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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, September 29, 2020

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Kahuku Unit of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park expands its open days starting Thrusday. See details, below. NPS photo

WHETHER TO END THE 14-DAY QUARANTINE for traveling to Neighbor Islands is the big discussion this week among the mayors of Hawai`i Island, Kaua`i and Maui Counties. Lt. Gov Josh Green, MD., fresh off his 14-day quarantine after contracting COVID-19, said he thinks quarantines could end. 
      Quarantines are set to end Oct.15 for those coming from out of state, who show a negative COVID-19 test approved by the state Department of Health, taken within 72 hours of arrival. Interviewed on the Honolulu Star Advertiser'sSpotlight Hawai`i program livestream today, Green said. "We don't need the 14-day quarantine." While some people question whether there should be one test prior to coming to the islands and another test after arrival, Green recommended one test per person before coming from out of state. He said additional tests, including testing for interisland travel, would be extremely expensive and generate few positive COVID results. He noted that the number of cases have been going down in Hawai`i.
     There is also a question of whether there is capacity to carry out tests in Hawai`i for everyone coming here. If 7,000 persons a day arrived to the state, only a fourth of incoming tourists before the pandemic, the cost could be $800,000 a day, said Green.
      He said he supports individuals, airlines and other entities paying for testing. One of the challenges is that it is not cheap," said the Lieutenant governor. The alternative will remain a two-week quarantine after arriving in Hawai`i.
    In a story published by the Star AdvertiserMayor Harry Kim addressed  the possibility of testing for those coming to this island, where a 14-day quarantine is required, even for residents returning from another island. He said, "I'm am told at this point, it's not very practical or better yet not even possible because of the availability of testing. If you times the number of tourists that may come in and you post testing or interisland traveling, there's just not enough testing to do that." He said it is a serious consideration and that the two-week quarantine will remain in place for now.
       The Neighbor Island mayors are expected to announce later this week their plans to test or not to test and whether to end the interisland quarantine.
        The state plans a press conference this Thursday to roll out all aspects of pre-testing for those coming from the mainland. Green said that new partners to administer COVID tests on the mainland are joining in They include CVS, Walgreens, Kaiser, Hawaiian Air, United Airlines, and Quest Labs, which will enable testing at Walmart. He said children under five will be exempt from testing since they are usually with their parents and the parents' test would cover them. Children over five often go to school and other places which separate COVID risks from their parents, he said.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

This chart from Dept. of Health shows each county's COVID case curve, plus the state average. Hawaii Island is teal.

AS THE WORLDWIDE DEATH COUNT FOR COVID- NEW COVID-19 CASES REACHED ONE MILLION TODAY, HAWAIʻI ISLAND reported zero cases for the first time since Aug. 10. The state reported no deaths for the first time since Sept. 22. See more COVID statistics below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
    
TIGHTER CONTROL OVER RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR REOPENING ON-CAMPUS public school classes is the aim of the chair of the state Board of Education. BOE Chair Catherine Payne will bring her proposals before the BOE during a live stream meeting this Thursday, Oct. 1 at 1:30 p.m.
    Her proposal would require, for on-campus classes, that schools "Successfully implement and consistently enforce at least six feet of physical distance between all individuals on campus at all times; consistently enforce mandatory, proper mask wearing for all individuals on campus; and implement proper ventilation strategies" as outlined in the state Department of Health Guidance for all indoor area on a campus occupied by more than one person.
Board of Education Chair Catherine Payne suggests tighter rules
for in-person schooling. HSTA photo

    The proposal would require principals seeking approval to transition schools from distance learning to hybrid or in-person learning, or from hybrid learning to in-person learning, to demonstrate that the school can adequately implement all COVID-19 mitigation strategies required by the Board of Education, Department of Education, and applicable collective bargaining agreements, with the anticipated number of students and staff that will be on campus in the new instructional delivery mode.
    To switch between distance, hybrid, and on-campus learning, a week's notice to student families and school staff would be required. Additional proposals include the rules be added to the school Principal Handbook, and Health and Safety Handbook.
    The BOE will also consider giving teachers more flexibility in teleworking during distance and hybrid learning classes, provided they have good internet connectivity, a place to work without distractions, and can keep in touch with their administrators.
    Send testimony to testimony.BOE@boe.hawaii.gov by noon this Wednesday, Sept. 30. The meeting will livestream this Thursday at 1:30 p.m. on Facebook and YouTube. See more at HSTA.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI RANKS NUMBER ONE IN SEATBELT USEAGE in the U.S., according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Hawaiʻi's seat belt usage is 97.1 percent. According to National Center for Statistics and Analysis, the national use rate was at 90.7 percent in 2019.
    Department of Health said in a recent statement, "One of the safest choices drivers and passengers in Hawaiʻi County can make is to buckle up. Statistics show that the majority of people in Hawaiʻi understand the lifesaving value of the seat belt. Wearing a seat belt is an easy way to help prevent a family member, a friend, or yourself from being seriously harmed.
    "We all must understand the potentially fatal consequences of not wearing a seat belt and properly buckle up every time. Seat belts are one of the best defenses against impaired, aggressive, and distracted drivers. Being buckled up during a crash helps keep you safe and secure inside your vehicle; being completely ejected from a vehicle is almost always deadly."
    Hawaiʻi's universal seat belt law requires that all front and back seat motor vehicle occupants buckle up. Adults and children must use their seat belts and child passenger restraints at all times. The fine for unrestrained occupants on Hawaiʻi, Oʻahu, and Maui is $102. On Kauaʻi it's $112. Drivers receive one citation for each unrestrained occupant in the vehicle. 
    Hawaiʻi's child passenger restraint law requires children younger than four years of age to ride in a child safety seat. Children four through seven must ride in a child safety seat or booster seat. Violators of the child restraint law are required to appear in court. If convicted, they must attend a four-hour class and may be assessed a penalty of $100 to $500.
    Hawaiʻi Police Department is dedicated to protecting the community in many ways, including strictly enforce the seat belt and child restraint laws. DOH says, "Every day, officers stop vehicles for traffic violations. If you are observed not properly wearing your seat belt, you will be issued a citation. We are proud that we have ranked number one in seat belt usage, but that's not enough. We want everyone to wear their seat belts all time. That simple act will save even more lives."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ADDING NURSES AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL STAFF to Hawaiʻi's hospitals will be paid for by $14 million of CARES Act funds. Hawaiʻi Department of Health will allocate the funds to provide more than 200 nurses and other specialists for hospitals over the next four months. Some of the out-of-state personnel began arriving this weekend.

Dr. Elizabeth Char backs allotment of CARES
Act funds for professional hospital staff.

    The breakdown includes 70 critical care nurses, 61 telemetry nurses, 71 medical-surgical nurses, 17 respiratory therapists, nine emergency department nurses, and five dialysis nurses.
    Dr. Elizabeth A. Char, Director of Health, said, "As Hawai‘i faces increases in hospitalizations due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, the Department of Health wants to be sure our hospitals have sufficient surge capacity. During their time here, these experienced healthcare staff will be providing critical patient care as well as respite for our dedicated local healthcare workforce."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

WORKFORCE TRAINING PROGRAMS through the University of Hawaiʻi have been awarded nearly $13.4 million from the U.S. Department of Education, announced Sen. Mazie Hirono. The funding, created by the CARES Act, will be administered through ED's Education Stabilization Fund. UH will develop programs focused on high-paying, in-demand jobs within the health care, technology, and skilled trades industries.
    The funding will support Hana Career Pathways, which UH will develop with the Hawaiʻi Workforce Development Council to increase short-term training that leads to industry-valued credentials, increase employment opportunities within high-paying, in-demand jobs, expand high-quality apprenticeship opportunities throughout Hawaiʻi, and develop post-apprenticeship career pathways and advancement opportunities.

    Hirono said, "During this time of great uncertainty for our community, we should be doing everything we can to support workers – including those who decide to seek new careers in resilient industries like health care, technology, and the skilled trades. This funding will provide much-needed support for workforce training programs to help workers throughout the state."
    Key partners include UH Community Colleges, Chaminade University, Hawaii ED Community School for Adults, Castle Foundation, the Healthcare Association of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi P-20, Chamber of Commerce Hawaiʻi, Elemental Excelerator, and CIO Council of Hawaiʻi.
    Earlier this year, Hirono cosponsored the Coronavirus Child Care and Education Relief Act (S. 4112), which would provide additional substantial funding for education programs through the ESF – including $175 billion for K-12 schools, $132 billion for colleges and universities, and $33 billion for states.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KEIKI CAN ACCESS WIFI AND LAPTOPS, as well as a free meal, at Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji. Open Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

JOIN PRENATAL HEALTHCARE PROGRAM PIKO. Kaʻū Women's Health Collective's director Tara Compehos, a midwife, says Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. This year, the Piko program is mobilizing to distribute sterilized prenatal care kits to the doorsteps of pregnant people, with an instructional video, Zoom classes, and access to midwifery support and childbirth education. Piko is funded, in part, by Papa Ola Lokahi, Hawaiʻi People's fund, and the Groundswell fun. Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK'S KAHUKU UNIT WILL BE OPEN FOUR DAYS A WEEK. Hours for the expansion from three to four days are Thursdays through Sundays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., starting Oct. 1. The Visitor Contact Station window will be open, but services are limited, and visitors should bring everything they might need for a safe visit including water, meals, and hand sanitizer.
    Visitors are encouraged to #RecreateResponsibily by: Practice social distancing. Maintain at least six feet of distance between you and other visitors.  Wear a face covering when social distancing cannot be maintained.   Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use  hand sanitizer. Cover mouth and nose to cough or sneeze.   Avoid touching eyes, nose, and mouth.    If feeling sick, choose to visit another day.  
    For more information on Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, please visit the park website, www.np.gov/hawaiivolcanoes.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

 NO NEW CASES ON HAWAI`I ISLAND AND NO NEW DEATHS THROUGHOUT THE STATE, is todays news from the state Department of Health. The Hawaiʻi Island case count is 700 since the pandemic began. Total 28 deaths are reported on Hawaiʻi Island, 26 of them residents at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home. The state reports 90 new cases today, all on Oʻahu. 
    The state reports no new deaths today, for the first time since Sept. 22. The state's official death toll is 132. Department of Health states some deaths are still being verified before being counted. 
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,203 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,215 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 1,850 active cases in isolation. There are 15 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus. 
    Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 11,026 cases, Maui County 388, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 819 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began. 
    In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley; and 96785 with Volcano Village. Zip code 96737, with Ocean View, has had no cases in the last 28 days. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date. Other areas shaded gray have no or very little population and no cases. 
    Visitation at Hilo Medical Center has been paused, with the exception of one visitor for OB, pediatrics, and end-of-life patients. The hospital's long-term care ward is closed to new patients for now. 

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 20 cases. Pale orange is 21 to 30 cases. Medium

orange is 31 to 80 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 81 to 110 

cases. Bright red is 111 to 150 cases. Dark red (not pictured)

is 151 to 340 cases. Department of Health map

    All beach and shoreline parks on Hawaiʻi Island are closed through Sept. 30. The activities of exercising, fishing, food gathering, use of restroom, shower facilities, and access to the ocean will continue to be allowed. Use of pavilions, barbecues, tents, or other shade devices, tables, hibachis, coolers, picnicking, camping, and commercial operations are all prohibited. 
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help." 
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe." 
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311. 
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,143,521 – about 22 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 205,003 – about 21 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 33.23 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 999,667.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate will be held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt
 for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, AI, EPS, or PNG with a quality of at least 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

Register to Vote online, olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail. Print a registration form. Forms must be postmarked no later than Monday, Oct. 5. As during the Primary, all ballots will be mailed, but voters can still vote in-person and may register the same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. Nov. 3. See other locations here. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.

Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING
Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, September 29, 2020

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Veterans of Foreign Wars delivered American Flags on Monday to Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home 
to honor those who lost their lives in the fight against COVID-19. See more below in story
about Stacyn Lopes Sakuma. Image from Veterans of Foreign Wars

THE FIRST DEBATE BETWEEN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES DONALD TRUMP AND JOE BIDEN was held today and drew responses from Hawaiʻi Senator Brian Schatz. He assessed Biden's performance by tweeting, "Don't be afraid of winning. Don't get cocky, but momentum is good, hope is good, confidence is good." He pointed out Trump's answer to the moderator's question on whether he would denounce white supremest groups as a source of violence at recent protests around the country. Trump said he would, but urged the Proud Boys to "stand by." Schatz remarked, "Just triple-checking he didn't condemn white supremacy... On the one hand white supremacy but on the other, no. There is no other hand." Referring to Trump, Schatz also tweeted, "To say that he's a child is an insult to children" and that "Trump is not in command of his emotions."
    Numerous suggestions in social media comments about the candidates talking over each other and lack of a civil discussion about the issues, included turning off the microphone of the person waiting to talk next. The next debate is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker. Watch or listen today's debate at any of the above sites.

Todd Eddins 
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FOUR NOMINEES FOR HAWAIʻI'S STATE SUPREME COURT are under consideration by Gov. David Ige. They are recommended by the Judicial Selection Commission. The seat has been vacant since Associate Justice Richard W. Pollack retired in June. The four nominees are:
    Todd W. Eddins. He's served as a judge with the First Circuit Court since 2017. He previously worked in private practice, specializing in criminal, civil, and appellate litigation. He also worked in the Office of the Public Defender and as a judicial law clerk for the Hawaiʻi Supreme court under Justice Yoshimi Hayashi. Eddins earned his BBA from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and his J.D. from the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. He has
David M. Forman 
coached youth athletics and the Hawaiʻi Youth Correctional Facility/Olomana High School mock trial team.
    David M. Forman. He is director of the Environmental Law Program at the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. He is also a faculty specialist at Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law. Previously, Forman worked as interim director, lecturer, and pro bono faculty advisor at the law school. He attended Harvard College where he earned a B.A. and later a Graduate Ocean Policy Certificate from UH Mānoa. Forman has a J.D. from UH Mānoa's William S. Richardson School of Law.
    Darolyn Lendio Heim. She serves as a District Court judge in Honolulu. Her first job was field worker for Del Monte Pineapple in Kunia. She was a staff reporter at Good Housekeeping Magazine and the Wall Street Journal, L.A. Bureau. As an attorney, she worked in private practice, and as an extern for Hawaiʻi Supreme 
Darolyn Lenio Heim
Court Justice Yoshimi Hayashi. In addition, Lendio Heim served as director of the Department of the Corporation Counsel, City, and County of Honolulu; vice president for Legal Affairs and University General Counsel, University of Hawaiʻi System; and interim executive administrator and secretary for the UH Board of Regents.
    Benjamin E. Lowenthal. He is a deputy public defender at the Office of the Public Defender in Wailuku, Maui. He has served as a law clerk for the Hon. Judge Corinne K.A. Watanabe, Intermediate Court of Appeals in Honolulu and worked as an attorney in private practice. Lowenthal also writes the column The State of Aloha for The Maui News. He attended the University of California, Santa Cruz, Maui Community College, and San Francisco State University, where he earned his B.A. In 2003, Lowenthal
Benjamin E. Lowenthal
received his J.D. from the University of Kansas School of Law.
    The public is welcome to submit comments on any of the nominees here. The governor has 30 calendar days to make his appointment.

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STACYN SAKUMA, OKUTSU VETERANS HOME'S Recreational Director, brings hope to residents, families, and staff as she coordinates with community groups who want to help. The Pāhala-raised Kaʻū High graduate grew up volunteering with Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association, helping Kaʻū Hospital and Rural Clinic. Its programs prepare local youth for careers in health care and support research on healthy living in the shadow of the active Kīlauea Volcano. Her father works for Kaʻū Hospital.
    Most recently, Sakuma has been a liaison between the Yuko Okutsu Veterans Home and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, which raises money and brings gifts to the Veterans Center. She also works with the Veterans of Foreign Wars, which is raising money and sending American flags to the Veterans Home to honor each vet who died there in the recent outbreak of COVID-19.
Stacyn Lopez Sakuma with Kaʻū Rural Health Community
 Association founder Jessie Marques (right) and state
 Sen. Lorraine Inouye earlier this year when Sakuma
was honored at the Hawaiʻi Legislature. 

    Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 383 sent flags to Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home on Monday, to be placed over each deceased veteran's bed. Hilo Exchange Club donated the flags. Chaplain John Hiduhick and Veterans of Foreign Wars made the presentation of flags that volunteers made ready by cleaning and folding them.
    According to a story in the Tuesday Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald, the Chaplain praised Sakuma saying, "Stacyn and all the staff have been so great and have worked tirelessly through this. The staff cares deeply for the veterans and I know this has been hard for them."
    The story by Kelsey Walling also says, "Hiduchick has also offered virtual, spiritual guidance to residents, especially those in the COVID-19 unit. 'It has been so wonderful and I think it's helpful to residents, especially those who can't be visited in-person,' Hiduchick said." See more at hawaiitribuneherald.com.

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SMALL BUSINESSES IN RURAL AREAS are encouraged to apply for Local Initiative Support Corporation-Lowe's Rural Relief Small Business Grants by Oct. 5. Applications are being accepted in "rounds." Owners must submit a new application for each round in order to be considered for funding in that round. Apply here.
    The grants go to support small businesses and enterprises affected by COVID-19 across the country, "especially those in underserved communities, including entrepreneurs of color and women- and veteran-owned businesses that often lack access to flexible, affordable capital," says the announcement.
    Applications will be reviewed based on criteria designed to prioritize particularly challenged businesses, and the final grantees will be randomly selected from the top-scoring applicants.
    Non-profit organizations are not eligible.
    All potential applicants are encouraged to review FAQ and grant information before applying.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

100 MILLION RAPID COVID-19 TESTS will be distributed by the federal government over the next several weeks, according to a report from Associated Press. Pres. Donald Trump made the announcement Monday and urged governors to "use them to reopen schools" for students in kindergarten through 12th grade.
    
U.S. cases remain elevated, with more than 40,000 per day. Experts warn of a likely surge in infections during the colder months ahead. Tests will be distributed on a per capita basis and can be used as governors see fit.
    The Abbott Laboratories' rapid tests would allow parents quick access to test results in symptomatic children. AP reports that officials said the administration "is emphasizing testing in schools because it's important to the physical, social, and emotional development of students to be back in classrooms to the degree that's possible."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

STUDYING MISINFORMATION SPREAD ABOUT COVID-19 is the goal of legislation introduced by Sen. Mazie Hirono and Congresswoman Jennifer Wexton (D-Va.). They introduced the COVID-19 Disinformation Research and Reporting Act, which would direct a study of the "infodemic" of "COVID-19-related disinformation and misinformation that has impacted the effectiveness of the response to this pandemic," says a statement from Hirono's office. "In the first three months of this year alone, disinformation and misinformation about COVID-19 sent an estimated 5,800 people to the hospital and cost at least 800 lives."

Image from medium.com
    The study would examine sources of disinformation and misinformation, social media's role in boosting its spread, and explore potential financial incentives driving the spread of misinformation and disinformation. The study would also include strategies to limit the negative impacts in the future. The bill authorizes $1 million to the National Science Foundation and the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct the study.
    Hirono said, "More than 200,000 Americans have died as the coronavirus pandemic rages on. As we work to curb infections across the country, we also face an infodemic caused by the viral spread of false information on the internet – particularly on social media. The COVID-19 Disinformation Research and Reporting Act will help our country get to the bottom of where coronavirus disinformation came from, how it spread, and how to mitigate the impact of COVID-related misinformation and disinformation going forward."
    Wexton said, "Misinformation and disinformation about COVID-19 is rampant and undermines the tireless work being done by our public health officials, doctors, and scientists to keep our communities safe and healthy. False information, spread willfully or not, can be deadly in a public health crisis like this. With this legislation, Senator Hirono and I are tasking the brightest scientific minds to examine this threat and provide lawmakers with the objective analysis we need to confront it."
    The COVID-19 Disinformation Research and Reporting Act is endorsed by the Union of Concerned Scientists.
    Hirono has repeatedly called on social media platforms and domain name registrars to better respond to coronavirus-related misinformation and disinformation. In April, Senator Hirono wrote to Facebook asking that the platform shut down coronavirus misinformation on WhatsApp, and also called for eight domain name registrars and hosting sites to combat scams and misinformation related to the coronavirus.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LEARN HOW TO PRACTICE SELF-CARE through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
    For this and additional series that feature wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AT LEAST 28 DAYS SINCE A COVID-19 CASE WAS REPORTED for two Kaʻū zip codes and Volcano. 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; and 96737, with Ocean View, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; and 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    Three new cases are reported for Hawaiʻi Island today. Two new deaths on Oʻahu bring the state's official death toll to 134. Total 28 deaths are reported on Hawaiʻi Island, 26 of them residents at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home. The state reports 87 new cases today, two in Maui County, 80 on Oʻahu, and two of residents diagnosed out-of-state. 
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,290 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,256 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 1,900 active cases in isolation. There are 15 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 20 cases. Pale orange is 21 to 30 cases. Medium

orange is 31 to 50 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 51 to 70 

cases. Bright red is 71 to 130 cases. Dark red (not pictured)

is 131 to 310 cases. Department of Health map

    
Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 11,106 cases, Hawaiʻi Island 703, Maui County 390, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-two victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 832 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    Visitation at Hilo Medical Center has been paused, with the exception of one visitor for OB, pediatrics, and end-of-life patients. The hospital's long-term care ward is closed to new patients for now.
    All beach and shoreline parks on Hawaiʻi Island are closed through Sept. 30. The activities of exercising, fishing, food gathering, use of restroom, shower facilities, and access to the ocean will continue to be allowed. Use of pavilions, barbecues, tents, or other shade devices, tables, hibachis, coolers, picnicking, camping, and commercial operations are all prohibited.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,183,367 – about 22 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 205,883 – about 21 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 33.48 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,004,278.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, AI, EPS, or PNG with a quality of at least 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary
.org.

Register to Vote online, olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail. Print a registration form. Forms must be postmarked no later than Monday, Oct. 5. As during the Primary, all ballots will be mailed, but voters can still vote in-person and may register the same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. Nov. 3. See other locations here. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov


Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, September 30, 2020

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County and state-owned beach and shoreline areas like this one on the Kaʻū Coast reopen Oct.1 with no camping. 
Gatherings are allowed for no more than ten people in each group. Face masks are required. Photo by William Neal

COUNTY AND STATE BEACH AND SHORELINE PARKS REOPEN THURSDAY, OCT. 1. A statement from Mayor Harry Kim today says, "All persons must abide by face covering, physical distancing, and gathering requirements of no more than ten persons. Camping at all beach parks and shoreline parks remains prohibited.
    At county and state parks, sports training and competitive play are allowed if conditions and requirements are met; pickup play is allowed, with a maximum of ten persons, i.e. beach volleyball would be allowed at Punaluʻu with fewer than ten competing in the match. Other sports would be allowed at grassy and paved sports areas in parks with maximum of ten persons practicing or playing. 

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Punaluʻu  beach with the county park in the background, which opens Oct, 1 without camping.
 Photo by Julia Neal

QUARANTINE LOCATIONS ARE DEFINED by Mayor Harry Kim's new Emergency Rule #12, released today. A statement from the mayor says, "It makes clear that short-term vacation rentals (STVR), bed and breakfast (B&B) homes, or other paid or commercial lodging defined by the Hawai‘i Revised Statutes as 'transient accommodations' cannot be designated as a quarantine location except for visiting essential and critical infrastructure workers, provided quarantine restrictions are followed. They also cannot be designated as a quarantine place for new or intended residents. This is to address persons wanting to use an STVR, B&B, etc. as quarantine location and staying longer than 30 days. Persons who have pre-arranged for long-term residential housing of 180 days or longer may utilize such housing as their designated quarantine location, provided that the full 14-day quarantine is served and not stopped early." 
    However, "persons meeting the negative test exception under Section IV.B. and Exhibit B Section 4(2) of the Governor's 13th Proclamation can designate an STVR, etc. as quarantine location." This means that a visitor can stay at the vacation rental or bed and breakfast if quarantining until the negative COVID-19 tests arrive. This rule applies to visitors arriving Oct. 15, or later. For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031. See article, below, for Kim's reaction on reopening to Trans-Pacific travelers.

Mayor Harry Kim doesn't think
quarantine-free travel is a good idea yet.

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HAWAIʻI ISLAND IS NOT READY TO WELCOME TRANS-PACIFIC TRAVELERS ON OCT. 15 without quarantine, Mayor Harry Kim said Tuesday, according to an article in Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald by Nancy Cook Lauer. Reopening to out-of-state travelers with a negative COVID-19 test, without requiring 14-day quarantine leaves too many gaps for the virus to come here, said the mayor.
"It's not as easy as just a pretest... How are you going to distinguish between those who have been tested and who has not... How do you monitor these people? The County of Hawaiʻi is having a very, very difficult time being the agency to ID who these travelers are. We will have a policy that's impossible to enforce."
    He told the Tribune-Herald he worries that more COVID cases will be brought in by improperly screened travelers. He told Cook Lauer of a traveler from the mainland infecting 40 people. A Hawaiʻi Island resident brought COVID back from a trip to Oʻahu and spread it to 29 other people: "He came back, he tested positive, he gave it to his wife and, in the meantime, he attended a gathering of mainly family and 17 of those people got infected and then 11 employees working with him got infected."
    Read the article here.

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FREE DRIVE-THRU COVID-19 TESTING will be held for the first time at Cooper Center tomorrow, Thursday, Oct. 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. No insurance is necessary to be tested, but bring insurance card if have. No co-pay for the individuals being tested. Be sure to wear a face-covering at all times and observe social distancing. For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031. Other free testing this week will be held at:
    Keauhou Shopping Center on Friday, Oct. 2 from 9 a.m. to noon.
    Civic Auditorium in Hilo – enter from Kuawa Street – on Friday, Oct. 2 from 9 a.m. to noon.

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Leslie Wilcox will leave Hawaiʻi
to care for an ailing relative.

ONE OF HAWAIʻI'S TOP LOCAL TELEVISION PROGRAMMING LEADERS will leave Hawaiʻi. Leslie Wilcox, known for developing many television shows at PBS Hawaiʻi, during her 14 years as CEO, will move to San Antonio to care for a relative. She is also one of the leading fundraisers in the state, leading PBS through its transition from the University of Hawaiʻi-Mānoa campus to its own facilities. The programs she developed for local broadcast ranged from music, to history, Hawaiian culture, and political discussions. Her own show, Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, produced interviews with Hawaiʻi leaders in many fields.
       "PBS Hawaiʻi has been a labor of love and learning for me. It's been an honor to steward such a vital public service, upholding fact-based journalism and universal access to education," said Wilcox.
    A number of Long Story Short interviews involved people with ties to Volcano and Kaʻū, including Suzanne Case, who led The Nature Conservancy's acquisition of Kamehame turtle preserve on the coast east of Punaluʻu, and the conservation of parcels of pristine Native Hawaiian forests between Nāʻālehu and Pāhala. She chairs the state Board of Land & Natural Resources. 
    Another Wilcox interview is with Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory geophysicist James Kauahikaua. Also interviewed are Dr. Billy Bergin, the veterinarian who documents ranch and paniolo life, including the history of Kapāpala Ranch between Pāhala and Volcano. Another interview features Kumu Hula Robert Cazimero, who brought his music and dance to Kalae Kilohana on South Point Road. Another person with ties to Kaʻū is Derek Kurisu, who founded the Mountain Apple brand of locally produced foods to KTA stores and invites young people to come up with a brand during his commencement speeches at Kaʻū High School. 
James Kauahikaua, geophysicist with Hawaiian
Volcanoes Observatory, is one of the Long Story
Short
connections to Volcano and Kaʻū
     Wilcox also interviewed Dr. Terrence Knapp, who performed the one-man play at Nāʻālehu Methodist Church on the life of Father Damien, who became Saint Daimen of Molokaʻi and helped Hansen's disease patients of Kalaupapa. Another Long Story Short is with Sabra Kauka who, for many years, brought children from a Kauaʻi school to Kaʻū, and narrated the film Saving Kaʻū's Coast, which was produced by The Kaʻū Calendar
     See the Long Story Short archive here or click on the names above to view each of their interviews.
    Wilcox is a Hawaiʻi native, born and raised on Oʻahu, who began her journalism career at Honolulu Star-Bulletin in 1973, while a freshman at University of Hawaiʻi–Mānoa. Mother to four and grandmother to three, she received a Hoʻokele Award for outstanding nonprofit leadership in 2011. According to an interview with Katherine Kama‘ema‘e Smith for Generations Magazine, Wilcox's Portuguese grandparents, Joao and Faustina Fraga Silveira, met on the ship on which they sailed to Hawai‘i, when it was still a monarchy. Read more at https://generations808.com/an-interview-with-leslie-wilcox/.

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REMINDING COFFEE FARMERS TO SIGN UP FOR ASSISTANCE from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Sen. Mazie Hirono yesterday noted National Coffee Day and tweeted: "On #NationalCoffeeDay I want to recognize all of the hard-working coffee growers in Hawaiʻi that supply high-quality coffee to consumers across the globe. These growers, like so many others, have suffered due to COVID-19 and are finally able to get some relief from USDA's CFAP-2." 
    Those needing help can contact Kaʻū Coffee Growers cooperative president Gloria Camba at 928-8558 or board member Miles Mayne at 928-0106; the state Hawaiʻi Farm Bureau at 808-848-2074, hfbf.org; or Hawaiʻi Coffee Growers Association at hawaiicoffeeassoc.org, contact@hawaiicoffeeassoc.org.

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The Food Basket feeds people throughout Kaʻū, serving 80,000 people
 around the island each month. Photo by Julia Neal
THE FOOD BASKET HAS EXPANDED from serving about 14,000 people a month to about 80,000 due to the pandemic, says an article from Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald's Stephanie Salmons. Executive Director Kristin Frost Albrecht said the nonprofit food bank, which serves all of Hawaiʻi Island, is serving those in need through ʻOhana Food Drop, partner agencies, and other programs, using food purchased only from on-island grocers, distributors, farmers, ranchers, fishermen and restaurants. "We haven't bought any food off this island," Albrecht told the Tribune-Herald.
    ʻOhana Food Drop was created in March to deliver food but has changed to drive-through pickup at ten locations around the island, including Cooper Center in Volcano and St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. The Food Basket also offers Kūpuna Pantry through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which requires elderly to sign up and qualify for the program.
    Albrecht told Salmons The Food Basket serves between 2,000 and 3,700 at each ʻOhana Food Drop site, and that more than 80 percent are unemployed. Albrecht said The Food Basket's capacity is "nearly bursting at the seams," with food coming in and going out at a rapid pace. Salmons reports Albrecht said, before the pandemic, food was rarely purchased for emergency distribution, "But now, due to high demand and problems getting food from the USDA's Temporary Emergency Food Assistance Program, 'we are having to purchase food like we have never done before.'"
Food Basket reports that more than 80 percent of those
accept its free food are unemployed. Photo by Julia Neal
    
The Food Basket has received $653,000 in federal coronavirus relief money through the state, Albrecht told the Tribune-Herald, which has only been used for food, and another $643,000 in Community Development Block Grant funding.
    Local foundations, local donors, and farmers also have given money or food to the food bank, "and continue to give," Albrecht told Salmons. "That's made it truly possible."
    Donate to The Food Basket at hawaiifoodbasket.org.
    Read the article here.

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WATCH EPISODE TWO OF COVID-19 TALK STORY ON NĀ LEO TV on Thursday, Oct. 1. The new series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents "regarding the most pressing challenge of our modern lives, the COVID-19 pandemic," says the announcement. A weekly show, it airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. at 10 a.m. on Spectrum Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, and streaming via the Nā Leo's free mobile app. Watch all episodes on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

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HEALTHCARE FOR ALL – KEIKI TO KŪPUNA is the focus of tomorrow's Talk Story with Kai. State Sen. Kai Kahele's guest speakers are Lt. Gov. Josh Green and Dr. Kealoha Fox, Native Hawaiian Liaison at AlohaCare, a non-profit health plan. On Thursday, Oct. 1 at 6 p.m. on Facebook Live, the three will discuss disparities in Hawaiʻi's healthcare system, and approaches to address those issues and improve access for those who are most vulnerable. 
    Says Kahele, "There have been over 11,900 cases of COVID-19 identified in Hawai‘i to date. The COVID-19 pandemic has shined a spotlight on longstanding and deep-seated challenges and inequities in our healthcare system. Access and affordability for rural and socioeconomically disadvantaged communities, the physician shortage, and Hawai‘i's high rate of chronic diseases like diabetes remain daunting challenges exacerbated by the pandemic." 
    
Kahele also posted a message for Hawaiʻi residents to fill out the 2020 Census, as health care is one aspect the census influences. A federal judge has ordered the census to continue through the end of October. "Hawai‘i needs our help to ensure our state receives its share of federal funding based on accurate population counts. Funding is critical for health care, education, social services and other programs. Plus, Hawai‘i receives specific federal funding for ethnic populations including Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, as well as Asian American communities. Tomorrow is the last day to be counted in the 2020 Census, which determines how much funding Hawai‘i will receive for the next decade – and it happens only once every 10 years! We have a chance to shape Hawaiʻi's future. Go to my2020census.gov to fill out the census. It only takes five minutes. Do it for Hawai‘i. Do it for our community. Mahalo."

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IMPROVING MAIL-IN BALLOT SECURITY BY BANNING BALLOT HARVESTING is the goal of legislation introduced by Reps. Tulsi Gabbard and Republican Rodney Davis. The Election Fraud Prevention Act, H.R.8285, would amend the Help America Vote Act of 2002 to prohibit payments to states that permit ballot harvesting. It would ensure that voters seeking to turn in their mail-in ballots may only be assisted by an election official or mail carrier acting in their official capacities as well as family members, household members, or caregivers.
    
Gabbard said, "The strength of our democracy lies in the integrity of our elections. Whether in the midst of a pandemic where mail-in voting is likely to drastically increase, or in a normal election, no one should get in between a voter and the ballot box. While some states have prohibited vote harvesting, many states lack any regulations that would stop third-parties from fraudulently collecting and mishandling ballots as has occurred in recent elections. Our bipartisan bill incentivizes states to take action and prevent any political parties or any third-party special interest groups from interfering with our sacred right to vote.
    Davis said, "Banning ballot harvesting shouldn't be a partisan issue. Allowing any individual, including political operatives, to pick up multiple voters' ballots and deliver them to a polling location undermines the integrity of our elections. We've seen ballot harvesting widely used in states like California and a recent court case in North Carolina outlined the clear opportunities for fraud and coercion with the ballot harvesting process. This bipartisan bill will encourage states to ban this process that is ripe for fraud and is a major threat to the integrity of our elections."

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JOIN HAWAIʻI TROPICAL FRUIT GROWERS ONLINE CONFERENCE Q&A session on Friday, Oct. 2 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. View recorded presentations, take a survey after watching the videos, and join presenters and hosts for the session. 
s    Topics include: Message from HDOA, Aloha & Welcome, Presidents Report, World Banana Tour, Breadfruit Varieties, New Cultivars & Species, and more. Visit HTFG 2020 Conference website for other details and for Zoom connections to the Q&A session.

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THE DEATH OF VIETNAM VET CHRIS DRAYER, 70, of Volcano, at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home in Hilo on Sept. 2 is the subject of a lawsuit from his sons Noah Bennett-Drayer and Daniel Bennett-Drayer, according to reporting in Honolulu Star-Advertiser. The sons said their father was within days of being released into their care when he contracted the disease and died. 
    The suit was filed against Avalon Health Care, of Utah, which managed the facility at the time of the death. Hawaiʻi Island attorney Jeffrey Foster is handling the case and issued a news release saying deaths at the Veterans Home was due to "gross mismanagement." Avalon spokesperson Allison Griffiths said she could not comment on the case but "health and safety of our residents is always our top priority."
Veterans of Foreign Wars delivered flags this week to drape over the beds of the fallen veterans who died fighting
off COVID-19 at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home. Photo from Hawaiʻi Health Systems Corp


TWENTY-SEVEN NEW COVID-19 CASES ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND are reported today, the highest single-day case count for this island since Sept. 4. On that date, Hawaiʻi Island had reported a total of 469 cases. Less than a month later, Hawaiʻi Island's cumulative case count is 730. See more COVID details, below.

ONE NEW DEATH FROM THE HILO VETS HOME today brings the total to 29 reported deaths on Hawaiʻi Island, 27 of them residents at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home. Two more deaths on Oʻahu today bring the state's official death toll to 136, but not all deaths from the Vets Home are included in that count.
    The state reports 121 new cases today, 27 on Hawaiʻi Island, one in Maui County, 91 on Oʻahu, and one resident diagnosed out-of-state. One case was removed due to new information.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,410 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,298 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 1,975 active cases in isolation. There are 13 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 11,197 cases, Hawaiʻi Island 730, Maui County 391, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-three victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 847 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 20 cases. Pale orange is 21 to 30 cases. Medium

orange is 31 to 50 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 51 to 70 

cases. Bright red is 71 to 130 cases. Dark red (not pictured)

is 131 to 300 cases. Department of Health map
    
No new cases reported in the last 28 days for two Kaʻū zip codes and Volcano. 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; and 96737, with Ocean View, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; and 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    Visitation at Hilo Medical Center has been paused, with the exception of one visitor for OB, pediatrics, and end-of-life patients. The hospital's long-term care ward is closed to new patients for now.
    All beach and shoreline parks on Hawaiʻi Island are closed through today. The activities of exercising, fishing, food gathering, use of restroom, shower facilities, and access to the ocean will continue to be allowed. Use of pavilions, barbecues, tents, or other shade devices, tables, hibachis, coolers, picnicking, camping, and commercial operations are all prohibited.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,221,278 – about 21 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 206,693 – about 20 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 33.8 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,010,477.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
EVENTS
Register to Vote online, olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail. Print a registration form. Forms must be postmarked no later than Monday, Oct. 5. As during the Primary, all ballots will be mailed, but voters can still vote in-person and may register the same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. Nov. 3. See other locations here. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Apply for Local Initiative Support Corporation-Lowe's Rural Relief Small Business Grants by Oct. 5. Applications are being accepted in "rounds." Owners must submit a new application for each round in order to be considered for funding in that round. Apply here
    The grants go to support small businesses and enterprises affected by COVID-19 across the country, "especially those in underserved communities, including entrepreneurs of color and women- and veteran-owned businesses that often lack access to flexible, affordable capital," says the announcement. 
Applications will be reviewed based on criteria designed to prioritize particularly challenged businesses, and the final grantees will be randomly selected from the top-scoring applicants. Non-profit organizations are not eligible. All potential applicants are encouraged to review FAQ and grant information before applying.

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov


Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Oct. 27, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Oct. 28, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, October 1, 2020

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Kayaking and paddling from Punaluʻu can be risky for solo boats. A couple went missing on Wednesday afternoon, 
drawing an aerial search by Coast Guard helicopter and a shoreline. and ocean search by Coast Guard Cutter. 
Photo by Julia Neal

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP TESTED POSITIVE FOR COVID-19 today, as did First Lady Melania Trump. Presidential candidate Joe Biden stood more than six feet away from Trump Tuesday night, for 90 minutes, during the first presidential debate. Neither wore masks. Both Biden and Trump have said they get regularly tested.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A MISSING COUPLE IN A YELLOW KAYAK WERE FOUND in good health by U.S. Coast Guard today. An Air Station Barbers Point C-130 Hercules aircrew located the kayakers and airdropped a message block to make contact. The kayakers confirmed they did not need Coast Guard assistance and were not in any distress.
    The couple set off from Punaluʻu and were the subject of a search that began last night. Wednesday afternoon, a truck with a yellow kayak was seen in Pāhala and a couple launching a kayak were witnessed at Punaluʻu. A good samaritan called authorities in the evening when the couple failed to return, and reported they wore yellow flotation devices.
An Air Station Barbers Point MH-65 Dolphin helicopter
was one tool USCG used to find the kayakers.
    
U.S. Coast Guard reported that "Sector Honolulu watchstanders received a report at 6:38 p.m. from a good Samaritan stating she saw the kaykers depart earlier in the day and had not returned though it was sunset. Upon notification, the watchstanders issued an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast notice to mariners asking the public to keep a sharp lookout for signs of distress and diverted the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in response. An Air Station Barbers Point MH-65 Dolphin helicopter and C-130 Hercules aircrews were launched to assist with the search."
    Weather was reported as relatively calm with 5 mph winds and seas up to three feet.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AIRLINES TOOK TENS OF THOUSANDS OF WORKERS OFF PAYROLL today, when $25 billion in federal funding, for which they promised to keep employees on payroll, expired. Congress failed to reach a deal on a new coronavirus relief package Wednesday. The first was given out in March.
    A Hawaiʻi News Now report says Hawaiian Airlines laid off 2,500 workers, while Alaskan Airlines laid off 532. Delta Air Lines is taking a different approach, going with "long and short-term voluntary leaves of absence" for 40,000 workers. Statements from United Airlines and American Airlines state American laid off 19,000 and Untied laid off 13,400. United and American statements that went out to employees say the companies are not giving up on reversing the furloughs. 
Hawaiian Airlines passenger jets, parked on the runway on Oʻahu.
Photo from World Airline News

    
Airline travel is down 70 percent compared to last year as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Airlines that operate in the U.S. are asking Congress for a second $25 billion stimulus package.
    Nick Calio, CEO of Airlines For America, said in a statement, "When our people lose their jobs, down the line there are other people who support the industry that also lose their jobs," saying restaurants, hotels, attractions, and other travel industries, among others, will be affected.
    Today, Lt. Gov. Josh Green said in a press conference that he expects 5,000 to 8,000 visitors soon after Oct. 15, the launch of the pre-travel testing program. He said the program "will not be perfect," but that it should "dramatically decrease the risk" involved with reopening tourism – which he said is "critical" for getting Hawaiʻi back to work. "This program adds an extra layer of security. Right now, nobody is getting a test before traveling. We have to begin the economy again. People are suffering."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ALASKA AIRLINES TRAVELERS TO HAWAIʻI FROM THE WEST COAST aged 3 months and older will be able to take a rapid Abbott ID NOW COVID-19 test, said the airline in a statement. Starting Oct. 12, Alaska Airlines will offer testing in Seattle, where twice-daily flights to four major Hawaiian Islands will resume on Oct. 15. Nonstop service to Hawaiʻi from Portland, San Jose, and San Diego will resume Nov. 1, and service to the islands from Alaska and Los Angeles will resume Nov. 20.
    
Alaska Airlines is partnering with Carbon Health to offer the $135 rapid test. Results will be within two hours.
    Sangita Woerner, Alaska's senior vice president of marketing and guest experience, said, "Our guests have been eager to return to the Hawaiian Islands and we're excited to be adding more ways to safely get them there. By assisting our guests with convenient testing options as they prepare for their trip, we're working together to help keep each other, and Hawaiʻi, safe."
    Carbon Health said it's planning to add more pop-up testing sites and full-service clinics at 48 more cities in the coming weeks.
    Learn more here.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

EVERY PENNY OF CARES ACT FUNDING WILL BE SPENT is the message from Gov. David Ige. He said 98 percent of $863 million in direct payment from Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act funding Hawai‘i received from the federal government will be spent to assist with COVID-19 response and recovery efforts. The governor's Hawaiʻi Pandemic Action Plan, which includes protecting public health, reviving the economy, and strengthening the community.
    During a briefing this week, Ige and other participants outlined numerous existing and upcoming programs targeted at the three priorities. Ige said, "We understand the urgency for this funding. We are working together to find the best uses possible so we can get this money into the pockets of those who need it most. I want to make it clear that we do not plan to return any of the Coronavirus Relief Funds. We are going use every penny. Any funds unspent at the end of the year will be placed into the state's Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund and used to help repay a $1 billion loan that was made to pay unemployment benefits to local residents."
    
Ige highlighted key funding distributions: $51 million of $61 million for Personal Protective Equipment has been used; $4.9 million used to staff a 200-person unemployment call center; and $75 million will be used for a restaurant card for unemployed residents, which will give local restaurants "a much-needed boost."
    Jill Tokuda, the Special Advisor to the Hawai‘i Data Collaborative, spoke about the group's dashboard that provides insight on all the federal dollars Hawai‘i has received. It also includes information about who is eligible to receive assistance due to the impacts of COVID-19.
    Tokuda explained, "The Hawai‘i Data Collaborative is a partnership with the State Office of Federal Awards Management, the House Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness, and DBEDT. It tracks and monitors federal funds awarded to the state and is constantly updated." Click on the COVID-19 tab at the top: https://www.hawaiidata.org/.

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VIRTUAL UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE CALL CENTER is open to help process unemployment claims. The new center, staffed by 200 people, operates 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. Operators will be able to answer all types of claimant inquiries, including Pandemic Unemployment Assistance.
    
Gov. David Ige said, "We are excited to be able to provide this much-needed resource in support of the State's UI program. While 96 percent of initial claims have been successfully filed online, our State is working overtime and leveraging every resource possible to help those filers who must utilize a phone to file or resolve an issue with their claim. I am optimistic that this new call center will further expedite much-needed relief to our residents who have struggled to connect via phone." 
    Current numbers used by local unemployment insurance offices and existing toll-free numbers will route to the new virtual call center. The toll-free numbers are (833)-901-2272 and (833)-901-2275 and respectively correspond to the local numbers (808)-762-5751 and (808)-762-5752.

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DONATE TO HABITAT FOR HUMANITY HAWAIʻI ISLAND through tomorrow, Friday, Oct. 2, during the extended Foodland Give Aloha program. Purchase at any Foodland or Sack N Save checkout, and Foodland and Western Union Foundation will make a donation too. To donate, show Maikaʻi card to cashier at checkout and tell them code 78553 and the amount of the donation. MyRewards certificate can also be made as a $5 donation.

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COFFEE AND ORCHARD CROP FARMERS are encouraged to apply for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2 by Andrea Kawabata of University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Ag and Human Resources. The expanded program includes coffee, mac nut, lychee, rambutan, avocado, mango, and more.
    Kawabata said farmers seeking one-on-one support with the CFAP 2 application process can call 877-508-8364 to speak directly with a USDA employee. "This is a recommended first step before a producer engages with the team at the FSA county office," said Kawabata. "If your business was affected by the pandemic, and you are eligible for assistance, please sign up as soon as you can." Applications accepted through Dec. 11.
    See https://www.farmers.gov/cfap.
    There is a payment limitation of $250,000 per person or entity for all commodities combined. Applicants who are corporations, limited liability companies, or limited partnerships may qualify for additional payment limits when members actively provide personal labor or personal management for the farming operation. In addition, this special payment limitation provision has been expanded to include trusts and estates for both CFAP 1 and 2.
    
Producers will also have to certify they meet the Adjusted Gross Income limitation of $900,000 unless at least 75 percent or more of their income is derived from farming, ranching, or forestry-related activities. Producers must also be in compliance with Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation provisions.

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JOIN HAWAIʻI TROPICAL FRUIT GROWERS ONLINE CONFERENCE Q&A session on Friday, Oct. 2 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. View recorded presentations, take a survey after watching the videos, and join presenters and hosts for the session. Topics include: Message from HDOA, Aloha & Welcome, Presidents Report, World Banana Tour, Breadfruit Varieties, New Cultivars & Species, and more. Visit HTFG 2020 Conference website for other details and for Zoom connections to the Q&A session.

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AN ENDORSEMENT FROM FORMER PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA is reported by state Sen. Kai Kahele who is running for District 2 U.S. House of Representatives seat. Kahele said, "Words cannot express how honored and excited I am to receive the endorsement of @BarackObama. As a fellow island son, this means so much to me, and I hope to represent our islands in Congress and bring the values of aloha to Washington." If Kahele is elected, he will represent Kaʻū and all of rural Hawaiʻi in Congress.

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WATCH OUT FOR FRAUD ATTEMPTS AGAINST SNAP RECIPIENTS, warns Hawaiʻi Department of Human Services: "Be aware of a scam using texting to obtain your personal information. The text might say you were chosen to receive food stamps or SNAP. If you do not know if a request for information about SNAP is real or not, contact your local SNAP office at a center near you. Visit: https://bit.ly/2RZm13l.
    "Never share personal information with individuals or organizations that you do not know. Personal information includes your social security number, bank information, or SNAP electronic benefits transfer card or PIN number. If you think the text is a scam, do not reply at all. Just delete."
    Report fraud at https://humanservices.hawaii.gov/bessd/snap/. Find out more from local Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program office, Kaʻū Sub-Unit, Nāʻālehu Civic Center, 95-5669 Māmalahoa Hwy, 808-939-2421.

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See recycled artwork by Ira Ono and other local artists during October at East Hawaiʻi Cultural Center. 
Image from Ira Ono
32ND ANNUAL THE TRASH SHOW HAWAIʻI: ARTISTS RECYCLE opens this Saturday, Oct. 3 and runs through Halloween, Saturday, Oct. 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at East Hawaiʻi Cultural Center, 141 Kalakaua St. in Hilo. Features The TrashFace Collection by Volcano Artist Ira Ono. For more information go to ehcc.org
    Ono says, "I see great beauty in found objects. No matter how humble, they become precious to me. The key ingredient for the success of each piece is in the wearing of it; creating an effect – powerful or subtle. By focusing interest on the mundane, the work implies a secret message – seen only by those with a sense of humor, style, and whimsy. The trash becomes beautiful because it is chosen with the eye of the artist." 
    The announcement from the Cultural Center says, "Ono's roots in recycled art go back to his childhood in New York, when he used to scrounge 'treasures' for his mom's antique shop. He was already known for his own recycled art collages and 'trash art' jewelry before he moved to the Big Island. He started the Trash Show in 1988 to give other island artists a showcase for original works made from recycled materials. And they responded, with everything from John Mydock's fanciful insect sculptures, with wings made from old sunglasses lenses, to elaborate installation pieces made with beach flotsam. Many pieces have had strong messages about the environment, recycling, and pollution. The show, Ono says, 'reminds people that we’re living on an island with limited resources.' The exhibit proved so popular that Ono was invited to create similar shows on Maui and Oʻahu."
     To attend, all visitors are required to wear a face mask, maintain six-foot social distancing, and no physical contact when greeting people. A maximum of ten people in the gallery and people are encouraged to stay home if they feel ill. See more art from Ono at Volcano Garden Arts & Café Ono, 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd., www.volcanogardenarts.comwww.cafeono.net, 967-7261.

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THREE NEW DEATHS on Oʻahu bring the state's official death toll to 136. Total 29 deaths are reported on Hawaiʻi Island, 27 of them residents at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home.
    The state reports 108 new cases today: six on Hawaiʻi Island and 102 on Oʻahu.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 20 cases. Pale orange is 21 to 30 cases. Medium

orange is 31 to 50 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 51 to 70 

cases. Bright red is 71 to 130 cases. Dark red (not pictured)

is 131 to 300 cases. Department of Health map

    
Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,515 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,340 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 2,035 active cases in isolation. There are 12 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 11,296 cases, Hawaiʻi Island 736, Maui County 391, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-three victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 862 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases reported in the last 28 days for two Kaʻū zip codes and Volcano. 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; and 96737, with Ocean View, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; and 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,276,938 – about 21 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 207,771 – about 20 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 34.15 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,017,129.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
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Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Register to Vote online, olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail. Print a registration form. Forms must be postmarked no later than Monday, Oct. 5. As during the Primary, all ballots will be mailed, but voters can still vote in-person and may register the same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. Nov. 3. See other locations here. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Apply for Local Initiative Support Corporation-Lowe's Rural Relief Small Business Grants by Oct. 5. Applications are being accepted in "rounds." Owners must submit a new application for each round in order to be considered for funding in that round. Apply here
    The grants go to support small businesses and enterprises affected by COVID-19 across the country, "especially those in underserved communities, including entrepreneurs of color and women- and veteran-owned businesses that often lack access to flexible, affordable capital," says the announcement. 
Applications will be reviewed based on criteria designed to prioritize particularly challenged businesses, and the final grantees will be randomly selected from the top-scoring applicants. Non-profit organizations are not eligible. All potential applicants are encouraged to review FAQ and grant information before applying.

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov


Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries,
 open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, October 2, 2020

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Isaac Hale Beach Park and Pohoʻiki Boat Ramp were greatly changed by the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. 
See details below regarding FEMA funds to repair infrastructure. DLNR photo


PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP IS HOSPITALIZED TONIGHT WITH THE CORONAVIRUS. Hawaiʻi congressional delegation members reacted:
    Sen. Mazie Hirono said, "I'm wishing the President and First Lady a speedy recovery from COVID-19. As we continue to confront this moment as a nation, it is imperative that everyone take the threat of this virus seriously ,and continue wearing a mask, practicing social distance, and washing our hands."
    Tin Tin posted on Hirono's twitter a quote from Robert Redfield, CDC director: "These face masks are the most important, powerful public health tool we have, and I will continue to appeal for all Americans to embrace these face coverings, if (everyone wore masks) for six - 12 weeks, we'd bring this pandemic under control."
    Sen. Brian Schatz retweeted an AP Politics report that says, "Official says masks will still not be mandatory at the White House, even after president tested positive for the virus. The official described facial coverings as 'a personal choice,' despite overwhelming evidence that they help stop spread of virus."
    Presidential contender Joe Biden said, "Be patriotic. It's not about being a tough guy. It's about doing your part. Wearing a mask is not only going to protect you, but it also protects those around you. Your mom, your dad, your brother, your sister, husband, wife, neighbor, co-worker. Don't just do it for yourself. Do it for the people you love, the people you work with." Biden said the president's test that shows him positive for coronavirus, a "bracing reminder" of the seriousness of the pandemic."
    Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, "My husband Abraham and I offer our best wishes and aloha to President
@realDonaldTrump and the First Lady @FLOTUS and praying for their speedy recovery. We also send our best wishes to Ivanka, Tiffany, Donald Trump Jr., Eric, and Barron during this difficult time."

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HAWAIʻI'S BOARD OF EDUCATION VOTED ON THURSDAY TO ALLOW SCHOOLS TO REOPEN beginning Oct. 12, to be determined by school principals and their area superintendents. It also voted to allow teachers involved in distance learning to work from home. Learn about concerns about reopening on the Monday, Sept. 28 Kaʻū News Briefs.

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FREE MEALS AND CENSUS INFO WILL BE SERVED ON SATURDAY AT NĀʻĀLEHU HONGWANJI from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Organizer Shellen Hashimoto said partners include West Hawaiʻi Community Health Center, L&L Drive-In, and the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations. The meals are first-come, first-served, with 300 meals available, said Hashimoto.

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THE POISONING OF FRESH WATER in streams, gulches, ponds, a criminal felony, is of increased concern to the state Department of Land & Natural Resources. While Kaʻū has intermittent streams mostly running during rains, any poisons, including pesticides for agriculture dumped into them can wind up in the few ponds, the gulches, and the ocean. The poisoning witnessed in recent months, according to DLNR, happened north of Hilo.
    Over the last three months, officers with the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement investigated six suspected chemical poisonings of streams. They collected samples of Tahitian prawns, water, and sediment in streams north of Hilo to verify poisonings after photographs showed mass die-offs of this popular local delicacy. Some photographs show prawns dying in streams or on their banks. Officers believe this indicates the prawns tried to get out of water that had been poisoned.
Dead Tahitian prawns are evidence of poisoned streams.
DLNR photo

    Two years ago, in April 2018, DLNR documented another series of poisonings in many of the same streams. DOCARE investigators said that unless suspects are caught in the act of using pesticides or other chemicals on streams, cases are difficult to prosecute. They warn the public to be careful about the sources of their prawns and to provide detailed information when they believe any stream has been poisoned. When reporting, notify DOCARE at (808) 933-3460, or 643-DLNR, or via the free DLNR tip app. Note time of day, date, and vehicle/license plates. Provide photographs if possible and a call-back number. If observing prawns crawling out of the water, freeze them as soon as possible (poisons break down quickly). The quicker this information is provided the higher the chance specialists can get water and sediment samples. 
    DOCARE Chief Jason Redulla said, "These poisonings not only risk the public's health when they unknowingly eat a poisoned prawn, but clearly this illegal activity has dramatic and negative impacts on the otherwise pristine streams flowing from the mountains and into the ocean on Hawai‘i island. If anyone has information on any of these poisonings we strongly urge you to contact DOCARE."
    No arrests have been made, but several incidents are being investigated. Anyone convicted of poisoning a Hawai‘i stream could face felony criminal charges and civil penalties, which upon conviction can carrying significant fines and/or jail time. See the DLNR video on stream poisoning at https://vimeo.com/269393431.

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LOCAL NONPROFITS WILL EXPAND MORTGAGE AND RENT HELP through grants provided to Hawaiʻi County from the federal government. Six Hawaiʻi Island-based nonprofit partners offer Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19 may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. The previous grant limit was $1,000 per month. RMAP applicants must also have a current annual household income at or below 140 percent of area median income for the number of members in their household – see chart.
    Payments are made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    Hawai‘i Community Lending and Hawai‘i County have modified RMAP to address barriers for applicants, application processing, and how to encourage more residents to apply. Other changes include reimbursement for payments made with personal resources, such as savings, credit cards, personal loans, or assistance from family or friends. In addition, households who entered into a forbearance or payment agreement with their mortgage lender or landlord for payments that were due between March and December 2020 may now be eligible. Residents who previously applied to RMAP and were rejected are encouraged to reapply.
    RMAP is funded by the County of Hawaiʻi with Federal CARES Act dollars. Funding is limited to households' primary residence on Hawaiʻi Island. RMAP nonprofit partners are:
    Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending: www.HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801
    HOPE Services Hawaiʻi: www.hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050
    Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union: www.hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600
    Neighborhood Place of Puna: www.neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550
    Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery: www.hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852
    Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island: www.habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.
    RMAP partners have disbursed more than $1.2 million in housing grants to 338 island households in the program's first four weeks. They are disbursing approximately $1 million per week and are on track to spend down $7.25 million by Nov. 30.
    Diane Ley, director of the County's Department of Research and Development, said, "By increasing the monthly rent and mortgage assistance allotment will better match the high cost of housing and further cushion impacted families in the months ahead. The County urges all families who have been negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic to apply. Do not disqualify yourself; instead, work with the County's partners, as they are available to assist."
    Jeff Gilbreath, HCL Director of Lending and Development, said, "RMAP is a demonstration of a successful public-private partnership at a time when our families are so desperately in need of financial assistance. Our role as nonprofit partners is clear: to be an advocate for our applicants and to use data to inform the prudent and efficient disbursement of relief funds to those who need. We mahalo all our RMAP partners and the County of Hawai‘i in staying focused first-and-foremost on getting $7.25 million into our community."

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CDC: PUBLISH DATA ON COVID-19 SPREAD IN SCHOOLS, urges Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and colleagues. Gabbard and 23 other Congress members wrote Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield to ask that the CDC begin collecting and publishing data nationally to track and address the spread of COVID-19 in schools.

    
An announcement from Gabbard's office says, "COVID-19 has disproportionately affected young Hispanic, Black, Native Americans, and Alaska Natives. In addition, young Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are overrepresented with chronic medical conditions that put them at greater risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms. The federal government is not currently tracking outbreaks of COVID-19 in schools, leaving the responsibility to states and school districts."
    In the letter to Redfield: "Efforts to reopen our classrooms should not happen in the dark. The limited COVID-19 school data we do have so far is troubling. This week the CDC reported that more than 120 youth (aged 21 and younger) have died of COVID-19 between February and July. Notably, the burden of disease revealed stark disparities.
    "Seventy-five percent of the youth deaths were students of color, despite Hispanic, Black, and American Indians or Alaskan Natives making up only 41 percent of the U.S. youth population. Further, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) acquire underlying chronic medical conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, asthma, kidney disease, cancer, and cardiovascular disease, at younger ages than other ethnic groups. This puts NHPI students at greater risk of severe symptoms of COVID-19. We cannot allow these disparities to continue. Data is the first step to addressing these alarming inequities."Read the letter here.
    Gabbard and her team have been working since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic and public health crisis to bring more resources home to Hawaiʻi, while also keeping Hawaiʻi residents informed through a resource hub on her website, https://gabbard.house.gov/COVID-19.

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RECOGNIZE AND AVOID SPOOFED ONLINE INFO with help from Federal Bureau of Investigation and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. The FBI and CISA urge all members of the American public to critically evaluate the websites they visit and the emails sent to their personal and business email accounts, to seek out reliable and verified information on election information. The agencies issued an announcement to help the public recognize and avoid spoofed election-related internet domains and email accounts during the 2020 election year:
    
Spoofed domains and email accounts are leveraged by foreign actors and cybercriminals and can be easily mistaken for legitimate websites or emails. Adversaries can use spoofed domains and email accounts to disseminate false information; gather valid usernames, passwords, and email addresses; collect personally identifiable information; and spread malware, leading to further compromises and potential financial losses.
    Cyber actors set up spoofed domains with slightly altered characteristics of legitimate domains. A spoofed domain may feature an alternate spelling of a word ("electon" instead of "election"), or use an alternative top-level domain, such as a "[.]com" version of a legitimate "[.] gov" website. Members of the public could unknowingly visit spoofed domains while seeking information regarding the 2020 election. Additionally, cyber actors may use a seemingly legitimate email account to entice the public into clicking on malicious files or links.
    Recommendations:
    Verify the spelling of web addresses, websites, and email addresses that look trustworthy but may be close imitations of legitimate election websites.
    Seek out information from trustworthy sources, verifying who produced the content and considering their intent. The Election Assistance Commission (https://www.eac.gov) provides a vast amount of verified information and resources.
    Ensure operating systems and applications are updated to the most current versions.
    Update anti-malware and anti-virus software and conduct regular network scans.
    Do not enable macros on documents downloaded from an email unless absolutely necessary, and only then, after ensuring the file is not malicious.
    Disable or remove unneeded software applications.
    
Use strong two-factor authentication if possible, via biometrics, hardware tokens, or authentication apps.
    Do not open e-mails or attachments from unknown individuals. Do not communicate with unsolicited e-mail senders.
    Never provide personal information of any sort via e-mail. Be aware that many e-mails requesting your personal information appear to be legitimate.
    The FBI is responsible for investigating and prosecuting election crimes, malign foreign influence operations, and malicious cyber activity targeting election infrastructure and other U.S. democratic institutions. CISA helps critical infrastructure owners and operators, including those in the election community, remain resilient against physical and cyber threats. The FBI and CISA provide services and information to uphold the security, integrity, and resiliency of U.S. electoral processes.
    The FBI encourages the public to report information concerning suspicious or criminal activity to the Hawaiʻi Field Office, (808) 566-4300, or to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov. For additional assistance, best practices, and common terms, please visit: Protected Voices, Election Crimes and Security, or #Protect2020.

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EDMUND "FRED" HYUN IS TEMPORARY ACTING DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SAFETY announced Gov. David Ige today. Hyun will oversee the state Department of Public Safety through November 30. Nolan Espinda announced his retirement in early September, effective at close of business Sept. 30.
    Hyun will assess the operations of the administration, corrections, and law enforcement divisions, including strengths and weaknesses. He is tasked with investigating concerns raised by the unions about the department's COVID-19 response. Following his assessment, Hyun will make recommendations to address any areas of concern and prioritize potential mitigation measures.
    Hyun is chair of the Hawaiʻi Paroling Authority. Effective immediately, he will take a temporary leave of absence. HPA board member Fituina Fiapule Tua will fill in as acting HPA chair until Hyun's return on Dec. 1.   
Fred Hyun is new manager of Hawaiʻi's
prison system
. Photo from Ige's office
    
After completing his undergraduate requirements, Hyun served in the Hawaiʻi Air National Guard. Following his initial active duty, he was hired by the Hawaiʻi Youth Correctional Facility as a Youth Corrections Officer, where he started the first halfway house for committed wards. He then was hired as a supervisor with the Oʻahu Intake Service Center to address jail overcrowding. Hyun became the Hawaiʻi Intake Service Center manager until his retirement from Public Safety in 2003. Upon his retirement, Hyun worked in private security until he was hired by the Honolulu Liquor Commission.
    Tua was born in American Samoa and raised on Oʻahu. He is a graduate of Saint Louis High School and San Jose State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree. He also graduated from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, with a Master of Science Degree.
    After completing his undergraduate work, Tua returned to Hawaiʻi and was employed as a business agent for United Public Workers Union representing Unit 10 members (Judiciary and State Corrections). Later, he returned to Boston and worked in Corrections for the State of Massachusetts and for the Trial Courts of Massachusetts in the Probation Department. Tua returned to Hawaiʻi and worked at the Judiciary as a Family Court probation officer until he was hired as a United States probation officer with the Federal Judiciary for the District of Hawaiʻi. After 20 years of federal service, Tua retired from the U.S. Probation Office in 2013 and was appointed to the State of Hawaiʻi Parole Board by Gov. Neil Abercrombie for a 4-year term and later by Gov. David Ige to another 4-year term that is scheduled to expire in Feb. 2021.

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ISAAC HALE BEACH PARK WILL RECEIVE OVER $1.4 MILLION FROM FEMA announced Sen. Mazie Hirono today. The $1,494,360 in funds are part of a grant agreement with Federal Emergency Management Agency for repairs to areas affected by the 2018 Kīlauea eruption.
Isaac Hale Beach Park will receive infrastructure repairs
with over $1.4 million from FEMA. County photo

    Hirono said, "We have come to realize and value the importance of our parks and outdoor spaces during this coronavirus pandemic, particularly when our activities were restricted. This funding will go towards park-related infrastructure to assist with Puna's recovery, so that residents and visitors can safely enjoy the park."

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APPLY FOR HOLOMUA HAWAIʻI RELIEF GRANTS for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

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Tom Paxton and the Don Juans will entertain virtually
on Monday at 5 p.m. Purchase tickets.

WATCH TOM PAXTON & THE DON JUANS Livestream performance Monday, Oct. 5 at 5 p.m. Blues Bear Hawaiʻi presents Grammy award-winning Tom Paxton with Grammy award-winning songwriters Don Henry and Jon Vezner for "an intimate concert experience full of harmonies, original songs, and superb musicianship," says the announcement. Stick around for a 15-minute audience Q&A following the show. Songs included in the performance will include covers of pieces by Harry Belafonte, John Mellencamp, Miranda Lambert, Neil Diamond, Ray Charles, Judy Collins, Pete Seeger, Janis Ian, Kathy Mattea, John Denver, Bob Dylan, and Peter, Paul, & Mary. Purchase tickets here.

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THREE NEW DEATHS on Oʻahu bring the state's official death toll to 142. Total 29 deaths are reported on Hawaiʻi Island, 27 of them residents at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home.
    The state reports 87 new cases today: 16 on Hawaiʻi Island, 69 on Oʻahu, and one a resident diagnosed out-of-state.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,601 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,389 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 2,070 active cases in isolation. There are 12 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 19 cases. Pale orange is 20 to 35 cases. Medium

orange is 36 to 57 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 58 to 92 

cases. Bright red is 93 to 114 cases. Dark red (not pictured)

is 115 to 287 cases. Department of Health map

    
Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 11,365 cases, Hawaiʻi Island 752, Maui County 391, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 880 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases reported in the last 28 days for two Kaʻū zip codes and Volcano. 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; and 96737, with Ocean View, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; and 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,320,006 – about 21 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 208,600 – about 20 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 34.45 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,025,354.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Register to Vote online, olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail. Print a registration form. Forms must be postmarked no later than Monday, Oct. 5. As during the Primary, all ballots will be mailed, but voters can still vote in-person and may register the same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. Nov. 3. See other locations here. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Apply for Local Initiative Support Corporation-Lowe's Rural Relief Small Business Grants by Oct. 5. Applications are being accepted in "rounds." Owners must submit a new application for each round in order to be considered for funding in that round. Apply here
    The grants go to support small businesses and enterprises affected by COVID-19 across the country, "especially those in underserved communities, including entrepreneurs of color and women- and veteran-owned businesses that often lack access to flexible, affordable capital," says the announcement. 
Applications will be reviewed based on criteria designed to prioritize particularly challenged businesses, and the final grantees will be randomly selected from the top-scoring applicants. Non-profit organizations are not eligible. All potential applicants are encouraged to review FAQ and grant information before applying.

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

32nd Annual The Trash Show Hawaiʻi: Artists Recycle open through Halloween, Saturday, Oct. 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at East Hawaiʻi Cultural Center, 141 Kalakaua St. in Hilo. Features The TrashFace Collection by Volcano Artist Ira Ono. To attend, all visitors are required to wear a face mask, maintain six-foot social distancing, no physical contact when greeting people, a maximum of ten people in the gallery, and encouraging anyone who feels ill to stay home. See more art from Ono at Volcano Garden Arts & Café Ono, 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd., www.volcanogardenarts.comwww.cafeono.net, 967-7261. For more information go to ehcc.org

Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov


Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. at 10 a.m. on Spectrun Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, and streaming via the Nā Leo's free mobile app. Watch all episodes on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, October 3, 2020

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Former Miss Kaʻū Coffee Amey Silva and her keiki at last year's inaugural Fall Family Funday Rodeo. 
Look back at the event, below, in Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year. Photo by Julia Neal

ENVIRONMENT HAWAIʻI'S OCTOBER ISSUE reviews news of the lifting of fishing bans in American Pacific waters. Patricia Tummons calls a decisions "A loss for American Samoa: The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned a lower court decision, effectively giving longline fishing vessels the right to fish as close as 12 miles from the territory's coast. The decision is a blow to the American Samoa government, which had sued the National Marine Fisheries Service and Kitty Simonds, executive director of the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, over the decision of NMFS in 2016 to shrink the zone in which longline fishing was prohibited to 12 miles from 50, the limit that had been in effect since 2002.

    "After that, the government of American Samoa sued, arguing that NMFS had not considered the 1900 and 1904 Deeds of Cession that protected the cultural fishing rights of its citizens. In 2017, U.S. District Judge Leslie E. Kobayashi found in favor of the territorial claim and declared the rule to be invalid. At the time the council recommended opening the closed area, it argued that the waters from 12 out to 50 miles were not being used by the smaller alia catamaran fishing vessels that local fishermen had developed.
    "On Sept. 25, the three-judge appellate panel issued its ruling, stating that it really didn't matter that NMFS ignored the cessions, since NMFS did consider the impact of the expanded longline fishing area on the alia vessels, "and rationally determined the effects were not significant." Read more and stories about the aquarium trade and stream diversion at environment-hawaii.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Nāʻālehu Volunteer firefighters are honored during Fire Prevention Week.
Photo from 2019 Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade by Leilani Esperanza
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK TO HONOR FIRST RESPONDERS begins tomorrow. Gov. David Ige ordered United States flag and state flag to be flown at half-staff at the State Capitol and upon all state offices and agencies as well as the Hawai‘i National Guard in the State of Hawai‘i. From Sunday, Oct. 4 through next Saturday the half-staff will honor the memory of firefighters and first responders who made the ultimate sacrifice to save and protect our citizens, homes, and communities.
    Ige said, "Our first responders—firefighters, law enforcement officers, emergency medical technicians, and lifeguards—step into harm's way every day to help keep our community safe. This year, they have faced ever more difficult challenges with the COVID-19 pandemic and a higher risk of fire. We honor their bravery and sacrifices."

Volcano firefighters and other first responders are honored next week,
with photo from Volcano July 4, 2019 parade. Photo by Yvette Slack

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ACCESS RANGELAND MANAGEMENT RESOURCES at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. The site offers access to current research, industry news, educational events, and more about rangeland management in Hawaiʻi. The website is maintained by the University of Hawai'i College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Cooperative Extension Service. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CONSERVATION COUNCIL FOR HAWAIʻI invites supporters, partners, and members to its annual meeting online at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 17. A statement from the nonprofit says, "Over the past seven decades, CCH has been able to protect our native plants, animals, and ecosystems across the Hawaiian Islands because of your support, we are extremely grateful and as we navigate our path forward we rely on your support even more than ever." See https://nwf-org.zoom.us/j/8085930255#success.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CARES ACT FUNDING IS AVAILABLE FOR CHILDCARE PROGRAMS announced Department of Human Services and Hawai‘i Community Foundation Friday. The $15 million available will support licensed childcare programs across the state. It's part of a new program called the Child Care Stimulus Grants Program, which provides regulated childcare providers or A+ providers in Hawaiʻi with extra funding to ensure they can reopen and continue operating during the COVID-19 pandemic. The program also wants to ensure that the childcare facilities are able to meet the additional health and safety measures set by DHS for reducing the risk of exposure to COVID-19.

    Gov. David Ige said, "I'm committed to using all the federal funding Hawai‘i has received in ways that benefit the people of our state. The Child Care Stimulus Grants Program fills a major need by ensuring the health and safety of our children and their families, which is the foundation for reopening our economy."
    DHS Director Cathy Betts said, "Since the beginning of this pandemic DHS recognized that childcare must be part of every conversation addressing essential workers and remains a critical part of reopening and supporting the local economy. Childcare providers are vital in giving children healthy and safe environments that promote early development while offering parents peace of mind during this extraordinarily challenging time."
    Allowable expenses under the program include staff salaries, personal protective equipment, cleaning supplies, and other materials needed to care for children, rent, and mortgage payments. Grant applications are open Oct. 6 through Oct. 30 at www.HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org/CareGrants.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

WATCH TOM PAXTON & THE DON JUANS livestream performance Monday, Oct. 5 at 5 p.m. Blues Bear Hawaiʻi presents Grammy award-winning Tom Paxton with Grammy award-winning songwriters Don Henry and Jon Vezner for "an intimate concert experience full of harmonies, original songs, and superb musicianship," says the announcement. Stick around for a 15-minute audience Q&A following the show. Songs included in the performance will include covers of pieces by Harry Belafonte, John Mellencamp, Miranda Lambert, Neil Diamond, Ray Charles, Judy Collins, Pete Seeger, Janis Ian, Kathy Mattea, John Denver, Bob Dylan, and Peter, Paul, & Mary. Purchase tickets here.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ELEVEN NEW DEATHS from COVID-19 bring the state's official death toll to 142. Total 29 deaths are reported on Hawaiʻi Island, 27 of them residents at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home. The Veterans Home has one resident with COVID in Hilo Hospital but all residents in the home have recovered from the virus.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 20 cases. Pale orange is 21 to 30 cases. Medium

orange is 31 to 60 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 61 to 80 

cases. Bright red is 81 to 120 cases. Dark red (not pictured)

is 121 to 280 cases. Department of Health map

    The state reports 133 new cases today: 43 on Hawaiʻi Island, three in Maui County, 87 on Oʻahu. 
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,734 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,415 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 2,165 active cases in isolation. There are 16 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus. 
    Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 11,452 cases, Hawaiʻi Island 795, Maui County 394, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 885 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began. 
    No new cases reported in the last 28 days for two Kaʻū zip codes and Volcano. 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; and 96737, with Ocean View, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; and 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,376,099 – about 21 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 209,328 – about 20 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 34.76 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,031,095.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Winners of Pole Bending, ages 5-8, with Help. Photo by Julia Neal
Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
One-year-old Kauwanaokalani 
Kaluna-Yurong, nibbling on her 
participation ribbon for Goat 
Undecorating. Photo by Julia Neal
   This time last year, Nāʻālehu Arena hosted the inaugural Fall Family Funday Rodeo. Canceled this year due to the pandemic, last year's event showed off paniolo skills of keiki and youth. Organized by Tammy Kaʻapana Kaʻū Roping and Riding Association and co-sponsored by Nancy Cabral and Day-Lum Properties, the rodeo saw competitors up to age 17. The youngest, one-year-old Kauwanaokalani Kaluna-Yurong, refused to let go of the tail when pulling off the ribbon in the Goat Undecorating event.
Winners of Barrel Racing, ages 9-13.
Photo by Julia Neal
    
In Dummy Roping, 4 and under, McKenzy DeMattos took first, Kuʻulei Serrao took second, and Kalauʻili Cardoza took third. For ages 5-8, Colt Mandaloniz took first, Kysen Rapoza took third, and Jaycee Amaral took third.
    In Goat Undecorating, 4 and under, Kuʻulei Serrao took first, Janiese Amaral took second, and McKenzy DeMattos took third. For ages 5-8, Hilai Karatti took first, Hilinai Karatti took second, and Jaycee Amaral took third.
    In Barrel Racing, 4 and under, with help, Devyn Akana took first, Marina Sakata took second, and Kalauʻili Cardoza took third. For ages 5-8, with help, Keanna took first, Quentin Lorenzo took second, and Kysen Rapoza took third.
Winners of Pole Bending, ages 4 & under, 
with Help. Photo by Julia Neal
    
In Barrel Racing, for ages 5-8, without help, Hilai Karatti took first, Caya Wong took second. For ages 9-13, the first go saw Kryslynn Nabarra at 17.87, Teani Souza at 18.64, and Blayne DeMattos at 20.43. The second go saw Nabarra at 18.41, Moana Mortensen at 19.75, and DeMattos at 20.80. Nabarra took first, with an average time of 18.14. Mortensen took second, with an average time of 20.095. Souza took third, with an average time of 20.225.
    In Barrel Racing, for ages 14-17, McKella Akana was the only competitor.
Winners of Dummy Roping,
ages 5-8. 
Photo by Julia Neal
    
In Pole Bending, for 4 and under, with help, Kalauʻili Cardoza took first, McKenzy DeMattos took third, and Aurora Serrao took third. For ages 5-8, with help, Keanna Macanas took first, Quentin Lorenzo took second, and Kysen Ropoza took third. For ages 9-13, the first go saw Blayne DeMattos at 31.22, Kryslynn Nabarra at 32.77, and Hayzen at 39.12. The second go saw Nabarra at 29.24, DeMattos at 33.70, and Moana Mortensen at 36.04. Nabarra took first, with an average time of 36.005. DeMattos took second, with an average time of 32.46. Mortensen took third, with an average time of 39.545. For ages 14-17, McKella Akana was the only competitor, with no time recorded.
    In Calf Riding, Hayzeh took first, Chaz took second, and Austin took third.
    In Sheep Riding, Kyson Rapoza took first, Kamakoa took second, and Quentin Lorenzo took third.
    In Calf Riding, Hayzeh took first, Chaz took second, and Austin took third.
    In Sheep Riding, Kyson Rapoza took first, Kamakoa took second, and Quentin Lorenzo took third.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

EARTHQUAKE MEASUREMENTS are the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates:
    That didn't feel like a Magnitude-4? What do earthquake measurements mean?
    Residents on the Island of Hawaiʻi are accustomed to feeling earthquakes. As the ground shaking subsides and the safety of everyone around is assured, one of the first questions we typically ask is "how big was that earthquake?"
Earthquake report card from 1967 containing detailed
information of personally observed effects from a
M3.9 earthquake at the summit of Kīlauea
    Before seismologists had equipment to calculate magnitudes, people relied on physical damage and human observations. Such observations could be compiled and analyzed to determine where the shaking seemed most intense and identify the epicenter.
    By 1930, Hawaiʻi had earthquake report cards that were distributed to the community by HVO staff for people to write detailed information about what they observed during earthquakes.
    These report cards became crucial for understanding seismicity while methods for measuring earthquakes were limited or non-existent. The reports helped estimate sizes of historic earthquakes by comparing how earthquakes were observed in the past to how they are observed today.
    Earthquake observations recorded in journals and report cards not only became a portal for scientists to look back in time at the historical seismicity, but also provided vital data points that helped determine the intensities of the earthquakes felt in different regions.
    In the early 1900s, Italian volcanologist Giuseppe Mercalli developed a scale to categorize the intensity of shaking from an earthquake based on the effects reported by the impacted community.
    This scale has since been adopted in the United States as the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale. The MMI scale is one of the most meaningful earthquake measurements in describing the areal extent and severity of the shaking at the surface.
    Different seismogenic regions can produce varying levels of intensity from the same magnitude of earthquake, depending on distance from hypocenter, direction of rupture, underlying geology, and even building design. A single large earthquake might have reports that span the entire I-XII range of the MMI scale.
HVO staff distributed the report cards to local citizens between 
1930 and 1989. Now, you can go online to report felt 
    This is why the MMI scale is the best way to communicate the relative effects among earthquakes. Values are derived from direct observations of the public and will give the best sense of shaking experienced in different regions.
    Today, we no longer provide earthquake report cards but instead you can go online and fill out a Did You Feel It? report, or even check intensities calculated in your region for older events, based on reported observations.
    While intensity is a great way to assess the effects in areas around the earthquake, seismologists needed an objective and quick method to determine an earthquake's size that does not rely on having a populated area around the earthquakes.
    In the 1930s, seismologist Charles Richter came up with the first known method to describe earthquake size based on the maximum amplitude measured from specific seismographs (instruments that measure earthquakes) deployed in southern California.
    Richter defined a magnitude-3 earthquake as producing a 1 mm (3/64 inch) peak swing on a torsion seismograph located 100 km (62 miles) away from the earthquake epicenter. He used this arbitrary designation to simply define size of a specific event and with the assumption that other earthquakes could be much smaller or much larger, he invoked the logarithmic scaling. Also central to Richter's work was determining how seismic wave amplitudes varied depending on the distance between earthquake and recording seismic station.
    Richter used a base-10 logarithmic scale, which means that each whole-number increase in magnitude represents a tenfold increase. But a tenfold increase in what? Does that mean the energy released was ten times bigger?
    The tenfold increase on the Richter scale is simply in regard to that max amplitude measurement on the seismogram, or earthquake-record. Energy release is actually portrayed by Richter magnitude logarithmically to approximately base-32, meaning that each whole magnitude increase releases about 32 times the energy.
Did You Feel It? reports help seismologists track earthquakes.
    Other magnitude scales have developed over time with the same principles of taking a physical measurement from the seismogram to produce an objective value, with the intent of emulating the relationship among earthquakes that Richter established.
    The next time you feel an earthquake, take the proper safety precautions. Then—instead of asking how big that earthquake was—fill out your DYFI forms and ask yourself what the intensity was based on your observed effects, and see if the associated magnitude is what you expected!
Volcano Activity Updates
    Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL (https://www.usgs.gov/natural-hazards/volcano-hazards/about-alert-levels). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.
    Kīlauea monitoring data for the month of September show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see https://www.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/k-lauea-summit-water-resources.
    Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.
    This past week, about 115 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper-elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths of less than 8 kilometers (about 5 miles). Global Positioning System measurements show long-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations and fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit remain stable. Webcams show no changes to the landscape. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see: https://www.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna-loa/monitoring.
    There was 1 event with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian Islands during the past week: a M2.3 earthquake 9 km (5 mi) NE of Honomu at 36 km (22 mi) depth on Sept. 27 at 7:35 p.m.
    HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity.
    Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Register to Vote online, olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail. Print a registration form. Forms must be postmarked no later than Monday, Oct. 5. As during the Primary, all ballots will be mailed, but voters can still vote in-person and may register the same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. Nov. 3. See other locations here. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Apply for Local Initiative Support Corporation-Lowe's Rural Relief Small Business Grants by Oct. 5. Applications are being accepted in "rounds." Owners must submit a new application for each round in order to be considered for funding in that round. Apply here
    The grants go to support small businesses and enterprises affected by COVID-19 across the country, "especially those in underserved communities, including entrepreneurs of color and women- and veteran-owned businesses that often lack access to flexible, affordable capital," says the announcement. 
Applications will be reviewed based on criteria designed to prioritize particularly challenged businesses, and the final grantees will be randomly selected from the top-scoring applicants. Non-profit organizations are not eligible. All potential applicants are encouraged to review FAQ and grant information before applying.

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.


Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

32nd Annual The Trash Show Hawaiʻi: Artists Recycle open through Halloween, Saturday, Oct. 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at East Hawaiʻi Cultural Center, 141 Kalakaua St. in Hilo. Features The TrashFace Collection by Volcano Artist Ira Ono. To attend, all visitors are required to wear a face mask, maintain six-foot social distancing, no physical contact when greeting people, a maximum of ten people in the gallery, and encouraging anyone who feels ill to stay home. See more art from Ono at Volcano Garden Arts & Café Ono, 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd., www.volcanogardenarts.comwww.cafeono.net, 967-7261. For more information go to ehcc.org

Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING
Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19 may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. The previous grant limit was $1,000 per month. RMAP applicants must also have a current annual household income at or below 140 percent of area median income for the number of members in their household – $81,760/yr. for one person, $126,000 for five. 
    Payments are made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    Hawai‘i Community Lending and Hawai‘i County have modified RMAP to address barriers for applicants, application processing, and how to encourage more residents to apply. Other changes include reimbursement for payments made with personal resources, such as savings, credit cards, personal loans, or assistance from family or friends. In addition, households who entered into a forbearance or payment agreement with their mortgage lender or landlord for payments that were due between March and December 2020 may now be eligible. Residents who previously applied to RMAP and were rejected are encouraged to reapply.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are: Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, www.HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, www.hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, www.hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, www.neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, www.hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, www.habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov


Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. at 10 a.m. on Spectrun Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, and streaming via the Nā Leo's free mobile app. Watch all episodes on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, October 4, 2020

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Kaʻū Voices mailed 1,600 Get Out The Vote to people in swing states this weekend.
See details below. Photo from Kaʻū Voices

TWO DEATHS AT HILO LIFE CARE CENTER OF HILO, with 23 residents and seven staff testing positive for COVID-19, are reported today. Another death is reported at Hilo Medical Center. In another cluster, University of the Nations-Kona reports 26 positive cases, four of them travel-related.
    Yesterday's record island positive COVID case count of 43 is attributed to the spikes at Hilo Life Care Center, a nursing home, and University of the Nations, a Christian-based Bible college. Mayor Harry Kim said in a statement the spike on campus "is being reviewed, right now, on a case-by-case basis for contact tracing to see exactly what the situation is to do everything we can to prevent further spread... All of us realizing how easy it is to be infected by it. All of us must follow the rules of prevention. As more time goes by we are all learning, especially with people like the president and first lady and others showing constantly how easily one catches the virus."
    See more COVID details, below.

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LAST DAY TO REGISTER TO VOTE for a mail-in ballot is tomorrow, Monday, Oct. 5. Register at olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail by printing a registration form and having it postmarked by Oct. 5.

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KAʻŪ VOICES MAILED 1,600 GET OUT THE VOTE messages on Saturday through Nāʻālehu Post Office. The effort across the country is coordinated by Vote Forward.
    Kaʻū Voices sent out 200 postcards to inconsistent voters in North Carolina with a handwritten, nonpartisan message to encourage them to vote. They also sent 1,400 letters printed from the Vote Forward website to potential voters in swing states, also with a handwritten, nonpartisan message urging citizens to vote. Twenty-two Kaʻū Voices participants wrote the letters and postcards. These writers also provided envelopes and postage for the letters. Vote Forward provided stamps for the postcards.
    
Anyone who wants to participate in Get Out The Vote can "adopt" voters and send them letters through votefwd.org. Vote Forward attained its goal of preparing 1 million GOTV letters and upped its goal to 1.5 million. The national send date is Saturday, Oct. 17, but in Hawaiʻi GOTV letters must be mailed by Saturday, Oct. 10. That leaves one week for people to volunteer to take action to make this a successful election. 
    Anyone willing to write letters and address envelopes, but needs to have letters printed, or needs envelopes and/or postage, call Linda Morgan at 785-2085.

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HOW TO TRAVEL SAFELY TO AND FROM THE MAINLAND is tackled in a statement from a Kaʻū resident, Dr. Renee Joy Dufault, an infectious disease specialist. She writes: "As a retired infection control expert, I would like to share a few ideas to improve air travel safety. On Sept. 29, I returned to Hawaiʻi from a trip to California where my mother died. 
    "While on the plane, I observed a man sitting across from me who slept for two hours without a mask. Nothing was done. I heard coughing and sneezing on occasion. There were three unoccupied rows of seats set aside for an extra fee. Meanwhile, travelers were not spaced even two feet apart below and above that vacant section of the plane.
    "After deplaning at KOA, I was greeted by a Hawaiʻi representative who expected me to touch a contaminated stylus and sign on an iPad. There was no disinfecting protocol between passengers for the stylus. Not all passengers were standing six feet apart in line and there was no temperature taking. 
    "Unless required to do otherwise, the airlines are going to cram people into seats without regard to spacing and they are not going to consistently enforce the wearing of masks. People are going to travel as they always have even when feeling unwell. Hawaiʻi needs to take temperatures of all arriving passengers as some may have taken Tylenol prior to boarding the plane.
Infectious disease specialist and Kaʻū
resident, Dr. Renee Joy Dufault, gives tips
on traveling safely on airplanes
during the pandemic.
    
"So, what can you do in such an unregulated environment? First and foremost, wear your mask. Second, carry wipes with a 60 second contact time for killing coronavirus and other infectious agents. Most alcohol wipes used on plane surfaces do not stay wet long enough to kill coronavirus. So, bring your own wipes on the plane and make sure they wet the surface long enough to kill flu and coronavirus. Refuse to touch any contaminated surface without a barrier (e.g. glove). Stay six feet away from others while standing in line."
    For more call Default at (808)345-6864 or email her at rdufault@foodingredient.info.

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LIFTING BANS ON FISHING IN NATIONAL MARINE MONUMENTS in the Pacific is focus of a story in the October edition of Environment Hawaiʻi. Teresa Dawson writes: "Earlier this year, President Donald Trump issued executive orders (13921 and 13924) aimed at promoting seafood competitiveness and economic growth and providing regulatory relief to support economic recovery. NOAA Fisheries gave the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council until November to submit a list of actions that it believed would ease burdens on domestic fishing in the region.
    "The council finalized its list at its meeting last month. Lifting fishing bans in the Pacific island marine monuments topped the list. Removing the longline vessel protected area in American Samoa was also considered – see story in Saturday's Kaʻū News Briefs.
    "Back in June, Mike Tosatto, regional administrator for the National Marine Fisheries Services' Pacific Islands Regional Office, warned the council that including actions that would require statutory changes would probably not be supported. Even so, the council recommended that NMFS work with the administration and Congress to exempt Pacific Islands fishermen from the Billfish Conservation Act and to amend the Endangered Species Act to reduce the ability of citizens to sue NMFS.
    "The council also recommended that the status of certain listed species that interact with the fisheries (i.e., green sea turtles and loggerheads) be revised where the populations are increasing and threats do not pose an immediate danger of extinction.
Endangered Green Sea Turtles are one species to consider when choosing where professional fishing is permitted.
Photo of turtles at Punaluʻu by William Neal
 

    "Tosatto suggested that the council's rationale for that recommendation was misguided. He noted that when NMFS designated distinct population segments of the green sea turtle years ago — which resulted in the Hawai‘i population being listed as threatened and those in American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands being listed as endangered — 'there was… never going to be a delisting situation. It was whether there was a DPS.'
    "Comparing delisting with establishing a DPS is like comparing apples and oranges, he suggested. 'You seem to be mixing that fruit basket,' he said, adding that when evaluating whether to delist a species, 'we can't consider the consultation burden when we're making those determinations. It has to be on the biology of the species.'"
    Read more and stories about the aquarium trade and stream diversion at environment-hawaii.org.
Subscribe to the monthly Environment Hawaiʻihere.

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VACATION RENTAL BY OWNER Awareness Association is urging vacation rental owners to contact the counties and the state about new rules for visitors coming to Hawaiʻi who will take COVID-19 tests to avoid quarantine starting Oct. 15. A message sent yesterday to owners noted that Gov. David Ige is "cautiously reopening tourism starting Oct. 15, when pre-travel testing will allow visitors to bypass the mandatory 14-day quarantine upon arrival in Hawaiʻi.
    
The announcement from VRBO says, "A big problem has arisen because the county mayors have since decided that they want all arrivals to take a second test within 72 hours of arrival. During those proposed 72 hours, all arriving would need to remain quarantined, and on Maui at least, that means travelers (though not owners) would need to stay in quarantine-approved accommodations (which excludes the majority of vacation rentals). Additionally, as homeowners, we may be responsible for a fine if our guests were to stay in our vacation rentals during their quarantine."
The mayors of Maui and Kauai are on record pushing for the second test. Lt. Gov. Josh Green is on record opposing the second test as it will severely reduce the number of visitors.
https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2020/10/01/live-lt-gov-josh-green-discuss-details-testing-program-trans-pacific-visitors/
    Counties need the governor's approval to implement the second test requirement.
VRBO's call to action is that residents send out three emails "voicing your concern that legal vacation rentals (a large part of the tourism economy) are being now pushed out of the reopening equation AND also that this second test will severely restrict the restarting of the tourism economy."
They request the message be sent to Hawaiʻi Mayor Harry Kim, https://www.hawaiicounty.gov/our-county/mayor; Ige, https://governor.hawaii.gov/contact-us/contact-the-governor/; and Green https://ltgov.hawaii.gov/contact-us/contact-the-lieutenant-governor/.

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ATTEND UH FROM HOME. Learn about it during a virtual workshop on Tuesday, Oct. 13 from to or Zoom Connection Link: go.hawaii.edu/A9z, Meeting ID: 950 5113 4914 Password: palamanui. 
     The announcement asks, "Want to come back to college but not leave home – or know someone who does? If so, you are invited to the UH Online and Hybrid Degrees workshop presented by the University Center West Hawaiʻi. Come learn about the 60+ UH two year, Bachelors, Graduate and Certificate programs that you can access here on Hawai'i Island. Online Learning with Local Support. Stay Here… Go FORWARD!" For more information, email Carrie at carriekp@hawaii.edu.

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DISTRACTED DRIVING ENFORCEMENT will ramp up Oct. 5 through 12. The Hawaiʻi Police Department said in a statement that "Distracted Driving remains a very serious concern for members of our community. Officers write these violations many times a day across the island as a way to lower the number of people involved in vehicle crashes. In 2018 alone 2,841 people were killed nationally as a result of distracted drivers."
    Hawaiʻi County is not alone in the goal to reduce the number of people injured or killed as a result of vehicle crashes related to the use of electronic devices. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Hawaiʻi Department of Transportation have identified Oct. 5 to 12 as a Distracted Driving Enforcement Period. That means officers will have a greater focus on distracted drivers, making traffic stops and issuing citations.
    The Hawaiʻi Police Department is asking the public's help to prevent this dangerous driving behavior: "Take the pledge. The fight to end distracted driving starts with you. Make the commitment to drive phone-free today. Protect lives by never texting or talking on the phone while driving. Be a good passenger and speak out if the driver in the car is distracted. Encourage friends and family to drive phone-free. Remember 'U Drive. U Text. U Pay.'"

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SHOOTZ BAND WILL PLAY AT OKK MARKET 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Oct. 7. ʻO Kaʻū Kākou market is located in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon. Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

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Watch a Livestream performance of
Tom Paxton & the Don Juans tomorrow.

WATCH TOM PAXTON & THE DON JUANS Livestream performance Monday, Oct. 5 at 5 p.m. Blues Bear Hawaiʻi presents Grammy award-winning Tom Paxton with Grammy award-winning songwriters Don Henry and Jon Vezner for "an intimate concert experience full of harmonies, original songs, and superb musicianship," says the announcement. Stick around for a 15-minute audience Q&A following the show. Songs included in the performance will include covers of pieces by Harry Belafonte, John Mellencamp, Miranda Lambert, Neil Diamond, Ray Charles, Judy Collins, Pete Seeger, Janis Ian, Kathy Mattea, John Denver, Bob Dylan, and Peter, Paul, & Mary. Purchase tickets here.

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FIFTEEN NEW CASES OF COVID-19 are reported today – see more above – pushing Hawaiʻi Island to 810 cumulative cases. At least 14 of those deaths are not yet reported by the state. The state death toll is 156, with 14 officially reported in the last 48 hours. Several of those deaths happened days or weeks ago.
    The state reports 70 new cases today: two in Maui County, 53 on Oʻahu.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,804 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,446 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 2,200 active cases in isolation. There are 16 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.
    Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 11,505 cases, Maui County 396, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 889 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 20 cases. Pale orange is 21 to 40 cases. Medium

orange is 41 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to 80 cases. Bright

red is 81 to 110 cases. Dark red is 111 to 280 cases. 

Department of Health map

    
No new cases reported in the last 28 days for two Kaʻū zip codes and one in Volcano. 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; and 96737, with Ocean View, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; and 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,418,596 – about 21 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 209,807 – about 20 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 35 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,035,452.

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Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is one of over 2,000 federal recreation areas that fourth graders and their companions 
all over the U.S. had access to for free from September last year through 
Aug. 31 thanks to the Every Kid Outdoors Act. NPS image
Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
THIS TIME LAST YEAR, Every Kid Outdoors provided free passes to fourth graders and their families for Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and over 2,000 federal recreation areas, through Aug. 31, 2020.
Students explore the forest at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National
 Park, before the pandemic. NPS Photo/J.Anastasio

    The Every Kid Outdoors Program was established by Congress in 2019. It replaced the Every Kid in a Park Program, which was launched in 2015. All fourth graders who completed a paper voucher on everykidoutdoors.gov and presented it to the ranger at the Park entrance station received a durable, free Every Kid Outdoors pass, with a map and directions to help choose adventures. Those who completed all the activities on opening day received a prize.
    Options for the first day included a ranger-guided program, How it All Started, a 20-minute orientation talk about the volcanoes that make up the Island of Hawaiʻi; and a ranger-guided walk, E Mākaʻikaʻi iā Kaʻauea - Explore the Summit, which explored the fascinating geologic features of Kīlauea and their deep connections to Hawaiian history and culture. Other suggested explorations included walking a trail or heading to the Kahuku Unit in Kaʻū to complete the new Junior Ranger program. These programs are on hold during the pandemic.
    The Every Kid Outdoors Program is an interagency collaboration between the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and U.S. Forest Service.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Register to Vote online, olvr.hawaii.gov, or by U.S. Mail. Print a registration form. Forms must be postmarked no later than Monday, Oct. 5. As during the Primary, all ballots will be mailed, but voters can still vote in-person and may register the same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day until 7 p.m. Nov. 3. See other locations here. Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Apply for Local Initiative Support Corporation-Lowe's Rural Relief Small Business Grants by Oct. 5. Applications are being accepted in "rounds." Owners must submit a new application for each round in order to be considered for funding in that round. Apply here
    The grants go to support small businesses and enterprises affected by COVID-19 across the country, "especially those in underserved communities, including entrepreneurs of color and women- and veteran-owned businesses that often lack access to flexible, affordable capital," says the announcement. 
Applications will be reviewed based on criteria designed to prioritize particularly challenged businesses, and the final grantees will be randomly selected from the top-scoring applicants. Non-profit organizations are not eligible. All potential applicants are encouraged to review FAQ and grant information before applying.

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

32nd Annual The Trash Show Hawaiʻi: Artists Recycle open through Halloween, Saturday, Oct. 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at East Hawaiʻi Cultural Center, 141 Kalakaua St. in Hilo. Features The TrashFace Collection by Volcano Artist Ira Ono. To attend, all visitors are required to wear a face mask, maintain six-foot social distancing, no physical contact when greeting people, a maximum of ten people in the gallery, and encouraging anyone who feels ill to stay home. See more art from Ono at Volcano Garden Arts & Café Ono, 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd., www.volcanogardenarts.comwww.cafeono.net, 967-7261. For more information go to ehcc.org

Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19 may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. The previous grant limit was $1,000 per month. RMAP applicants must also have a current annual household income at or below 140 percent of area median income for the number of members in their household – $81,760/yr. for one person, $126,000 for five.
    Payments are made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services.
    Hawai‘i Community Lending and Hawai‘i County have modified RMAP to address barriers for applicants, application processing, and how to encourage more residents to apply. Other changes include reimbursement for payments made with personal resources, such as savings, credit cards, personal loans, or assistance from family or friends. In addition, households who entered into a forbearance or payment agreement with their mortgage lender or landlord for payments that were due between March and December 2020 may now be eligible. Residents who previously applied to RMAP and were rejected are encouraged to reapply.
    RMAP nonprofit partners are: Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, www.HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, www.hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, www.hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, www.neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, www.hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, www.habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov


Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. at 10 a.m. on Spectrun Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, and streaming via the Nā Leo's free mobile app. Watch all episodes on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, October 5, 2020

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ʻAlalā in the wild will be taken back into captivity to teach other captive-raised endangered Hawaiian crows to forage, 
avoid predators, and social behaviors. Learn more, below. Photo from The ʻAlalā Project

INCREASING MASK WEARING FROM 57 PERCENT TO 95 PERCENT is the way to cut down the spread of COVID-19 on Hawaiʻi Island, according to Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD. When questioned this morning about allowing people into Hawaiʻi without quarantine if they come up negative in one, two, or three negative tests, he said only one test before arrival is needed. Kauaʻi's mayor proposed a second test after arrival, which would mean several days of quarantine. Maui's mayor also talked about a second test. Mayor Harry Kim is still deciding on the testing protocol for this island. However, Gov. David Ige today turned down Kauaʻi Mayor Derek Kawakami's formal request for the second test. 
    Kawakami responded, "Our proposed pilot was intended to augment the state's pre-travel testing program." He said his county "has been clear that a single pre-arrival testing program alone does not provide the needed level of protection for our Kauaʻi community."
    Green told Hawaiʻi News Now in a live interview this morning that he understands that Neighbor Island mayors, with much lower COVID-19 counts than on Oʻahu, fear travelers bringing in the coronavirus. He said that he welcomes a second test but without mandating quarantine until the results come in. He said a second test would only catch one case in two or three thousand arrivals and would deter many visitors from coming to Hawaiʻi, if they have to quarantine for three or four days out of a six-day trip. 
    Green said that only 57 percent of people in Hawaiʻi County wear masks, with 68 percent on Kauaʻi. He said the better way to control the virus is to get the mask-wearing up to 93 percent to 95 percent. He also noted that when the one-test, no quarantine program goes into effect on Oct. 15, there will be no requirement for children under five to take it. He also said some mail-in tests will be allowed, just so the taking of the tests are observed – which can be done online.
    
The Lt. Governor said that it is important to get the economy going. "We can't have 150,000 starving, not be able to pay their bills, go homeless." Concerning pushing back the opening of Hawaiʻi for tourism past Oct. 15, he said, "Changes at the eleventh hour will destroy our credibility," since the start date has been delayed each month since Aug. 1 and recently delayed from Oct. 1 to Oct. 15. "If the mayors want to stop the spread of the virus, they should get our mask-wearing rate up. If we raise our mask rate, we will not have spread. That's the safe way to do it."
    Green also said not opening interisland travel would be a "fear-based position. If we are not comfortable opening up our economy safely, and we have to delay all the way until May, because we will not have a vaccine, then there will be incredible consequences." Mayors of the counties are allowed to require a pre-travel test for those coming in from other islands.
    See the interview here.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP LEFT WALTER REED National Militray Medical Center today and returned to his White House residence. Hawaiʻi's Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD, gave his assessment of care given to the president. He noted that Trump received a "$100,000 dose" of Regeneron's experimental coronavirus treatment, not yet approved by the FDA. He said such a move would indicate severe disease, that they likely got panicked or made a decision to "throw stuff at the wall." Trump said he's feeling well and took off his mask when entering the White House, where many people work. Trump said he may be immune. Some White House staff members have also tested positive.

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ʻALALĀ WILL BE TAKEN BACK INTO CAPTIVITY at Keahou Bird Conservation Center in Volcano. The plan is to help teach younger, captive-raised Hawaiian crows how to live in the wild. The coalition of conservation partners working to recover the ‘alalā, the endangered Hawaiian crow, said in a statement today they are "looking to the future as they work to address recent challenges that have affected the population of the species living in the Puʻu Makaʻala Natural Area Reserve on Hawai‘i Island."
ʻAlalā released into the wild since 2016 began attempting to breed in
the wild, but have not had success. Photo from The ʻAlalā Project
    B
ringing the remaining ‘alalā back from the wild and into the conservation breeding program is in response to recent mortalities, including predation of the birds, mostly by ‘io, the Hawaiian hawk, another endangered species. The statement explains that the Hawaiian hawks, having successfully lived in the wild for two to three years, "have knowledge about foraging, predator avoidance, and other social behaviors that could be passed on to the birds residing within the conservation breeding program and aid with future recovery efforts."
    Coordinator of The ‘Alalā Project, Jackie Gaudioso-Levita, a biologist with the state Department of Land & Natural Resources Division of Forestry & Wildlife, said, "For the last three years it has been encouraging to see the released birds transition to the wild; foraging, calling, and flying in native forests. It is important to ensure that these surviving ‘alalā are able to pass on the skills they have learned in the wild to future generations of the species. While very difficult, bringing these birds back into the breeding program is an interim step to the review and adaptation of the program to recover the species."
Predation of ʻAlalā in the wild is one reason they will be
taken back into captivity. Photo from The ʻAlalā Project
    
ʻAlalā have been rare for much of the 20th century, with fewer than 100 birds remaining in the wild by the 1960s due to habitat loss and fragmentation, invasive mammalian predators, introduced diseases, and "perhaps other unknown factors," says the statement. ʻAlalā became extinct in the wild in 2002, preserved only at Keauhou Bird Conservation Center and Maui Bird Conservation Center. ʻAlalā from those conservation breeding populations were reintroduced to the wild beginning in 2016. The reintroduced population, closely monitored by conservationists with DOFAW and the SDZG's Hawai‘i Endangered Bird Conservation Program, has survived for the last few years, even attempting to breed in the wild.
    The statement says, "Recovering the ʻalalā in the wild will take many years. By working as partners and utilizing tools such as conservation breeding, the road to recovery will be similar to the recovery of other reintroduced species."
ʻAlalā were released into the wild in stages, including getting to meet 
already-released birds through cages. Photo from The ʻAlalā Project
    
Michelle Bogardus, Maui Nui & Hawaiʻi Island Team Manager, Pacific Islands Fish & Wildlife Office, said the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is "committed to the recovery of ‘alalā and plans to continue to work with "the many partners in The ‘Alalā Project" to "determine the next steps for this iconic species."
    Paul Baribault, chief executive officer and president of San Diego Zoo Global, said his organization "has a depth of experience in recovery programs and we are confident that we can work with our distinguished partners to address this challenge and continue our work to recover the ‘alalā. This species is important not only to the recovery of Hawaiian forests but also to Hawaiian culture, and our organization is committed to creating a world where wildlife and people thrive together."
    David Smith, administrator for the DLNR Division of Forestry & Wildlife, said the conservation partners "have always known that there would be some setbacks and challenges along the way. Fortunately, the project has an extremely knowledgeable, dedicated, and passionate team and we believe this level of care and consideration for the ‘alalā, will hopefully in time, see a re-establishment of a wild population."
    The recaptured birds will rejoin the population of more than 100 ‘alalā being cared for within the SDZG's conservation breeding program. "As the dedicated project staff are working tirelessly to recapture and protect the remaining birds, they are driven by the vision that the goal of ‘Alalā recovery is still attainable," says the statement.

Coffee growers are urged to take a survey on
pandemic impacts. HCA photo

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COFFEE GROWERS ARE URGED TO TAKE A SURVEY on how the pandemic is affecting them. Hawaiʻi Coffee Association President Chris Manfredi says, "In an ongoing effort to gauge the impacts of the COVID 19 pandemic on Hawaiʻi's coffee industry please help us better understand the ways in which you have been impacted by completing the following survey. Thank you for your prompt attention!"
    The questions are:
    How have sales been impacted in the second and third quarters?
    What other impacts have you seen?
    Have you received any assistance?
    Are you aware of Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2 assistance? 
    Would a webinar covering the CFAP 2 application process be helpful for you? 
    Are you aware of the COVID-19 related resources posted on the HCA website? 
    Do you find them helpful? If no, please help us understand why not. 
    Do you have other ideas for activities the HCA could perform that would assist either you, your operation, or Hawaiʻi's broader coffee industry? 
    The survey concludes with a way to sign up for the HCA emailing list. 
    Take the survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PRPGNGJ.

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KAʻŪ HIGH & PĀHALA ELEMENTARY QUARTER TWO MATERIAL DISTRIBUTION for middle and high school students this week will feature entries for a raffle. Distribution will be held Tuesday, Oct. 6 at St. Jude's in Ocean View from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesday, Oct. 7 at Nāʻālehu Club House from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, Oct. 8 at Pāhala School Gym from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    
Each student will receive one entry for attending, and there will be a second distribution Oct. 20-22, where students can receive a second entry. The drawing will be held Wednesday, Oct. 28, and feature a commercial pig and ten other prizes. See more details at khpes.org.

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READ REPORT ON PUBLIC INPUT about disaster recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. The project will focus on repairing and/or replacement of critical infrastructure in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and U.S. Geological Survey-operated facilities and equipment. The comments received are being considered and used for refining a design concept and developing the National Park Service and USGS's proposed action. Once the proposed action is developed, the NPS and USGS will seek additional community input through public scoping prior to the environmental analysis process, tentatively planned for early 2021.
    Park Acting Superintendent Rhonda Loh said, "We are deeply appreciative of everyone for taking the time to comment, and the public can be assured you will continue to have a voice in shaping the future of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park."
    Acting HVO Scientist-in-Charge David Phillips said, "The USGS is very grateful for the thoughtful public input that will help USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory continue its mission to monitor active volcanoes in Hawaiʻi, assess their hazards, issue warnings, and advance scientific understanding to reduce impacts of eruptions."
Existing conditions at Kīlauea Visitor Center.
    Hawai‘i Volcanoes and USGS asked the community to consider four initial design concepts from May 15 through June 15. The designs include plans for potential future use of the Uēkahuna Bluff area, a site considered sacred to many Native Hawaiians and other groups. It also presents solutions to overcrowding at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Out of 159 pieces of communication received from nine states, 78 percent were from Hawai‘i residents, and one comment was from Great Britain.
    The Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report can be viewed here.

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FREE DRIVE-THRU COVID-19 TESTING will be held at locations around the island. No insurance is necessary to be tested, but bring insurance card if have. No co-pay for the individuals being tested. Be sure to wear a face-covering at all times and observe social distancing. For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031. Free testing this week will be held at:
    Keauhou Shopping Center on Wednesday, Oct. 7, and Friday, Oct. 9, from 9 a.m. to noon.
    Civic Auditorium in Hilo – enter from Kuawa Street – on Wednesday, Oct. 7 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. 
    West Hawaiʻi Community Center at 74-5044 Ane Keohokālole Highway in Kona on Saturday, Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    Testing for University of the Nations Kona for students, staff, and close contacts only, will be held Tuesday.

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LEARN ABOUT GROWING AND USING HEALTHY, LOCAL STARCHES at Hawaiʻi-Grown Starches: Stories, Growing, Eating, and Learning on Saturday, Oct. 17 from 10 a.m. to noon. Register for the webinar by Wednesday, Oct. 7. Presented by County of Hawaiʻi, Center for Getting Things Started, and collaborators, this first session of the Local Food Toolkit webinar series will focus on the abundance of healthy local starches growing in Hawaiʻi. The cost to attend is $25 and includes one ʻElima box with five local starches from Hawaiʻi ʻUlu Cooperative. Contact Koh Ming Wei at kohmingwei@gmail.com with questions. Register here.

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WATCH THE DEBATE BETWEEN MAYORAL CANDIDATES Ikaika Marzo and Mitch Roth which happened at 5 p.m. on Nā Leo TV, Spectrum Channel 54, online at naleo.tv/channel-54/, or via the free Nā Leo mobile app. The announcement said, "With the general election less than a month away, this may be the final chance to see both candidates side by side before ballots arrive."

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HELICOPTERS WILL FLY OVER OVER KAHUKU UNIT of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park at 6,000- to 8,500-foot elevation on Tuesday, Oct. 6, between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. to survey invasive faya trees.
Monitoring invasive faya trees is one reason for overflights of Hawaiʻi
Volcanoes National Park this month. DLNR photo

    
On Thursday, Oct. 8, between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., eight sling loads of trail maintenance gear will be transported from Nāpau to Mauna Ulu landing area, between 2,800- to 3,800-ft. elevation.
    Searching for and controlling invasive trees in Ka‘ū desert from the coast to 3,000-ft. elevation will be conducted Tuesday, Oct. 13, between 7 a.m. and 2 p.m.
    Also on Oct. 13, and on Thursday, Oct. 15, the Hawaiian petrel will be monitored on the slopes of Mauna Loa from Mauna Loa Road at 5,500-ft. elevation to the petrel colony between 8,000- and 9,000-ft. elevation. ʻUaʻu, Pterodroma sandwichensis, is a federally endangered native seabird. The majority of known nests on Hawaiʻi Island are within the Park, on the lower alpine and subalpine slopes of Mauna Loa.
    In addition, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation. The Park regrets any noise impact to residents and Park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather.
    Management of the Park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities.

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FREE JOB TRAINING for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Using $10 million in federal CARES Act funds, Department of Business Economic Development & Tourism matches workers with companies in sectors such as conservation, renewable energy, agriculture, creative arts, aerospace, entrepreneurship, and STEM fields. The programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Eligible people are displaced workers, or recent high school or college graduates. There are two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. To learn more, go to https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

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TEN NEW CASES OF COVID-19 are reported on Hawaiʻi Island today. The state reports 52 new cases today, with 41 on Oʻahu. One case was removed from Maui County. 
    There are 32 deaths reported on Hawaiʻi Island: two at Life Care Center of Hilo, three at Hilo Medical Center, and 27 at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home. The state death toll is 157. At least a dozen deaths from Hawaiʻi Island are not included in the official state count.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,854 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,470 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 2,225 active cases in isolation. There are 12 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 20 cases. Pale orange is 21 to 40 cases. Medium

orange is 41 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to 90 cases. Bright

red is 91 to 100 cases. Dark red is 101 to 270 cases. 

Department of Health map

    Since the pandemic began, Hawaiʻi Island reported 820 cases, Oʻahu 11,546 cases, Maui County 395, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 889 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began. 
    No new cases reported in the last 28 days for two Kaʻū zip codes and one in Volcano. Zip code 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; and 96737, with Ocean View, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704, which includes Miloliʻi; and 96777, which includes Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    In Hilo zip code 96720, 104 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 94 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,451,774 – about 21 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 210,079 – about 20 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 35.34 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,039,171.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Shootz Band will play at OKK Market 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Oct. 7. ʻO Kaʻū Kākou market is located in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon. Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/
OKauKakouMarket

Attend Hawaiʻi Children and Youth Summit on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with a watch party on Tuesday, Oct. 6 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For ages 24 and younger. Register here. The annual event brings together youth from across the islands to discuss key issues that they believe the Hawaiʻi State Legislature needs to address to make Hawaiʻi a better place to live and work. Priorities that come out of the Summit are used by legislators to create bills and resolutions in the following year. Some of the things that have come out of the Summit are things like expanding afterschool programs, lowering the age of consent for Mental Health Services, and planting over one million trees.

Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    
Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Attend College from Home Virtual Workshop, Tuesday, Oct. 13, noon to 1 p.m. or 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Zoom Connection Link: go.hawaii.edu/A9z, Meeting ID: 950 5113 4914 Password: palamanui. The announcement asks, "Want to come back to college but not leave home – or know someone who does? If so, you are invited to the UH Online and Hybrid Degrees workshop presented by the University Center West Hawaiʻi. Come learn about the 60+ UH two year, Bachelors, Graduate and Certificate programs that you can access here on Hawai'i Island. Online Learning with Local Support. Stay Here… Go FORWARD!" For more information, email Carrie at carriekp@hawaii.edu.

Attend a Free Conflict Resolution Workshop, Kū I Ke Aloha: Stand Up & Speak Out on Friday, Oct. 16 from 5:45 p.m. to 7 p.m. via Zoom. The interactive session explores examples of individual and community advocacy that resulted in positive change in Hawaiʻi and beyond. Take away some communication skills for the real world – no matter the media – to use with aloha. Visit https://kakouletsworkitout.eventbrite.com to register or RSVP to Majidah at Kuʻikahi Mediation Center, (808) 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org.

Conservation Council for Hawaiʻi Annual Meeting online at 10 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 17. A statement from the nonprofit says, "Over the past seven decades, CCH has been able to protect our native plants, animals and ecosystems across the Hawaiian Islands because of your support, we are extremely grateful and as we navigate our path forward we rely on your support even more than ever." See https://nwf-org.zoom.us/j/8085930255#success.

Give Input on the Hawaiʻi 2050 Sustainability Plan Update by the State of Hawaiʻi Office of Planning from Oct. 13 through 28. The public is invited to participate in online sessions to learn about the strategic plan and contribute to the revision process. Free; advance registration required. Register online.


Take Free Courses and Certifications for Hawaiʻi Residents through Coursera are offered by state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. More than 3,000 options. Registration open until Oct. 31. Recommended courses for picking up technology skills, see https://www.htdc.org/covid-19/learning-tech/. To view more: https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-25/.

Give Input of Pandemic on Small Businesses to Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center. Partnering with the Federal Reserve Bank system, the 2020 Small Business Credit Survey provides vital information to policymakers and lenders who are weighing decisions that affect small businesses. Ten-minute-long survey open to businesses currently in operation, recently closed, or about to launch. Survey closes Oct. 31. Responses are confidential. Click here to complete the survey. Questions? Contact SFFedSmallBusiness@sf.frb.org. 

Vote and Register In-Person same day. Locations are in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, #1, and Kona, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. Ballots for registered voters should start to arrive around Oct. 16. Secure ballot dropbox located in Nāʻālehu Police Station at 95-5355 Māmalahoa Hwy from Oct. 14, 24 hours a day, until 7 p.m. on Nov. 3, Election Day . See other locations here. is Tuesday, Nov. 3. See tips on helping others to register to vote at nationalvoterregistrationday.org. Find more information at elections.hawaii.gov. Check voter registration status here.

Artists and Vendors, sign up for the Annual Art & Craft Fair at Ocean View Community Center on Nov. 7. The event, held outside from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., will help raise funds for the Center, as well as benefit local artists and crafters. Booths are $8 for a 10' x 10' space, tents not provided. Face masks required. Free admission for attendees. Contact organizer Helen McCullough at 808-209-9204 or hmccullough.1@gmail.com.

ONGOING
Presidential Debates Schedule: The first Presidential Debate was held Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Cleveland, Ohio. The single Vice Presidential Debate will be held Wednesday, Oct. 7 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 15 in Miami, Florida. The final Presidential Debate will be held Thursday, Oct. 22 in Nashville, Tennessee. 
    Each debate will air from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on. Each debate will be broadcast live on C-SPAN, ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, CNN, Fox News, Fox Business Network, and MSNBC, among others. All the major news networks will offer a free live stream, as will YouTube and Twitter. Listen to the Hawaiʻi Public Radio broadcast at 89.1, or stream the audio here, on the HPR mobile app, or on a smart speaker.

Apply for Expanded Hawaiʻi County Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program. RMAP partners encourage Hawaiʻi Island residents who are at least 18 years old and lost income or work hours due to COVID-19 may be eligible for up to $2,000 per month for rent, lease, or mortgage payments. The previous grant limit was $1,000 per month. RMAP applicants must also have a current annual household income at or below 140 percent of area median income for the number of members in their household – $81,760/yr. for one person, $126,000 for five. 
    Payments are made directly to landlords, property managers, or mortgage lenders. Approved applicants also have access to financial counseling services. 
    Hawai‘i Community Lending and Hawai‘i County have modified RMAP to address barriers for applicants, application processing, and how to encourage more residents to apply. Other changes include reimbursement for payments made with personal resources, such as savings, credit cards, personal loans, or assistance from family or friends. In addition, households who entered into a forbearance or payment agreement with their mortgage lender or landlord for payments that were due between March and December 2020 may now be eligible. Residents who previously applied to RMAP and were rejected are encouraged to reapply. 
    RMAP nonprofit partners are: Hawaiian Community Assets/Hawaiʻi Community Lending, www.HawaiianCommunity.net, 808-934-0801; HOPE Services Hawaiʻi, www.hopeserviceshawaii.org/rmap, 808-935-3050; Hawai‘i First Federal Credit Union, www.hawaiifirstfcu.com/pathways, 808-933-6600; Neighborhood Place of Puna, www.neighborhoodplaceofpuna.org/coronavirus-rent-mortgage-relief, 808-965-5550; Hawai‘i Island Home for Recovery, www.hihrecovery.org/RMAP, 808-640-4443 or 808-934-7852; Habitat for Humanity Hawai‘i Island, www.habitathawaiiisland.org/rmap.html, 808-450-2118.

Micronesian-Language COVID-19 Helpline offered by We Are Oceania. Receive answers to questions about COVID-19 symptoms, testing, quarantine, health insurance, housing, unemployment, and other related questions, for those Micronesians who do not speak English. COVID-19 questions can be asked 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., daily. Other questions about health insurance, housing, or unemployment, helpline available weekdays, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. WAO helpline: (808) 913-1364. Watch the video here.

Anyone Feeling Depressed or Anxious, or who needs someone to talk to, can call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.

Learn How to Practice Self-Care through Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. In partnership with Hawai‘i Department of Health, the program seeks to "remind the community that now more than ever, it's important to be gentle with yourself. Be present, limit the amount of news and media, listen to your body, and most importantly, ask for help if you need it. If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health challenges, please reach out to friends and family for support, and seek professional help for serious or persistent symptoms."
For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group on Facebook.

The State of Hawai'i requires a Letter of Exemption for Farm Workers. Requests should be submitted to 
covidexemption@hawaii.gov 5 days prior to arrival. For a sample request letter visit: https://www.rd.hawaiicounty.gov


Student Athletes of Kaʻū High interested in participating in athletics during the 2020-2021 school year are encouraged to call Athletic Director Kalei Namohala at 313-4161 to sign up for the Student Athlete Google Classroom.

COVID-19 Talk Story on Nā Leo TV series aims to help deliver accurate and current information to Hawaiʻi Island residents. Airs live Thursdays at 10 a.m. at 10 a.m. on Spectrun Channel 53, online at naleo.tv/channel-53/, and streaming via the Nā Leo's free mobile app. Watch all episodes on-demand at naleo.tv/covid19.

Sign Up for ‘Imiloa's Hālau Lamakū Place- and Culture-based Fall Enrichment Program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo. Held for seven weeks, Oct. 19 through Dec.4, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., except holidays. 
    The program offers "fun, engaging and educational activities, crafts, games, outdoor exploration, and observations grounded in Hawaiian culture, science, math, and art. Explorations from deep ocean to deep space, and everything in between – all from ‘Imiloa's facilities and outdoor gardens. 
    Enrollment limited to seven pods for K-5th grade students with one instructor, one assistant, and up to eight participants, who will remain together for all seven weeks. Participant's required synchronous and asynchronous school distance learning needs will be addressed. Students will bring their own lunch, two snacks, and two bottled water each day. 
    Cost per member child is $695; registration starts Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 a.m. Non-member cost per child is $995; registration starts Friday, Oct. 2 at 8 a.m. Enrollment open through Oct. 7, first-come, first-served. Scholarship applications are open; proof of financial need required. See imiloahawaii.org/halau-lamaku to register, apply for a scholarship, become a member, and find out more.

Resilience Hub at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Monday-Wednesday-Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Drop-in wifi and laptop access, free meals for participating keiki. Follows all county, state, and federal COVID-19 guidelines. For more info, contact Michelle Galimba, 808-430-4927.

Nominate Businesses that Provide Excellent COVID-19 Safety Precautions for a Gold Star. Submit nominations to County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development here. Find help for small businesses here.

Attend Weekly Virtual Town Meetings, hosted by Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Discussion topics include attendance, best practices, Grab-n-Go meals, school updates, questions and feedback, and more. Go to KHPES website for Live WebEx link.

Pre-Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach Program in Ocean View here. Completing the form does not guarantee a spot in the program. A staff member will reach out to eligible families, to complete the registration process. Questions? Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org.


Free Tutors for Keiki in Pāhala, for grades one through six, available from Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island. Subjects are Homework Help, Social Studies, Reading, Writing, Math, Spelling, Test Taking Strategies, Organizational Skills, and more. Contact Boys & Girls Club at info@bgcbi.org or 961-5536.

Free Wifi Access for Students is available in Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, and Ocean View through Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary.

     In Pāhala, access is limited to ten students at a time at the school gym on weekdays from  to  Support is provided by Joshua Ortega.

     In Nāʻālehu, access is limited to 12 students at a time at Nāʻālehu Assembly of God on Thursdays from  to  Support is provided by Carla Lind.

     In Ocean View, access is limited to five students at a time at Ocean View Community Center on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Support is provided by Carla Lind and Mrs. Marcia Masters. No restrooms available at this location.

     Kaʻū Mobile Learning Hub at St. Jude's lower parking lot is available weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Instruction and support are provided by Carla Lind, Mrs. VanNewkirk, Mrs. Heather Naboa, Mrs. Marcia Masters, and Mrs. Ebanez.

     All students and staff must wear a mask at all times and follow all COVID-19 guidelines. Each student must bring their device, school materials, and a water bottle. Questions? Call 313-4100.


32nd Annual The Trash Show Hawaiʻi: Artists Recycle open through Halloween, Saturday, Oct. 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at East Hawaiʻi Cultural Center, 141 Kalakaua St. in Hilo. Features The TrashFace Collection by Volcano Artist Ira Ono. To attend, all visitors are required to wear a face mask, maintain six-foot social distancing, no physical contact when greeting people, a maximum of ten people in the gallery, and encouraging anyone who feels ill to stay home. See more art from Ono at Volcano Garden Arts & Café Ono, 19-3834 Old Volcano Rd., www.volcanogardenarts.comwww.cafeono.net, 967-7261. For more information go to ehcc.org

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts here. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  Face coveri required when usher comes to vehicle to pass out worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live-streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, here, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food For Pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

Food Basket Distribution last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. Another distribution will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30, at Volcano Village's Cooper Center, from 10 a.m. until pau. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Emergency Boxes Available at Cooper Center Tuesday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Call ahead, 967-7800.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays, , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at  $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . Limit of 50 customers, 25 vendor booths, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up here.

ʻOhana Help Desk
 offers online How-To Guides fo

r Chromebooks and iPads here. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab, weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. O

pen to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

Apply for Holomua Hawaiʻi Relief Grants for small businesses and nonprofits of up to $10,000 to support core operations, safe on-going and reopening costs, personal protective equipment, and training and technical assistance. The business or nonprofit must employ 50 people or fewer. See the program website.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for wifi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. Wifi available to anyone with a library card from each library parking lot. librarieshawaii.org

Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13 at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issuesthrough Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Complete webform here or call 808-933-6600. Contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019 with questions.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub, Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources.Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov.

Free Job Training for workers displaced by COVID-19 is launched by the state for up to 650 workers. Using $10 million in federal CARES Act funds, Department of Business Economic Development & Tourism matches workers with companies in sectors such as conservation, renewable energy, agriculture, creative arts, aerospace, entrepreneurship, and STEM fields. The programs offer on-the-job training through Dec. 15, with wages starting at $13 to $15 an hour, health care benefits, and mentoring. Eligible people are displaced workers, or recent high school or college graduates. There are two different tracks in innovation or conservation sectors. To learn more, go to https://dbedt.hawaii.gov/blog/20-21/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Coffee Farmers and Producers of Other Agricultural Products encouraged to apply to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program through Dec. 11. Coffee included; see funding updates and resources hawaiicoffeeassoc.org. See complete list of eligible commodities, payment rates, and calculations at farmers.gov/cfap.

Local Ag Producers can Sign Up for a Program to Sell Produce and Meats on Hawaiʻi Island. Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, in partnership with County of Hawai‘i and non-profit entities, has developed a program to purchase product from commercial farmers and livestock producers on Hawai‘i Island for distribution to families in need. The Food Basket and other channels will distribute the products. Learn more.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19 from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature.

Find Rangeland Management Resources at globalrangelands.org/state/hawaii. The site offers access to current research, industry news, educational events, and more about rangeland management in Hawaiʻi. The website is maintained by the University of Hawai'i College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Cooperative Extension Service. Subscribe to the newsletter to receive updates.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, October 6, 2020

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Andrea Ghez used Maunakea' Keck telescope to help win a Nobel prize in Physics this year. Learn more, below. 

BOTH POST AND PRE-TRAVEL TESTING FOR COVID-19 will be required for those wanting to come into Hawaiʻi county without 14 days of quarantine.
    Mayor Harry Kim said on Tuesday that, to ensure the safety of the community as Hawai‘i tries to reopen amid the pandemic, "I just don't think we should take the risk with one COVID-19 test taken up to three days before traveling. There are so many variables involved in a pre-travel test that could make the tests unreliable; we have to have a second test upon arrival in Hawai‘i."
    The number of potential positive cases being introduced to the community would pose too high of a risk, said Kim. Approximately 2,000 visitors are coming to Hawai‘i every day. An estimated 5,000 arrivals a day are expected once the one-test policy goes into effect.
    The Mayor said he and the other three mayors of counties in the Hawaiian Islands discussed, on Tuesday, a two-test policy for transpacific travel, instead of the policy that goes into effect on Oct. 15, whereby a single negative result of a test taken up to three days before travel would eliminate the need to quarantine for 14 days. "We need time to work out the logistics of administering a second test, but it will be worth it," Mayor Kim said. He said a definitive decision would be forthcoming this week.
    Currently, all travelers arriving in Hawai‘i must quarantine for 14 days after arrival from the mainland. Interisland travel from O‘ahu and between the Neighbor Islands is also subject to the 14-day quarantine.
    Earlier, Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald reported that this county would opt out of the state's one-test plan and continue the 14-day quarantine. 
Nobel Prize winner Andrea Ghez helping the public to understand "How
 to observe something you cannot see."Photo from Keck Observatory
    The mayor's Chief of Staff, Maurice Messina, told the Tribune-Herald the reason the mayor opted out was because the science shows that one test has too much risk. Messina told Tribune-Herald writers, "We have been told that the one test would catch only 40 percent of the potential positives, even if Lt. Gov. Green claims 80 percent. Even at 80 percent, the number of positives being introduced to our community is high. A second test after arrival significantly reduces that risk." He said the county is looking at a second and possibly third COVID-19 test for arrivals.
    "If the county is not ready for the additional testing by Oct. 15, it will stick with the 14-day quarantine, until the additional tests are ready. A team addressing the logistics for the second test is actively working to have this in place as soon as possible," Messina told the Tribune-Herald. The final plan depends on cooperation from the state and other counties.
    See more at hawaiitribune-herald.com/.

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A NOBEL PRIZE HAS GONE TO A KECK OBSERVATORY ASTRONOMER. Longtime W. M. Keck Observatory astronomer Andrea Ghez - the UCLA Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics and director of the UCLA Galactic Center Group - won the Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 for her revolutionary research proving the existence of a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. She has been studying the Galactic Center using Keck Observatory on Maunakea for more than two decades.
    The Nobel Prize committee made the announcement early this morning, Tuesday, Oct. 6, stating:
Andrea Ghez wins the Nobel Prize today.
Photo from Keck Observatory

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 was divided, one half awarded to Roger Penrose "for the discovery that black hole formation is a robust prediction of the general theory of relativity," the other half jointly to Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez "for the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the centre of our galaxy."
    Ghez is the fourth woman in history to win the
Nobel Prize in Physics. A statement from Keck said, "On behalf of Keck Observatory, we congratulate Andrea for all the work she has championed that led her to this fantastic, well-deserved award, as well as to her fellow prize winners Penrose and Genzel!"

Mayoral candidate on Vibrant Hawaiʻi.
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VIBRANT HAWAI‘I'S MAYORAL CANDIDATE CONVERSATIONS are available online for voters to see and study. A Vibrant Hawai‘i statement says, "Mahalo nui to Mayoral Candidates Ikaika Marzo and Mitch Roth for sharing their manaʻo on ten questions that demonstrate their leadership through the values of the Vibrant Hawaiʻi Grounding Statement: equity and belonging; aloha and prioritizing the knowledge, skills, and solutions of the people of Hawaiʻi; ʻauamo kuleana through shared ownership and accountability; and makawalu and acknowledging that we each hold one piece that is a part of something bigger."

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ATTEND A FREE WORKSHOP ON CONFLICT RESOLUTION, Kū I Ke Aloha: Stand Up & Speak Out, on Friday, Oct. 16 from 5:45 p.m. to 7 p.m. via Zoom. In honor of International Conflict Resolution Day, the evening begins with an introduction by the Rotary Club of Hilo on 100 Years of Building Peace. Workshop presenter T. Ilihia Gionson, Board President of Hawaiʻi Island United Way and Principal at Hiehie Communications, says, "When we approach issues with a clear vision and focus, grounded in aloha for the people and places affected by the issue, we can express our values and concerns in a productive way." 
    The interactive session explores examples of individual and community advocacy that resulted in positive change in Hawaiʻi and beyond. Take away some communication skills for the real world – no matter the media – to use with aloha. 
    This event is the fifth in the Kākou: Let's Work It Out! workshop series, co-hosted by the County of Hawaiʻi Office of the Prosecuting Attorney, Kuʻikahi Mediation Center, Rotary Club of Hilo, Rotary Club of Hilo Bay, Rotary Club of South Hilo, Rotary Club of Volcano, UH-Hilo Political Science & Administration of Justice Department, and UH-Hilo International Student Services & Intercultural Education Office. 
    Visit https://kakouletsworkitout.eventbrite.com to register or RSVP to Majidah at Kuʻikahi Mediation Center, (808) 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org.

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SIGN UP FOR MINDFUL EATING LAB Level 2 by Thursday, Oct. 8. The virtual classes will be held by Hui Mālama Nā ʻŌiwi Thursday, Oct. 15, 22, and 29. Recommended for those who have taken Level 1 or Healthy at Any Size classes. The course focuses on using mindfulness to address emotional eating; identifying trigger foods that might cause bingeing; shifting mindset from bad to good foods; and strengthening ability to listen to physiological clues. Register and learn more at hmono.org/services.

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GIVE INPUT ON THE HAWAIʻI 2050 SUSTAINABILITY PLAN UPDATE by the State of Hawaiʻi Office of Planning from Oct. 13 through 28. The public is invited to participate in online sessions to learn about the strategic plan and contribute to the revision process. Free; advance registration required. Register online.

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THE IMPORTANCE OF SEED BIODIVERSITY for Hawaiʻi's local food system, and the role seed plays in human health and nutrition, is the focus of a recent blog post from Hawaiʻi Seed Growers Network. In It all Begins...and Ends with Seed, Education and Outreach Coordinator Nancy Redfeather shares her insights.
    She writes, "We know that biodiversity is one of the 'keys' to a healthy agricultural system and that seed can’t be taken for granted. For the past 10,000 years, growers large and small have been growing, selecting the best plants, and saving seed for the next planting. But over the past century, that practice has continued to dwindle. Today, we have lost (unavailable or extinct) approximately 92 percent of all food varieties of seed that were grown by our ancestors in 1900. These were the varieties that fed our families during hard times. As you can see in the infographic created by National Geographic, that in 1903, commercial seed houses offered a whopping 497 varieties of lettuce, and by 1983 there were only 36 varieties left, or they offered 298 varieties of beets – and then there were 17."
    Read the blog.

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ATTEND FINDING SOLUTIONS, GROWING PEACE free virtual talk Thursday, Oct. 15 from noon to 1 p.m. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts this Brown Bag Lunch Series thanks in part to funding from the County of Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i Island United Way.
Lorenn Walker addresses at-risk youth in a
virtual Brown Bag Lunch talk on Oct. 15.

    
October's speaker is Lorenn Walker, on the topic Effective Approaches for Positive Adolescent Behavior: Alternatives to Grouping "At-Risk Youth" Walker says, "Research confirms that most parents know: exposing a child with problem behaviors to others bad behaviors increases the likelihood of more bad behavior. Despite the research on negative peer influence and labeling, problems grouping 'at-risk youth' are common."
    In this talk, learn how to apply restorative justice, solution-focused, cooperative, and peer-education approaches with youth.
    Lorenn Walker, JD, MPH, develops, implements, researches, and reports on cooperative learning interventions using public health approaches including restorative justice and solution-focused applications. She collaborates with schools, prisons, courts, law enforcement, NGOs, and individuals to address injustice. A Senior Fulbright Specialist, Walker directs Hawai‘i Friends of Restorative Justice and is a professor at the University of Hawai‘i Public Policy Center.
    To get the Zoom link, register online at https://freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com.
    For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org, or visit www.hawaiimediation.org.

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FOURTEEN NEW CASES OF COVID-19 are reported on Hawaiʻi Island today. The state reports 83 new cases today, with 67 on Oʻahu and two in Maui County.
    Since the pandemic began, there have been 12,937 COVID cases in the state. Department of Health reports 10,526 people of those infected have completed isolation. There are about 2,250 active cases in isolation. There are at least 17 people hospitalized on Hawaiʻi Island with the virus. At least 160 people have died in the state, 32 on Hawaiʻi Island.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray

areas have zero residential addresses. White is zero cases.

Yellow is one to 10 cases. Pale orange is 11 to 30 cases. Medium

orange is 31-60 cases. Dark orange is 61 to 80 cases. Bright

red is 81 to 110 cases. Dark red is 111 to 270 cases. 

Department of Health map

    
Since the pandemic began, Hawaiʻi Island reported 834 cases, Oʻahu 11,613 cases, Maui County 397, and Kauaʻi 59. Thirty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 889 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began.
    No new cases reported in the last 28 days for three Kaʻū zip codes and one in Volcano. 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Mark Twain, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96785 with Volcano Village; 96737, with Ocean View; and 96704, which includes Miloliʻi, have had no cases in the last 28 days. In the last 28 days, less than ten active cases have been reported in zip code 96777, which includes Pāhala, Punaluʻu, and Wood Valley. Zip code 96718, shaded gray on the map, is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date.
    In Hilo zip code 96720, 105 cases have been reported in the last 28 days. In Kona zip code 96740, 95 cases have been reported in the last 28 days.
    Hawaiʻi Island police continue enforcement of preventative policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. Civil Defense says, "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced. While on patrol, police officers will provide face coverings to people they encounter who do not have one. Mahalo for your help."
    Civil Defense says the number of new cases of coronavirus on this Island "reflects the need and importance of continuing testing throughout the Island as the virus remains a threat. With all accepting kuleana, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With the community's involvement, we can keep Hawaiʻi Safe."
    See the Hawaiʻi County COVID-19 webpage at coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
    COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 7,501,612 – about 21 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 210,909 – about 20 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 35.8 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 1,049,754.