vents and knowing their ages based on radiocarbon dating, geologists recognized a general pattern in the frequency of lava flows spreading from the summit area and the rift zones during the past few thousand years." See the Mauna Loa maps. Learn more.
USGS HVO map
     On the Geology and History page for Kīlauea, HVO geologists explain the volcano is still considered to be "in the shield-building stage of Hawaiian volcanism.  "Long periods of explosive (tephra-dominated) and effusive (lava-flow-dominated) activity have alternated at Kīlauea for the past 2,500 years. Scientists infer that the eruption style is determined by the amount of magma being supplied to the volcano. When magma supply is high, the summit caldera fills and feeds voluminous lava flows from summit and rift zone vents. When the magma supply drops, the caldera collapses. When the caldera floor is deep enough to be at or near the water table (about 500 m (1640 ft) deeper than present), water can seep into the vent to trigger steam explosions. Eventually magma supply increases, and effusive eruptions dominate as many lava flows fill the caldera and erupt from the rift zones."

     Geologists studying Kīlauea have a "difficult time" piecing together its history, as "there is a lack of old, exposed rock… 90 percent of the volcano's surface is covered by lava flows younger than 1,000 years, and about 20 percent of those flows are less than 200 years old. The Hilina Basalt formation, exposed in Hilina fault scarps on Kīlauea's central south flank, includes the oldest lava flows found above sea level, which erupted around 50,000 to 70,000 years ago." Older rock has been taken from submarine slopes and drill cores, "providing some clues to the volcano's origin... Current research indicates the first alkali-basalt lava flows erupted onto the ocean floor between 210,000 and 280,000 years ago, and the volcano transitioned from its pre-shield to shield-building stage about 155,000 years ago."
     

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Fourth of July parade in Nāʻālehu is canceled, along with parades in Hilo and Kona. Photo by Leilani Esperanza
FOURTH OF JULY EVENTS IN HILO AND KONA ARE CANCELED. The County of Hawai‘i today announced the cancellation of this year's Hilo Bay Blast. "The safety and wellbeing of our community is a priority, as State and County officials continue to encourage responsible personal decision making and appropriate preventive measures due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic."
     Cancellation includes all originally scheduled activities such as the Salute to Our Veterans Hilo Bay 5K Run/Walk at Liliʻuokalani Gardens, the Hot Rides Expo at the Hilo Bayfront Soccer Fields, live music performances, children's activities, and various food vendors that were to occur throughout the Hilo Bayfront area. The fireworks display and musical accompaniment that close out the annual Independence Day celebration in Hilo are also canceled.
     There will be no street closures or modified traffic patterns implemented this year. All County parks will open at 7 a.m. and close at 6 p.m. over the holiday weekend. Mayor Harry Kim said he hopes that some of the events can be rescheduled to later in the year, provided that the pandemic threat has eased and people can safely gather. West Hawaiʻi fireworks displays at Kailua Bay and Queens Bowl in Waikoloa, which are privately organized, were previously canceled. The Kona Fourth of July Parade was also previously canceled by its organizers.
     ʻO Kaʻū Kākou earlier canceled the Independence Day Parade through Nāʻālehu, which usually draws the mayor and many candidates for office as well as horses, riders, floats, and walking groups.
     "Please take this time to celebrate the birth of American independence in a safe and responsible fashion, with family and friends. We ask that everyone continue to adhere to physical distancing requirements, always wear proper face coverings, and ensure proper sanitization protocols," says the statement from the county.

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CAFÉ AND ROASTERIES ARE ENCOURAGED TO DOWNLOAD THE COFFEE INDUSTRY COVID-19 PLAYBOOK. Members of the Hawaiʻi Coffee Association and the Oregon Coffee Board created the Coffee Industry COVID-19 Playbook "because each state and county has adopted
different measures and guidelines, we have created this Playbook specifically for cafes & roasteries reopening this month in Hawaiʻi as others have adopted the same outlines for their regions."
     The document is provided to all members of HCA. Members are encouraged to share it with "your fellow coffee colleagues within the state, including all staff and employees of cafés and roasteries." The Playbook provides Tips for Business Owners, Relief Package Updates, New Sales Channels, Cafe & Roastery Guidelines, Workers' Rights, Unemployment Information, and more.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
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NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, but four on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 37 over the last six days.

     Hawaiʻi Island has recorded no new cases in about two weeks. All 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 451 cases, Kauaʻi 21 and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 685 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.

     In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno said, "As the Island and State of Hawaiʻigoes forward, please know the importance of continuing to follow the policies of physical distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy. Thank you for doing your part in keeping Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for listening and have a safe day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2.04 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 115,000. Worldwide, more than 7.04 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 404,000.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
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Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, June 11, 2020

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Old South Hilo Sanitary Landfill, covered in synthetic turf weighted down by sandbags. Read details of the closure, below.
Photo by David Corrigan, Big Island Video News

WEDNESDAY WAS KAMEHAMEHA DAY, the celebration of the life of the king who unified all of the Hawaiian Islands. In the decades just before the arrival of missionaries, Kamehameha I brought together the islands, from the BigIslandto Niʻihau. He formally established the HawaiianKingdom as an internationally recognized government in 1810. During King Kamehameha's reign, from 1795 to 1818, fur traders and merchants, picking up local sandalwood on their way to markets in China, stopped in Hawaiʻi on their sailing ships. Pineapple and coffee crops were introduced.

King Kamehameha I
     Kamehameha I's great-grandson, Kamehameha V, established the holiday in 1871, and Kamehameha Day quickly grew to include such events as carnivals, horse and foot races, parades featuring paʻu riders – the flower-bedecked horseback contingents representing each island – hula competitions, and hoʻolauleʻa. The holiday continued as Hawaiʻi became a part of the U.S. Celebrated each June 11, it was one of the first state public holidays to be written into law when Hawaiʻi became a state in 1959.
     There are four statues of Kamehameha: one in Hilo, another in Kapaʻau on the north end of this island, a third in Honolulu, and a fourth in the U.S. Capitol visitor center in Washington, D.C. Annually, all are sites of lei ceremonies on Kamehameha Day. All in-person celebrations for the 51st occurrence of the state holiday are canceled this year due to the pandemic. However, there were signs of hoʻokupu, gifts, left to honor Kamehameha at his statue at WailoaState Park in Hilo. A long maile lei was draped from his outstretched fingers, and foliage, flowers, and fruit surrounded the base of the statue," reported Big Island VideoNews.

King Kamehameha statue in the U.S. Capitol, draped with lei. In-person celebrations this year in honor of the king 
are canceled. Photo by Julia Neal


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SUPPORT FOR BUSINESSES WITH TEN OR FEWER EMPLOYEES from the Small Business Administration is requested by Senators Mazie Hirono, Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), and Ed Markey (D-Mass). The group urges SBA Administrator Jovita Carranza and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to "make sure these businesses can fully access coronavirus relief programs."

Sen. Mazie Hirono asks SBA to make sure small businesses,
with ten or fewer employees, receive benefits through
federal programs during the pandemic.
     Hirono's office gives some information: "Nationally, there are 31.7 million small businesses in the United States. Hawaiʻi is home to 135,567 small businesses – representing 99.3 percent of the businesses in the state and 275,908 employees. Based on recent information from the SBA, the vast majority of these businesses have 10 or fewer employees."

     The Senators wrote: "Our smallest businesses, especially women-owned and minority businesses, have long struggled getting access to capital. The coronavirus pandemic has created new hurdles for them. We urge you to ensure that small businesses with 10 or fewer employees and self-employed individuals get the help they need from the Paycheck Protection Program, Economic Injury Disaster Loan, and other COVID-19-related assistance.

     "Smaller businesses represent 96 percent of small businesses across the country and are disproportionately women- and minority-owned… The CARES Act was meant to prioritize underserved concerns including many of these women and minority-owned businesses. Soon after the PPP went into effect, however, it was reported that many smaller and underserved businesses struggled to access these loans."
     Hirono has continued to advocate for coronavirus relief programs—including PPP and EIDL. Hawaiibusinesses have received 23,651 loans through PPP totaling $2.468 billion, and 7,681 loans through EIDL, totaling $482.487 million.
     Read the letter here.

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HAWAIʻI COFFEE ASSOCIATION WEBINAR SERIES is open for registration. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.
     Webinar Schedule (For speaker bios follow the registration links):

     Wednesday, June 24

     , message from HCA President Chris Manfredi - REGISTER

     , The Impact of Time, Temperature, and Extraction on the Sensory Quality of Drip Brew Coffee– Mackenzie Batali of UC DavisCoffeeCenter - REGISTER


     Coffee Scoring Systems Panel – Kim Westerman, Shawn Steiman and Pacific Coffee Research - REGISTER

     2019-2020 CTAHR Research and Extension Update – Andrea Kawabata and Shannon Sand - REGISTER

     SHAC Update – Suzanne Shriner - REGISTER
     Thursday, June 25
     , Hawaiʻi in a Global MarketREGISTER

     to , SCA US Chapter Update– Madeleine Longoria Garcia - REGISTER

     , HDOA Update– Phyllis Shimabukuro-Geiser - REGISTER
     , USDA Rural Development Programs– Brenda Iokepa-Moses - REGISTER


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IN-PERSON SERVICE reopens at Environmental Management Administration offices Monday, June 15. This includes the Department's administration, Solid Waste Division administration, the Abandoned and Derelict Vehicles Program (
345 Kekūanāoʻa Street, Suite 41, Hilo
) and the Wastewater Division administration and Engineering Section (
108 Railroad Avenue, Hilo
).

     Operations will be modified to ensure the safety of both customers and employees. Face coverings will be required. The Department encourages customers to continue to practice social distancing by using these options:
     Payments for Solid Waste and Wastewater services are accepted by phone, mail, or at drop box locations (checks only). Most customer service inquiries can be handled by phone, or email. Mail payments to 
345 Kekūanāoʻa Street, Suite 41, Hilo
, Hawaiʻi 96720 (attention: Solid Waste Division or Wastewater Division). 

      Drop Boxes (for checks only) are available at the Department of Water Supply, 345 Kekūanāoʻa Street (in the front circular driveway), or on the exterior wall of the Motor Vehicle Registration Office at the Aupuni Center, 101 Pauahi Street, Suite 5, Hilo (by the U.S. Postal Service blue mailbox). 

     For payments by phone, or for questions or to schedule an appointment, call Administration at 808-961-8083, Solid Waste Customer Service at 808-961-8339, Wastewater Customer Service at 808-961-8338, or Wastewater Engineering at 808-961-8615.

     Walk-ins are accepted, but appointments are recommended. Notary service and engineering services will be by appointment only. Please notify the office to cancel a scheduled an appointment due to feeling ill, and they will reschedule it.   
     "The public's understanding is very much appreciated during this challenging time," says the Department.


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GREEN SYNTHETIC TURF GRASS COVERS THE OLD SOUTH HILO SANITARY LANDFILL where much of Kaʻū's trash was disposed until its closure. The turf covers the landfill as large as 30 football fields. The county started to shut down the place for disposal in August 2019. County of Hawaiʻi Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division worked on closing the Landfill with contractor Kiewit Construction. The project is expected to be substantially completed by mid-June.

     Use of the landfill goes back to the 1960s, and it received the last truckload of waste in December 2019. The county hired HDR Engineering to facilitate the closure plan, approved by the state Department of Health.

Covered in fake grass, the old South Hilo Sanitary Landfill's big green hill compliments the color
of the surrounding vegetation. Photo by David Corrigan, Big Island Video News
     The project involves capping the 40-acre waste site with soil and a polyethylene liner, synthetic turf liner, and installation of stormwater management structures. The green synthetic turf grass (like that used on indoor football fields) was placed over the polyethylene liner and sealed. The capping method is the first to be permitted and constructed in Hawaiʻi, and is expected to reduce overall maintenance.
     A statement from the Solid Waste Division says, "Thank you for doing your part in keeping our island a clean and safe paradise." Visit hawaiizerowaste.org for locations and services, or call Department of Environmental Management, Solid Waste Division Office, at 961-8270.


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INTERESTED IN GROWING POTATOES? Attend a free webinar on potato production on Wednesday, June 17 from  to  Planting seed material may be available. Register at: https://bit.ly/potatovirtualworkshop.

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WIND ADVISORY FOR KAʻŪ and most of the rest of Hawaiʻi Island is in effect through tomorrow morning. The National Weather Service expects sustained winds of 25 to 35 miles per hour, with localized gusts over 45 mph. "Please take the time to secure or bring in-doors any items in your yard that may be affected by high wind," says NSW.


Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

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NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, but seven on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 44 over the last week.

     Hawaiʻi Island has recorded no new cases in more than two weeks. All 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 458 cases, Kauaʻi 21 and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 692 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.
      In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno said, "As the Island and State of Hawaiʻigoes forward, please know the importance of continuing to follow the policies of physical distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy. Thank you for doing your part in keeping Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for listening and in celebration of a beautiful day of heritage, Happy King Kamehameha Day! This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."

     In the United States, more than 2.06 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 115,000. Worldwide, more than 7.15 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is over 408,000.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS

Join In Sign Waving with Kaʻū Voices to End Police Brutality on Saturday, June 13 from to at the intersection of Mamalahoa Hwy and South Point Road. Kaʻū Voices, a group of local residents affiliated with the Indivisibles, "is sponsoring sign waving to promote social justice. All are invited to participate in this demonstration to end police brutality," Linda Morgan of Kaʻū Voices told The Kaʻū Calendar.

Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.
Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, June 12, 2020

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Vegetable seeds for bok choy, tomatoes, and carrots will be distributed in ʻĀina, ʻOhana, and Me: Summer Challenge!
 Packets to school children on Saturday in Ocean View and next week in Pāhala. See more below. Photo by Katie Graham

VACATION RENTALS WILL BE ALLOWED TO OPEN TO ANYONE NOT REQUIRING QUARANTINE, according to word from Mayor Harry Kim's office. With approval from Gov. David Ige, the first travelers from within Hawaiʻi could check into Hawaiʻi Island vacation rentals next Tuesday, June 15, when the two-week quarantine is lifted for interisland travelers.
     Currently, vacation rental owners are prohibited from renting to anyone from this island or elsewhere unless guests are deemed essential workers. The new rule will allow those from this island  and other islands to stay in vacation rentals. County officials said they want those under quarantine to stay in hotels where they can be more closely monitored. Those coming from the mainland are prohibited on this island from staying in vacation rentals, unless they quarantine somewhere else.
Kaʻū District Gym will be reserved for Summer Fun over the next few
weeks. Other practices of sports in small groups are expected soon.
Photo by Julia Neal
     The opening of vacation rentals came after a group of owners threatened to sue the state for billions of dollars in lost income and damages. Kauaʻi was the first county to ask Gov. David Ige for permission for vacation rentals to be open to those journeying in the Hawaiian Islands travel bubble. The governor approved it. Mayor Harry Kim received permission today for the June 15 reopening of vacation rentals on this island.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

VENUES THAT REMAIN CLOSED ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND because of the pandemic are
bars, nightclubs, public swimming pools, and large indoor gathering and activities venues for concerts, sports, conventions, and expos. Nāʻālehu Park and Kaʻ District Gym are closed temporarily for the safety of the Summer Fun program. Mayor Harry Kim announced today that many venues can open, with safe practices, starting June 15. They include county park pavilions, community centers, and picnic tables.

LARGER GATHERINGS ARE ALLOWED starting June 15, under Mayor Harry Kim's new rule. However, at County Parks & Recreation Facilities, no contact sports are allowed including scrimmages, exhibition games, and tournaments. Controlled practices are allowed, provided physical distancing can be adhered to at all times.
     Indoor gatherings of groups of up to 10 persons are permitted with a maximum of 50 people, provided that physical distancing and safe practices can be maintained. Outdoor gatherings of groups of up to 10 persons are permitted with a maximum of 100 people, provided that physical distancing and safe practices can be maintained unless a greater amount of people are permitted under this rule.


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REOPEN TRANS-PACIFIC TRAVEL and implement guidelines that will allow travel to resume safely before July 31. That is the message today from Chamber of Commerce Hawaiʻi. "Every day we inch closer to an economic cliff that will close businesses permanently and destroy our local business community beyond repair if tourism does not reopen," said Sherry Menor-McNamara, President & CEO. "It is incumbent that the Administration implement a plan to accelerate the opening of the trans-Pacific visitor economy ahead of July 31. Local businesses and workers will pay the price if safe, decisive, and swift action isn't taken."
     The Chamber is soliciting signatures on a petition to reopen travel safely and expedite other measures "that will save businesses. This petition follows an April effort that led to over 1,000 supporters calling for economic assistance and other actions for businesses," said the statement from the Chamber.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Byron Ledge and other trails and destinations within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park reopen on Monday,
along with the main gate and resumption of admission fees. NPS photo by Janice Wei
VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK'S MAIN GATE WILL REOPEN ON MONDAY, JUNE 15, with access to many trails as well as some businesses. The Park has given permission for the opening of Volcano HouseKīlauea Military CampVolcano Art Center Gallery, and the Park's non-profit partner, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. "Contact the businesses directly for dates and details." advises the Park in a statement this afternoon. It says the Park is following guidance from the White House, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state and local public health authorities.
     On Monday, collection of entrance fees will resume, and these areas will reopen for outdoor enjoyment and exercise by 9 a.m.: Crater Rim Drive to Kīlauea Military Camp and to Devastation Trail parking lot; Kīlauea summit area trails, including Byron Ledge Trail (newly repaired following the 2018 eruption and summit collapse); Devastation and Halema‘uma‘u trails; Kīlauea Iki Overlook and trail (one-way counterclockwise loop only); Chain of Craters Road to Mauna Ulu parking lot;
Pu‘uhuluhulu and trails near Mauna Ulu, including Nāpau and Nāulu trails (day use only); and Ka‘ū Desert and Mauna Iki trails (day use only).
     Areas already open are: Mauna Loa Road to Kīpukapuaulu for vehicles, bicyclists and hikers, including Tree Molds and Kīpukapuaulu Trail (pavilion, picnic area, and restroom remain closed); Mauna Loa Road past Kīpukapuaulu for hikers and bicyclists to Mauna Loa Overlook at 6,662 feet, but closed to vehicles for wildfire prevention; Footprints Trail from Highway 11 to the Ka‘ū Desert Trail and Mauna Iki Trail junction, including the Footprints shelter; and Escape Road, for bicycling, horseback riding, and hiking.
     All other areas in the Park remain closed at this time for public safety, including Nāhuku and Kīlauea Visitor Center.
     "Services are limited, and visitors should bring everything they might need for a safe visit including water, meals, and hand sanitizer. Above all, visitors should pack their patience, avoid crowds, and have alternate destinations planned should parking lots be full," said Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Acting Superintendent Rhonda Loh. Visitors are urged to recreate responsibly by planning their visit in advance and acting with care while in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park:
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park will reopen its main gate, many trails, and some other destinations on Monday, June 15.
Photo by Julia Neal
     "Practice social distancing. Maintain at least six feet of distance between you and others. Wear a face covering when social distancing cannot be maintained. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use your hand sanitizer. Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. If you feel sick, please visit another day.
Let wildlife be wild. Do not feed nēnē, the Hawaiian goose, and look out for them on roadways and in parking lots," says the statement from the Park. "The health and safety of Park users, employees, volunteers, and partners continue to be paramount. While these areas are accessible for the public to enjoy, a return to full operations will continue to be phased and services are limited. Park users should follow local area health orders from the Governor of Hawai‘i, practice Leave No Trace principles, and avoid crowding and other high-risk outdoor activities.
     "The CDC has offered guidance to help people recreating in parks and open spaces prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Park staff will continue to monitor all park functions to ensure that visitors adhere to CDC guidance for mitigating risks associated with the transmission of COVID-19, and will take any additional steps necessary to protect everyone's health."
     Details and updates on park operations will continue to be posted on the Park website www.nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes and social media channels. Updates about NPS operations will be posted on www.nps.gov/coronavirus.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Pāhala Branch of Bank of Hawaiʻi offers 24-hour ATM, lobby hours on
weekdays, and special kūpuna hours. Photo by Julia Neal
BANK OF HAWAI‘I HELP DURING THE PANDEMIC is explained in a message released this week.
     Emergency Loans for those affected by the COVID-19 shutdown are available for up to $3,000. Customers will need to provide Social Security number for a credit-check, employment status, income information (pre-COVID-19 income if income is impacted by COVID-19), and information on assets including checking and savings accounts. The emergency loan applications are accepted online.
     Bank of Hawaiʻi also aids customers struggling with mortgage, personal or automobile loan, or home equity line of credit, through a Forbearance Program, Extension Program, or Online Small-Dollar Emergency Loan Program.
     BoH also accepts applications for benefits from Paycheck Protection Program; Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security - CARES Act; and Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program.
     In addition, BoH is waiving all early withdrawal penalties for customers with CDs, or Time Deposit Accounts, through the end of June. ATM fees are also waived, through July 21.
     In Ka‘ū, Bank of Hawaiʻi, operates its branch in Pāhala at 96-3163 Pikake Street. Open weekdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Kaʻū branch also offers a kūpuna-only hour from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. on weekdays. Call to make an appointment, 928-8356.
     The message promises that Bank of Hawaiʻi "is committed to helping both individuals and businesses."
     For the environment, BoH has reduced paper by no longer requiring paper remittance tickets for credit card payments, loan principal payments, consumer loan payments, or deposits (unless taking out cash).

     In social mindfulness, BoH is celebrating Pride Month by asking the public to consider donating to the Hawaiʻi LGBT Legacy Foundation, which operates the Hawaiʻi LGBTQ+ Center in Waikiki, or the Honolulu Gay & Lesbian Cultural Foundation, which helps educate and raise awareness of LGBTQ+ culture and the arts.
     Learn more at boh.com.


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DELAYING HEALTH SERVICES IS DANGEROUS, especially for the elderly and those with underlying health conditions, says a recent statement from the Department of Health:
     "In addition to the serious consequences that occur when these conditions are not well controlled, people with chronic medical conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, asthma, or cancer are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Work with your healthcare provider to monitor your condition and optimize your best health now to help reduce risk of illness in the future.

     "As Hawaiʻi reopens, now is a great time to reconnect with your healthcare provider."     Tips to "navigate the new normal" in healthcare visits include:

     Call, don't cancel– If you have a scheduled appointment, call your healthcare provider to see if the appointment can be kept and what precautions are being taken.

     Consider alternate healthcare delivery– Telehealth options may be available to you and vaccinations are provided at most pharmacies, saving you a trip to your healthcare provider's office. Use the vaccine locator and call first to confirm vaccine availability and restrictions that may apply.

     Be patient for routine care, but persistent for more urgent issues– Healthcare providers are facing a backlog of patients, but if you have a health concern, insist on being seen soon. For medical emergencies, seek immediate care, and call 9-1-1.

     For those without health insurance or who are unable to pay for healthcare services, call 2-1-1 for assistance. Free or low-cost services are available to those who qualify.
     Dr. Steven A. Hankins, Lead Coordinator of Public Health and Medical Services, Hawaiʻi Emergency Management Agency, said, "Now is one of the safest times to go get the care that you need. Hawaiʻi healthcare provider offices are open, and they are taking the necessary steps to protect their patients and their staff. In addition to screening patients for COVID-19 symptoms in advance, many offices are offering telehealth services and scheduling appointments, for patients who may be more vulnerable to severe illness from COVID-19, earlier in the day, similar to the kūpuna hours seen at grocery stores."
     For more information, visit hawaiicovid19.com.


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FULL FUNDING AUTHORIZATION FOR HOMELAND DEFENSE RADAR-HAWAIʻI is issued.  Senate Armed Services Committee's Sen. Mazie Hirono made the announcement yesterday. A statement from Hirono's office says the $162 million authorization "reverses the Trump Administration's decision to zero-out funding in its budget request for the project – which will be a critical component of the United States' ballistic missile defense system when completed." The funding will support construction of HDR-H following the Missile Defense Agency's completed siting process – "a process that should include meaningful community engagement." 
     The authorization also directs the Department of Defense to execute all its Fiscal Year 2020 support of HDR-H, requires the Director of the Missile Defense Agency to provide a revised plan with a timeline for completion of the project, and routine briefings to the Senate Armed Services Committee on the project.

     Hirono said, "HDR-H is part of our country's critical, layered defense. As the United States continues to confront a range of strategic threats in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, it is imperative that all Americans are protected by our ballistic missile defense system. Securing full funding authorization for HDR-H was my top priority in the NDAA this year because it will help keep Hawaiʻi safe from external threats. I will continue to advocate for its inclusion in the final, approved package."
     Earlier this year, Hirono pressed Secretary of Defense Mark Esper to justify the proposed elimination of HDR-H funding during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the DOD's budget request.

Artists rendering of the Homeland Defense Radar. Image from army-technology.com

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Ali McKeigue from PARENTS, Inc. and Katie Graham, of Food Corps
Hawaiʻi, put together ʻĀina, ʻOhana, and Me packets to be distributed 
in Ocean View and Pāhala during the next week.
‘ĀINA, OHANA, & ME SUMMER CHALLENGE PACKETS will be given away to keiki in Oceanview and Pāhala later this week. For keiki in Ocean View, packets will be available this Saturday, June 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the picnic table by Mālama Market. For keiki in Pāhala packets will be available from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, June 17 at Pāhala Shopping Center.
     ‘Āina, ‘Ohana, and Me is a collaborative pilot project between PARENTS, Inc. and Food Corps Hawai‘i. Each packet will include seeds, soil, a notebook, colored pencils, and ‘āina-based activities for families to connect with each other and the outdoors. Putting the packets together are Ali McKeigue, of PARENTS, Inc. and Katie Graham, of Food Corps. Hawai‘i.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

‘O KA‘Ū KĀKOU WILL HOST A GIVEAWAY TO SENIORS AND THE NEEDY on Monday, June 15 at 11 a.m. behind the Bank of Hawai‘i in Pāhala. The gift bags will include rice, chicken, canned goods, and toilet paper.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
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NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, but 15 new cases on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 59 in eight days.
     Hawaiʻi Island has recorded no new cases in more than two weeks. All 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 473 cases, Kauaʻi 21 and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 706 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.
Civil Defense Director 
Talmadge Magno.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The Island and State of Hawai‘i have done very well in minimizing the spread of the Coronavirus. Your efforts and good work of prevention have placed Hawai‘i State as the top in the Nation for the lowest per capita infection rate. A grateful thank you to the community of Hawai‘i for doing your part to keep Hawai‘i safe.
     "In going forward, know the virus threat remains and we must continue to follow the preventive policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy. Thank you for listening. Have a beautiful aloha Friday and please stay safe. This is your Hawai‘i County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,048,986 million cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 114,669. Worldwide, more than 7.65 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is almost 426,000.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
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Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS

Join In Sign Waving with Kaʻū Voices to End Police Brutality on Saturday, June 13 from to at the intersection of Mamalahoa Hwy and South Point Road. Kaʻū Voices, a group of local residents affiliated with the Indivisibles, "is sponsoring sign waving to promote social justice. All are invited to participate in this demonstration to end police brutality," Linda Morgan of Kaʻū Voices told The Kaʻū Calendar.

Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series.The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.
Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, June 13, 2020

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While Volcanoes National Park gate opens this Monday, Volcano Art Gallery in the original Volcano House
Hotel will open to the public on Wednesday. Photo from Experience Volcano

A FIRE DESTROYED THE CRUZ FAMILY HOME in Pāhala today. The house is across from the Community Center and gas station. Neighbors said they believed that Mrs. Eufemia Cruz was trapped inside. They tried to break in, but the fire raged quickly to engulf the house. Firefighters, less than a block away, rushed to the scene and put down the inferno in a stiff wind. With smoke billowing through the village, firefighters and neighbors doused adjacent houses and saved them, the community center, and gas station. The Cruz house was gutted. Her son Orlando Cruz, who also lived there, was able to escape with some burns treated at Ka‘ū Hospital.
     Mrs. Cruz was known for her Filipino pastries and banana bread, still making them well into her 90s. She cooked them on Saturday mornings in her basement and sold them in the afternoons, a driver taking her around town.
     Community members around the scene described her as the area's last living Sakada, who came here on a ship from the Philippines to work and live in Hawaiʻi in 1946.
     In addition to firefighters from Pāhala Fire Station, responders came from Volcano Fire Station and Pāhala Volunteer Fire Station, along with police and medics.
A fire gutted the Cruz family home in Pāhala today during stiff winds. Mrs. Eufemia Cruz, over 90 years of age, is
believed to have been inside. She was famous for her banana bread, which she still sold house to house in
recent months. Photo by Julia Neal
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

WILL HAWAIʻI COUNTY GIVE LEGAL VACATION RENTAL OWNERS a property tax break for the time they were prohibited from renting them during the pandemic?  Rental by Owner Awareness Association released a statement today, saying the organization asked all four counties whether property taxes will be deferred. City & County of Honolulu adopted a deferment plan without penalty or interest. "County of Hawaiʻi said there were no options for deferral of property tax payments. The county of Kauaʻi said they were still considering the matter. The county of Maui did not reply to repeated requests for information."
     Mayors of Maui, Kauaʻi, and Hawaiʻi all decided to allow transient vacation rentals to re-open this coming week to host guests, with the exception of those subject to quarantine. "This means guests who have been in Hawai'i for 14 days, who live on the island of your rental, have traveled inter-island to the island of your rental, are allowed to stay in your vacation rental," said the statement from Rental by Owner. "Rental to those subject to quarantine is still restricted, although owners can reside in the properties, but must abide by quarantine rules. All three county mayors pointed out that the ability to rent only extended to legal vacation rentals." Gov. David Ige recently extended the quarantine for out of state visitors to July 31.
     Rental By Owner also noted "multiple lawsuits launched against the Governor, the Mayors, the state, and counties in regards to vacation rentals and the quarantine in general. Rental by Owner has not joined in with any of those lawsuits, however, we think that one of them regarding vacation rentals may have been the impetus for the mayors to reverse their earlier positions. It was a well-reasoned argument that essentially stated that there was no legal justification for the ban on vacation rentals."
     Rental by Owner also stated, "We are aware that the hotel industry is working very hard to garner whatever little tourist market there will be in Hawaiʻi over the next few years. We have seen statements in the media which are, shall we say, 'unverifiable,' about the benefits of hotels. Competition will be stiff for many months. Be prepared."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus is open. The Gallery inside Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park opens 
on Wednesday. VAC photo
VOLCANO ART CENTER GALLERY REOPENS WEDNESDAY, June 17, The gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park has been closed since March, when the Park closed its gates due to the COVID-19 pandemic. VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in VolcanoVillage reopened to the public on Monday, June 1,
     Operating under CDC guidelines and social distancing protocol, VAC Gallery will be open Wednesday through Sunday. The Niʻaulani Gallery in VolcanoVillage remains open Monday through Friday, with the Nature Trail & SculptureGarden.

     Both locations now offer virtual shopping appointments. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time, here. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.
     VAC also now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos.
     A message from the gallery says, "We would like to express our sincerest gratitude to the VolcanoArtCenter‘Ohana who have contributed donations, made purchases, took online courses, and offered support in so many ways these last few months. We are so appreciative and can't tell you enough how uplifting it is to hear from you while being confronted with the harsh realities of canceled contracts and budget cuts that VAC faces today. Your contributions provide us the needed hope in restructuring our creative community. As we softly reopen, VAC continues to place the safety and health of our associates, artists, members, and customers first and want you to know that we are doing all we can to make sure everyone feels comfortable."
The Nature Trail & SculptureGarden at Niʻaulani Gallery in VolcanoVillage is open Monday through Friday,
The current exhibit, Interplay: Art Science features sculptural works "inspired by Nature, informed by 
Science, expressed as Art," is on display through April 2021. VAC photos

     VAC guidelines are that all visitors must wear a CDC recommended face covering to enter the Gallery in the Park or Niʻaulani Gallery and classroom spaces in Volcano Village; those with cough, fever, or who do not feel well are asked to not visit. All visitors must maintain a six-foot distance from one another at all times; visitors may be asked to wait outside the Galleries to allow for social distancing inside. "We encourage you to use the hand sanitizer we provide at the entrance." Class participants are required to use the sanitizing supplies provided to clean areas after use. All classes will require pre-registration and will have a 10-person maximum. Social distancing floor markers and acrylic screens will be at checkout registers. Associates will be cleaning high touch areas frequently throughout the day including checkout register areas. "We will continue our pick-up service for local residents allowing you to order online, by phone, or email, should you prefer to continue doing so. We look forward to seeing you all again!"


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ST. JUDE'S ONLINE WORSHIP is available, St. Jude's Second Sunday after Pentecost, featuring Father Doug Coil, from Coco Beach, Florida. People are invited to join the Zoom Aloha Hour, Sunday, June 14 at with host Cynnie Salley. Go to https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, meeting ID: 684 344 9828, password: Aloha.


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DEADLINE FOR TO APPLY FOR AG COVERAGE with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency's Agriculture Risk Coverage or Price Loss Coverage programs for 2020 is Tuesday, June 30 by close of business. Although program elections for the 2020 crop year remain the same as elections made for 2019, all producers need to contact their local USDA FSA office to sign a 2020 enrollment contract.


     Producers who do not complete enrollment will be ineligible to receive a payment should one trigger for an eligible crop.

     Producers are eligible to enroll on farms with base acres for barley, canola, chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long-, medium-, and short-grain rice, safflower seed, seed cotton, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed, and wheat.
     More than 1.4 million ARC and PLC contracts have been signed for the 2020 crop year, 89 percent of expected enrollment. FSA will send reminder postcards to producers they expected to apply.

     ARC and PLC contracts can be mailed or emailed to producers for signature depending on producer preference. Signed contracts can be mailed or emailed back, or dropped off – call ahead for local drop off and other options for submitting signed contracts electronically.

     FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce said, "The Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage programs are critical safety-net programs for farmers, helping producers weather market distortions resulting from natural disasters, trade disruptions and, this year, a pandemic. Contact your FSA county office today to complete enrollment before June 30. This can be done in concert with filing your acreage report and applying for other FSA programs."

     For more information on ARC and PLC including web-based decision tools, visit farmers.gov/arc-plc.
     USDA Service Centers, including FSA county offices, are open for business by phone only, and field work will continue with appropriate social distancing. While program delivery staff will continue to come into the office, they will be working with producers by phone and using online tools whenever possible. All Service Center visitors wishing to conduct business with the FSA, Natural Resources Conservation Service, or any other Service Center agency are required to call their Service Center to schedule a phone appointment. More information can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus. Visit offices.usda.gov to find location and contact information for the nearest FSA county office.

Watch how to grow mangoes.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TIPS ON GROWING MANGOES AND BREADFRUIT are presented by Hawaiʻi Specialist Mark Suiso and Professor Noa Lincoln. A message from Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United shares both videos, which are part of a workshop series by Kahumana Organic Farms and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Program and in affiliation with HFUU, Wai'anae Chapter.
     On ʻulu: "Will breadfruit grow in your location? Hawaiʻi is one of the best places in the world to grow breadfruit. Dr. Noa Lincoln shares his knowledge and research about breadfruit habitat, varieties, and seasonal patterns in production."
Watch how to grow breadfruit.
     On manako: "People often ask, why do some fruit tree drop its fruit? Mark Suiso from Makaha Mangoes gives answers and demonstrates how to manage large mango trees for optimal production, including giving homeowners advice on pruning and how to prepare for mango season early on."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI WILL RECEIVE $54 MILLION TO HELP IMPROVE TEACHING AND LEARNING for at-risk students, announced Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. Title I, Part A federal aid will focus especially on students in low-income communities. The first round of funds will be dispersed in July, with the remaining funds, as adjusted, becoming available in October.

     Gabbard said, "Many of our keiki face challenges outside of their control and that require support in our schools. We have worked to ensure these funds are delivered to our teachers to help provide them with the tools they need to meet the educational needs of all our keiki, providing them with a strong foundation in learning."

     Gabbard's statement gives a background on Hawaiʻi public schools:
     "Hawaiʻi Department of Education's 256 K-12 public schools and 34 public charter schools, collectively make up the 10th largest school system in the nation, serving approximately 180,000 students. During the 2019-2020 school year, nearly 47 percent of those students were considered economically challenged.

     "Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 provides financial assistance to school districts for services that improve the teaching and learning of children at risk of not meeting challenging State academic standards, especially those children who reside in areas with high concentrations of children from low-income families.
     "There are two types of assistance that can be provided by Title I funds. The first is a 'schoolwide program' in which schools can dispense resources in a flexible manner. The second is a 'targeted assistance program' which allows schools to identify students who are failing or at risk of failing."


Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
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NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, but 17 new cases on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 76 in nine days.

     Hawaiʻi Island has recorded no new cases in nearly three weeks. All 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 489 cases, Kauaʻi 21, and MauiCounty120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 723 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The Island of Hawaiʻi has done very well in minimizing the spread of the coronavirus. Your efforts and good work of prevention are why Hawaiʻi Island is in the present good status. In going forward, know the virus threat remains and we must continue to follow the preventive policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and keeping physically and emotionally healthy. Thank you for doing your part in keeping Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for listening and have a safe weekend. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
Civil Defense Director 
Talmadge Magno.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     In the United States, more than 2,073,603 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 115,383. Worldwide, more than 7,763,921 have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 429,632.


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HOW KĪLAUEA'S RECENT ERUPTIVE HISTORY BEGAN is the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. Today's article is by HVO Research Corporation of the University of Hawai‘i geologist Lil DeSmither:

     Kīlauea's 1952 summit eruption ended a long period of inactivity.On June 27, 1952, an eruption started at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, ending a period of quiescence that had lasted nearly 18 years. 

     During the nearly two decades of quiet on Kīlauea following a summit eruption in 1934, there were several periods of increased earthquake activity and deformation beneath the summit. However, none of these phases of unrest resulted in an eruption. 

     Early in April 1952, a series of earthquakes began along Kīlauea's East Rift Zone and beneath the summit. The earthquakes, accompanied by summit inflation, persisted through May and June.

     At approximately  on June 27, an eruption commenced at the summit. A loud roaring and bright glow emanating from Halema‘uma‘u Crater alerted residents and staff in proximity to Kīlauea Caldera of the new eruption. 

     Within minutes of the eruption onset, HVO staff were on their way to the office located on Uēkahuna bluff. From HVO, a fountain erupting on the southwestern edge of the Halema‘uma‘u Crater floor was visibly over-topping the crater rim, nearly 245 m (800 ft) higher. The fountain quickly waned and by  was no longer visible from the bluff. 

Two small spatter cones, within a larger cone, are outgassing on the floor of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. A lava pond, approximately 30 m (100 ft) in diameter, is visible between the small cones. This photograph is looking westward, 
taken from the southeastern rim of the crater by G. Macdonald on August 27, 1952.

     HVO staff reached the Halema‘uma‘u Overlook 30 minutes after the eruption began. A 790 m (0.5 mile) long fissure crossed the entire floor of Halema‘uma‘u crater, and pooled lava had completely covered the crater floor. 

     A detailed account of the eruptions early hours can be found in another Volcano Watch article.

     The lake of lava had plates of cooled crust on its surface separated by cracks that provided views of the incandescent molten lava below – much like the smaller 2008-2018 lava lake within the Halema‘uma‘u "Overlook crater." The fountaining lava created waves over the surface of the lake that emanated outward from the fissure to the crater walls.

     Observers also noted seeing occasional whirlwinds on the lake surface that threw pieces of crust, up to a meter (yard) across, several meters into the air. This same phenomenon was observed in 2018 over the fissure 8 lava channel. 

     After the initial hours of the eruption, the lava fountains began to subside. After a little more than four hours, only the northeastern quarter of the fissure was active, and observers thought that the eruption could be ending. Shortly after, however, the southwestern end of the fissure reactivated with low bubbling fountains, and by that time Halema‘uma‘u Crater was estimated to have been filled with a lake of lava approximately 15 m (50 ft) deep.

Halemaʻumaʻu on May 4, 2018. USGS photo
     During the first two weeks of the eruption, small lava fountains continued to pop up along the surface of the lava lake.

     By July 11 the active length of the fissure had shortened to approximately 120 m (400 ft). Two main fountains persisted and began to build a large cinder and spatter cone within the lava lake. Gaps within the cone wall allowed lava to spill out and feed the surrounding lava lake, which had shrunk from a peak of 40 hectares (100 acres) on June 28 to about 14 hectares (34 acres) by early August. The lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u Crater in early 2018 paled in comparison, at approximately 4.2 hectares (10.4 acres).

     By the end of August, most of the erupted lava was contained within the large cone, where two active vents were building smaller spatter cones. Between the two spatter cones, there was a small lava pond that had an average diameter of about 30 m (100 ft). This continued – with occasional lava flows on the floor of Halema‘uma‘u Crater – for the next few months, until the eruption ended after 136 days on November 10.

     Approximately 0.05 km3 (64,000,000 cubic yards) of erupted lava was confined within Halema‘uma‘u Crater. The eruption filled the crater with 95 m (310 ft) of new lava, raising the floor from 235 m (770 ft) to 140 m (460 ft) below the rim. For comparison, the Halema‘uma‘u Crater floor prior to the 2018 summit collapse was approximately 80 m (260 ft) below the rim.

     After nearly two decades of quiet on Kīlauea Volcano, the 1952 eruption ended the longest eruptive pause on Kīlauea in (at least) the past 200 years.  

     Volcano Activity Updates

     Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

     Kīlauea monitoring data for the past month show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html

Halemaʻumaʻu after the 2018 eruption. Photo from Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
     Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.
     This past week, about 107 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper-elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths of less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show long-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations and fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit remain stable. Webcams show no changes to the landscape. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

     There were 3 events with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian islands during the past week: a magnitude-3.4 earthquake 6 km (4 mi) NE of Pāhala at 33 km (21 mi) depth on June 10 at 5:57 p.m., a magnitude-3.2 earthquake 5 km (3 mi) NNW of Pāhala at 35 km (22 mi) depth on June 10 at 5:05 p.m., and a magnitude-2.8 earthquake 6 km (4 mi) E of Pāhala at 33 km (21 mi) depth on June 09 at 10:59 a.m.

     HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity.
     Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Kupu affiliates prepared native plants for planting at Kāwā last year. Photo by Kaweni Masaniai-Ibarra

Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
Last year, Kupu's Hawaiʻi Youth Conservation Corps worked at Kāwā with Kaʻū's own Nā Mamo o Kāwā stewardship hui. As part of its summer program, Kupu sent five affiliates to stay in Pāhala and help with Kāwā conservation projects.
Lei from dryland forest foliage at Kāwā.
Photo by Kaweni Masaniai-Ibarra
     With three members enrolled in college, one college graduate, and one high school graduate, the group traveled to Kaʻū to learn about collaborative conservation. Under the guidance of Nā Mamo o Kāwā, Kupu aided in the stewardship efforts of Kāwā and continued their mission to revitalize connections to the ʻāina. Both Kupu and Nā Mamo o Kāwā members, including spiritual leader Duane Pua, offered daily cultural protocol to begin work along the beach trail and coastal lands.

     The group focused on Nā Mamo o Kāwā's efforts to care for the land, with such activities as clearing invasive plant species, propagating native plants, and maintaining integrity of coastal areas. In accordance with Kupu's mission to encourage pono through environmental stewardship and service-learning opportunities, Nā Mamo o Kāwā led the group through its plans while teaching the cultural importance of the area. Among native species planted and cared for are ʻulu (breadfruit), ʻūlei (Hawaiian rose), and alaheʻe (canthium).
     James Akau, executive director of Nā Mamo o Kāwā at the time, said the progress has been increasingly impactful as more groups have come in to contribute to the effort. Nā Mamo o Kāwā aims to clear invasive plants to increase the presence of native plant species, such as ʻaʻaliʻi (soapberry) and milo (sorghum), while incorporating useful plants that can benefit the community. This ties into their effort to restore a native dryland forest to the area. The fruits of the organization's labor have become apparent through an increase of native plants along the coast. At the end of the week, Kupu gathered ʻaʻaliʻi from Kāwā and local plumeria to craft lei.
     Pāhala Plantation Cottages hosted the Kupu affiliates during their stay in Kaʻū.

Kupu's mission to encourage pono was in action at Kāwā last year. Photo by Kaweni Masaniai-Ibarra


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou will Host a Giveaway to Seniors and the Needy on Monday, June 15 at behind the Bank of Hawai‘i in Pāhala. The gift bags will include rice, chicken, canned goods, and toilet paper.

Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series.The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.
Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.





Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, June 14, 2020

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A fisherman who went missing north of Punaluʻu overnight Friday is still the subject of a search......
Photo by Julia Neal

ONE NEW COVID-19 CASE ON HAWAIʻI ISLANDis reported today. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "Although the Department of Health reports that this new case seems to be very isolated and connected to a previous travel-related case, it is a reminder that the Coronavirus threat remains and we must continue to follow the preventive policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy. Hawaiʻi Island is in a very good place because of your efforts in keeping Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for doing your part. Thank you for listening. Have a safe Sunday. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."

     Hawaiʻi Island had recorded no new cases in nearly three weeks. The other 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     Oʻahu reports three new cases today, bringing the state's new case total to 80 in ten days.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 492 cases, Kauaʻi 21, and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 727 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.
      In the United States, more than 2,094,048 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 115,732. Worldwide, more than 7,899,547 have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 433,019.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A REQUIRED FORM FOR INTERISLAND TRAVEL, which begins without quarantine on Tuesday, is available online from the state Department of Health, in order to save time at airports. The DOH website recommends arriving to airports early to avoid delays and missing fights. "You can expect two new mandatory procedures before boarding a plane. One is filling out the Travel & Health Form. The other is a temperature check. Anyone with a temperature of 100.4 or higher will be prohibited boarding the plane."
     The requirements come with the end of the 14-day quarantine for interisland travel, imposed to tamp down spread of COVID-19. The quarantine ends this Tuesday, June 16. The health department asks "for your help in providing complete answers. Providing honest and complete answers will help ensure timely follow up and contact tracing as well as identify travelers who may benefit from testing and health information. Most importantly, you will be helping us keep Hawai‘i healthy! The health information may be filled in ahead of flight time, but no more than 24 hours in advance. The more current the information, the more useful it is."
     According to DOH, the fillable PDF form should take no more than two to five minutes to complete "if you have your information readily available. Once you complete the form, print it and bring a copy with you to present to the screener prior to boarding." See more on interisland travel at health.hawaii.gov/travel/interisland-travel/interisland-travel-procedures.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
Hawaiʻi Housing Authority is offering studio and one-bedroom apartments in Pāhala.
Photo by Julia Neal
EIGHT STUDIO AND THREE ONE-BEDROOM UNITS IN PĀHALA are available at
senior housing to seniors and younger people who qualify. The Hawaiʻi Public Housing Authority made the announced last week. The units are available to those impacted by the pandemic.
     Hawaiʻi Housing Authority Executive Director Hakim Ouansaf said, "The COVID-19 pandemic is undoubtedly one of the most life-changing events that we have seen in modern times. During this time of emergency, the HPHA stands ready to continue to assist our most disadvantaged populations with safe, decent, and sanitary affordable housing." Call 933-0474 for an application to send to Hawaiʻi Public Housing Authority, 600 Wailoa St., Hilo, HI 96720.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A MESSAGE FROM WEST KAʻŪ'S STATE REP. DRU KANUHA takes a look at the legislature reopening on Monday: "On Tuesday, June 9, Senate President Ron Kouchi and House Speaker Scott Saiki announced that the Hawai‘i State Legislature will reconvene on Monday, June 22, and is expected to adjourn on Friday, July 10.
     "During the modified Legislative Session in May, the Legislature successfully passed bills regarding the State's budget, Capital Improvement Projects, and CARES Act funding. Now, we have another opportunity to provide further program support and improve our legislative process by including virtual remote access for public testimony. This is an amazing opportunity for neighbor island residents as this new technological venture can produce infrastructure for future legislative proceedings; whereas, creating a more thorough and representative public process at the Capitol.

     "As always, my staff and I are available in the office for immediate assistance at (808) 586-9385.  Please continue to practice general physical precautions - wear a face mask when in public, remain at home unless to retrieve essential goods, and practice social distancing.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HUMANE MEASURES TO PROTECT NATIVE WILDLIFE FROM INVASIVE PREDATORS such as cats are urged by National Wildlife Federation and 52 state and territorial affiliates, including the Conservation Council for Hawaiʻi, Sociedad Ornitológica Puertorriqueña, and the Virgin Islands Conservation Society. The resolution was agreed upon during the organization's 84th Annual Meeting, held virtually due to the COVID-19 crisis.
     In a resolution, the organizations say, "State and local governments should take humane steps to protect island wildlife from domestic cats and other invasive predators." The resolution highlights the unique threats cats, rats, and introduced mammals pose to the endangered and at-risk wildlife species on Hawaiʻi, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and other islands.
     "The National Wildlife Federation urges passage and enforcement of local and state ordinances, and promotion of related actions to restrict free-roaming cat populations associated with human activities on islands, as well as supports education programs (such as American Bird Conservancy's Cats Indoors Program) and common sense rules to eliminate or reduce the impact of outdoor cat activity on native island species," the resolution states, and ... that the National Wildlife Federation calls for development of improved trapping and toxicant options and methods to remove mammalian invasive predators that are humane and that avoid secondary impacts to non-target species."
     Moana Bjur, executive director of Conservation Council for Hawaiʻi, said the organization "appreciates the acknowledgment that something more needs to be done to protect our islands native species. The passing of this resolution provides us the support and foundation to engage local policymakers and industry partners in taking action to protect native plants, animals, and ecosystems utilizing progressive humane strategies."
     Julissa Irizarry, of Sociedad Ornitológica Puertorriqueña, said, "This resolution recognizes one of the biggest threats to native and endemic wildlife species on islands. With its passage, the National Wildlife Federation provides a platform for our organization to engage in local partnerships and protect Puerto Rico's avifauna. By promoting humane actions, this resolution supports the movement to ensure the welfare of Puerto Rico's out-sized stray cat and dog populations."
     Jason Budsan, president of Virgin Islands Conservation Society, said, "The protection of our wildlife from predators is paramount and all efforts to help reduce the harmful impacts from stray cats and other island predators will help protect our threatened and endangered species in the Virgin Islands. We are grateful to Conservation Council For Hawaiʻi for their resolution and the National Wildlife Federation for its passage."
     Visit the NationalWildlifeFederationMediaCenterat NWF.org/News. The National Wildlife Federation is America's largest conservation organization, "uniting all Americans to ensure wildlife thrive in a rapidly-changing world." Follow on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Oiwi brought education for keiki and families to Pāhala community Center for the third year in a row
last June. Among the displays was this illustration of The Balancing Act of Food and Fitness, which includes
Activity. Leenal Castro explained its importance to health. Photo by Leilani Esperanza
Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
Last year, Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Oiwi hosted the third Nā Keiki Fest at PāhalaCommunity Center. The festival – canceled this year due to the pandemic – aims to serve expecting and first-time mothers, women considering pregnancy, and young families, encouraging families and individuals to take steps toward better health. Attendees experienced activities, music, food, health screenings, education, and prizes.
     Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Oiwi offers online classes and support groups during the pandemic – see hmono.org/calendar/.

     The festival featured a trail map to direct keiki and families to local agencies offering health resources and wellness services. The map led to surprises. Once a keiki completed the trail on the map to agencies in the room, the award was a backpack with school supplies. Participants also entered a raffle for more prizes, including car seats, diapers, and more from donors like KTA Super Store, ACE Hardware, Mizuno Superette, Hana Hou Restaurant, and Punaluʻu Bake Shop.

     Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻOiwi hosted tables with more activities, health information and awareness, and crafts, including Kahea; Whoa, Slow, Go; Jump Your Height; Otitis Media Screening; Sugary Drinks; Rainbow Frames; Cancer Kine Tings; Healthy Hapai; Grow Your Own Plant; and Makahiki Games.
Gaku Yamaguchi-Tiare Ortega of Otitis Media. Photo by Leilani Esperanza
     Mabel De Silva, Chair of Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Oiwi, said she wishes to focus on keiki health and services "to show keiki we care and to show them the value of life."
     Dr. Kaʻohimanu Dank Akora, who works for Hui Mālama, said she "spends much time as a street doctor seeing homeless people and those who are homebound, unable or unwilling to go to a physician." She said she works with the Marshallese community and is willing to come to Kaʻū to see whomever needs medical care in their home or homeless camp.
     Hawaiʻi Diaper Bank invited families to donate and receive diapers. According to Diaper Bank founder and President Jessica Histo, one in three American families have to choose between diapers and food. This agency accepts diapers (unopened or opened packs) and wipes to "help Hawaiʻi island families meet their keiki's basic needs." Diaper Bank also accepts other items for young keiki. To make donations online, visit Hawaiʻi Diaper Bank's Amazon Wish List: bit.ly/HDB_WishList. For all other donations, contact info@hawaiidaiperbank.org.

     Partners in Development Foundation, which sponsors Tutu & Me in Kaʻū, explained its early childhood education program and encouraged participation in foster care. Partners aims "to inspire and equip families and communities for success and service, using timeless Native Hawaiian values and traditions," states the information provided at Keiki Fest.

     The Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes from the University of HawaiʻiHilo, provided information on volcanic and natural hazards that occur in Hawaiʻi and worldwide. Its programs on learning about volcanoes are aimed at bringing families together for fun and educational activities.

Many families choose between buying diapers and food, says Jessica Histo, 
President and founder of the Hawaiʻi Diaper Bank, at 
Mālama Nā Keiki Festival last June. Photo by Julia Neal

     Hawaiʻi Child Passenger Safety Program promoted car seat safety and gave out car seats. "Children under the age of four are required to ride in a child safety seat and children ages of four through seven to ride in a child safety seat or a booster," said the info distributed on car safety.

     Family Support Hawaiʻi promoted an Early Head Start, answering questions about pregnancy, labor, and delivery; sharing the latest ideas in baby care and development; teaching about playing with infants and toddlers; and encouraging planning a healthy future "for you, your baby, and your family." Early Head Start is for those who are pregnant or have a child under three years old, are a teen parent or foster parent, are living below the poverty level, are receiving TANF benefits or S.S.I. benefits, or are homeless – or hidden homeless (couch-surfing) – and living in the districts of North and South Kona, Waikaloa, North and South Kohala, Kaʻū, Kamuela or Honokaʻa. For more, contact the closest office: Kaʻū, (808) 939-7028; Kona, (808) 334-4123. See familysupporthawaii.com or facebook.com/familysupporthawaii.
     PARENTS, Inc. provided information on prevention, education, and treatment services for men, women, and children. The organization hopes to strengthen families and create cycles of positive parenting in the community by providing resources, skills, support, and advocacy. Contact the closest office: Kaʻū, (808) 333-3460; Hilo, (808) 934-9552.


Laurel Ledward at Cancer Kine Tings. Photo by Leilani Esperanza

     At the American Red Cross table, Uilani Soares gave natural disaster scenarios and ideas for what families could do to prepare. The group works to prevent and alleviate human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors.
     Bay Clinic, which provides health care to the local people of Hawaiʻi, educated about the dangers of vaping, e-cigarettes, hookahs, and secondhand vaping. Bay Clinic states vape pipes, hookah pens, and e-cigarettes are, "A new way to addict people to nicotine," and that even vape products that don't contain nicotine may still be harmful.
     Project Vision Hawaiʻi provided free eye health screenings to participants at the festival and educated them about the importance of healthy eyes.
     Hawaiʻi Island Food Bank provided and received food for families that came to Pāhala's Community Center. Their mission is to end hunger in Hawaiʻi County.
     See more on Hui Mālama.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou will Host a Giveaway to Seniors and the Needy on Monday, June 15 at behind the Bank of Hawai‘i in Pāhala. The gift bags will include rice, chicken, canned goods, and toilet paper.

Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series.The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.




Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, June 15, 2020

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The main gate is open to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo

HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK reopened its main gate today, with access to trails and businesses. Entrance fees began at , most locations open 24 hours a day. The Park is following guidance from the White House, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state and local public health authorities.
     Within the Park, Kīlauea Military Camp– see article below – Volcano Art Center Gallery– see Saturday's Kaʻū News Briefs– the Park's non-profit partner, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and Volcano House, are allowed to reopen. Volcano House retail is open as of today, with restaurants opening Friday and lodging in the hotel Monday, June 22.

Fees that support operation of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes
National Park were charged today for the first time since
the pandemic began and Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National
Park closed to the public. NPS photo
     Areas open in the main part of the Park include Crater Rim Drive to Kīlauea Military Camp and to Devastation Trail parking lot; Kīlauea summit area trails, including Byron Ledge Trail; Devastation and Halema‘uma‘u trails; Kīlauea Iki Overlook and trail (one-way counterclockwise loop only); Chain of Craters Road to Mauna Ulu parking lot; Pu‘uhuluhulu and trails near Mauna Ulu, including Nāpau and Nāulu trails (day use only); Ka‘ū Desert and Mauna Iki trails (day use only); Mauna Loa Road to Kīpukapuaulu for vehicles, bicyclists and hikers, including Tree Molds and Kīpukapuaulu Trail (pavilion, picnic area, and restroom remain closed); Mauna Loa Road past Kīpukapuaulu for hikers and bicyclists to Mauna Loa Overlook, closed to vehicles; Footprints Trail from Highway 11 to the Ka‘ū Desert Trail and Mauna Iki Trail junction, including the Footprints shelter; and Escape Road, for bicycling, horseback riding, and hiking. Services are limited, and visitors should bring everything they might need for a safe visit including water, meals, and hand sanitizer.
     All other areas in the Park remain closed, including Nāhuku and KīlaueaVisitorCenter.
     At Kahuku Unit, open without fees Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to , the public can access Pu‘u o Lokuana Cinder Cone, Kamakapa‘a Trail, Palm Trail Hike, Pali o Ka‘eo Trail, and Pit Crater Trail, among other places. Vehicles must remain below Upper Palm Trail. Services are limited and some places, such as the Visitor Contact Station and Book Store, are closed to the public.

     Park officials recommend visitors "pack their patience, avoid crowds, and have alternate destinations planned should parking lots be full." Visitors are expected to practice social distancing and/or wear face coverings; utilize frequent hand washing or sanitization; cover mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing; avoid touching eyes, nose, and mouth; stay home when ill; avoid crowding and other high-risk outdoor activities; park only in designated areas; stay on marked trails; and be prepared for limited or no access to restrooms and other facilities.
Hiking in the Park today, a child looks at the scenery 
from the best seat on the trail. NPS photo

     The Park also requests visitors practice Leave No Trace principles, "let wildlife be wild" and not feed nēnē, the Hawaiian goose, looking out for them on roadways and in parking lots.
     See details and updates at nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoesand social media channels.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TRANSIENT ACCOMMODATIONS TAXES, the state's revenue from hotel, vacation rentals, bed and breakfasts, and other accommodations, dropped by 96 percent this May from the same month last year. Last May, transient accommodations brought state government $190.3 million. This May, TAT brought in $4.3 million.
     An additional loss from little use of accommodations was the General Excise tax, which is tacked on to the Transient Accommodations Tax. The total tax on accommodations is 14.75 percent, with a portion going to Hawaiʻi County and the rest to the state. The taxes collected in May are from sales in April, just after the stay-at-home order on March 25 and the implementation of the 14-day quarantine for out of state and interisland travelers, which went into effect on March 26.
     The entire revenue collection by the state in taxes, fees, leases, and other income for May was $359 million, down 49 percent from last year's $704.5 million. Sales tax income alone dropped top $190.3 million this May from $312.4 million this May – a 39 percent decline.


Mostly residents were seen in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
on its reopening today, according to Park officials. NPS photo
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A FEW VENUES AT KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP REOPENED today, Monday, June 15. Reservations for accommodations, for guests who do not require 14-day quarantine, are available. Call 967-8333.


     Restaurant 10-Pin Grill (Snack Bar) & Java Café is open for dine-in (limited occupancy, face masks required) and take-out from  for breakfast and  for lunch and dinner, daily. The bowling alley itself remains closed. Call 967-8350. Crater Rim Cafe and Lava Lounge remain closed.
     KMC General Store is open, face masks required, Monday through Saturday from  to  The two gasoline pumps are open for use 24 hours a day, with debit or credit card. The store offers household items, curios, souvenirs, food, drinks, toiletries, firewood, and more.
KMC's 10-Pin Grill is open for dine-in, with limited seating
and face masks required, and take-out. KMC photo
     The Post Office is open weekdays, face masks required, from to  The lobby is open 24 hours a day. Collections times are Monday-Friday at , and Saturday at

     The laundromat is open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

     Tennis and basketball courts are open, with modified hours - call 967-8333 for details.

     Crater Rim Café will offer a special menu for dine-in and take-out meals for Father Day, Sunday, June 21. Fourth of July will also have a special menu. Reservations to dine in must be made in advance. Call 967-8356. The restaurant is otherwise closed for now.

     Lava Lounge also remains closed for now.

     Other KMC amenities – such as the bowling alley, fitness center, and rec center – are all still closed.

     See kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CU HAWAIʻI FEDERAL CREDIT UNION opened its Nāʻālehu and all other branch lobbies today to serve members. A statement from CU Hawaiʻi says "Even though we are no longer limiting access to our lobbies we are asking members to adhere to the following to keep us all safe: 
     "All members entering the credit union or standing in line for other services located outside of the lobby must wear a mask. Exceptions will be made for children two years of age or younger, or members with breathing issues. Maintain proper social distancing of at least six feet while in the credit union, standing in line to use an ATM or a remote teller station RTS unit. On June 30, CU Hawaiʻi branches with drive-thru return to single transactions only. we are excited to unlock our doors and look forward to providing full in-branch services. We appreciate your patience over these past few months," says the CU Hawaiʻi statement.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Not yet will Pāhala Pool open to the public and to swimming contests. Mayor Harry Kim explained the challenge
of monitoring and keeping clean the locker rooms, showers, and restroom areas. Photo by Julia Neal
PĀHALA AND OTHER COUNTY SWIMMING POOLS REMAIN CLOSED and Mayor Harry Kim explained the reasoning today, as his Emergency Rule reopened most businesses, operations, and activities effective June 15, while public swimming pools remain closed.
     Kim said, "The most important reason we cannot reopen the pools is because of the inability to keep the restrooms and showers clean. The facilities need constant monitoring and disinfection to keep them clean due to the heavy use of the facilities by swimmers and non-swimmers, but that's not feasible due to the shortage of personnel to do it."
     The Mayor said. while he understands the public's desire to return everything to normal, his overriding responsibility is to ensure that people are safe from the highly-contagious Coronavirus, under guidelines from the CDC regarding swimming pools, changing rooms, and public bathrooms.
     "Until we are assured that we can meet the responsibility to keep the bathrooms and the swimming pools clean, the pools will stay closed to ensure the public safety," said Kim.
     He urged the community to keep up their observance of CDC guidelines to prevent the spread of the virus, including social distancing, face coverings, and hand washing. The Coronavirus threat remains, and everyone must continue to follow the preventive measures so we remain the best in the nation with the lowest per capita infections and fatality rate, the Mayor said.
     Hawai‘i County on Saturday reported its first active case in three weeks, a reminder that the virus is still present.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

REP. TULSI GABBARD IS ON NATIONAL GUARD TRAINING this week, June 15 to 19. Gabbard has served as a Soldier in the Hawaiʻi Army National Guard for over 17 years and is a veteran of two Middle Eastdeployments. She will conduct a portion of her annual training duty, then return to Washington, D.C.for Congressional hearings and votes on June 23.

     While on duty, Gabbard's congressional staff will continue to work on behalf of residents throughout Hawaiʻi – through individual constituent casework, coordination with authorities, and on-the-ground efforts – as well as in Washington, D.C. fighting to bring relief resources to the people of Hawaiʻi.

     Gabbard, "National Guard and Reserve service members across the country balance their family responsibilities, a civilian career or school, and their service commitment to our nation at least one weekend a month and two weeks per year. I am grateful for the opportunity to serve alongside so many who give so much."

     A background on Gabbard's service is detailed in a message from her office: "Rep. Tulsi Gabbard has served in the Hawaiʻi Army National Guard for 17 years, and is a highly-decorated veteran of two Middle East deployments. She has participated in multiple joint-training exercises with countries such as Japan and Indonesia. She has been activated twice in recent years in response to natural disasters and community crises in Hawaiʻi. In November 2014, Rep. Gabbard was activated and served in Hawaiʻi National Guard efforts as an eruption of Kīlauealava flow headed toward Pāhoa on Hawaiʻi Island. In May 2018, as lava erupted from fissures throughout Lower Puna neighborhoods, Rep. Gabbard again served in uniform to provide support to a community facing the loss of homes, schools, and livelihoods.
     "Since the early days of the coronavirus crisis, Rep. Gabbard and her team have been hard at work to bring Federal dollars to support the people of Hawaiʻi, fighting for more masks and PPE (personal protective equipment) for Hawaiʻi's healthcare professionals, and advocating for free mass testing capabilities across the state and country. She is keeping Hawaiʻi residents updated regularly through e-newsletters and town hall events. Read about how she is fighting for families, frontline essential workers, to prevent the virus spread, and help the economy survive and recover from this crisis by visiting her COVID-19 resource webpage."

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, but eight new cases on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 87 in 11 days. All but one, reported Saturday on this island, are on Oʻahu.

     Hawaiʻi Island has recorded only one new case in nearly three weeks. Hawaiʻi Department of Health says the case is "very isolated and connected to a previous travel-related case and is being monitored." The other 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 501 cases, Kauaʻi 21, and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 736 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "On today's update of COVID-19, the number of active cases for Hawaiʻi Island stands at one… This is a reminder that the Coronavirus threat remains and we must continue to follow the preventive policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, and cleanliness.
     "Hawaiʻi Island remains in a very good place because of your efforts in keeping Hawaiʻi safe. Your efforts and good work of prevention have placed Hawaiʻi State as the best in the Nation with the lowest per capita infection and fatality rate. In going forward, know the importance of continuing to follow the preventive policies of keeping Hawaiʻi safe. A grateful thank you to the community of Hawaiʻi for doing your part. Thank you for listening. Have a good week and be safe. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,113,901 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 116,125. Worldwide, more than 8 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 436,406.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, June 16, 2020

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Eucalyptus, grown on tree farms on Kamehameha Schools land around Pāhala, are stockpiled to burn at the 
Hū Honua electric plant north of Hilo. Read more on the status of the electric plant, below. Photo by Julia Neal

REINSTATE THE INTERISLAND TRAVEL BAN is Gov. David Ige's plan, should the number of COVID-19 cases rise substantially with today's lifting of quarantines for those traveling between the islands. During a press conference Monday, he said that the requirement to quarantine for 14 days for interisland travel will be reinstated if cases double statewide, each week over the next month. He said scientists recognize a doubling of cases as "a definite increase in activity that we would want to say 'let's pause and re-look at it.'"

     The governor said, however, that each increase will be evaluated by its concentration.  A hot spot with many cases would not necessarily be interpreted as an indicator of wide community spread. He pointed to a recent cluster of cases on Oʻahu, which led to many cases, as high as 17 in one day.
      He noted that airlines with interisland flights will limit the number of passengers and that trans-Pacific flights, which could begin in August, will do the same.
      For the interisland flights, all travelers are required by the state Department of Health to fill out a preflight health form and submit to a health screening, with temperature checks, before boarding. See the health form to fill out before going to the airport at health.hawaii.gov/travel.

A one-way Kīlauea Iki trail for social distancing at Hawaiʻi
Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo
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VISITATION WAS LIGHT TODAY AT HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK. A tweet from the Park said guests are, "Mostly Hawaiʻi Island residents. #DYK our island (has) extraordinarily low cases of COVID-19? Help keep it that way; adhere to all public safety signs, like this one at Kīlauea Iki. The trail is now a one-way loop for social distancing."

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EMERGENCY ORDERS SUCH AS QUARANTINE AND CLOSING OF BUSINESSES TO PROTECT HAWAIʻI'S POPULATION from the pandemic are the subject of lawsuits filed by the Freedom Law Firm and Center for American Liberty. The suits are filed in Hawaiʻi federal district court. Hawaiʻi's state Speaker of the House, Scott Saiki, said today, "Due to our population size, Hawaiʻi requires extra safeguards to protect our families and resources during this pandemic. These lawsuits were filed by mainland entities on behalf of Hawaiʻi and non-Hawaiʻi residents. People who do not want to live with aloha and respect for others risk the health and safety of everyone."


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ALL SMALL BUSINESSES IN HAWAIʻI affected economically by COVID-19 can apply for low-interest loans under the Small Business Association's Economic Injury Disaster Loan program. Loans to all but agricultural small businesses were closed early in the pandemic but have reopened for applicants.
     The loans will provide approved small businesses without credit available elsewhere with loans of up to $2 million at 3.75 percent Annual Percentage Rate, and non-profits with 2.75 percent APR. Terms are determined on a case by case basis, based upon borrower's ability to repay. For businesses facing short-term liquidity issues, including making certain debt payments, SBA "highly recommends" contacting the businesses' bank to see what kind of relief programs may be available.

     SBA uses a "table of size standards," which defines a small business based on the business's number of employees and average annual receipts. Using these criteria, a small business could be defined as a business with a maximum of 250 employees or a business with a maximum of 1,500 employees.

     According to an analysis by the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism there are 8,302 businesses in Hawai‘i with 99 or fewer employees. Those businesses account for 96,189 jobs with a combined annual payroll of $3.16 billion.  

     The loans can be used to pay fixed debts, payroll and other bills that can't be paid because of a disaster's impact.
     Loan applicants are required to complete and file a loan application (SBA Form 5); Tax Information Authorization (IRS Form 4506-T), Personal Financial Statement (SBA Form 413); and Schedule of Liabilities listing all fixed debts (SBA Form 2202 may be used). Loan forms and additional information can be accessed online at the SBA's Disaster Assistance Loan Portal


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Coffee unsold, sold but spoiled and sold at a reduced price could be approved for reimbursement of losses to
farmers should coffee be added to the USDA as an eligible crop for assistance. Contact USDA.
Photo from Hawaiʻi Coffee Association
REIMBURSING COFFEE FARMERS FOR LOST SALES would be a possibility were coffee listed as an eligible specialty crop for the USDA Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. It reimburses producers for lost sales, or sales made at a reduced price of at least 5 percent, due to COVID-19.
     Hawaiʻi Coffee Association President Chris Manfredi sent out a message to coffee farmers statewide today saying that HCA has already commented "and your comments are needed now."
     Comments from Kaʻū Coffee farmers can be made at regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003. Click Open Docket Folder button. Click Comment Now button and submit comments directly to USDA on how Coronavirus has impacted the Kaʻū Coffee business and ask that coffee be included on the list of eligible specialty crops.
     Manfredi noted that Hawaiʻi's coffee industry has the second-highest value crop in the state of Hawaiʻi. "A recent HCA member survey indicates that our members have been severely impacted by the pandemic. If you have experienced a price drop for your GREEN coffee, please express that in your comment in terms of percent (%)." He said that in order to gain eligibility for coffee, USDA needs to understand what were the commodity losses, market losses, and price losses during the period between January 15, 2020 and April 15, 2020. "At least one of the following criteria must be met, so please share your data in your comment and be prepared to document your individual losses in your application relating to these factors:
     "Suffered a five percent-or-greater price decline between mid-January and mid-April as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic; shipped but subsequently spoiled due to loss of marketing channel; or not left the farm or remained unharvested as mature crops."
     Manfredi noted that USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service had an average green price in 2019 of $20.10 per pound. "This may be higher or lower than your actual price. If possible, please offer evidence of your price, including any documented price drop through the USDA portal. The USDA staff told us that Value-Added (roasted) pricing is not eligible. Growers who submit roasted coffee valuations will be rejected so please use green pricing in your comment. It's important to comment whether or not you have documentation or if you intend to apply. The deadline for comments is June 22, 2020.
     "You may apply now for relief. Please contact your local FSA office to begin this process. FSA can receive your application but they are unable to process it until coffee is made eligible. Applications will be accepted until August 28, 2020."
     Manfredi said HSA will follow up with more information. "Feel free to reach out to local FSA with questions regarding this program by visiting their website."

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KĪLAUEA RECOVERY GRANT PROGRAM APPLICATIONS are open. Hawaiʻi County Council authorized nonprofit organizations from Volcano into Puna to apply for recovery funding to address damages suffered by the 2018 Kīlauea eruption.

     Qualifying nonprofit organizations will have until  Friday, July 24 to apply. The program is supported by recovery funds provided by the State. Grants are capped at $500,000. Grants may be used for capital improvement purposes as long as the structure, property, fixture, or road was


destroyed, damaged, or shown to be at risk by the eruption. Grantees must show that the properties or improvements were properly permitted and in compliance with State and County laws prior to the eruption.
     Applications and supporting documentation can be mailed to: Kīlauea Disaster Recovery Program Communications Specialist, Dept. of Research and Development, County of Hawaiʻi25 Aupuni St., Room 1301, HiloHI 96720

     Puna Councilwoman Ashley Kierkiewicz introduced the bill authorizing the program, calling it part of a "roadmap to recovery. Community is still reeling from the devastation brought by the Kīlauea eruption but knows what it needs to bounce forward. I am honored to have worked with the Recovery Team to design a tool that empowers community to act. By leveraging this program, residents can implement community-based solutions that address the unique challenges they are seeing on the ground."
     For more information, and to access application documents, visit recovery.hawaiicounty.gov/resources/recovery-grants. For questions regarding the overall grant process, submittal process, and/or items on the checklist, contact Patti Pinto, Recovery Assistant, at 961-8500 or patti.pinto@hawaiicounty.gov.

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WITH EUCALYPTUS LOGS FROM KAʻŪ TREE FARMS PILING UP, the Hū Honua electric plant nears completion on the Hamakua Coast to burn biofuel for energy to sell to the utility company. Hū Honua awaits approval by the Public Utilities Commission to open the $336 million plant. A story by Megan Fernandes this week in Pacific Business News reviews the situation.


     The PUC is considering a revised Hawaiian Electric purchase agreement to buy power from the $336 million Hū Honua plant, following the state Supreme Courts' annulment of an earlier agreement last June. Hū Honua is going through the PUC's regulatory process again, "with more consideration given to reducing greenhouse gas emissions," reported Pacific Business News.
Eucalyptus trees and their logs farmed to burn for 
energy on Kamehameha School lands around Pāhala. 
Photo by Julia Neal

     The 21.5-megawatt facility is nearly complete and could operate this year, with PUC approval. Representatives for the energy company and its Honolulu-based Yamamoto Caliboso law firm, urged the PUC to hold a scheduling conference on this docket. However, the PUC said the issue is delayed by a request for proposals from Hawaiian Electric, and the "drastic reshaping of the economic landscape in the state over the past few months" during the pandemic. The PUC says it needs "necessary time to reflect on the current set of renewable energy projects under consideration in its various ongoing dockets" and will place the order on the docket "as soon as reasonably possible," writes PBN
     PBN quotes a letter from the PUC: "This is in particular recognition of the fact that any decision the commission makes on one project for Hawaiʻi Island will necessarily have effects on other, future commission decisions, and the fact that it is crucially important at this time to ensure that the commission's decisions reflect the best long-term choices for the state's recovering economy, clean energy transformation, Hawaiʻi Island's grid, and Hawaiian Electric [Companies'] ratepayers." During the pandemic, the commission has invited proposals and new programs that could support and expand clean energy job opportunities.
     On June 10, the Yamamoto Caliboso law firm shared Hū Honua's concern regarding the delay: "Hū Honua is not a replacement for variable renewables; instead, it is a firm generation replacement for existing fossil generation. Hū Honua can co-exist with other existing and future renewable energy resources... The project will have a significant role in the revitalization of Hawaiʻi Island's agricultural sector and will enable our state's renewable energy goals to be achieved in parallel with agricultural activities which utilize, process, and harvest commercially-grown local crops."

Ocean View distribution of the ʻĀina, ʻOhana, and Me packets, by
Food Corp's Katie Graham, handing out garden seeds, soil, and more for
keiki. Pāhala distribution is Wednesday from to Graham called
the Ocean View distribution on Saturday "a big hit" for budding
young gardeners. Photo from PARENTS, Inc.
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‘ĀINA, ‘OHANA, & ME SUMMER CHALLENGE PACKETS will be given away to keiki in Pāhala from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday, June 17 at Pāhala Shopping Center.
     ‘Āina, ‘Ohana, and Me is a collaborative pilot project between PARENTS, Inc. and Food Corps Hawai‘i. Each packet will include seeds, soil, a notebook, colored pencils, and ‘āina-based activities for families to connect with each other and the outdoors. Putting the packets together are Ali McKeigue, of PARENTS, Inc. and Katie Graham, of Food Corps. Hawai‘i.

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Keiki all over the island receive hot food prepared by Boys & Girls Club Big Island. Photos from BGCBI
FORTY-TWO THOUSAND HOT MEALS – so far – have been cooked, transported, and delivered from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island to residents in need during the pandemic. Chief Executive Officer Chad Cabral said this week that Boys & Girls produces over 900 individually plated "comfort food" meals each day "that go to support our Island keiki, kūpuna, homeless populations, and to family households that have experienced employment loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated business closures."

West Hawaiʻi received Pork and Peas hot food plates
yesterday. Photo from BGCBI
      Yesterday, East Hawaiʻi received Pork Adobo plates, West Hawaiʻi received Pork and Peas.

     All meals continue to be provided free-of-charge, said Cabral. "It is estimated to cost approximately $5.50 for each meal to be produced and transported by BGCBI. Forty-two thousand meals at $5.50 comes at no small cost to provide. Thank you to everyone who has joined our efforts in helping to make this much needed nutritional supplementation resource possible."

      Cabral said Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island "will continue with this critical support offering throughout Hawaiʻi Island for as long as we are able to. Keep safe everyone and let's continue to heal our Island and communities together. You are making a difference!"
     Donate at bgcbi.com. Learn how to volunteer, info@bgcbi.org or 808-961-5536.


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A VIRTUAL SUMMER READING PROGRAM FOR ALL AGES is open through the Hawaiʻi State Public Library System. Imagine Your Story, the 2020 Virtual Summer Reading Program, runs through August 31.

     The expanded online Summer Reading Program allows all readers, from keiki to kūpuna, flexibility to explore creativity and imagination using a mobile phone application, design to be easy to use. Virtual activities, programs, and crafts are available. Take the challenge to read and log 1,000 minutes. For every 100 minutes of reading logged, library patrons are rewarded with a virtual badge, a downloadable activity, and an automatic entry in the lucky prize drawing. The more one reads, the better chances are to win the grand prize drawing: four roundtrip tickets to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies, courtesy of Alaska Airlines.

     State Librarian Stacey Aldrich says, "Ignite your imagination through fairy tales, fantasy, crafts, artwork, sewing, writing, poetry, music, photography, and more! This summer is the perfect time to download ebooks, audiobooks, and emagazines.  If you don't already have a library card, no problem! Everyone can now apply for a library card online and participate in our Summer Reading Program. Read and log your minutes online, and help us reach our statewide reading goal of 10 million minutes."
     To register, visit librarieshawaii.org/SummerReading. Hawaiʻi's Summer Reading Program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library of Hawaiʻi and other 2020 Summer Reading Sponsors.


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FEEDBACK FROM PARENTS AND GUARDIANS of Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary School Students is requested by Principal Sharon Beck: "As we plan for the opening of the 2020-21 school year, we would like to gather feedback from our parents/guardians about what that might look like for our students. The deadline to complete and return the survey is June 30, 2020. Thank you for your time in helping us better serve our students and families."

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Chef Instructor Paul Heerlein
A FREE ONLINE COOKING DEMONSTRATION by Chef Instructor Paul Heerlein, CCE, CCC is available from Hawaiʻi Community College – Pālamanui will be held Thursday, June 18 from noon to 12:30 p.m. Heerlein, coordinator of the Culinary Arts Program at Pālamanui, will give a virtual tour of the Culinary Arts program and provide a demonstration on making "Holiday Hollandaise." Cooking enthusiasts and those interested in learning about the Culinary Arts program at HCC – Pālamanuiin Kona can tune in to the free Zoom workshop. The workshop is part of a series of online workshops HCC – Pālamanui is offering this summer called "Discover Pālamanui."

     For the zoom link and more information, go to hawaii.hawaii.edu/discoverpalamanui

A FREE ONLINE WORKSHOP ON DEGREES is scheduled for Thursday evening from from Hawaiʻi Community College – Pālamanui. From "UH Online and Hybrid Degrees," students can learn about their options for accessing University of Hawaiʻi bachelor's and graduate degree programs through distance learning. 
     For the zoom link and more information, go to hawaii.hawaii.edu/discoverpalamanui

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
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NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, but four new cases on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 91 in 11 days. All but one, reported Saturday on this island, are on Oʻahu.

     Hawaiʻi Island has recorded only one new case in nearly three weeks. Hawaiʻi Department of Health says the case is "very isolated and connected to a previous travel-related case and is being monitored." The other 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 505 cases, Kauaʻi 21, and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 740 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, " Commencing today, June 16th, inter-island travelers will not be subjected to a 14-day quarantine. Out-of-state travelers are still subjected to the 14-day quarantine policy. The State and Island of Hawaiʻi are moving forward on reopenings, but remember that the Coronavirus threat remains and we must continue to follow the preventive policies to protect our community. Please do your part to stop this virus. Thank you for listening. Have a safe day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,133,716 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 116,962. Worldwide, more than 8,162,276 have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 443,685.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket's ʻOhana Food Drop is available once a month at four Kaʻū and Volcano locations. People can receive a multi-day supply of shelf-stable and fresh food, depending on supply. Call The Food Basket at 933-6030 for Pāhala and Volcano or at 322-1418 for Nāʻālehu or Ocean View. Food can be picked up from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at:

     Nāʻālehu's Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy was June 1; the July date will be announced later.
     Ocean View's Kahuku Park was June 9; the July date will be announced later.
     Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on  Wednesday, June 24.
     Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is
pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

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Papio are among the fish populations that could be restored, according to a new study, Characteristics of Effective 
Marine Protected Areas in Hawaiʻi. Read more, below. Photo by Alan Friedlander 

THE FIRST COVID-19 CASE IN OCEAN VIEW WAS CONFIRMED TODAY. The address of the person is in zip code 96737. It is the second case in Kaʻū, the first being in the Nāʻālehu zip code 96772. The Ocean View and four additional new cases on Oʻahu, bring the state's new case total to 96 in 12 days.

     Hawaiʻi Department of Health says the other active case on this island is in Puna and is "very isolated and connected to a previous travel-related case and is being monitored." The other 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. No one died here. There was only one overnight hospitalization.
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu has reported 508 cases, Kauaʻi 21, and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents who were diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 744 people have been confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.
This map shows the first COVID-19 case in Ocean View. which was
confirmed today. It also shows cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.
 White is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange
 (not pictured) is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is
 11 to 20 cases.  Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno, released before the case today was reported, says, "The State and Island of Hawaiʻi continue to move forward on reopening, as Hawaiʻi is in a good place because of your efforts of prevention. In going forward know the importance of continuing to follow the preventive policies of keeping Hawaiʻi safe. A grateful thank you for doing your part. Thank you for listening. Have a beautiful and safe day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,157,768 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 117,622. Worldwide, more than 8.28 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 446,257.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CORAL REEF FISHERIES COULD BE RESTORED with a diverse, integrated system of marine management areas to boost their resilience in a changing climate. That's the message from a comprehensive study on Hawaiʻi's nearshore waters and the need for more effective management. It's called Characteristics of Effective Marine Protected Areas in Hawaiʻi.
     University of Hawaiʻi fisheries researcher, Dr. Alan Friedlander, is lead author. He said that well-designed marine management areas are a proven tool that can restore coral reef fisheries, increase coastal protection and provide recreational, cultural, and economic opportunities.
     The study found that while Hawaiʻi has many marine management areas, most are too small and allow some form of human use within their boundaries that can limit their ability to restore depleted fisheries. "We need to improve the marine management areas we already have and effectively manage additional areas if we are to protect and restore Hawaiʻi's unique and valuable marine environment," said Friedlander. "That includes setting aside some areas where fishing is prohibited, because we know that replenishes fish stocks. It also includes areas where the State co-manages resources with coastal communities that want to implement more sustainable traditional management practices."
     The study provides data for the State's initiative to effectively manage 30 percent of Hawaiʻi's nearshore waters by 2030. Key in reaching this goal is to create an ecologically connected network of marine management areas that can rebuild and sustain productive nearshore fisheries. According to Friedlander, reef fish populations have declined dramatically in Hawaiʻi over the last century, with some important food fish populations reduced by more than 90 percent.
Food fish on Hawaiian reefs could substantially grow if nearby reefs were protected, according to the new study. See Characteristics of Effective Marine Protected Areas in HawaiʻiPhoto by Jim Petruzzi
     The study also shows that, overall, marine management areas in Hawaiʻi are too small and that the average marine management area size (1.1 km2) is minuscule compared with the geographic extent of the species they are designed to protect. Hawaiʻi's marine management areas vary in size and levels of governance, enforcement and effectiveness. They comprise only five percent of State waters, extending out to three nautical miles from the shore, limiting their ability to sustain fish abundance across the state. Of that five percent, fully and highly protected waters cover only 1.4 percent of nearshore areas, with Kahoʻolawe Island Reserve accounting for most of it. Less than 0.1 percent are within marine protected areas, which provide full protection for fish to grow large and reproduce.
     Studies show that when fish can mature in protected waters, they grow much larger and can produce exponentially more eggs than smaller, younger fish. The larger fish and their larvae can spill over into neighboring areas that are open to fishing. "Many fishers already know this and engage in what's called 'fishing the line' between MPAs and open fishing areas," Friedlander said. "In general, fishers can get the greatest benefit by protecting the largest spawning fishes in larger no-fishing areas."
     Established in 1983, the Pūpūkea Marine Life Conservation Districts on Oʻahu's North Shore  expanded seven-fold in 2003 and saw a dramatic increase in food fish biomass. "I can't describe the feeling of seeing more and bigger fish in the Marine Life Conservation District after years of seeing no visible change," said Jenny Yagodich, Mālama Pūpūkea-Waimea Education Director and Makai
Watch coordinator helping to co-manage the Marine Life Conservation District with the state Department of Land & Natural Resources. "Fisherfolk have expressed that the areas next to the Marine Life Conservation District are now abundant with fish thanks to spillover, and fishing is better there now than it was prior to protection."
Ulua return to no-fishing areas, the study says. See Characteristics of Effective Marine Protected Areas in Hawaiʻi.
 Photo by Alan Friedlander
     Recent surveys in the Molokini Reserve offshore of Maui found more fish and larger predators, a sign of a healthy ecosystem, returned in a few months after restriction of boat traffic due to COVID-19. Species include ulua, omilu, and reef sharks. According to Friedlander who joined the survey team, "While these increases are likely temporary and will probably disappear once visitors return to Molokini, our surveys show just how quickly our marine systems can rebound if given a chance."
     The study concludes that larger marine management areas protect a diverse range of habitats and help maintain the health and function of marine ecosystems. They provide protection for a wider range of species and serve as a buffer against environmental fluctuations and disturbances. With climate change and increased coral bleaching already occurring in the islands, establishing more and larger management areas will help protect the state's nearshore resources into the future, the study says. "Fortunately, the size and boundaries of current marine management areas can be designed as effective components of a larger network," say the authors in a statement.
     Characteristics of Effective Marine Protected Areas in Hawaiʻi was published in the journal Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. Co-authors with Friedlander are Mary Donovan and Whitney Goodell who worked with  University of Hawaiʻi, and Haruko Koike and Paul Murakawa, who worked with state Department of Land & Natural Resources' Division of Aquatic Resources.

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Michael Newman, who worked with Kupu at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Photo from Kupu
THE GREAT AMERICAN OUTDOORS ACT PASSED THE U.S. SENATE today and moves on to the House of Representatives where it is expected to pass. Sen. Mazie Hirono co-sponsored and supported the bill as a member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources  Committee. The bipartisan legislation is crafted to address the National Park Service's nearly $12 billion in deferred maintenance; permanently and fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund; and fund deferred maintenance needs in other agencies like the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Bureau of Indian Education schools.
     Hirono also introduced an amendment to the Great American Outdoors Act to clarify that deferred maintenance projects using public-private partnerships include organizations with qualified youth and conservation corps, like Kupu in Hawaiʻi. While the amendment was not adopted, Hirono said she will continue to advocate for employing conservation corps in completing maintenance projects. Last month, Hirono announced Hawaiʻi would receive more than $4 million in AmeriCorps funding, of which Kupu would receive approximately $2.29 million, serving more than 250 AmeriCorps members.
     After passage of the Great American Outdoors Act, Hirono noted that the deferred maintenance backlog for Hawaiʻi National Park Service projects totaled more than $165 million as of 2018. "The Land and Water Conservation Fund has invested more than $260 million in conserving some of the most critical assets in Hawaiʻi over the last five decades and permanent, full funding is needed to continue that important work for our future generations. We must also maintain our beloved places like Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail, and the Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge. The support that this bill provides for Hawaiʻi's natural resources is critically needed and long overdue."
Lava tree molds, and the occasional rainbow, can be seen in various
areas of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo
     Simon M. Bussiere, President of Hawaiʻi Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, said, "Residents of Hawaiʻi and millions of people from all over the world visit the Hawaiian islands every year to enjoy our national, state, and local parks. These landscapes are incredibly important to our local culture and sense of place. Landscape architects take great pride in the work we do to design, maintain, and protect these spaces. But too often, these parks fall into disrepair due to lack of funding.
     "The Great American Outdoors Act will go a long way to fixing these problems by permanently and fully funding LWCF and providing critical funds for park infrastructure. American Society of Landscape Architects is proud to support this bill. We thank Senator Hirono for sponsoring it and for her years of leadership on the conservation and protection of public lands."
     Lea Hong, Hawaiian Islands State Director of Trust for Public Land, said, "Land & Water Conservation Fund is an integral part of creating parks and protecting land for people in Hawaiʻi and across the country. Thanks to this funding source, we've been able to protect some of our state's most special places, such as Waimea Native Forest on Oahu’s North Shore, Kīlauea National Wildlife Refuge on Kauaʻi, Haleakala National Park on Maui, and the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail on Hawaiʻi Island. Senator Hirono has been a koa for LWCF and we are incredibly thankful for her support of permanently and fully funding the Land & Water Conservation Fund."
Ala Kahakai Trail. Photo from Trust for Public Lands
     Hirono has repeatedly called for addressing the deferred maintenance backlog and providing full funding to LWCF as a member of the Energy & Natural Resource Committee, including at a 2018 ENR hearing on the Fiscal Year 2019 Department of the Interior budget and a 2018 ENR hearing on the deferred maintenance and operational needs of the National Park Service. The Senator also highlighted Land & Water Conservation Fund's critical protection of Hawaiʻi's natural resources during a speech on the Senate floor in February 2019. She supported full funding of these programs as legislation passed out of Energy & Natural Resources last year. She has supported efforts to protect natural lands throughout her service in government, and signs onto letters to appropriators each year requesting robust funding for Land & Water Conservation Fund. The Senator also received 100 percent rating from the League of Conservation Voters on its 2019 environmental scorecard.

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HAWAIʻI ISLAND HUMANE SOCIETY WILL  END ANIMAL CONTROL SERVICES, focus on preventing cruelty to animals, eliminating pet overpopulation, and enhancing the bond between humans and animals. HIHS's Board of Directors announced this week that it will not respond to County of Hawaiʻi's Request for Proposals for Animal Control Services for Hawaiʻi Island. Its contract expires  June 30.
     HIHS Board Chair Adam Atwood said the organization will focus instead on "compassionate care for animals… Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society will work with Hawaiʻi County Police Department on a smooth transition to a new entity."
Hawaiʻ Island Humane Society plans to focus on preventing cruelty to 
animals, eliminating pet overpopulation, and enhancing 
the bond between humans and animals. HIHS photo
     Atwood said HIHS has provided animal control services in Keaʻau, Waimea, and Kona "for many years and the decision to not bid on the County contract did not come easily. With the opening of our new Animal Community Center in Kona and with plans underway to renovate our Keaʻau facility to help more animals in need, we felt it was time to turn our attention from Animal Control to increasing community outreach programs and services. We will continue to promote humane education in schools, to share our dog parks for people and pets to enjoy and we will continue to work with dedicated volunteers, fosters, and donors to improve the lives of pets around the island."
     The 55-year old non-profit agency will continue to provide service island-wide as an independent animal welfare organization, providing compassionate care for animals at its three shelter locations in Keaau, Waimea and the soon-to-be-opened Animal Community Center in Kona.
     CEO and veterinarian Dr. Beth Jose said, "Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society is looking forward to expanding volunteer opportunities at all three shelters, providing programs to meet the needs of shelter animals, increasing community outreach and growing the organization's successful spay and neuter program." She said HIHS performs between 4,500 and 5,500 spay and neuter surgeries annually at the Keaʻau and Kona locations. "Expanding outreach into Hawaiʻi Island's rural communities with the mobile Spay & Neuter 'Waggin will grow the numbers and help our island alleviate pet overpopulation."
The mobile Spay and Neuter 'Waggin, operated by Hawaiʻ Island Humane
Society, travels into Kaʻū, Volcano, and other rural areas of the island
to help keep down pet overpopulation. HIHS photo
     The first phase of the Animal Community Center in Keauhou Mauka, Kona opened last year, with the Central Bark Dog Parks for both small and large dogs. Phase two will open next month, with a Welcome Center, Education Amphitheatre, Administration Building, Cat Barn, Doggie Dorms, and an Adoption Square. An Education Center is under construction and will be completed later this year. The next phase includes a state-of-the-art Veterinary Center that will allow the Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society added capacity to grow the spay and neuter program. Construction on the Vet Center begins later this year.
     Jose said, "We're moving completely out of the present site adjacent to the Police Station in Kona in July. We now have the infrastructure in place to grow our mission. We've doubled our capacity for dogs and tripled our capacity for cats at the new Animal Community Center. We are excited to begin work expanding and improving our Keaʻau and Waimea facilities. We obviously have a lot in the works but I'm excited about what the future holds for the Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society."
   
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Farmers are urged to attend a wildfire preparedness webinar. Photo from UH Cooperative Extension
ATTEND A WEBINAR ON WILDFIRE RISK Wednesday, June 24 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Hawaiʻi Farm Fire Management Webinar, presented by University of Hawaiʻi Cooperative Extension, offers "Assessing and reducing wildfire risk on your farm! Dry season is here and wildfire risk is ramping up. Are you prepared? Join us for an online webinar about how to assess and reduce wildfire risk on your farm." Clay Trauernicht, UH Extension Specialist in Wildfire Science and Management, will speak on planning for fire preparedness, identifying fire-related hazards on the land, and methods to manage vegetation to reduce fire risk. Q&A facilitated by Josh Silva, Extension Agent in Edible Crops. RSVP at eventbrite.com/e/hawaii-farm-fire-management-webinar-tickets-109038286450.

Road damage, like this from the 2018 eruption, will be
repaired on Hwy 11 near the Park entrance over the
next several months. USGS photo
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ROADWORK ON HIGHWAY 11 NEAR HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK MAIN GATE, between mile markers 28 and 32, began yesterday. Motorists are advised to drive with caution and be prepared to stop. Flaggers will direct traffic through alternate lane closures, from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, as Hawai‘i Department of Transportation contract workers repair and resurface the section of highway damaged by seismic and subsidence activity during the summit collapse of Kīlauea volcano in 2018.
     The work is projected to take about 100 days, expecting to end sometime in November. It is funded by federal disaster relief monies. 

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HAWAIʻI RANKS FIRST IN RACIAL EQUALITY IN EMPLOYMENT in terms of having the most equal median annual income, poverty rate gap, labor-force participation rate, share of unsheltered homeless, and homelessness rate, according to a recent WalletHub article. WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia, looking at the difference between white and black Americans in areas such as annual income, unemployment rate, and homeownership rate.
     Ranking fourth overall in equality, Hawaiʻi trails New Mexico, Alaska, and Arizona, and ranks just above Texas. The least-equal place is Washington D.C., with an overall score of 16.00. The next least-equal places are Wisconsin – with a score of 44.30 – Illinois, Minnesota, and Iowa.

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APPLICATIONS ARE OPEN at U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency through Friday, June 19. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, FSA is hiring full-time temporary Program Technicians. Duty locations are to be determined upon selection and may include telework. Duties include general activities supporting FSA programs administered at the field level. Successful applicants must be reliable, have a professional attitude, and enjoy working with the public. Send specific questions regarding the position, or apply by e-mailing a resume, to fsajobs@usda.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI FARMERS UNION UNITED offers an update on the Navigating COVID Relief for Farmers guide (PDF Download). Also, see the Farm Aid's press release has hit the wire! (PDF Download).

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSA, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, Washington, DC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.
     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.

Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.

Feedback from Parents and Guardians of Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary School Students is requested by Principal Sharon Beck: "As we plan for the opening of the 2020-21 school year, we would like to gather feedback from our parents/guardians about what that might look like for our students." Deadline is June 30: KHPES Parent Survey: Planning for the 2020-21 School Year.

ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is July 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers and the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. The ʻOhana Food Drop program is being phased out. Nāʻālehu's final date is tentatively Wednesday, July 8 from 10 a.m. until pau – supplies run out – at Nāʻālehu Shopping Center. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, June 24 or July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Go to Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30, 10 a.m. until pau. There will be no July date.


On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.
     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, June 18, 2020

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This view of Halemaʻumaʻu can be seen by visitors at the newly reopened Volcano House. Dine-in food opens tomorrow. 
Retail opened last Monday. Lodging reopens this Monday. See details below. Photo by Julia Neal
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

IN A VICTORY FOR DREAMERS, the U.S. Supreme Court voted five to for today that the Trump administration unfairly attempted to end the program for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Often called Dreamers, they were brought to the U.S. illegally as young children, grew up here, and go to school or work. Pres. Barack Obama set up the program to allow them to stay in the country as long as they work or seek an education.
     Sen. Mazie Hirono, who lobbied on behalf of the Dreamers in Congress, said the Supreme Court ruled "that Trump cannot arbitrarily terminate DACA, which stopped his plot to end this crucial program that has protected immigrants brought to the United States as children, from deportation. This is a huge win for the over 700,000 DACA recipients who have been at risk of being kicked out of the only country they've ever known."
     Hirono said the "fight to protect these Dreamers, and all immigrants, doesn't end. Trump continues to deliberately attack our immigrant community. It's an absolute disgrace." She noted that some 200,000 DACA recipients work on the front lines, in jobs that deal with the coranvirus pandemic. "And yet, President Trump has been working to remove them from the only place they've known."
     She also contended that "Trump's hand-picked Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh voted as expected, in line with Trump's far-right agenda to strike down DACA. Trump called the Supreme Court's decision 'politically charged' and 'horrible,' and doubled down on his mission to pack our courts with more ultra-right judges to destroy our independent judiciary. He is weaponizing the Supreme Court decision to further activate his base supporters."
Sen Mazie Hirono with Dreamers in Washington, D.C. during one of the many events she attended to
support them. Photo from Office of Mazie Hirono
     Hirono noted that it's been a year since the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Dream and Promise Act, which would provide Dreamers the opportunity to apply for permanent legal status and eventually become eligible for U.S. citizenship.
     She said the Senate needs to act now, even though "Mitch McConnell has refused to hold a vote on this bill." She asked her constituency to add names to her petition, "to demand Mitch McConnell hold a vote on the Dream and Promise Act so Dreamers have a permanent legislative path to citizenship." She said, "Immigrants are the backbone of America. Their home is here, and we must continue fighting for them."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI'S UNEMPLOYMENT RATE WAS 22.6 PERCENT IN MAY, FOLLOWING 23.8 PERCENT IN APRIL. The state Department of Labor & Industrial Relations reported that statewide, 490,700 were employed and 143,150 unemployed in May for a total seasonally adjusted labor force of 633,850. Nationally, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 13.3 percent in May, down from 14.7 percent in April. To view the full report, see http://labor.hawaii.gov/blog/category/news/.


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THE NEED FOR A JUST SOCIETY is the focus of a letter this week from Hawai‘i Community Foundation CEO Micah Kāne. He said HCF stands "in solidarity with those who are peacefully raising their voice and calling for a new path forward."
     Kāne said the "highly publicized tragic events" over the last few weeks in the U.S."have left us angry, sad, and looking for ways to take action. The death of George Floyd and too many others are stark reminders of the centuries of racism and injustice in our country faced by African-Americans and people of color. While the events may seem far from our islands, racism and discrimination in Hawai‘i happen far too often, and it is unacceptable.
     "We believe that this is a moment of inflection for us all, individuals and organizations, to reexamine the actions and nonactions that have contributed to unjust systems and commit to doing more."

     Hawai‘i Community Foundation "represents the vision and desire of a community where all people have opportunities to thrive." In 2018, the organization created the CHANGE framework "to explicitly address the deep inequities that have left far too many of our citizens struggling to just get by. We have ample data that tell us that many of our systems, institutions, and programs are not working for all.
     "The goal of CHANGE is to galvanize collective action across philanthropic and civic sectors, and alongside individuals within our community to create equitable opportunities across our state. Recent events have only underscored that we still have much to learn and a great deal of work to do. We are resolute in our desire to be part of a better Hawai‘i and world."
     See hawaiicommunityfoundation.org.


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CONCERN FOR THE NATIVE FOREST is coming from the state Department of Land & Natural resources with the expected increase in interisland travel, now that the 14-day quarantine is lifted. A DLNR statement says, "As more and more restrictions on outdoor activities are being lifted, many people are returning to Hawaiʻi's forests to hike, hunt, and to participate in other recreational activities."

Spread of Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death from and to other islands is of concern
to officials now that the interisland quarantine
is lifted. Photo from DLNR
     One of the risks is the spread of fungal disease Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death, which spread recently to more native forests. DLNR cautions: "With many natural areas re-opening and yesterday's resumption of interisland travel, DLNR and its partners remind forest users to clean their boots, vehicles, and equipment of any dirt and soil, and spray with a 70 percent alcohol solution to ensure they are not transporting the fungus which causes ROD."

     DLNR Chair Suzanne Case said, "With our ability now to visit and hike on neighbor islands, it is more important than ever to remind people that they can accidentally spread diseases and weeds unless precautions are taken. As COVID-19 very effectively demonstrates protecting our way of life and our natural resources in Hawaiʻi requires everyone's care and participation."
     Updated island maps, ROD outreach materials and virtual activities (list of different online events and webinars) are available at rapidohiadeath.org.


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Retail shops at Volcano House are now open, along with the lobby, fireplace room, and
views of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. The Rim restaurant opens Friday. Photo by Julia Neal
VOLCANO HOUSE REOPENS THE RIM FRIDAY for sit down dining with beer and wine. Uncle George's Lounge will serve take-out food only and the bar is closed. Grab-and-go and curbside service will be available. Walk in, or see the menu and make reservations for dine-in at hawaiivolcanohouse.com/dining. The lobby and fireplace room will be open and food will be available at Volcano House daily from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., according to staff onsite on Wednesday.
     The main retail shop next to the fireplace room at Volcano House opened Monday, June 15. The observation deck, and the indoor sitting area where visitors can gaze into Halemaʻumaʻu, are open to the public.
     Volcano House is taking reservations for hotel accommodations with check-in starting Monday, June 22. Call 844-569-8849 or go to hawaiivolcanohouse.com.

     Namakanipaio, the campground and cabins managed by Volcano House, is yet to set a reopening date.


The Rim at Volcano House opens its doors on Friday to dine-in. There
is also grab-and-go and curbside foodservice at Volcano House. 
Photo by Julia Neal
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE PACE OF PEOPLE ARRIVING TO THIS ISLAND IS PICKING UP, with more people coming on direct flights to Kona and the 14-day quarantine lifted this week for interisland travel. There were no direct flights from outside the state today. However, eighty-nine people arrived in Kona on two flights Tuesday. Twenty-three arrived on three flights Monday. Total arrival of passengers to the islands from out of state was 1,516 today, 1,671 on Tuesday, and 1,769 on Monday.
     After a two-week quarantine, those arriving are allowed to travel interisland. The Attorney General's office warns that people breaking quarantine can be arrested. Special agents to the Attorney General this week arrested a man who left his home in his car several times and took walks from his lodging during quarantine. Members of the public reported him. His bail was set at $2,000. He faces a fine of up to $5,000 and up to a year in jail. The quarantine is in effect until end of July and could be extended.

     Only those under quarantine with homes in Hawaiʻi can stay in them during quarantine. All others must stay in hotels for the 14 days unless they have exemptions as essential workers. Renting cars or offering ride shares to those under quarantine is prohibited except to essential workers with waivers.
Interisland travel resumed this week. Photo from State of Hawaiʻi
     Those traveling to Hawaiʻi to perform critical infrastructure functions may break quarantine to do their work. Hawaiʻi residents who leave the state to perform critical infrastructure work do not need to self-quarantine upon returning but must wear protective gear and practice social distancing. Exceptions to quarantine also apply to those arriving on recreational boats at sea for at least 14 days, if no one on the boat is ill or experiencing COVID-19 symptoms.
     For questions regarding exemptions, contact CovidExemption@hawaii.gov. If under self-quarantine and a visitor or intended resident: 808-468-9952; Hawaiʻi residents, call 808-377-4760. For general travel-related questions, contact the Hawaiʻi Visitors and Convention Bureau Call Center at 1-800-GO-HAWAII (1-800-464-2924). To report quarantine violations in Hawaiʻi County, call 808-935-3311.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 

zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 

is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 

Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
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NO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND are reported today. There are two active cases here, one in Ocean View, one in Puna. Both cases are identified as travel-related and state Department of Health asks the public to "emphasize the importance of caution while traveling." Both cases are monitored by DOH.

     Eighteen new cases today on Oʻahu bring the state's new case total to 114 in 13 days. 

     Hawaiʻi Island recorded two new cases in the last three weeks. The other 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were two hospitalizations on-island.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 526 cases, Kauaʻi 21, and Maui County 120. Twelve victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 762 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The State and Island of Hawaiʻi continue to move forward on reopening, as Hawaii is in a good place because of your efforts of prevention. In going forward know the importance of continuing to follow the preventive policies of keeping Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for listening. Have a safe day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,187,876 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 118,381. Worldwide, more than 8.45 million have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 452,520.


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HAWAIʻI STATE LEGISLATURE RECONVENES MONDAY, June 22. In finishing up the 2020 session, legislators expect to work on a limited number of bills, and are scheduled to adjourn after three weeks.
Pastor Pam and Lance Ako
     The Capitol remains closed to the public. Some events will be broadcast or available to stream.
     Deadline for final bills proposing constitutional amendments are due by Tuesday, June 30. Deadline for bills to be amended by the non-originating chamber is Thursday, July 2. Legislators have July 3 off for Independence Day. Deadline for bills to pass in non-originating chamber back to originating chamber is Wednesday, July 8. Legislators will recess on July 9, and close the session Friday, July 10. Bills that passed both chambers will be transmitted to Gov. David Ige.
     Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/par.

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ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU WILL GIVE OUT SHAVE ICE AND KEIKI GOODIE BAGS tomorrow, Friday at 11 a.m. at the Ocean View Park-N-Ride along Hwy 11. Families have a chance to find one of the ten gift certificates from local businesses in the Keiki Goodie Bags.

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HOPE DIA-MEND MINISTRIES has relocated to 92-8988 Ginger Blossom in Ocean View. In-person services are held Sundays at  Led by Pastor Pam & Lance Ako, masks are required, six-foot distances will be maintained, and hand sanitizer will be available. "Everyone welcomed."

Bruno Facchini. HPD photo
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HAWAIʻI ISLAND POLICE ASK FOR THE PUBLIC'S HELP in locating 36-year-old Bruno Facchini. He is wanted for an outstanding bench warrant. He is approximately 5-feet-9 inches, approximately 205 pounds, with black hair, and brown eyes. Contact Detective Frank Mohica at (808) 961-2375, frank.mohica@hawaiicounty.gov, or non-emergency (808) 935-3311. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.



directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.



Feedback from Parents and Guardians of Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary School Students is requested by Principal Sharon Beck: "As we plan for the opening of the 2020-21 school year, we would like to gather feedback from our parents/guardians about what that might look like for our students." Deadline is June 30: KHPES Parent Survey: Planning for the 2020-21 School Year.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is July 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.orgto verify dates and times. The ʻOhana Food Drop program is being phased out. Nāʻālehu's final date is tentatively Wednesday, July 8 from until pau – supplies run out – at Nāʻālehu Shopping Center. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 
19-4030 Wright Road
 on Wednesday, June 24 or July 22, until pau. Go to Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 
96-1149 Kamani Street
 on Tuesday, June 30, until pau. There will be no July date.



On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, June 19, 2020

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A group of Discovery Harbour residents has submitted the Discovery Harbour Golf Cours and buffer zones for
purchase with PONC funds for golf, trails, bicycle park, tennis courts, and other options.
Photo from haleyhawaii.com
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR GOLF COURSE IS NOMINATED FOR ACQUISITION THROUGH PONC FUNDING. Rob Schoenherr, of Discovery Harbour, is one of the organizers of the effort. He noted that with the closure of Volcano and Sea Mountain golf courses, Discovery Harbour Golf Course is the only Kaʻū regional course that is playable and open to the public. It "has become much more important for Kaʻū area golfers. Discovery Harbour residents are pursuing a couple of options."


     One course of action is nominating the land for acquisition through Hawaiʻi County's Public Access, Open Space, and Natural Resources Preservation Commission. Schoenherr said the "Kaʻū community and Discovery Harbour residents need an affordable regional golf course, and space for hiking and biking trails, a little league baseball - soccer field, a dog park, a dirt track bicycle park, tennis courts, and other recreational options. The Discovery Harbour Golf Course and surrounding buffer acreage could provide the space for all these activities and more. As a regional recreation area, this space could be run as a public non-profit by volunteers coordinating with county and local entities and kept in perpetuity for this purpose. There could be 'iron rangers' and mail-in options for the collections of nominal fees."
Volunteers keep Discovery Harbour course mowed but the owner may stop
the golfing and find other uses starting in September.
Photo from haleyhawaii.com
     Monthly meetings of PONC for discussing acquisition nominees begin Monday, July 13 in the Hilo County Building's County Council Chambers. Meetings may not allow the public, depending on the course of COVID-19. However, the public can send in testimony to PONC, 
25 Aupuni St., Suite 1401HiloHI 96720
.
     The other option for the golf course land pursued by Discovery Harbour residents also involves a non-profit, volunteer effort. The proposal is to operate a full-time clubhouse and pro-shop with cart rentals and operation of the golf course. Proposed golf course fees would be equivalent "to low-end commercial or municipal golf operations, but would still be higher than what many Kaʻū and Discovery Harbour residents could or would pay to play golf on a regular basis," said Schoenherr. "Commercial efforts to run the Discovery Harbour golf course have repeatedly failed in the past. If priced too high, this effort will likely end with the same results."
     He cautioned that owners of Discovery Harbour Golf Course have indicated that they could lock the course in September and no longer allow volunteer mowing operations or trespassing. The alternative is a two-year leasing plan to an operator of the golf course or purchase of the land.
     Schoenherr said that the golf course owners are allowed to convert the golf course to any agriculture, including raising cattle and pigs. He said the owners have also indicated that they may create a coffee plantation in the buffer area of the course and could eventually convert the whole course to raising coffee.
Discovery Harbour Golf Course could wind up with coffee farming along its borders. Photo from haleyhawaii.com
     Local residents are currently maintaining the course in exchange for using the course. That arrangement could end in September unless the volunteer course keepers come up liability insurance and form an LLC to run the course.

     For more on the Discovery Harbour Golf Course proposal, call Ron Schoenherr at 775-846-8381 or email mtrosealoha@sbcglobal.net.
     See more on PONC properties in Kaʻū recently nominated for acquisition and opportunities to steward Kaʻū properties in upcoming Kaʻū News Briefs and the July print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar newspaper.


Discovery Harbour was built as a golf course community.
Photo from haleyhawaii.com
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MAKING JUNETEENTH A NATIONAL HOLIDAY, to commemorate the end of slavery, is the aim of a bipartisan resolution from 181 members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including Tulsi Gabbard and Ed Case. With Hawaiʻi, North Dakota, and South Dakota the only states that don't recognize the holiday, members of Congress suggest commemorating June 19, 1865, as the end of slavery in the United States. On that date, Union forces read orders in Texas– one of the farthest reaches of the former Confederate States – enforcing the end of slavery in America. Juneteenth has been commemorated in communities across the country for 155 years.

     Gabbard said, "Though slavery officially ended following the Civil War, its consequences are still felt to this day. This resolution celebrates the end of that evil institution. It also reminds us that those consequences are an open wound carried by the descendants of its victims. Remembering our history and acknowledging that it impacts our present is crucial in helping solve the challenges of our future."

     Case said, "Freedom Day, a day not only of celebration and commemoration but for each and all of us to look outward and inward to the still-persisting legacy of slavery and to ask what each and all of us can do to end it once and for all."
     Gabbard recently cosponsored legislation "which seeks to confront and address the continued racism and implicit bias that has undermined civil rights and equal protection under the law as was highlighted by the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officers in May," says a statement from her office. She has also backed a bills that would designate lynching as a federal hate crime, create a commission to explore reparations proposals to address the impacts of slavery, and more.

Juneteenth official flag, from activist Ben Haith, founder of the National Juneteenth Celebration Foundation.


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HAWAIʻI HAS THE WORST UNEMPLOYMENT RECOVERY form the pandemic in the U.S.,according to a recent report from WalletHub. It compared the 50 states and Washington, D.C.Hawaiʻi has a 730.64 percent increase in unemployment between May 2020 and May 2019, with 141,832 unemployed in 2020 versus 17,075 in 2019. Between January and May 2020, there was a 629.44 percent increase in unemployment, with 19,444 unemployed in January. For May, Hawaiʻi had a 22.5 percent unemployment rate, second only to Nevada at 25.2 percent.
     Hawaiʻi is followed in slow recovery by Nevada, Michigan, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. The states doing the best in recovery are Nebraska, with a 5.1 percent unemployment rate, D.C., Arizona, New Mexico, and Montana.
     WalletHub reports the American economy added 2.5 million nonfarm payroll jobs in May, taking the U.S.unemployment rate to 13.3 percent, compared to the "nearly historic high" of 14.7 percent at the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The drop "can be attributed to the fact that all U.S.states have begun to reopen non-essential businesses. In addition, most people who became unemployed during this crisis have only been temporarily laid off, and expect to be rehired by their former employers once companies reopen and start to make money again. However, it will take far more time for us to reduce the unemployment rate to pre-pandemic levels than it did for the virus to reverse over a decade of job growth."

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Volcano Art Center's two locations - within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
 and in Volcano Village at the Niʻaulani Campus - are open for
in-person and virtual experiences, including tours and classes.
Photo by Julia Neal
EVENTS AND EXHIBITIONS
ARE LIVE AT VOLCANOARTGALLERYin Hawaiʻi VolcanoesNational Park and Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. The Gallery is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. The Campus is open Monday through Friday, 
     Both locations are operating under CDC guidelines and social distancing protocol; face masks are required for entry into buildings, tours, and classes.

     All quilters are invited to participate in the third semi-annual quilt show, Quilts in the Forest – Winds of Change. The show opens on July 17 and continues through Aug. 8, Tuesday through Saturday from to Entries may be submitted by full-time and part-time residents of Hawai‘i Island, whether they are amateur or professional quilters. Call 967-8222 for entry info.

     Further details for all events can be found at volcanoartcenter.org/events or by calling 967-8222:
     At Niʻaulani, guided nature walks through the Nature Trail & Sculpture Gardenresume Mondays at No reservations are required for groups of five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free, but donations are greatly appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. The garden is open to walk through at one's own pace during operating hours.

A one-way experience at Volcano Art Center. Photo by Julia Neal
     Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss from to on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays resumes Monday, June 22.
     Join Yoga with Heather Lewis from to on Monday, June 22.
     Experience an Eco-Tour at ShakaForestFarms in VolcanoVillageon Friday, July 3 at

     An Independence Day Community Barbecue will be held at Niʻaulani on Saturday, July 4 from to , or as long as supplies last. Free grilled hot dogs and hamburgers will be handed out, and chicken and ribs plates will be available for

purchase.

     Zentangle with Lydia Meneses is back on Saturday, July 11 from to

     Learn how to Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel in two separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from to

     Virtual workshop via Zoom, Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, will be held Saturday, July 25 from to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies."

     At the Gallery in the Park, exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person from during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from VolcanoVillage"who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it."
Floor arrows show how to maintain social distancing
within VAC. Photo by Julia Neal
     Gallery Manager Emily C. Weiss says, "Both artists create graphic representations of species unique to Hawaiʻi. Their works expose and inform the viewer, educating people about many rare, endangered and even extinct species. VAC is honored to share their newest works which help support the Center's mission to promote, develop, and perpetuate the artistic, cultural, and environmental heritage of Hawaiʻi through arts and education."

    Both VolcanoArtCenterlocations offer virtual shopping appointments. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time, here. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.

     VAC also now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos.

     VolcanoArtCenteris a non-profit educational organization created in 1974 to promote, develop, and perpetuate the artistic and cultural heritage of Hawai‘i's people and environment through activities in the visual, literary, and performing arts. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for full event details and more.

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NEW COVID CASES SURGED TO 28 STATEWIDE TODAY,  with all on Oʻahu except one in Maui County and one on Kauaʻi. Gov. David Ige said the spike was expected: "Today's spike in positive cases was anticipated as we began the process to re-open our community. It is still manageable, but it serves as a reminder that we must continue to be vigilant in the battle against COVID-19, especially because of the potential harm that the virus can cause to our most vulnerable populations.
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 

zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 

is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 

Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     "We are well-prepared to handle this level of new cases. We have good capacity for testing, contact tracing, and care within our hospitals and other healthcare facilities. In addition, the increase in cases is a clear sign that our contact tracing and testing programs are working and we're finding more COVID-19 in our communities.

     "It's critically important that we slow the spread of the disease by continuing the safe practices that have become the new norm. The reopening of our communities and our ability to remain open depends on how successful we are at preventing surges that could overwhelm our healthcare system."
     On Hawaiʻi Island, no new cases are reported today. There are two active cases here, one in Ocean View, one in Puna. Both cases are identified as travel-related and state Department of Health asks the public to "emphasize the importance of caution while traveling." Both cases are monitored by DOH.
     The 25 new cases today on Oʻahu, and one each on Kauaʻi and in MauiCounty, bring the state's new case total to 141 in 14 days.

     Hawaiʻi Island recorded its two new cases in the last three weeks. The other 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were two hospitalizations on-island; both patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 551 cases, Kauaʻi 22, and Maui County 121. Twelve victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 789 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The Island of Hawaiʻi is in a good place of minimizing the spread of the coronavirus. This is due to your efforts and work of prevention. In moving forward, know the importance of continuing to follow the preventive policies of protecting yourself and our community. Thank you for doing your part to stop this virus. Thank you for listening and a beautiful Aloha Friday to you. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,220,961 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 119,112. Worldwide, more than 8,641,521 have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 459,474.


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AVOCADO GROWERS are urged to take a survey to help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry. Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United says the purpose of this survey is to estimate the current supply of avocados grown commercially in Hawaiʻi, including the types of cultivars (varieties) and growing elevations on each island. This information will assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says HFUU.
     The survey is conducted by HFUU and Hawaiʻi Avocado Association as part of a Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Product Promotion Grant for fiscal year 2020. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. The results will be shared publicly.
     Those who complete the survey will receive an option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. 

     For a hard copy of the survey, email info@growfruithawaii.com.
     Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

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WHEN TRAVELING TO KONA OR HILO, WHERE THERE ARE TRAFFIC LIGHTS, understand traffic signal rules. That's the message from the county Department of Public works: "As motorists, we've all been there. You reach an intersection and discover the traffic light is not working due to a power outage or storm. What do you do?"

     Malfunctioning Traffic Signals – Who Has the Right of Way?  If a traffic signal is not functioning or flashing, motorists should treat the intersection as a four-way stop and yield to motorists that get to the intersection first. In the event two vehicles arrive at an intersection at the same time, yield to the vehicle on the right. Proceed with caution as other vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians may not stop.

     To report a malfunctioning traffic signal, call the Traffic Division at (808) 961-8341 during normal business hours, Monday through Friday, from to ; after hours, call the Hawaiʻi Police Department at 9-1-1.

     Red Light: To Turn or Not to Turn? Right turns on red are allowed at intersections with traffic signals if not prohibited by signs. Where right turns on red are allowed, motorists are reminded that they must first come to a complete stop and proceed only when it is safe to do so. When a traffic signal shows a red arrow for a right turn, right turns on red are allowed unless prohibited by signs.

     Motorists also need to be especially aware of pedestrians who are legally crossing the street on either a white "WALK" or flashing red "DON'T WALK" signal. Pedestrians are cautioned to be aware of motorists who are making a right turn on red. It's a good practice to make eye contact with the driver whenever crossing any street to help assure a safer crossing.
     Department of Public Works Traffic Division has a free Rules of the Road brochure with traffic safety tips. The brochure is available at the DPW Administration office, 101 Pauahi Street, Suite 7, in Hilo. Bulk orders of the brochure are available on a first-come, first-served basis. To request a copy of the Rules of the Road brochure, call 961-8499.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.

Attend a Wildfire Risk for Farms Webinar Wednesday, June 24 from  to  Hawaiʻi Farm Fire Management Webinar, presented by University of Hawaiʻi Cooperative Extension, offers "Assessing and reducing wildfire risk on your farm! Dry season is here and wildfire risk is ramping up. Are you prepared? Join us for an online webinar about how to assess and reduce wildfire risk on your farm." Clay Trauernicht, UH Extension Specialist in Wildfire Science and Management, will speak on planning for fire preparedness, identifying fire-related hazards on the land, and methods to manage vegetation to reduce fire risk. Q&A facilitated by Josh Silva, Extension Agent in Edible Crops. RSVP at eventbrite.com/e/hawaii-farm-fire-management-webinar-tickets-109038286450.

Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.



Feedback from Parents and Guardians of Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary School Students is requested by Principal Sharon Beck: "As we plan for the opening of the 2020-21 school year, we would like to gather feedback from our parents/guardians about what that might look like for our students." Deadline is June 30KHPES Parent Survey: Planning for the 2020-21 School Year.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is July 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. The ʻOhana Food Drop program is being phased out. Nāʻālehu's final date is tentatively Wednesday, July 8 from  until pau – supplies run out – at Nāʻālehu Shopping Center. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, June 24 or July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Go to Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30, 10 a.m. until pau. There will be no July date.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, June 20, 2020

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Tina Neal returned to a post in Alaska this week after five years of keeping up with Kīlauea Volcano and many other 
matters at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Here, she talks with Secretary of the Interior David Berhardt and Acting 
Superintendent of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Rhonda Loh about the future of HVO headquarters following the 
2018 eruption and earthquakes that made it unusable. Bernhardt committed to rebuilding and keeping HVO near Kīlauea. 
Photo by DOI/Tami A. Heilemann
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

SAY ALOHA TO TINA NEAL, Scientist-in-Charge at U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. As s she returns to Alaska, the focus of this week's Volcano Watch is Tina Neal herself, written by USGS HVO scientists and affiliates:  "Extraordinary tenure ends for leader of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory," says Volcano Watch, with the following story:

Tina Neal, HVO Scientist-in-Charge from 2015–2020, 
ended her tenure on June 19, 2020USGS photo

     The extraordinary leadership of Tina Neal as Scientist-in-Charge of USGS HVO comes to an end this week. She  returns to a post Alaska Volcano Observatory after fulfilling her five-year commitment to HVO. David Phillips, HVO's Deputy SIC, will take the helm until Tina's successor arrives.

     By her own admission, nimbleness became a central theme of Tina's leadership. She continually strived to move HVO forward as a responsive and innovative team during periods of rapid and remarkable changes on Kīlauea Volcano, within the observatory, and around the world.

     Tina began her HVO leadership role in March 2015 just as Kīlauea's "June 27th" lava-flow threat to Pāhoa ended. In May 2016, a new vent erupted on the flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and by late July, the resulting lava flow entered the ocean at Kamokuna in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The lava entry quickly drew thousands of visitors on land and in boats to witness up close lava building new land.

     Tina spurred HVO geologists to take a fresh and detailed look at hazards associated with the growth and collapse of active lava deltas as described in science publications and internal reports. Their analyses resulted in the designation of a high-hazard area extending a minimum distance of 300 m (984 ft) around the lava-entry zone. The National Park used this revised distance to establish a safe viewing area, which ultimately helped Park personnel to avert injuries or loss of life during a large lava delta collapse on New Year's Eve in 2016.
     On April 30, 2018, a large intrusion of magma into the lower East Rift Zone of Kīlauea began, prompting HVO to issue a Volcano Activity Notice describing the activity and indicating that an eruption was possible downrift (east) of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. On May 3, the first of many fissures erupted downrift of Puʻu ʻŌʻō in the Leilani Estates subdivision and nearby areas. Soon after, Kīlauea's summit began collapsing as magma from the summit reservoir steadily moved into the lower East Rift Zone.
Tina Neal, responding to Kīlauea's Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō eruption, in November of 1983. At that time, USGS personal
protective equipment standards differed. USGS photo
     Tina was at the center of HVO's response to this remarkable eruption and summit collapse. Earthquakes and ground settling at the summit soon damaged HVO's main building, which forced the immediate and unprecedented move of the observatory’s center of operations from Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park to temporary offices in Hilo, the first of three moves in less than a year.

     During the 2018 events, HVO sustained 24/7 operations with support from nearly 100 scientists and volunteers chiefly from the USGS and University of Hawaiʻi. Tina was constantly on the move to bolster HVO's response in order to provide up-to-date scientific information and warnings for the public, as well as Federal, State, and County incident command teams, and to research and document the eruption for real-time and future analyses of extensive data sets.

     After the eruption ceased, Tina began the long process of planning for a new USGS office building and field station, which will house both HVO and the Pacific Islands Ecosystem Research Center. Numerous meetings regarding location, type of facilities, construction requirements and costs have resulted in preliminary plans that will guide the process forward.

Tina Neal gave many public presentations
during the 2018 eruption. USGS photo
     During her tenure, Tina persistently worked to embrace expanded volcano-monitoring capabilities, including the use of Unoccupied Aircraft Systems; anticipate changing hazardous conditions on Kīlauea; prepare HVO staff and Hawaiʻi residents and officials for a future eruption of Mauna Loa; and ensure employee safety and well-being. She also supported the dissemination of authoritative USGS information through news and social media, public briefings, and written reports and publications.

     Tina's most lasting legacy, however, will undoubtedly be the unprecedented numbers of new HVO staff hired to fill permanent USGS positions added to improve the observatory's science and operational capabilities and to replace retirements and transfers. She also oversaw the addition of several temporary positions through a long-standing cooperative agreement with the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

     In a final challenge, Tina ends her leadership role amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, which has forced HVO staff to work remotely and embrace innovative ways of interacting. All the while, she kept employees safe, engaged, and ready to face future changes on Hawaiian volcanoes.

     We offer Tina a profound "mahalo" for her leadership, compassion, inspiration, and nimbleness over the past five years and wish her well in her future endeavors in Alaska.

     Volcano Activity Updates

     Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL (volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

     Kīlauea monitoring data for the past month show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html.
Tina Neal speaking in front of a recent lava flow during activity in 2016. USGS photo
     Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.

     This past week, about 75 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper-elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths of less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). Global Positioning System measurements show long-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations and fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit remain stable. Webcams show no changes to the landscape. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

     No felt earthquakes were reported in the Hawaiian islands during the past week. 

     HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity.
     Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


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FOURTEEN NEW CASES WERE ADDED TO THE STATE'S COVID-19 count today with seven on Kauaʻi, six on Oʻahu, and one on Maui. No new cases on Hawaiʻi Island were reported.
     Most of the cases were discovered by contact tracing – testing those associated with a person with COVID on Kauaʻi and testing others on Oʻahu associated with other victims.
     State Director of Health Bruce Anderson issued a statement today explaining the importance of tracing and testing to prevent further spread. He and other health officials concluded the people are relaxing their guard against COVID by abandoning wearing of masks and distancing from other people. They also urged people to maintain frequent hand-washing practices.
     Friday's COVID-19 case surge was the largest since April 2. The Department of Health reported that the majority of new cases are associated with "community clusters in large households with crowded conditions, adult care and long-term nursing facilities, and with a faith-based group gathering at a home." All of Friday's new cases are Hawaiʻi residents: 22 adults, five children. None of them are on this island.

     Hawaiʻi State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park, commented, "These clusters really emphasize our call for the continuation of safe practices, including physical distancing, using face coverings, frequent hand washing, and staying home and away from others when sick. Virtually all of the newly reported cases of COVID-19 are due to community-spread, often from a group setting." She said there is no evidence the spike in cases is due to recent protests. "Nonetheless, we continue to strongly encourage physical distancing and the use of face masks when people are engaged in practicing their First Amendment rights, or while in any other large gatherings, with people who don't live in the same household."

     A faith community on Oʻahu, having gatherings in a home, prompted health authorities to reiterate safe practices for people being together in crowded conditions, reports DOH. As many as 35 of the new cases are linked to the meetings. Guidance based on best practices from sources such as DOH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and from research institutions and municipalities across the country is available online: oneoahu.org/house-of-worship-guidance.
Image from Oregon governor's office.
     The Health Director said, "Despite our recent spike in cases, all of our testing and contact tracing procedures are working exactly as intended. Additional cases are being identified and added to the case count as a result of aggressive investigations, contact tracing and testing of household contacts."
     This week at the House Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness meeting, Alan Oshima, the Governor's Recovery and Resiliency Navigator said he sees members of the public failing to observe contamination protocols such as wearing masks and physical distancing in public. He said with recent low contamination numbers, people may have a false sense of security about catching the disease. "We all have a personal responsibility to help maintain public health for our families and the entire community," said Oshima.
     See the Hawaiʻi Department of Health COVID-19 site and the Hawaiʻi Data Collaborative COVID-19 Tracking site for many details on tracking and analyzing the impact of COVID. Also look for a new tool for the public, to safely help guide reopening efforts, at recoverynavigator.hawaii.gov.
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 

zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 

is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 

Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     State Sen. Dru Kanhua, who represents the western part of Kaʻū into Kona, urged yesterday for continued vigilance against the virus: "Although many of us have slowly regressed into our normal routine, today's spike is a reminder that COVID-19 is not a thing of the past. This new normal will require just a little more attention, vigilance, and commitment for the health, safety, and well-being of our West Hawai‘i community. Therefore, let us continue to incorporate general physical precautions into our daily routines – wear a mask when in public, remain at home unless to retrieve essentials or exercise, wash hands frequently, and practice social distancing."
     On Hawaiʻi Island, no new cases are reported today. There are two active cases here, one in Ocean View, one in Puna. Both cases are identified as travel-related and state Department of Health asks the public to "emphasize the importance of caution while traveling." Both cases are monitored by DOH.

     The 14 new cases today on Oʻahu, Kauaʻi, and in Maui County, bring the state's new case total to 165 in 15 days.

     Hawaiʻi Island recorded its two new cases in the last three weeks. The other 81 COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were two hospitalizations on-island; both patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 557 cases, Kauaʻi 29, and Maui County 122. Twelve victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 803 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.
     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The Island of Hawaiʻi is doing well in minimizing the spread and impact of this virus. During the weekend when we gather and enjoy the lifestyle of Hawaiʻi, please continue practicing the policies of distancing, gatherings, cleanliness, face coverings, and keeping yourself physically and emotionally healthy. All of these policies have one purpose; to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Thank you for listening. Stay safe on this special day of World Peace and the First Day of Summer. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,255,119 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 119,719. Worldwide, more than 8,791,794 have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 464,465.


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"Light" to "weak" intensity is how felt reports of today's
M3.6 earthquake ENE of Pāhala are recorded. USGS map
A 3.6-MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE shook the island about 8 kilometers (5 miles) east northeast of Pāhala this afternoon at 3:49 p.m. Felt reports came in from all over Hawaiʻi Island, at light to weak intensities. No damage is reported. The quake was not strong enough to generate a tsunami.

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KONA RECEIVED 114 NEW AIR ARRIVALS ON THURSDAY, according to hawaiitourismauthority.org. Air travel is slowly increasing since the lifting of the 14-day interisland quarantine. Of the arrivals, 49 were visitors, 48 returning residents, and seven were relocating to Hawaiʻi Island. The remainder were nine crewpersons and one person in-transit.
     The state welcomed 1,767 people on Thursday. Of those, 575 were visitors and 519 were returning residents.

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DADS IN HAWAIʻI ARE THE THIRD HEALTHIEST IN THE NATION, according to a WalletHUb report leading into Fathers Day. The health ranking was partly based on life expectancy for men, where Hawaiʻi came in third, tied with Connecticut, Colorado, and New York. The list ranking in metrics used for health includes insured rate. Hawaiʻi ranks second in the nation, just behind Massachusetts, and ahead of Vermont, D.C., and Minnesota.

    The Aloha state ranks 12th in the work-life balance metric, 33rd in child care, and 44th in economic and social well-being. Hawaiʻi ranks 32nd overall for working dads.

     WalletHub reports that, in 1960, 75 percent of American families relied on a single income, "that of the dad, who spent much of his week at work while mom stayed home with the kids. Today, two-thirds of family households depend on two incomes. Plus, the contemporary dad no longer fits neatly into the standard of the married breadwinner and disciplinarian. That's especially true this year, as many fathers are working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic and face a unique opportunity to spend more time face-to-face with their children and help teach them while schools are closed.

     "Regardless of the changing identity and priorities of the modern dad, fatherhood remains an undisputedly tough job, and a father's ability to provide for his family is central to his role. In fact, over 93 percent of dads with kids younger than 18 were employed in 2019, and while millions of men have lost their jobs during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are being laid off less often than women. However, not all working dads are in the same situation; those who live in states with greater economic opportunity and quality of life have it better than others."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TRY OUT A NEW TOOL TO SHOW THE STATE HOW TO BALANCE THE BUDGET, urges Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi. Available at grassrootinstitute.org/budget, the tool allows Hawaiʻi's taxpayers to "show lawmakers how to balance the budget," says Keliʻi Akina, president and CEO of Grassroot Institute. " It's time to work together to navigate Hawaiʻi's financially uncertain future."
The public is encourged to play with the numbers
to help balance the state's budget. This is the beginning
distribution, with the largest portion representing
fixed costs. Go to grassrootinstitute.org/budget/.
     Akina says, "With the click of a button, Hawaiʻi residents can balance the state budget and understand where their tax money goes. This tool makes it easy to see that modest cuts can balance the budget without any need to increase taxes or debt. If our lawmakers had not increased spending so much since 2018, there would be no need to cut at all."
     The institute's new budget tool accounts for the recent actions by the Legislature to balance the budget, such as its $740 million in cuts to Gov. David Ige's budget and replenishing the state's rainy day fund with $735 million from special funds and other sources, according to a Grassroot report from earlier this year. However, finding other ways to reduce the debt "will not be as easy," since $4,254,697,897 – or 63 percent of the state's projected revenues of $6,700,712,000 – of the general fund goes toward "fixed costs," such as the state retirement fund, the state health benefits fund, debt, and Medicaid, says the group.
     Akina urges lawmakers to refrain from using the entire $1.1 billion rainy day fund to balance this year's budget. "Some of the money could be used now," he said, "but the rest should be pocketed for later, in case it is needed for the uncertain times ahead. More than half of every dollar spent by the state goes toward benefits and debt. If our lawmakers can't find ways to reduce those costs, then all other options will need to be put on the table as the state enters a period of enormous financial uncertainty."
     Akina said that Hawaiʻi's projected $1.4 billion general fund deficit in fiscal year 2021 could be balanced by using $700 million from the rainy day fund, making 15 percent cuts across the board, and delaying salary increases, says a statement from the group. That would still save $431 million in the rainy day fund and bring general fund spending to $7.7 billion, which is just below FY 2018 levels of $7.8 billion, according to a 2019 Grassroot report.

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ENERGY ASSISTANCE APPLICATIONS ARE OPEN through June 30 to those who have lost income during the pandemic. Those needing help to pay their energy bill may be eligible for Department of Human Services' Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program Energy Credit Assistance Program. LIHEAP provides heating and/or cooling assistance to Hawaiʻi households in need, by assisting with a one-time payment towards their utility bill, electric or gas. To see qualifying circumstances and to apply, go to humanservices.hawaii.gov/bessd/liheap/.


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CELL PHONE SCAMS involve sending people text messages regarding their accounts for their phones and other services, warns Hawaiʻi Police Department. The scammer sends out a text message pretending to be a telecommunications company, such as AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, or Sprint. The text informs customers that their payment has been blocked and to call 1-888-312-6806. During the call, the scammer asks for personal information.

     HPD says to never provide personal information over the phone or on-line – to include date of birth, social security numbers, credit card information, bank account information, etc. – to anyone whose identity is unconfirmed.   
     Anyone contacted by a person involved in a scam, either by phone or via the internet, is asked to call HPD's non-emergency number, (808) 935-3311, to report the activity.


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ST. JUDE'S ONLINE WORSHIP is available at stjudeshawaii.org. People are invited to join the Zoom Aloha Hour, Sunday, June 21 at  Go to https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, meeting ID: 684 344 9828, password: Aloha.


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A new Hale built last year inside Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park in honor of Kumu Hula Ab Valencia, with 
assistance from Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and many others. 
Photo from Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year

The late Kumu Hula Ab Valencia.
Photo by Dinno Morrow
THE HALE PROJECT, supported by Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and Puʻuohonua O Honaunau, was in full swing this time last year, with the building of a traditional Hawaiian structure at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Friends reported that money raised, beginning in 2015, funded the construction.
     Friends Executive Director Elizabeth Fien said a promise was made to Hawaiian Cultural Practitioner and kumu hula Irenio "Ab" Kawainohoikalaʻi Valencia to rebuild the Hale. "He was the original FHVNP project manager, and we were devastated when he passed in 2017. Every time we pass the Hale, we can feel his presence and love.
     "The project started with the stripping of bark from ironwood logs (due to Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death, we no longer are able to use the ʻōhiʻa trees), and collecting materials to rebuild. The pa hula is a very special and significant cultural area. The Hale allows for dancers to get ready before a performance."
     See more on Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park at fhvnp.org.
The Hale under construction at pa hula in Volcano uses ironwood instead of ʻōhiʻa posts to prevent the 
spread of Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death. Photo from Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Make Reservations for Father's Day at Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp for Sunday, June 21 from  to  Seating limited due to social distancing. Dinner also available to go. The main course is Prime Rib and Vegetable Alfredo Pasta Bake, with side dishes and dessert, for $27.95 per person. Call 967-8356 for dine-in reservations, to-go orders, and current event information. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Attend a Wildfire Risk for Farms Webinar Wednesday, June 24 from  to  Hawaiʻi Farm Fire Management Webinar, presented by University of Hawaiʻi Cooperative Extension, offers "Assessing and reducing wildfire risk on your farm! Dry season is here and wildfire risk is ramping up. Are you prepared? Join us for an online webinar about how to assess and reduce wildfire risk on your farm." Clay Trauernicht, UH Extension Specialist in Wildfire Science and Management, will speak on planning for fire preparedness, identifying fire-related hazards on the land, and methods to manage vegetation to reduce fire risk. Q&A facilitated by Josh Silva, Extension Agent in Edible Crops. RSVP at eventbrite.com/e/hawaii-farm-fire-management-webinar-tickets-109038286450.

Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.



Feedback from Parents and Guardians of Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary School Students is requested by Principal Sharon Beck: "As we plan for the opening of the 2020-21 school year, we would like to gather feedback from our parents/guardians about what that might look like for our students." Deadline is June 30KHPES Parent Survey: Planning for the 2020-21 School Year.


ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is July 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. The ʻOhana Food Drop program is being phased out. Nāʻālehu's final date is tentatively Wednesday, July 8 from  until pau – supplies run out – at Nāʻālehu Shopping Center. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, June 24 or July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Go to Pāhala's Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street on Tuesday, June 30, 10 a.m. until pau. There will be no July date.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, June 21, 2020

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Live from Volcano at the Skateboard Park
The indoor skateboard park at Cooper Center in Volcano reopened last week. Photo by Julia Neal

JOB TRAINING, HOUSING ASSISTANCE, AND SUPPORT FOR THE UNEMPLOYED AND SMALL BUSINESSES are the designated uses for the $635 million from the federal government to Hawaiʻi through the CARES ACT, as proposed by leaders of the state legislature. The plan is expected to be approved when the legislature reconvenes this week.

     State Senate President Ronald D. Kouchi, House Speaker Scott K. Saiki, Sen. Donovan M. Dela Cruz, and Rep. Sylvia Luke announced the plan yesterday, to provide "immediate relief to residents and small businesses who are suffering from the devastating economic shutdown caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The plan aims to support and reinforce the social safety net for our residents, rebuild and move our economy forward, and address the ongoing pandemic," said their joint statement.
    Luke, who chairs the state House of Representatives Finance Committee, said, "The Legislature is acutely aware of the daily challenges facing Hawaiʻi's working residents. The economic impacts of COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi has further exacerbated the need to support working families. The CARES Act funds will provide immediate relief for Hawaiʻi's families and local businesses."

     The plan sets aside $230 million to support unemployed residents until the end of the year. Dela Cruz, Chair of the Senate Ways and Means Committee, said, "These critical funds will provide a new state unemployment insurance weekly benefit that replaces the weekly federal plus-up payments set to expire July 31. Beginning August 1, an estimated 117,000 unemployed individuals will receive the State's enhanced weekly unemployment benefit of $100."

     Over 34,000 households are expected to receive help from the plan's $100 million funded rental and housing assistance subsidies. The State's most financially vulnerable households will receive rental assistance in the form of a $500 monthly subsidy or 50 percent of rent, whichever is lesser, for up to five months from August 1 to December 31.

     Another $56 million will be used to bring back small businesses, support training and job programs connecting unemployed with local businesses in need of employees, and provide manufacturing grants to local companies that can create local supply chains for necessary cleaning supplies and personal protection equipment.

     The House Speaker said, "The push to diversify the State's economy has been a priority for years. The pandemic has exposed the urgency with which we need to provide workforce development and businesses with the tools to learn how to thrive beyond the tourism economy. We are proud to announce this plan that will address the immediate needs of residents and small businesses, and in the process will aide in stimulating our economy."

     Addressing the public health needs of the COVID-19 pandemic is another pillar to the comprehensive funding plan, said the joint statement. The Senate President said, "The Legislature's plan devotes $100 million to distribute ample sanitation and PPE supplies for essential workers beyond the health care community including child care facilities, elderly care homes, small businesses, schools, and non-profits that work with populations vulnerable to the coronavirus." 

     The Legislature's proposed plan builds upon the University of Hawaiʻi's Economic Research Organization's estimates that $618 million in spending will generate more than $1 billion in Gross Domestic Product over the coming year and help Hawaiʻi's households and businesses by supporting up to 6,500 jobs. The plan provides discretion to Gov. David Ige's Administration to spend the remaining CARES funds to pay for unanticipated and emerging needs. This discretionary amount could be used to bolster Hawaiʻi's unemployment insurance funds or support COVID-19 related programs.
     For video of legislators announcing plan, visit facebook.com/watch/live/?v=2759894364335751.


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Project Hawaiʻi, Inc. works with H. Hata & Co. Target and through a Hawaiʻi Community Foundation grant, to
help isolated keiki during the pandemic. Photo from Project Hawaiʻi, Inc.
PROJECT HAWAIʻI INC. is working with H. Hata & Co., Target Stores, and through a grant with Hawaiʻi Community Foundation through the Kuki‘o Community Fund, to provide hundreds of homeless children with meals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

     Project Hawai‘i Inc. is a volunteer-staffed nonprofit with public donations to serve homeless, unsheltered children around the island throughout the year. With stay-at-home orders instituted to tap down coronavirus spread in March, Project Hawaiʻi directed seven leaders to contact isolated families and those needing resources, in order to give them meals and hygiene supplies to help with the health of keiki.

     Project Hawaiʻi also reached out to help support education when the schools closed, delivering educational packets and fun activities to keep the children's minds engaged.

     Hawaiʻi Community Foundation provided a grant to help fund meals and food box delivery during the Summer. See more on Project Hawaiʻi at helpthehomelesskeiki.org.

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A COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IS IN THE WORKS FOR MAUI, according to its County Council member Shane Sincenci. The measure is aimed at diversifying the Maui economy to be less dependent on tourism, which has given it one of the highest unemployment rates in the country – 37 percent – during the COVID-19 pandemic.
     The proposed Charter Amendment would go on the ballot this November. The group supporting a county Department of Agriculture released a statement saying that it would be a critical step to empower the residents of the county "to revitalize an industry that has been in decline for decades. Without this initiative, our agricultural sector will remain that same as it has for decades – and possibly worse. We must fight now so that our community has a chance to thrive and be self-sufficient. There will be people that have been benefiting from the current system who will come out and speak against this measure. It is up to us to remind them that this decision doesn't belong to a select few to decide. It is a decision for our community to vote on." The idea goes before a Maui County Council committee on Tuesday.

Maui County Councilman Shane Sincenci proposes 
a County Department of Agriculture.
     The group developed a list of "vast opportunities and careers with Agriculture" as the driver: Arable farming for food; animal husbandry – including for food, fabrics, nutrient cycling, soil regeneration, and carbon sequestration; aquaculture – including the cultivation of fish, shellfish, bi-valves, and plants/algae, whether within nearshore waters, natural ponds, or holding tanks; forestry – for both harvesting and conservation, including hardwoods or bamboo used for building materials, fruiting trees, or native fauna; horticulture – encompasses crops and gardens for food, flowers, medicinal plants, and herbs for fibers, landscaping for ornamentals, and forestry; biofuels – including horticulture (i.e. sunflowers), aquaculture (i.e. algae), and animal husbandry (i.e. off-gassing capture enclosures); animal processing facilities – establish an affordable, larger capacity, public processing facility; nutrient recycling – composting management for different climates and materials, both green and human waste streams; seed banking – continuous growing for seeds, establish a dry down/climate-controlled bank to ensure seed longevity; markets – direct sales such as farmers markets or CSA boxes, and indirect sales through grocery stores, restaurants, added-value product makers; and added-value products – including foods, beauty products, and household cleaning products, providing data on the types of ingredients being sought/requested and connecting farmers to product makers.
     The County Department of Agriculture would also be tasked with tracking imports – collecting data on agriculture streams coming into the county, and exports – supporting/creating industries that aid farmers in expanding growth potential off-island. It would help with curbing invasive species – establish/increase inspection protocols for incoming agriculture products (i.e. potted plants). It would conduct and support research and development – new and emerging industry research, integrated pest management, farming technologies, processing and distribution technologies, soil remediation, and effects of climate change on the local agricultural sectors. It would support and advocate for farmers and producers. It would assist with workforce development; agricultural engineering, developing alternative plant-based plastics and packaging, and maintain records of growth and development in ag-sector; and oversee the county ag budget items "in a responsible and accountable process," according to their statement.


St. John's Church in Washington D.C., where
Pres. Trump held up a bible after ordering force
to push out peaceful protestors.
Photo bv Julia Neal

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INVESTIGATE USE OF FORCE AGAINST PEACEFUL PROTESTERS, demands Sen. Mazie Hirono and 20 of her colleagues. The Senators wrote Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz, asking him to open an investigation into the conduct of Attorney General William Barr and the Department of Justice in directing the use of force against peaceful protestors around Lafayette Square on June 1, 2020. The President ordered the protestors removed in advance of his standing in front of St. John's Episcopal Church on Lafayette Square, across from the White House for a photo opportunity. The church clergy objected.

The interior of St. John's Church.
Photo by Julia Neal
     The Senators also called on the Inspector General to probe the deployment of federal law enforcement "to suppress protests and intimidate protestors" across the country, and the temporary expansion of the Drug Enforcement Agency's authority to "conduct covert surveillance" on Americans participating in protests.

     The  Attorney General was not only on the scene less than an hour before the use of force to clear peaceful protesters, but he also participated in President Trump's photo op, posing for pictures in front of St. John's Church.


     The Senators wrote, "We write to request an immediate investigation into Attorney General William Barr's and the Department of Justice's roles in directing the use of force – including the use of teargas or a similar gas, rubber bullets, pepper balls, and batons – to suppress peaceful protesters around Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C., on June 1, 2020. This misuse of force is all the more alarming given that the Attorney General appears to have issued this order to allow President Trump to walk across the street from the White House for a political photo-op in front of St. John's Church.
Presidents John Kennedy, Lydon Johnson and Richard Nixon all attended
 St. John's Church, which welcomes all religions. Photo by Julia Neal
     "We believe that the concerning actions we have identified warrant immediate investigation by your office, as they raise serious questions about misconduct, abuse of power, and waste by the Justice Department. Moreover, there appears to be no question about your office's jurisdiction in this matter.

     "Therefore, as detailed above, we urge your office to investigate the roles of Attorney General Barr and the Department of Justice in directing the use of force, including tear gas and rubber bullets, against peaceful protesters near Lafayette Square on June 1, 2020; deploying federal agents to suppress protests and intimidate peaceful protesters; and expanding the authority of DEA to conduct covert surveillance of protesters." Read the letter here.


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LEGISLATION ON JUSTICE IN POLICING AND CONDEMNING POLICE BRUTALITY was cosponsored by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard last week. She backed both the Justice in Policing Act and a resolution condemning police brutality, racial profiling, and the use of excessive and militarized force throughout the country.
     Gabbard said, "Our nation is facing great heartbreak and trauma in the wake of the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolispolice officer in broad daylight. Accountability and justice for Mr. Floyd and his family must occur, but that is not enough. As a nation, we must address the many systemic problems that have brought us to this point by enacting significant reforms. This legislation takes the first steps in being able to do that. These problems are complex, will not be solved overnight, and will require us to come together as Americans, in the spirit of aloha – respect and love for others – taking a stand for justice and equality for all." 


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Puʻuhonua o Honaunau's 59th Cultural Festival and Anniversary Celebration is canceled this year. Photo by Kawai Domingo
CANCELED IS THE 59TH HAWAIIAN CULTURAL FESTIVAL and Anniversary Celebration at Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park. The event would have taken place on June 27 and 28. Following the guidance from the White House, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state and local public health authorities, says the announcement, "This difficult decision was made to protect the health and safety of the community as well as our visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners. While this year's event has been canceled, you can still witness the wonder of previous Hawaiian Cultural Festivals virtually." A video to commemorate previous Hawaiian Cultural Festivals will be released on Saturday, June 27 at facebook.com/PuuhonuaoHonaunauNPS. Take a virtual park tour: nps.gov/puho.
Large crowds gathered in previous years at the cultural festival. Photo from mosaicsinscience.org
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A SMALLER BIN FOR GLASS RECYCLING at Volcano Recycling & Transfer Station is in place, due to "recurring vandalism concerns," says a statement from the County Solid Waste Division. The non-HI-5 glass recycling roll-off at the station is replaced with a smaller mobile bin.
     Two-Bin Recycling – corrugated cardboard, brown paper bags and non-HI-5 glass – at Volcano Recycling and Transfer Station is available on Monday, Thursday, and Saturday from to  The public is asked to not leave non-HI-5 glass containers at the site when the mobile bin is not present.
     "We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience and understanding as we tackle the challenges of vandalism at this site," says a statement from the county Solid Waste Division.
     Visit hawaiizerowaste.orgfor locations and more information.


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REGISTER FOR HEALTHY FARM SOILS VIRTUAL WORKSHOP Soil Health Principles—Application and Results of Investing in Your Soils on Tuesday, June 23 from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Presented by the National Center for Appropriate Technology and suggested by The Kohala Center, farmers can learn how to apply the five principles of healthy soil management and hear from experienced farmers who have benefited from these practices. Free; advanced registration required at register.gotowebinar.com/register/6393299882850606607.


Cold wax painting by Darcy Gray who will teach a Cold Wax Painting
Class at Volcano Art Center. See more.
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REGISTER FOR A COLD WAX PAINTING CLASS by Darcy Gray on Saturday, June 27 from to at VolcanoArtCenter's Niʻaulani Campus in VolcanoVillage. The $65/$60 VAC member class is three hours long and will be limited to six people. Advanced registration required: volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222. Students must wear a CDC recommended face covering during class and are required to use the provided cleaning supplies after class. Artists of all levels will be introduced to various methods of working in oil and cold wax medium through an intuitive process utilizing various non-traditional mark-making tools. Students will receive four sheets of 9"x12" Arches Oil Paper and a 4-ounce jar of cold wax medium. "Bring an apron and any oil paints you may have, and a snack if you wish."
     Instructor Darcy Gray holds a B.A. in 3-dimensional design from the City of Birmingham University in England. Her work has been featured in multiple exhibitions throughout Hawai‘i and California, in both solo and group shows. In 2016, she received awards from the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, Hawai‘i Island Art Alliance, and Honorable Mention in the 2018 WailoaCentershow, Jan Ken Po. For more information on Darcy and her work, visit www.darcygrayfineart.com.


Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 

zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 

is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 

Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
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TWO NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, including at least one in Kealakekua 96750 zip code, are reported today, with nine more on Oʻahu.
     There are three active cases on this island: Ocean View, Puna, and Kealakekua. The patients are being monitored by DOH.
       The 11 new cases in the islands bring the state's new case total to 176 in 16 days.

     Hawaiʻi Island recorded its three active cases in the last week. All other  82 confirmed COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were two hospitalizations on-island; both patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 566 cases, Kauaʻi 29, and Maui County 122. Twelve victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 814 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Seventeen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "Unfortunately, the Islands of Kauaʻi and Oʻahu are now experiencing an increase of positive cases. This emphasizes the importance of understanding that the virus threat remains and we must continue to follow the policies of prevention to protect our community. All of these policies have one purpose, to stop the spread of the virus. Thank you for listening and thank you for doing your part to keep Hawaiʻi safe. A Happy Father's Day to all the Papas; stay safe. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 2,275,319 cases have been confirmed. The death toll is over 119,949. Worldwide, more than 8,914,528 have contracted COVID-19. The death toll is more than 466,527.

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Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
TO PRESERVE, SUSTAIN, AND RESTORE CORAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS via a prize competition was the goal of legislation introduced by Sen. Mazie Hirono and Rep. Ed Case this time last year.
     The Coral Reef Sustainability Through Innovation Act of 2019 addressed threats to U.S. coral reef ecosystems by directing the 12 federal agencies on the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force to use existing funding to carry out a coral health prize competition. The legislation would allow federal agencies to work with private entities to both fund and administer the prize competition.
Coral reefs support clouds of reef fish. DLNR photo
     Said Hirono, "The waters surrounding Hawaiʻi are home to more than 620 square miles of coral reef and a quarter of the world's marine life, including thousands of native species found nowhere else in the world. Hawaiʻi's coral reefs generate nearly $800 million in economic activity each year for our state. We cannot afford to sit by as the health of our oceans continues to decline. This bill encourages federal agencies as well as the private sector to come together to find innovative solutions to help our declining reefs. Collaborative partnerships such as these are desperately needed to ensure that our marine environments and the numerous services they provide will be around for future generations."
     Said Case, "This no-cost bill amends the proven Coral Reef Conservation Act of 2000... Prize competitions that encourage public-private partnerships, such as the one that this bill proposes, have an established record of spurring innovation that can be integrated into a next-generation federal ocean management strategy. This small 
Coral bleaching and other forms of coral death lead to a lack of reef fish.
DLNR photo
step could generate huge leaps forward in the preservation and protection of one of the most critical and endangered corners of our natural world."
     A peer-reviewed study commissioned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimates the total economic value of coral reefs in the main Hawaiian Islands alone to be nearly $34 billion. Healthy reefs contribute to local economies through tourism and provide shoreline protection during severe weather events by mitigating damaging wave action. Threats to coral reefs include climate change, bleaching, disease, overfishing, pollution, and more.
     Rep. Tulsi Gabbard cosponsored the bill. Read the full text here. A one-page summary and fact sheet about the bill is available here. The bill is still supported by Hawaiʻi's congressional delegation.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
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Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Advocate for Hawaiʻi Crops to be Included in Coronavirus Food Assistance Program Listing by submitting comments by June 22. The CFAP helps agricultural producers impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. Crops not included are coffee, macadamia nuts, cacao, and more. Comments can be submitted online, or by mail by, June 22. Go to regulations.gov/document?D=FSA-2020-0004-0003 or mail to: Director, SND, FSAU.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Stop 0522, WashingtonDC 20250-0522. Reference Docket ID: FSA-2020-0004.

     Questions? Contact William L. Beam, (202) 720-3175 or email Bill.Beam@usda.gov. Persons with disabilities or who require alternative means for communication (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).
     "One well-supported comment is often more influential than a thousand form letters," says UH-CTAHR's Andrea Kawabata. See Tips for Submitting Effective Comments.



Attend a Wildfire Risk for Farms Webinar Wednesday, June 24 from  to  Hawaiʻi Farm Fire Management Webinar, presented by University of Hawaiʻi Cooperative Extension, offers "Assessing and reducing wildfire risk on your farm! Dry season is here and wildfire risk is ramping up. Are you prepared? Join us for an online webinar about how to assess and reduce wildfire risk on your farm." Clay Trauernicht, UH Extension Specialist in Wildfire Science and Management, will speak on planning for fire preparedness, identifying fire-related hazards on the land, and methods to manage vegetation to reduce fire risk. Q&A facilitated by Josh Silva, Extension Agent in Edible Crops. RSVP at eventbrite.com/e/hawaii-farm-fire-management-webinar-tickets-109038286450.


Register for Hawaiʻi Coffee Association Webinar Series. The virtual event will be held Wednesday, June 24 and Thursday, June 25. Each session is designed to provide important updates on the effects of the pandemic on the Hawaiʻi coffee industry and on the coffee industry at large, as well as addressing other useful topics to inform coffee professionals of changing trends and regulations. Each session must be registered for individually – go to hawaiicoffeeassoc.org/page-1771697. The sessions will be recorded and later published on the HCA website. To become a sponsor for the webinar, click here.



Feedback from Parents and Guardians of Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary School Students is requested by Principal Sharon Beck: "As we plan for the opening of the 2020-21 school year, we would like to gather feedback from our parents/guardians about what that might look like for our students." Deadline is June 30KHPES Parent Survey: Planning for the 2020-21 School Year.



Enter the RevʻULUtion Student Art Contest by Tuesday, June 30. Hawaiʻi ʻUlu Cooperative invites all students residing in Hawaiʻi in PreK through 12th grades to create and submit original artwork that will be featured in an upcoming traveling art exhibit, a 13-month calendar, and across the internet on the cooperative's partners websites and social media. The purpose of the contest is to raise awareness of ʻulu as a "resilient cultural and agricultural resource" that is a "viable option for increasing food security and self-sufficiency across the Hawaiian Islands.
     Each student may submit as many pieces as they wish on 8.5 by 11 paper, in the landscape (horizontal) orientation. Any art medium, except computer graphics and photographs, may be used as long as the artwork is flat and can be scanned. Each entry must be accompanied by a short – 75 words or less – explanation of ʻUlu's Place in Hawaiʻi: Past, Present, and Future, and an entry form.
     Visit eatbreadfruit.com/pages/artcontest for more information and to submit an entry.



Apply for Energy Assistance through June 30 for help to pay energy bills. Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program Energy Credit Assistance Program assists eligible people with a one-time payment towards their electric or gas bill. See humanservices.hawaii.gov/bessd/liheap.


Cold Wax Painting Class by Darcy Gray, Saturday, June 27, at VolcanoArtCenter's Niʻaulani Campus in VolcanoVillage. $65/$60 VAC member. Must wear CDC-recommended face covering, required to use provided cleaning supplies after class. Artists of all levels welcome. Limited to six people, advanced registration required: volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222.

ONGOING

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays,  at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace,  weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays,  at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, June 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is July 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone. Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     For further informa