Quantcast
Channel: The Kaʻū Calendar News Briefs, Hawaiʻi Island
Mark channel Not-Safe-For-Work? cancel confirm NSFW Votes: (0 votes)
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel.
0
Previous Article Next Article

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, August 25, 2020

0
0
The bitmoji banner for the virtual classroom of fourth-grade teacher Mrs. Pablo at Nāʻālehu Elementary School.
Image courtesy of Nāʻālehu Elementary
THE FIRST WEEK OF NĀʻĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL is showing excellent online attendance of students, according to its tech coordinator Bob Martin. He reported that to help students keep up, School Safety Attendant Rolland Alcoran made a run today to Mālama Market in Ocean View with a bus full of Chromebooks and iPads, for preschoolers to sixth graders.
     Martin, tech coordinator for the school, said that teachers are enjoying a high rate of virtual attendance to classes this week and that every student who needs an instrument has been issued a Chromebook or other way to learn and connect with teachers. He talked about a slew of programs in use, from Google Classroom to Prodigy, Wonders, and Epic. For those without internet at home, the school is providing Mifi, a Verizon portable wifi hotspot at no cost to students.
School Safety Attendant Rolland Alcoran delivered Chromebooks and iPad
to Nāʻālehu Preschoolers through sixth graders today, for distance learning.
Photo by Bob Martin/Nāʻālehu Elementary
     Martin said that a number of students were issued Chromebooks and other equipment earlier this year and that families have done an excellent job of taking care of them. He also said the school is providing good programs for those who are learning English as a second language.
     He said many families are kind, deferring to receiving Chromebooks if they already have a computer, in favor of giving them to families without any. The school is connecting with those families to see if their older computers will work with the educational software, said Martin.
     Also important, said Martin, is the free food program for breakfast and lunch for all children who are enrolled. Family members can pick up the food from the Nāʻālehu campus.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Voices, in front of Nāʻālehu's U.S. Post Office this morning, urges full funding for the public service.
Photo from Kaʻū Voices
FULLY FUND THE POST OFFICE was the message this morning from 14 members of Kaʻū Voices, an affiliate of Indivisible. They joined the American Postal Workers Union National Day of Action by waving signs next to Nāʻālehu Post Office. Their signs urge the U.S. Senate to pass the USPS Fairness Act that passed the House last Saturday. The bill, H.R. 2382, fully funds the Postal Service and requires mail services to be restored to the level they were before Pres. Donald Trump's appointee Louis DeJoy became Postmaster General in June.
     "Slower, unreliable delivery of ballots could interfere with the Nov. 3 election. In Hawaiʻi, this presidential election will be 100 percent mail-in ballots," noted Kaʻū Voices in a statement this evening.
     "Meanwhile, many people are hurt by the poor mail service in many ways. Medications are coming as much as seven to ten days late, putting people at great risk. Bills and payment delays are resulting in penalties and late fees, in some cases evictions. Gifts and cards aren't arriving in time for celebrations. The time to receive items ordered online is longer, often doubled."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Wayne Kawachi and Nadine Ebert, of ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, gave out fresh fish to first responders on Monday at Pāhala Fire 
Station. Kawachi, a fisherman who lives at Punaluʻu, uses his own boat to bring in fish to give away in the community 
during the pandemic. He is President of OKK. At left is Vice President Nadine Ebert. Photo from OKK
AN OKK FISH GIVEAWAY ON MONDAY took place at Pāhala Fire Station with first responders receiving the catch. Fisherman and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou President Wayne Kawachi and Vice President Nadine Ebert gave away 130 lbs of yellowfin tuna steaks. This was the second of Kawaichi's giveaways to first responders in Kaʻū. The first tuna giveaway was to local Kaʻū police. Another gift of fish will be to the staff at Kaʻū Hospital at a date to be determined.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL has announced an upcoming virtual Kaʻū Coffee Festival. It also announced that the latest crop of Kaʻū coffee was released nationwide today in Starbucks US Roasteries, Reserve Bars ad Clover
Chris Manfredi
stores. Chris Manfredi, one of the long time organizers of the festival, buys from farmers and sells to Starbucks through his Kaʻū Local Products brokerage. The statement from the Festival says, "Starbucks has been a fantastic partner to the Kaʻū coffee community and is a major contributor to a new water distribution system to help growers improve efficiency, reduce cost and combat climate change." He said, "Kaʻū coffee farmers are so proud to be part of Starbucks Reserve!"
     The release from Kaʻū Coffee Festival notes that "Starbucks has also released a new digital traceability tool where customers can enter or scan the production code on the back of the coffee bag to learn about the origins of the coffee they are drinking. Users can trace Kaʻū coffee origins and meet some of the farmers. Find details about the just-released mobile web app at https://stories.starbucks.com/stories/2020/new-starbucks-traceability-tool-explores-bean-to-cup-journey/. Using a smartphone, visit traceability.starbucks.com to start the app."
     The statement wraps up with, "Stay tuned as the Kaʻū coffee community plans the first-ever Kaʻū Coffee Virtual Festival. Watch for updates at www.kaucoffeefestival.com."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


UNEMPLOYMENT CLAIMS statewide have dropped to 4,000 new applications a week, according to the new acting head of the state Department of Labor Anne E. Perreira-Eustaquio. She said this morning that up until two weeks ago, new claims were coming in at a rate of 7,000 to 8,000 weekly.
     She said that more workers are processing cases at the Hawaiʻi Convention Center in Honolulu
     The Department of Labor has also decentralized call centers for queries from those who have submitted unemployment claims. Eight offices throughout the state are answering phones. The call center at the Convention Center is closed in order for the team there to concentrate on processing claims. To date, the unemployment system has received 167,000 claims during the pandemic, cleared 94,000, and are working to catch up on the remainder, said Perreira-Eustaquio. She also explained that unemployment benefits are authorized for 23 weeks, which can be extended with a new application for 13 weeks.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SELF-AWARENESS IN PROTECTING FAMILIES AND FRIENDS FROM COVID is the main message from county, state, and health systems leaders. Wear a mask. Distance from one another. Avoid gatherings of more than ten people who are not already living in the same household. Mask up and stay apart in those gatherings. These are the sounds of the constant drumbeat that grows louder.
     Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno sounded off yesterday as news of surging COVID-19 grew. He said that police will be stepping up enforcement and transition from a predominance of warnings and education to citations.
Civil Defense Director
Talmage Magno
     On Hilo's busiest corner, the 24-hour-a-day Ken's House of Pancakes shut down yesterday, many of its 45 employees sidelined after one employee came up with COVID.
     Restaurant Leung's Chop Suey House in Hilo closed last week with cases.
     In Hilo, Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home reported its first ten cases. HMC spokeswoman Elena Cabatu said three employees and seven residents tested positive this week, reported Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald today. Cabatu said a testing strategy is still being worked out, but "We're communicating, supporting, and working closely with the Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home to ensure the residents' safety. Avalon has provided excellent care over the years, and we're confident that we will successfully resolve this COVID outbreak."

     Ka ʻUmeke Charter School shut its three campuses, moved all learning online, and submitted information to the state Department of Health to conduct contact tracing and notify those who may have been exposed.
     Yesterday, vehicles packed the road to Kawananakoa Gym for free COVID-19 testing in Keaukaha, conducted by Premier Medical Group, the county, and Keaukaha Community Association.
     One of the sources of the recent Hilo outbreak is suspected to be the life celebration of Manaʻo Company's singer Kaulana Pakele. More free testing in Keaukaha is planned for Thursday.
     Magno said some people rebel against measures that have been established to keep their friends and family safe. He told Tribune writer John Burnett, "They're taking off their face masks, and they're not wanting to (social distance) anymore... But this is the worst numbers that we've had, and this is when we need people to come together, to be responsible for themselves, their families, their neighbors."
     Mayor Harry Kim today set out a statement on approval by Gov. David Ige of updates to Rule 11, which covers requirements in Hawaiʻi County to help reduce the spread of COVID-a9. See updated Rule 11, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A STAY AT HOME, WORK AT HOME order will go into effect on Thursday on Oʻahu to tamp down COVID-19. Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD said, "Crush this virus and be good in two weeks." The second Stay at Home order since the pandemic began, initiated by Honolulu's mayor and approved by the governor, follows last week's scalpel approach of shutting down beaches and parks, which public officials say are not enough.
     With the state COVID-19 count nearing 5,000 active cases, the new order means most retail stores will shut down again, with the exception of grocers, pharmacies, and take-out restaurants. The shutdown comes with a plan to test some 70,000 people on Oʻahu in the next week and a plan to place many of those in quarantine into a hotel in Waikiki.
     In the meantime, hospitalizations across the state have shot up since Aug. 1, with some 270 COVID-19 patients hospitalized, ten on Hawaiʻi Island. Some Emergency Rooms on Oʻahu have gone on "Ambulance Divert" status which directs patients to other facilities.
     The Lt. Governor said that the high number of cases now means trouble, with too many hospitalizations in a few weeks.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE RATE OF POSITIVE COVID TESTING ACROSS THE STATE OF HAWAIʻI, according to Johns Hopkins University, is the fifteenth highest in the country, at 9.2 percent. The highest is Mississippi and the lowest is Maine. New York is also one of the lowest in current positive testing, following a period of some of the highest numbers of cases and deaths in the country.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ELEVEN NEW CASES OF COVID-19 are reported on Hawaiʻi Island today. There are 65 active cases, according to Civil Defense, with at least one in Kaʻū zip code 96777 and at least one in Volcano zip code 96785. There are ten hospitalizations on-island.

     Statewide, 215 new cases are reported, with three in Maui County and 201 on Oʻahu.
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light orange

(not pictured) is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to 150 

cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

     Hawaiʻi Island reported 220 cases since the pandemic began. Since the pandemic began, no one died on this island.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 6,382 cases, Maui County 303, and Kauaʻi 56. Twenty-three victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Forty-nine people have died. Statewide, 419 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,236 have been released from isolation.

     In his daily message, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said, "Hawaiʻi Island has seen large daily increases of positive cases for the past three weeks. Health data shows the majority of these new cases have been identified as Hilo based gatherings where people are disregarding the policies of prevention. 

     "The situation in Hilo is a very serious one and we must all do our part to stop the spread of the virus. This is a serious situation we have in Hiloand only you can help stop the spread of this virus. We need your help in following the guidance of prevention. This is a community issue and community involvement and support is needed to protect our family, friends, kūpuna, and neighbors. With your help, we will control the spread and stop the virus and make Hawaiʻi a safe place. Thank you for listening and take care. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 5,773,220 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 178,326 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 23.74 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 815,745.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE COUNTY OF HAWAIʻI'S RULE 11, with the force and effect of law, to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus was updated by Mayor Harry Kim and Gov. David Ige applies through at lease Sept. 30. It includes the following:
     The rule notes that "COVID-19 continues to endanger the health, safety, and welfare of the people of this State and County. Because COVID-19 is easily transmitted, especially in group settings, and gatherings accelerate transmission of the disease, a response requires the continued effort and sacrifice of the community to avert strains on our healthcare system and other disastrous impacts. The more people an individual interacts with at a gathering and the longer that close interaction lasts, the higher the individual's potential risk of becoming infected with COVID-19 and then spreading COVID-19 to others.
     "The higher the level of community transmission in the area where the gathering is held, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spreading at the gathering. This rule is based upon evidence of COVID-19 within this State and County and seeks to address the essential objective of slowing its spread."
     Work in Businesses or Operations: All businesses, operations, and activities are permitted to remain open except those businesses, operations, and activities (that are prohibited.)
     Safe Practices All persons shall implement the following physical distancing and sanitation requirements to the fullest extent possible: Face Coverings Required. All persons within the County shall wear non-medical grade face coverings, over their nose and mouth, while in public settings. Face coverings are not required in the following circumstances, unless specifically indicated otherwise in this rule: persons five years of age or younger; persons with health or medical conditions that prevent them from wearing a face covering; persons actively communicating with a person who is hearing impaired, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication; persons obtaining a service involving the nose or face for which temporary removal of the face-covering is necessary to perform the service; persons for whom wearing a face covering would create a risk to the person related to their work, as determined by local, state, or federal regulators or workplace safety guidelines; persons actively engaged in work-related activities and able to maintain a physical distance of at least six feet from others; persons actively engaged in exercise activity so long as physical distancing requirements are maintained; persons who are engaged in outdoor activities when alone, with members of their household, or when able to maintain a distance of at least six feet from others. A business or organization may refuse to allow entry or service to a worker, customer, or patron that refuses to wear a face covering.
     High-risk populations. Elderly and others at high risk for COVID-19 are urged to stay in their residences to the extent possible, except as necessary to seek medical care. Persons who are sick or are exhibiting symptoms such as fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea or any other symptoms of COVID-19... shall stay at their residences, except as necessary to seek medical care.
     Physical distancing requirements. All persons shall maintain a minimum of six feet of physical separation from all other persons to the fullest extent possible.
     Businesses or operations shall designate lanes for patrons' entry and checkout with appropriate signage, tape, or other means to establish the minimum six-foot spacing for customers waiting in line. Checkout operations shall be modified to provide the minimum physical distancing or to provide a shield or barrier separating the interactions between customers and checkout clerks. Businesses and operations shall monitor and enforce, on their premises, the physical distancing requirements set forth in this rule.
     Limited customer occupancy. Each business and operation shall determine the maximum number of customers that its respective facility may reasonably accommodate while maintaining the specified physical distancing requirements. The business or operation shall post and maintain this maximum number at its primary entrance. The business or operation shall limit and enforce the number of customers in its facility or at its operation to not exceed that maximum number at all times. It is strongly recommended that a maximum of one customer per one hundred fifteen square feet of retail floor area be allowed into a facility or operation to maintain the minimum physical distancing requirement.
     Hand sanitizing products. Businesses and operations shall provide hand sanitizer or equivalent hand sanitizing products for all employees and customers. All customers/patrons shall sanitize hands before entry. Hand sanitizing stations shall be available at each entrance. Employees handling items from customers, such as cash or credit cards, shall frequently utilize hand sanitizers.
     Disinfection. Businesses and operations shall regularly disinfect all high-touch surfaces. Businesses and operations shall assign, train, and schedule employees/staff to sanitize carts, conveyors, counters, handles, knobs, and other high -touch surfaces.
     Safeguards for high-risk populations. Businesses and operations are urged to implement processes to safeguard the elderly and any person identified by the CDC that are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Persons at increased risk are encouraged to stay in their residence to the extent possible, except as necessary to seek medical care.
     Online and remote access. Businesses and operations shall post online whether a facility is open and how best to reach the facility and continue services by phone or remotely. Businesses or operations shall encourage their customers to do their business remotely by phone or online to the extent possible.
     Pick-up at store or delivery. Businesses or operations shall provide for, if feasible, online ordering and purchase of goods and customer pickup of orders at a location outside the facility or shall provide for delivery to customer locations.
     Signage. Businesses or operations shall post a sign at the entrance of the facility informing all employees and customers that they shall, at a minimum: wear face coverings while at the business or operation; avoid entering the business or operation if they have a cough or fever or otherwise do not feel well; maintain the required physical distancing from all others; and not shake hands or engage in unnecessary physical contact.
     Gatherings indoors or outdoor social gatherings of groups up to ten persons are permitted. Face coverings are required and physical distancing of at least six feet between separate groups must be maintained. Members of a single residential or family unit who share the same address are not restricted. A social gathering is defined as a planned or spontaneous event, assembly, or meeting that brings together multiple people from separate households in a single space or area, indoors or outdoors, at the same time and in a coordinated fashion. A social gathering includes, but is not limited to, such get-togethers as a banquet, barbecue, concert, fair, festival, funeral, luau, parade, party, picnic, or wedding. A social gathering does not include, and this definition does not apply to, federal, state, and county government operations and functions; educational, adult and childcare facilities with adequate and active supervision and monitoring, enforcement capabilities, and established emergency response protocols; businesses, operations, and activities operating under Section A of this Rule.
     Travel to the County of Hawaiʻi Pursuant to the 12th Proclamation, all persons traveling to the County of Hawaiʻi from out of state or from interisland, are subject to mandatory 14-day self-quarantine. The period of self-quarantine shall begin from the date of entry onto Hawaiʻi Island and shall last 14 days or the duration of the person's presence on the island, whichever is shorter. Persons traveling to Hawaiʻi Island from interisland and seeking a modified self-quarantine or exemption from the self-quarantine requirements must request and receive approval for such modification or exemption from the County. Persons requiring paid or commercial lodging while subject to the mandatory 14-day quarantine shall designate a hotel or motel as their quarantine location.
     Short-term vacation rentals (STVR), bed and breakfast (B&B) homes, or other types of transient vacation rentals (TVR) shall not be designated as a quarantine location except for visiting essential and critical infrastructure workers, provided quarantine restrictions are followed. A STVR, B&B, or TVR may not be designated as a quarantine location for a new or "intended" Hawaiʻi County resident.
     Pursuant to Hawaiʻi Revised Statutes Section 127A-29, any person violating this Rule shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction, fined not more than $ 5,000 or imprisoned for not more than one year, or both.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PETFIX SPAY AND NEUTER CLINIC FOR DOGS will be held Sunday, Aug. 30 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

PETFIX SPAY AND NEUTER CLINIC FOR CATS will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Jatty Daugherty is wanted by police.
ASSIST POLICE in locating Jatty Daugherty, a 23-year-old male who frequents the Kaʻū, Hawaiian Ocean View Estates, and Kona areas, says a statement from Hawaiʻi Police Department. Daugherty is wanted for two outstanding warrants of arrest.

     He is described as a local-Caucasian male, approximately 5-feet 8-inches tall, 150 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact Detective Donovan Kohara at (808) 326-4646, ext. 238, or at the police non-emergency number (808) 935-3311 .
     Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Apply for Assistance through U.S. Department of Agriculture's Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, Aug. 28. Visit farmers.gov/cfap for more information.
Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.

Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from  to  volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING
St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at  on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, August 26, 2020

0
0
U.S. Surgeon General Vice Admiral Jerome Adams and Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD, spoke up today about Hawaiʻi
going red in its positivity rate for COVID-19 as they roll out some 70,000 tests that can be self-administered.
Photo from Lt. Gov Josh Green facebook
CONTACT, TRACE, AND TEST "LIKE MAD FOOLS," said Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD today. He was talking about the surge in COVID-19 on Hawaiʻi Island, where there were 23 new cases today, following 11 cases on Tuesday. He said the Big Island is "where Oʻahu was two months ago." Since then, case numbers on Oʻahu have exploded, leading to a statewide positivity rate of 11 percent reported today. It's higher than rates in some two dozen states and Washington, D.C., with most of their positivity rates below five percent. The U.S. Surgeon General, Vice Admiral Jerome Adams, who has been visiting the Islands, said Hawaiʻi has gone into "the red," and he supports the two-week stay-at-home order now imposed on the residents of Oʻahu.
     Green said, "Staying at home will keep people alive." He and the Surgeon General rolled out new free COVID tests on Oʻahu for some 70,000 people and they demonstrated the ease with which the tests can be self-administered. Watch the demonstration here: https://vimeo.com/451663548. See more at the Lt. Governor's Facebook.
     On Hawaiʻi Island, the county and partners are also rolling out more free testing. Recent
COVID cases in Hilo have come to Liberty Dialysis and Bay Clinic, Ken's House of Pancakes, and a charter school with three campuses.
Green helps make it simple at his whiteboard today, recommending groups of no more than five. Stick with households
and mask mandates are critical to stop the explosion of COVID-19, he said. Photo from Lt. Gov. Josh Green's Facebook
     Regarding the outbreak at the veteran's home in Hilo, apparently through a staff member, Mayor Harry Kim, himself a medic in the Vietnam War, told the Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald that he feels "horrible. Our duty is to make them (the veterans) feel as pleasant and comfortable as possible." The mayor implored the public: "When I send a message to the community to protect your family, protect your friends, protect your community — that's what I'm talking about." See more COVID-19 statistics, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, an arm of the state Department of Health, has activated the Hawaiʻi CARES hotline to provide assistance and triage of COVID-19 cases. The
Hawaiʻi CARES call center is the state's centralized resource for mental health and substance use treatment assistance. During the pandemic, the call center duties will be expanded for arranging appropriate placement for isolation/quarantine. The Hawaiʻi CARES hotline can be reached by calling toll free at 1-800-753-6879. For more information about Hawaiʻi CARES, email hicares@hawaii.edu.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A DIRE WARNING FROM HAWAIʻI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE came today from its President & CEO Sherry Menor-McNamara, concerning further shutdown of the economy to tamp down COVID-19:
     "Hawaiʻi's local businesses have taken the economic brunt of stopping the spread of COVID-19. We understand that defeating COVID-19 is only possible (way) through a collective effort, but are disappointed that the high case count has necessitated a second stay at home order for Oʻahu. Second shutdowns are more devastating for local economies. Two weeks is an eternity for businesses that are already suffering — many will not survive.
     "We have yet to see any comprehensive, statewide plan to support businesses in need. For instance, Hawaiʻi is just one of 11 states without a statewide financial relief program for businesses.
     "We understand that these are difficult decisions. But while we continue to advocate on behalf of local businesses, the financial resources to create statewide support programs lie with the government. It didn't have to come to this — local businesses and their employees deserve better."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI RANKS IN THE TOP FIVE FOR HEALTH AND FOR LOWEST NUMBER OF CHILDREN LIVING IN POVERTY, according to a study released today by WalletHub. Hawaiʻi ranks 47th in the review of all 50 states and Washington, D.C. to determine places with the most underprivileged children. The study found the most underprivileged to live in New Mexico, Mississippi, District of Columbia, Alaska, and West Virginia. Hawaiʻi ranked as one of the best for children, tying with Maryland, and just behind North Dakota, Utah, and New Hampshire.
     See more at Wallethub.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TWENTY-THREE NEW CASES OF COVID-19 are reported on Hawaiʻi Island today. There are at least 71 active cases, according to Civil Defense, with at least one in Kaʻū zip code 96777 and at least one in Volcano zip code 96785. There are at least 13 hospitalizations on-island.

     Statewide, 277 new cases are reported, with eight in MauiCounty, 254 on Oʻahu. Two more people have died, both Oʻahu men above age 50 with underlying health conditions.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light orange

(not pictured) is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to 150 

cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

     Hawaiʻi Island reported 220 cases since the pandemic began. Since the pandemic began, no one died on this island.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 6,626 cases, losing one to new info, Maui County 311, and Kauaʻi 56. Twenty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Fifty-one people have died. Statewide, 444 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,288 have been released from isloation.

     In his daily message, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said, "This morning information on COVID-19 shows a continuous increase of positive cases to Hawaiʻi Island and especially to the community of Hilo. This spread can be contained and stopped without adding further restrictions or "Stay at Home" policies. This can be accomplished by all following the preventive policies of distancing, gatherings, and face coverings.

     "Especially for our children and kūpuna, who depend on us, we need to do our part to keep our home safe. The CountyTask Force will ramp up programs of disinfecting and spraying, assisting and inspection of businesses, and enforcement of policies. County-sponsored testing will be increased and continued as long as needed. A special thank you to the people of Keaukaha who turned out in huge numbers to be tested. This is a community issue and needs community involvement to make a difference.

     "The situation in Hilo is a very serious one and we must all do our part to stop the spread of the virus. For family, friends, and community, do your part to keep our home safe. We need your help in following the guidance of prevention. Thank you for listening and take care. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 5,822,927 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 179,734 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 24.18 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 825,798.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Apply for Assistance through U.S. Department of Agriculture's Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, Aug. 28. Visit farmers.gov/cfap for more information.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs will be held Sunday, Aug. 30 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.

Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from  to  volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING
St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at  on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, August 27, 2020

0
0
The Case for Climate Action report was released this week and Sen. Brian Schatz urges reading it here.
Photo from The Case for Climate Action: Building a Clean Economy for the American People
LEARN FROM HOME WILL CONTINUE IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS THROUGH AT LEAST OCT. 2. A message for the state Department of Education said today that the Learn from Home program will continue through the first quarter:  "Ahead of the Aug. 17 return of students for the 2020-21 school year, the Department announced most schools would shift the majority of instruction to distance learning for at least the first four weeks of the academic year. This extends that by three weeks for the remainder of the first quarter.
     "The extension applies to all Oʻahu schools and most neighbor island schools. Hāna High & current models. Kaunakakai Elementary and Moloka‘i High plan to implement distance learning until Sept. 8. Elementary School on Maui and Kilohana Elementary, Maunaloa Elementary, and Molokaʻi Middle schools on Molokaʻi will continue their
Na`alehu Elementary School's virtual class led by Mrs. Badua welcomes
online students with this bitmoji banner. Image from Na`alehu Elementary
     "During the Learn From Home phase, schools will continue offering learning hubs on campus to provide connectivity for students who need it. Schools will also continue educational programming for vulnerable students as previously identified.
     "Complex area superintendents will work with school principals to develop transition plans for the second quarter, with considerations for community-specific needs.
     "The Department will continue to work closely with state, county, and health officials to assess if and when students can safely return to in-person blended learning models. As decisions are made, schools will communicate with families."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
The Case for Climate Action: Building a Clean Economy for the American People can be downloaded here.
SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ EMPHASIZED THAT "CLIMATE CHANGE IS THE SINGLE GREATEST THREAT OF OUR GENERATION." He released a statement this week after completion of a report from a U.S Senate's Special Committee on Climate Crisis. He said that after "dozens of hearings and meetings, this week, we released a 250-page report making the case for serious and meaningful climate action." The report's title is The Case for Climate Action: Building a Clean Economy for the American People.” Download the report here.
     The Hawai`i Senator said the report relied on extensive public input. He told Vox: 'We did the work of listening. We started with labor. We went to the environmental justice community, to American Indian tribes, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. We talked to farmers, to both small and large businesses, and to financial services and insurance communities. We had hearings, but we also had avenues for public comment, and got thousands of individual comments from the public." The Vox story can be read here
     In his interview with Vox, Schatz lauded Hawai`i's plan for renewable energy, saying, "Hawai'i has arguably made more progress than any other state in moving toward clean energy, and we did it with an RPS. I’m absolutely open to whatever can get done that is equal to the task." Shatz  told Vox, “We want to enable everybody to prosper in the process of solving the problem... allowing people to imagine all the opportunities they will personally experience if we take climate action.”
      The Hawai`i Senator brought the COVID-19 pandemic into the conversation. He contended: “Now we see that ignoring science is causing mass preventable death. We don’t have to explain why ignoring science is dangerous anymore. Everyone is living it.”
     He also talked about the cost of solving the climate change: “When it comes to climate action, the question is not whether we can afford to pay for it; it’s how much it will cost us if we don’t take action.”

     Schatz said, "It’s going to take a broad, diverse coalition to tackle the climate crisis." He called for electing public officials "who believe in science, recognize the gravity of climate change, and who are committed to combating it and protecting our planet." See the Vox interview here.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

"IT'S GUT WRENCHING AND WE HAVE TO STOP THIS SPREAD," said Lt. Gov. Josh Green today on KITV News. He said that 5,140 active cases now mean that Hawaiʻi could see more than 500 hospitalizations in the next few weeks. Today's COVID-19 new case number is 306. Three hundred cases a day would lead to 9,000 a month. "That's an extra 1,000 in the hospital," said Green. warning that Hawaiʻi could expect the kind of horror and death seen in New York and other hard-hit places.
A local store posts a sign saying "Absolutely No Entry" without
a mask as the county promises more enforcement of social
distancing and mask wearing. Photo by Julia Neal
     When asked whether the two week shut down beginning today on Oʻahu will tamp down the virus sufficiently, he said that if everyone follows the protective measures, perhaps there could be a soft reopening. Otherwise, it may take a month. "If we have to do four weeks, it will save lives."
     Green said there are already 60 individuals with COVID in ICU's with 40 on ventilators. "We could see an incredible surge."
     He said he is "relatively enraged" that the state Department of Health "didn't get the testing and tracing done in May." He pointed to his time over the past two days with U.S. Surgeon General, Dr.     Adams, who brought in COVID tests "because the spread was out of control on Oʻahu." He said he and Adams are organizing teams to go to public housing, Pacific Islander communities, all first responders, and teachers. Some 5,000 people signed up within a day of the announcement of the surge testing on Oʻahu.
Bug Buster cleans the Hilo bus station.
Photo form County of Hawai`i
     Green said the goal is to take the active COVID case count down into the two double digits and then low double digits.
     When asked about economic ramifications of the shutdown, he said that reopening businesses "would be very doable" with a lowering of the COVID count.
     See island, state, country, and world COVID-19 numbers, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE COUNTY 'S BUG BUSTERS are on the job. The Cleaning and Disinfecting Task Force is on a mission to keep the COVID-19 virus at bay. The are easily identified, traveling in County of Hawai`i vehicles, wearing bright-yellow Bug Busters shirts, as they apply disinfecting products via sprayers, specialized fogging deveices and other methods. See a map displaying their Bug Busters spraying locations at www.hawaiicounty.gov/bug-busters.
     According to a county statement today, Bug Busters focus on sanitizing high-traffic areas and high-touch surfaces seven days a week, at work since early March. Comprised of specially trained employees, the Bug Busters sanitize shelters, post offices and Couty water spigots. They also sanitize facilities with known positive cases are identified, like schools, medical facilities and private businesses.
The map shows bus stops in Ka`u and around the island
where the county sends its Bug Busters team for
deep cleaning to hold back  COVID-19.
Image from County of Hawai`i
     Civil Defense Admnistrator Talmade Magno said, "The Bug Busters are one part of our commitment to keeping our community safe from CIVID-19. These Coutny workers get up every morning to get the job done."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.  

O`AHU HOSPITALS ARE ASKING NEIGHBOR ISLAND HOSPITALS to possibly take some of their patients. should they become overwhelmed with COVID-19 cases. Maui Mayor Mike Victorino pushed back today, saying hospitals on his island need to protect themselves and prepare for their own cases. Earlier, planners thought of O`ahu's larger and well-equipped houses would be the place to send patients from Neighbor Islands.
     See island, state, country, and world COVID-19 numbers, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A NEW APP SHOWS MORE DETAIL ON THE LOCATIONS OF COVID-19 breakouts.
The creator is Ryan Ozawa, Communications Director for Hawai`i Information Service. He studies the state map showing zip codes and investigates business signage and other sources in the zip codes to find the location of the COVID-case. He told KITV News, "The objective is not to shame businesses, most responsible businesses discloses these cases publicly. This helps you to know if the super market, care home or bank had a case. You might want to adjust whether you go there next, or take extra precautions before you go."
      See https://www.hawaiislack.com/maps/. The mobile version is at: https://maps.hawaiislack.com/
     See island, state, country, and world COVID-19 numbers, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HUI MĀLAMA HAS ANNOUNCED A FREE ONLINE HOME GARDENING CLASS. It starts on Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs.
     The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget."
     Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a week from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at www.hmono.org/services.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ALOHA BOULEVARD between Iolani Lane and Highway 11 in Ocean View was closed today for about four hours due to a traffic accident. See tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs for more.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

POLICE ARE ASKING FOR HELP WITH THE INVESTIGATION OF TWO MURDERS IN UPPER PUNA, ONE IN EDEN ROCK AND ONE IN MOUNTAIN VIEW. Hawai`i Police Department released the name of a Sean Nephi Kuhia, 49, of Eden Rock, whose body was found on an unpaved roadway. The death has been classified as a homicide.
       In the second murder investigation, police are looking for 26-year-old Dwayne "CJ" Cory Wallace Jr., of Puna. Wallace, wanted for second-degree murder, is described as 6-feet-5-inches, 210 pounds, with brown hair balding on top and brown eyes. The public is advised against approaching Wallace, who should be considered armed and dangerous.
Dwayne "CJ" Corey Wallace Jr. is
wanted by island police.
     Wallace was last seen shortly after  Tuesday, Aug. 25 operating a primer-gray colored Toyota 2-door sedan, bearing State of Hawaiʻi license plate HLN 184.

     The victim of the shooting in Mountain View on Tuesday, for which Wallace is being pursued, has been identified as 26-year-old Peter C. Grammar, of Mountain View. An autopsy determined the cause of death was due to a gunshot wound to the chest.

     Police remind citizens that harboring and assisting a fugitive is a felony offense.

      Police ask anyone who may have information about this incident or the location of Wallace to call the Police Department's non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or Detective Blaine Morishita at (808) 961-2385 or Blaine.Morishita@hawaiicounty.gov.
     Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FOUR MORE DEATHS from COVID-19 are reported in the state today, making it Hawaiʻi's highest one-day death toll. Since the pandemic began, Hawaiʻi has recorded 55 deaths from the coronavirus. Statewide, 306 new cases are reported today, with seven in MauiCounty, 289 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 7,566.

     There are at least 94 active cases on Hawaiʻi Island, according to Civil Defense, with at least one in Kaʻū zip code 96777 and at least one in Volcano zip code 96785. There are at least 13 hospitalizations on-island. Hawaiʻi Island reported 220 cases since the pandemic began. Since the pandemic began, no one died on this island.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light orange

(not pictured) is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to 150 

cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 6,915 cases, Maui County 318, and Kauaʻi 56. Twenty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 462 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,371 have been released from isloation.

     Commenting on the increasing activity on this island and Maui, State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park said yesterday, "Along with our county partners, we are closely monitoring these trends. We have concerns that ongoing gatherings, especially with inconsistent mask use or distancing, are contributing." On Hawai‘i Island, reports Department of Health, two recent large gatherings are of particular concern: a beach gathering and a large funeral. Social media videos from the funeral showed people not physically distancing or wearing masks. More than 500 tests have been reportedly administered to people who attended the funeral, with additional testing planned.

     In his daily message, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said, "Hawaiʻi Island and especially the community of Hilocontinues to have an increase of positive cases. In addressing this, the CountyTask Force will ramp up efforts in its programs of disinfecting and in assisting and inspecting businesses. The Hawaiʻi Police Department will be adding to their patrols and enforcing the preventive policies of wearing face coverings, distancing, and (smaller) gatherings.

     "We need your help in following the guidance of prevention. The situation in Hilois a very serious one and we all need to do our part to keep Hawaiʻi safe.

Thank you for listening and take care. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 5,858,85 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 180,494 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 24.28 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 828,070.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Apply for Assistance through U.S. Department of Agriculture's Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. The deadline to submit an application is Friday, Aug. 28. Visit farmers.gov/cfap for more information.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs will be held Sunday, Aug. 30 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.

Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from  to  volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING
St. Jude's Episcopal Church Services and Worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at  on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at the upper parking lot of Kahuku Park near St. Jude's, to those in need, from 10 a.m. until the food runs out. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, August 28, 2020

0
0
Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority's new leader is John DeFries, sustainability expert from Hawaiʻi Island. He is
President of Native Sun Business Group and serves on Friends of NELHA and other community boards. The image
above is from HTA's website, which aims to promote cultural and environmental awareness. Read more below.
A BUST FOR ILLEGALLY TAKING AQUARIUM FISH HAPPENED AT SOUTH POINT BOAT RAMP on Thursday. After one Department of Land & Natural Resources officer conducted surveillance of the boat from shore, more officers were called to board the boat. They found 333 Yellow Tang and three Pakuʻikuʻi - Achilles Tang - both popular fish sold to aquarium dealers.
Evidence photo of illegal aquarium fish seized at
South Point Boat Ramp, the bust coming after a
DLNR surveillance from shore on Thursday.
Photo from DOCARE
     Operator of the boat, 47-year-old Jason Beevers, of Nāʻālehu, was arrested and released for illegally taking the protected fish from the West Hawaiʻi Regional Fisheries Management Area. The Division of Conservation & Resources Enforcement officers also found permit and fishing gear violations, according to the statement.
     They arrested Beevers for numerous violations, including collecting aquatic life in a prohibited area; absence of an aquarium collecting permit and boat registration; failure to display a dive flag; possession of aquarium collecting gear, including SCUBA gear; and possession and use of lay nets with mesh less than 2.75 inches. The DOCARE officers seized all of the equipment connected with the alleged violations.
     In a statement from DLNR, DOCARE Chief of Enforcement, Jason Redulla said, "While our officers continue to provide for everyone's safety during the current COVID-19 crisis, we continue to be on the lookout for natural resource violations."
     Beevers is required to appear on the charges, which are petty misdemeanors. He could face fines, imprisonment, and administrative penalties.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE ONLINE SAFE TRAVELS APPLICATION TO ENTER HAWAIʻI will be mandatory beginning Sept. 1. This digital application collects required health and travel information. A statement from the state today says it "is critical to protecting the health of our residents and visitors alike." Safe Travels is part of a multi-layered screening process of arrival temperature checks and secondary screening for those with symptoms or temperatures of 100.4 F or higher. The application can be found at https://travel.hawaii.gov.
     Safe Travels digitizes and simplifies the paper-based process with one form each for interisland and transpacific. The Safe Travels platform provides a one-stop-shop for both types of travelers. It also provides the State Department of Health access to mandatory health information to monitor and protect public health in realtime. It can also be used by the Dept. of the Attorney General and county law enforcement officials to enforce quarantine rules.
An animated film on the new mandatory online application to enter
Hawaiʻi is available at https://travel.hawaii.gov.

     Gov. David Ige said, "I am pleased to launch this digital app, which will allow our travelers to provide their required health and travel information before they arrive at the airport. It will also help us keep in contact with those who are required to be in quarantine. This is an important step in preparing to reopen our economy." Travelers are encouraged to enter info and trip details well in advance of flights. Once health info is entered 24 hours before departure, travelers receive a QR code via email. The QR code on their mobile device or printed on paper is scanned by airport screeners upon arrival.
     Douglas Murdock, chief information officer of the state Office of Enterprise Technology Services, said, "Compared to paper processing, this online app will save travelers time at the airport and will speed up distribution of information to state and county officials who need it to keep us all safe."
     The Safe Travel app was developed in partnership with Google and its partner SpringML, at a cost of $638,000 for initial implementation. A platform to collect, aggregate, display, and analyze data is provided by ESRI. Funding is from the Federal CARES Act.
A travel health questionnaire is required online to enter Hawaiʻi.
 See https://travel.hawaii.gov
     Key features include: Ability to login using Email, Google or Facebook logins; a highly secured platform built on Google cloud; verification of passenger contact information before arrival to speed up processing at the airport; collection of health and contact information needed for arrival screening and public health monitoring; creation of a QR code which airport screeners scan to review the traveler's information for clearance or secondary screening; and automated generation of quarantine check-in reminders as emails and text messages.
     New features and data elements will be added in future phases, as the Safe Travels process and Hawaiʻi travel requirements evolve, according to the state's statement. "Travelers without smartphones or computers can ask a friend or relative for assistance or receive assistance at the arrival airport. Travelers without email addresses will need to create one on an email service to comply with the conditions of quarantine."
The Safe Travel app helps the state track visitors for compliance with
 COVID-19 quarantine and health checks. See https://travel.hawaii.gov.
     The project is being spearheaded by the Office of Enterprise Technology Services, in collaboration with the State Department of Transportation, DOH, Dept. of the Attorney General, Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority, and the counties.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

JOHN DEFRIES IS THE NEW CHIEF OF HAWAIʻI TOURISM AUTHORITY. The HTA board, named by Gov. David Ige, made the appointment at its Thursday meeting. DeFries is a longtime resident of Hawaiʻi Island.
Sustainability advocate John DeFries is chosen
to become Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority Chief.
     DeFries worked in research for Hawaiʻi County. He is president of Native Sun Business Group and director of Friends of the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaiʻi Authority. He is also a Director of the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University.
     NELHA's website describes some of DeFries' interests as "sustainable development as a human right, the importance of indigenous knowledge and native intelligence and the potential for Hawaiʻi Island to become a world model for sustainable living, and humanity's universal responsibility to care for our planet and one another." He has lived in Kona with his wife Jinny since 1991.
     Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority, mostly funded by the state, is the overarching organization of visitors bureaus and many other programs across the islands. In recent years, it has launched the Kuleana Campaign to teach visitors Hawaiʻi's cultural etiquette. It funds an Aloha ʻĀina program, this year supporting 34 nonprofits to protect Natural Resources. Its website includes frequent updates on visitor industry statistics and such guides as Maʻemaʻe, Hawaiian Style & Resource Toolkit.
     HTA posts its agendas in Hawaiian and English. This Thursday's agenda included Kūkākūkā A Hoʻoholo I Ka Hoʻokumu I ʻAha Kūkā Heʻenalu A Hoe Waʻa - Discussion and Action to Establish a Surfing and Canoe Paddling Advisory Committee. See https://www.hawaiitourismauthority.org/.
Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority, which has named Hawaiʻi Islander John DeFries to be its new CEO, is
also considering establishment of a Surfing and Paddling Advisory Committee. Image from HTA

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI AGRICULTURAL FOUNDATION CO-SPONSORS THE EAT THINK & DRINK Open for Business event series. Co-sponsored by Hawaiʻi Chamber of Commerce and other partners, it brings farmers, ranchers, restaurants, and food distribution businesses together online. The
Thursday, September 10 event from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. is a virtual panel discussion on The New Normal
for Restaurants. Hear first-hand from business owners affected in the restaurant and bar industries on handling the pandemic and their needs to survive. Discussion will explore solutions implemented to provide relief in light of staving off gatherings and close personal contact.
     Moderated by Kelly Simek of KHON2, the panel will feature Dylan Ching, VP of Operations, TS Restaurants Jason Higa, CEO, FCH Enterprises, Kevin Hanney, Chef/Owner, 12th Ave Grill Gavin Onishi, Executive Chef, Contemporary Flavors Catering, Lee Anne Wong, Executive Chef, Papaʻaina at the Pioneer Inn, and Henry Yoon, DB Restaurant Group.
     Hawaiʻi Island participants are offered a take out meal from a participating local restaurant, through Hawaiʻi Agricultural Foundation. The $10 registration fee is waived for all EAT & DRINK takeout orders. Each restaurant partner has created a special Kona Brewing Co. dinner pairing for two. Participating restaurants and additional details on ordering and pickup are available on the registration page.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A MORATORIUM ON TURNING OFF ELECTRICITY FOR FAILURE TO PAY BILLS IS EXTENDED through Dec. 31, The state Public Utilities Commission gave the order this week. Hawaiian Electric urges customers challenged by the financial impact of COVID-19 to seek utility bill assistance from government and nonprofits, and to set up interest-free payment plans. See hawaiianelectric.com/paymentarrangement or call the customer service number on the bill.

     The utility voluntarily suspended its collection efforts in March to ensure customers' electric service would not be disrupted while many were staying home. The PUC subsequently ordered all utilities to suspend disconnections, stating that "customers should continue paying their bills to the extent possible during this time, noting that customers will still ultimately be responsible for paying Utility service billings accrued during this suspension."

     Shelee Kimura, Hawaiian Electric senior vice president of customer service said, "Regardless of the date of the moratorium, we want to ensure that customers facing financial hardship are able to take advantage of the CARES funding that is set to expire at the end of the year and that we can help them make their payments more manageable. We need to hear from customers in order to help them."

     Applications are open for utility bill assistance programs. See hawaiianelectric.com/COVID19.
     For assistance managing energy costs, Hawaiʻi Energy is a trusted resource for tips and rebates to help offset the costs of energy-saving equipment and services. Visit https://hawaiienergy.com/tips for more information.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

POLICE ARRESTED THE MAN SUSPECTED OF TUESDAY'S MURDER near Highway 11 on North Kulani Road. After a tip, police found suspect Dwayne Cory Wallace and arrested him at 2:30 p.m. today in Orchidland. Wallace, 29, was carrying a rifle and tried to run from the scene. He is being held in a police cellblock. Wallace allegedly shot 26-year-old Peter Cyrus Grammer, of Mountain View, and left him in the middle of the road. 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE VICTIM OF A SINGLE-VEHICLE DEADLY CRASH AT ALOHA BLVD AND HWY 11 IN OCEAN VIEW on Thursday has been identified. According to police, Kevin Ceasar, of Nāʻālehu, 62, was driving a 2000 black Dodge Durango toward Hwy 11 when the vehicle veered off the right shoulder and struck an embankment at 8:55 a.m.  

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

POLICE WILL INCREASE ENFORCEMENT OF FACE MASK AND SOCIAL DISTANCING RULES to help tamp down COVID-19, particularly in Hilo, said the latest alert from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense today. "The Hawaiʻi Police Department will be increasing their patrols and enforcement of the preventive policies of wearing face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. The situation in Hilo is a very serious one and we all need to do our part to keep Hawaiʻi safe. With your help, we will stop the spread of the virus and make Hawaiʻi a safe place."
   Friday's county update of COVID-19 reported 95 active cases on Hawaiʻi Island. Fifteen are hospitalized.
     Civil Defense also gives an update on Okutsu Veteran's Home in Hilo. All 143 staff and 90 residents were tested on Saturday, Aug. 22, and again on Thursday, Aug. 27. Two residents are hospitalized and five remain isolated at the veteran's home in the COVID unit. Testing of all staff and residents will continue every three to four days "Testing will continue until absolute confidence of clearance"
     Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said, "A testing was held yesterday at Keaukaha and again the conduct and turn-out was tremendous and admirable. Thank you Keaukaha and to all the community volunteers and a special thank you to Baba. Remember the purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the virus. We need your help in following the prevention policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light

orange is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to

150 cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

FOR THE SECOND DAY IN A ROW, FOUR MORE DEATHS from COVID-19 are reported in the state today. Since the pandemic began, Hawaiʻi has recorded 59 deaths from the coronavirus. Statewide, 265 new cases are reported today, with 26 on Hawaiʻi Island, six in MauiCounty, and 233 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 7,830.

     There are at least 95 active cases on Hawaiʻi Island, according to Civil Defense, with at least one in Kaʻū zip code 96777 and at least one in Volcano zip code 96785. There are at least 15 hospitalizations on-island. Hawaiʻi Island reported 279 cases since the pandemic began. Since the pandemic began, no one died on this island.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 7,147 cases, losing one to new information today, Maui County 324, and Kauaʻi 56. Twenty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 485 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,410 have been released from isolation.

     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 5,906,615 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 181,579 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 24.57 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 833,836.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs will be held Sunday, Aug. 30 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a week, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.


Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from  to  volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.


ONGOING
St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKa
FZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.


Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, August 29, 2020

0
0
Last year, Kaʻū High went from 8-man to 11-man football. Read thoughts and expectations of the team and coaches in The Way We Were Last Year, below.
Photo by Tim Wright, Kaʻū 77
THE HIGHEST DAILY COUNT OF NEW COVID-19 CASES WAS REPORTED TODAY for Hawaiʻi Island, with 39 positive test results. The number of active cases nearly doubled in four days, reaching 116, more than a third of island cases since the pandemic began. This is also a day when at least one new case is reported in the Nāʻālehu zip code 96720, followed by last week's case in the Pāhala zipcode 96777, its first since COVID-19 hit the island. There has been at least one case in Volcano zip code 96785 in the last 28 days, and none in Ocean View zip code 96737.
     With the majority of this island's surge in Hilo and overwhelming participation in testing there today, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense announced that testing will continue on Sunday. The free screening will be a drive-up at Prince Kuhio Plaza from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The Civil Defense message says, "Thank you all for participating, as the program of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the virus.
     "We need your help in following the prevention policies of face coverings, distancing and gatherings. The Hawaiʻi Police Department will be increasing their patrols and enforcement of the preventive policies of wearing face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. The situation in Hilo is a serious one and we all need to do our part to keep Hawaiʻi safe. With your help we will stop the spread of the virus and make Hawaiʻi a safe place."
     Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD, said he is concerned with the high case count on Hawaiʻi Island. He said 17 of the 24 Intensive Care Unit beds are occupied. While only a few are taken by COVID patients, there are at least 17 hospitalizations at Hilo, he said, indicating that more beds could soon be needed. He warned everyone, "Wear a mask and avoid any groups."
     See more on COVID-19 with state, national and, world stats, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MASS COVID SURGE TESTING THAT WILL SHUT DOWN A HIGHWAY next week is good for O‘ahu but not necessary at this time on Hawai‘i Island. That's the opinion of Mayor Harry Kim. In a Hawai‘i Tribune-Herald story on Saturday, Kim told writer Stephanie Salmons that Hawai‘i Island people have stepped up for voluntary testing through clinics, non-profits, the county, and other partners. Kim pointed to multiple testings in Keaukaha, with more to come, in order to test, trace and track through the surge of cases in Hilo.
     On O‘ahu, a state and federal partnership will shut down the H-3 freeway on Tuesday and Thursday for mass testing, as COVID-19 cases continue to grow, hospitals fill up, and traveling nurses and other health care workers fly in from the mainland to help out.
     A statement from Hawaiʻi COVID-19 Joint Information Center says that more than 900 healthcare workers responded to the state's call for hospital nursing staff.
     Also helping hospitals are members of the Hawai‘i Medical Reserve Corps., a group of volunteer health professionals, organized after the 9/11 terrorist attack. It has more than 750 members statewide.
     Hawai‘i hospitals are still accepting nurse applications. Waivers are in place for recent nursing graduates preparing for licensing exams to work. The recent graduates will free up more experienced nurses to care for sicker patients. Nurses can apply by completing this survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HRNVLM7.  See more COVID-19 stats below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Hawaiʻi Child Nutrition Programs urges USDA to extend its food program for distance learning students
beyond Aug. 31. A letter from Hawaiʻi's Congressional Delegation went to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture.
Image from Hawaiʻi Child Nutrition Programs
EXTEND FOOD ASSISTANCE FOR HAWAIʻI'S KEIKI urge Senators Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz, and Representatives Tulsi Gabbard and Ed Case. Hawaiʻi's Congressional Delegation wrote to U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue on Friday, imploring him to extend child Food & Nutrition funding for schools and community organizations to feed students during the 2020-2021 school year.

     Following nationwide school closures during the pandemic, USDA granted waivers to Aug. 31 to extend federal school lunch programs for students, including those not physically at school. Without waivers to continue, it will be more difficult for schools to feed students learning remotely during the COVID pandemic.

     Hawaiʻi's Congressional Delegation wrote waivers prevent hunger through Summer Food Service Program and Seamless Summer Option, with "a significant impact for Hawaiʻi students and families – by some estimates providing tens of thousands of meals per day during the recent school closures."

     The USDA "should be focusing on providing maximum flexibility to support our families and schools. Instead, USDA is poised to let current waivers expire, and has failed to provide a detailed explanation of the legal or budgetary roadblocks that have prevented the agency from extending these waivers."

     Sharlene Wong, Program Administrator for the Hawaiʻi Child Nutrition Program, said, "As Hawaiʻi's schools grapple with the challenges of serving meals to our keiki, the Hawaiʻi Child Nutrition Program is grateful for the support of Hawaiʻi's Congressional delegation. The extension of these critical waivers will allow us to meet the overwhelming needs of addressing food insecurity during this pandemic.

     Nicole Woo, Senior Policy Analyst for the Hawaiʻi Appleseed Center for Law & Economic Justice, said, "During this difficult time when many children and families in Hawai'i are dealing with unprecedented challenges, it is imperative that the USDA take action to provide local communities with the flexibility they need to feed students. Rather than making it more difficult for students to receive meals, we should be working to support families by extending these waivers."
     Click here to download the signed letter.

Wayne Kawachi brings free ahi to Kaʻū Hospital's Keoni
Grace for distribution to nurses and other staff.
Photo by Nadene Ebert, OKK VP
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FORTY-SIX AHI FILETS LANDED AT KA‘Ū HOSPITAL on Friday, courtesy of fisherman and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou President Wayne Kawachi. Receiving the fish is Ka‘ū Hospitals chef and food service manager Keoni Grace. He says he is happy to give the ahi steaks to the hard-working nurses and staff members of the hospital and clinic.
     Kawachi is on a mission to give free fish to first responders. OKK has also contributed much food, including fresh fish to the community during the pandemic. OKK operates its Nā‘ālehu Market, outdoors, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to noon.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Duke Kahanamoku was an Olympian and a mentor for swimming. He
also excelled in surfing, volleyball, and canoe paddling. Scholarships
and sports team grants are available in his name from his foundation.
Photo from Outrigger Duke Kahanamoku Foundation 
OUTRIGGER DUKE KAHANAMOKU FOUNDATION OFFERS GRANTS TO SPORTS TEAMS AND SCHOLARSHIPS to students in Kaʻū and Volcano.
     Scholarships are available to students full-time, undergraduates attending an accredited college, and high school seniors demonstrating financial need. Applicants must be a resident of Hawaiʻi, with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, and participate in volleyball, surfing, sailing, canoeing, kayaking, swimming, or water polo, with a record of accomplishments and intention to compete in college.
     Applicants should demonstrate the spirit of aloha through leadership and community involvement.
     Multiple scholarships are available. Sports team grants are also available for such disciplines as volleyball, which is widely played in Kaʻū. Event Grants are also available.
     More on Duke Kahanamoku's life as an Olympian swimmer, surfer, and ambassador of Aloha, along with application requirements, can be seen here.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

REACHING OUT TO KAʻŪ, NEIGHBORHOOD PLACE OF PUNA provides rental and mortgage assistance to households who lost income due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Representatives will meet those in need in front of Mālama Market in Ocean View from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 7 and Tuesday, Sept. 8. 
     Located in Keaʻau, Neighborhood Place can also be reached at its offices,  or online. Apply and learn more at neighborhoodplace.org.
     Community Development Specialist Kaikea Kleikini Blakemore said, "Although we are based in Puna we also want the public to know that we are offering rental and mortgage assistance for the whole island. We operate to prevent family homelessness to help protect vulnerable keiki in Hawaiʻi."
     Help is also available by phone, email, and at outreach meetings. In-person appointments at 16-105 Opukahaia Street in Keaʻau can be arranged by calling 808-345-3915. Email caresact@neighborhoodplace.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

State Sen. Dru Kanuha
STATE SEN. DRU KANUHA, who represents West Kaʻūthrough Kona, released a statement Friday on "the new normal":  "As the month of August comes to a close, our West Hawaiʻicommunity has been dedicated and vigilant in the fight against COVID-19. With many family, friends, and neighbors wearing masks and practicing social distancing, the new normal has become a part of our daily routine which pays tribute to our commitment that we are all in this together. 
     "Please continue to pay attention to things like staying home when we feel sick, being mindful of locations and destinations that may be overcrowded, and use contactless services as much as possible.
     "In this new normal, our health and well-being will depend on our collective effort to maintain general physical precaution while finding new ways to live and create aloha. Therefore, let us continue to do better and keep improving the livelihood of our West Hawaiʻi Community."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Louis Sanchez is wanted by island police.
HELP POLICE LOCATE Louis Sanchez, a 26-year-old Kaʻū man wanted on several outstanding bench warrants, and for questioning in connection with other criminal investigations. He is described as 5-foot-six inches tall, 150 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair. He is known to frequent the area of South Kona and the Hawaiian Ocean View Estates subdivision. 

     Contact Detective Donovan Kohara at (808) 326-4646, ext. 238; or via email at donovan.kohara@hawaiicounty.gov, or the non-emergency number at (808) 935-3311.
     Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE STATEWIDE COVID COUNT HAS REACHED 7,410 CASES and 62 deaths, with three new fatalities today. The number of active cases is 5,600.
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light

orange is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to

150 cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

     Statewide, the 310 new cases reported today are 39 in Hawaiʻi County, seven in MauiCounty, one on Kauaʻi, and 263 on Oʻahu.
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 7,410 cases, Maui County 330, losing one to new information today, Hawaiʻi 318, and Kauaʻi 57. Twenty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places.

     Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD said the positivity rate is about ten percent,

     Statewide, 497 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,477 have been released from isolation.
     In his morning message, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said island police are "increasing their patrols and enforcement of the preventive policies of wearing face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. The situation in Hilois a very serious one and we all need to do our part to keep Hawaiʻi safe." He praised Kaʻū, Kohala, Kona, and Hāmākua districts, but reminded the public, "this is not the time to be complacent. We need you to continue to follow the preventative polices to keep your family, friends, and community safe. With your help we will stop the spread of the virus and make Hawaiʻi a safe place. Thank you for listening and take care."

     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.

     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 5,958,486 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 182,711 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 24.83 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 840,341.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HOW VOLCANOES' SHAPES ARE MEASURED is the focus of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. Today's article is by HVO geophysicist Sarah Conway:

     Geodesy through time: a history of measuring the shape of Hawaiian volcanoes

     Geodesy is the science of accurately measuring and understanding the Earth's geometric shape, gravity field, and orientation in space – and how these change through time. Many geodesists today map shorelines, determine land boundaries, and improve transportation and navigation.

     In the past century, geodesists have used different tools and survey methods to help measure the Earth's shape. While these scientists can wear many different hats, geodesists at USGS HVO are interested in studying how the surface of a volcano deforms to determine what is happening underground.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Global Positioning System survey near the coast in Hawai‘i Volcanoes 
National Park on September 10, 2019. USGS photo by P. Dotray

     This article provides a brief history of different volcano geodetic methods used through time.

     Triangulation is one of the most time-honored and earliest methods, gaining traction by the 19th century. Triangulation is the process of determining the location of a point by measuring the angles (of a triangle) between control points a known distance apart. This allows measurement of long distances, being controlled only by sight of the beacon. Each calculated distance could then be used to form another triangle forming a complex chain. The earliest triangulation at Kīlaueatook place in 1896.

     While similar to the geometry you learned in school, the formulae used in triangulation include curvature of the earth due to the lines being kilometers (miles) long. Triangulation was used sporadically for volcano monitoring on Kīlauea, though it was replaced in the mid-20th century by more accurate electronic distance measuring.

     Trilateration is a similar surveying technique but instead of measuring the angles, the lengths of the triangle’s sides are measured. Any deformation in the region of the established network could then be measured by repeating the survey at a later date.

     Leveling, a technique used to measure height differences, has been conducted at Kīlaueasince 1921 and was an integral part of HVO's monitoring from the early 1960s until a decade ago. During leveling, the differences in height along a series of benchmarks are measured and then compared with previous measurements to determine the amount of uplift or subsidence.

     Leveling remains one of the most precise ways to measure vertical height over long distances. Unfortunately, leveling is rarely done at Kīlauea today due to the amount of staff required and expansion of modern satellite-based techniques, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).

GPS for Kīlauea Caldera over the last five years. HVO image
     In the mid-1960s, an Electronic Distance Meter (EDM) was introduced to Kīlauea. With an EDM, distances could be quickly and precisely measured electronically. Most EDMs use a laser to measure the transit time of light through the atmosphere to reflective targets, which are placed around the volcano.

     Using the travel time, speed of light, and air temperature and pressure, distance can be calculated with precision of 1 mm (0.04 inch) over a distance of 1 km (0.6 miles). If the distance changes between surveys, deformation is happening! Most EDMs used today are short-range and are one component of an integrated instrument known as a "total station." Since the late 1990s at HVO, EDMs have given way to satellite techniques.

     Microgravity surveys have been conducted on the Island of Hawai‘i since the early 1970s. The force of gravity depends on the mass beneath your feet and your distance from that mass, so gravity is not a constant as magma moves and the ground surface changes shape. For volcano geodesists, microgravity surveys are conducted to measure how much magma may be moving beneath the ground. Gravimeters are extremely precise (and expensive) instruments that use either a very sensitive spring-and-boom or quartz sensor.

     Tiltmeters have been used to monitor volcanoes for decades. Just like a carpenter’s level, an electronic tiltmeter uses a small container filled with a conducting fluid that has a bubble to measure a change in slope. There are a variety of tiltmeters used but the majority of tiltmeters on the Island of Hawai‘i are installed in boreholes at least a few meters (5–20 feet) deep to control surface noise.

     The most common geodetic tools used by HVO today are high-precision Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), which includes GPS and InSAR; these have been described in two recent Volcano Watch articles (here and here).

     Geodesists from around the world come to the Island of Hawai‘i to study Earth's ever-changing shape, with Kīlauea and other Hawaiian volcanoes making it a great "natural laboratory!"
An HVO scientist in the field with a GPS unit. HVO photo 
     Volcano Activity Updates

     Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL(https://volcanoes.usgs.gov
/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

     Kīlauea monitoring data for the past month show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html.

     Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.

     This past week, about 90 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper-elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths of less than 8 kilometers (about 5 miles). Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show long-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations and fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit remain stable. Webcams show no changes to the landscape. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

     There were 2 events with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian Islandsduring the past week: a M2.7 earthquake 10 km (6 mi) ENE of Pāhala at 32 km (19 mi) depth on Aug. 25 at and a M3.0 earthquake 1 km (0 mi) ESE of Pāhala at 34 km (21 mi) depth on Aug. 23 at 10:50 a.m.

     HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity.
     Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlaueaand Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

As a sophomore, #7 Izaiah Pilanca-Emmsley was instrumental in the Trojans' win of the 8-man BIIF 
Championship on Oct. 27, 2018Photo by Dave Berry

Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
Last Year, the Trojans' first 11-man football game in seven years was played in Pāhala against the Kamehameha Schools Warriors. "Jitters" might be the reason the Kaʻū High team was shut out, with a score of 48, said Coach DuWayne Ke in a Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald article for Kamehameha, that Kaʻū Athletics posted to Twitter. Kamehameha won the 2018 BIIF Division II Championship in 11-man football. Kaʻū decided to revert to 11-man football after winning the BIIF 8-man football championship for years.

     Said Ke, "It was a good experience coming back [to 11-man], but now we have to work a little bit harder. The first game is out of the way. Maybe the jitters are, and we can move forward."

Skirmish in 11-man game in 2019. Photo by Tim Wright, Kaʻū 77
     Kaʻū's Izaiah Pilanca-Emmsley, a junior during the 2019-2020 school year, is the 2018 national 8-man rushing leader with an average of 293.3 yards per game. He managed to carry the ball 28 times for a total of 86 yards during the game, with a long gain of 14. He also scored a 98-yard kickoff return, but it was negated by a penalty.
     Loea Kaupu followed Pilanca-Emmsley, with 13 carries for 34 yards.

     The team is co-coached by Ke and his wife, Tammy Mareko-Ke. They are assisted by Nainoa Ke, who works with the offensive line, Kainalu Ke, who works defense, and Talai Ke.

     In another article by Matt Gerhart of the Tribune-Herald from Aug. 14, 2019, Ke expressed his pride in the team for doing things like "running their drills, no coach there" and holding each other accountable for using foul language.

     Gerhart asked an excited Pilanca-Emmsley how he thought the transition from 8-man to 11-man would go. "Harder to score, harder to find holes. It's always a good time to move up. More challenging and we get to play different teams."

Izaiah Pilanca-Emmsley, pigskin in tow. Photo by Tim Wright, Kaʻū 77
    The Trojans had about 40 players during the 2019-2020 season. Freshmen made up 19 of the roster. Only 12 of the roster played in 2018-2019. The 2020-2021 season is postponed due to COVID-19.

     In the Tribune-Herald article, Mareko-Ke said, "Everybody in the town is like, 'Oh, this is 11-man, you guys are going to get creamed,' but we're trying to keep the boys on the positive. We've never played Kamehameha, this is going to be our first time, and this is going to be their first time playing us. What makes you think they can try to run over us right away?"

     Defensive end player Weston Davis told Gerhart, "Coming from a small town, we want to show these guys what we can do. We're going to get there. I think they are going to take us lightly."
     Defensive end player Mana Beck-Chong told Gerhart, "I have faith in my players. We just have to push hard and be aggressive. I'm excited about my defense, we push as a family out there. It feels like family no matter what."

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs will be held Sunday, Aug. 30 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a month, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.




Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from  to  volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.


ONGOING
St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0p
UL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.


Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, August 30, 2020

0
0
The lone submarine leads the fleet of RIMPAC in Hawaiian waters for war games. See story below.
 
Photo from RIMPAC
FIRST COVID-19 DEATH ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND was reported this morning and another victim is in an Intensive Care Unit. In Pāhala Village, there is at least one active case. In Nāʻālehu zip code 96772 there is at least one; in Volcano zip code 96785 there is at least one - diagnosed in the last 28 days. The state reported 22 newly diagnosed for Hawaiʻi Island today. Islandwide, the county reports 151 active cases for today. Eighteen are hospitalized. Free testing continues in Hilo, where much of the surge is taking place.
     A statement from Civil Defense today says, "Remember the purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the virus. The turn-out along with the courtesy and patience of the people in Hilo has been tremendous. The County of Hawaiʻi is very appreciative of the teamwork with the Department of Health, National Guard, and the Community of Hawaiʻi. Thank you.
     "In efforts to control the spread of Coronavirus, the Hawaiʻi Police Department will be increasing their patrols and enforcement of the preventive policies of wearing face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. With your help, we will stop the spread of the virus to keep Hawaiʻi safe."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Campaigners for a contact tracing app for all residents who volunteer are John Kevin Vaccarello, Kumu Ramsay Taum,
and Maui Surgeon Dr. Stephani Yan, whose efforts are the subject of a resolution before Hawaiʻi County Council
this coming Tuesday; testimony invited. Images from the Island Family Surgeon Facebook
A VOLUNTEER CONTACT AND TRACING APP may soon be available on Hawaiʻi Island to track movements of people. It could message them after they visit a place at the same time as a person later diagnosed with COVID. In some countries, for example, people are notified that they were in a market at the same time as another person, later diagnosed with COVID-19. The message suggests or tells them to be tested.
     In the case of using such an app in Hawaiʻi County, signing up would be voluntary. A resolution supporting the app comes before the County Council on Tuesday. It asks Mayor Harry Kim to allow Google and Apple to use it for contact tracing on the island. The author of the resolution is Puna council member Matt Kanealiʻi-Kleinfelder. His resolution says the surge in recent cases statewide and limitations on access to hospital beds, Intensive Care Units, and ventilators are reasons to quickly move to more contact tracing and testing. He says they have been "shown to minimize and contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus." The resolution also notes that the app is already approved by Apple for a pilot program with Kauaʻi.
Some of the attributes of the COVID SafePaths programs
developed by MIT which could be used for volunteer
app for this island to fight the virus.
Image from MIT
     A partner in providing the app is nonprofit Sustain Hawaiʻi, in cooperation with such supporters as Maui surgeon Stephanie Yan, John Kevin Vaccarello, Kumu Ramsay Taum, and SafePaths from MIT. "Contact tracing is a huge piece of the infrastructure to control this virus and to open up the economy for good without the intermittent shutdowns," Yan wrote to the County and state Department of Health.
     The app would create a digital location diary through GPS that would be kept only on each person's phone, unless the person approves sharing with health, Civil Defense officials, or others. Those who test positive for COVID-19 would be prompted to voluntarily release their anonymous location data.
     The app would enable the private keeping of schedules and reminders. It could upload health records, physician videoconferencing, and other files with consent of the user.
     All testimony must be received no later than on Monday, Aug. 31. Sumbit oral testimony by video via WebEx. Email Jeanette Aiello at jeanette.aiello@hawaiicounty.gov or call 961-8255.
     Written testimony may be emailed to

counciltestimony@hawaiicounty.gov, faxed to 961- 8912, or mailed to the CountyClerk's Office in Hilo at
25 Aupuni Street, Hilo, Hawaii, 96720
. All written testimony, regardless of time of receipt, will be made a part of the permanent record.
      The meeting will be available for live viewing through Council Meetings at hawaiicounty.gov.  No in-person attendance is allowed during the pandemic.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

RESORT BUBBLES SHOULD START ON THE NEIGHBOR ISLANDS, says Mufi Hannemann, President of Hawaiʻi Lodging & Tourism Association. He gave his opinion on TV news shows across the state this weekend. A result bubble would allow people to visit resorts that are contained, with the guests unable to leave the grounds, but not locked in their rooms, which is the current protocol.
     There are those who don't want any visitors to come back and others who are afraid of ten million visitors showing up, said Hannemann, who called for a middle ground. He said he supports such carefully orchestrated, bubble visitations as film productions. "We have had a history of film production," said Hannemann, naming Hawaiʻi Five-O and Magnum P.I. "We need to move this forward."
     Hannemann talked about commercial lodging to house people for quarantine when they come to the islands and separate lodging for residents with COVID-19 who cannot quarantine at home without exposing others. He said he is working with the state and hoteliers to provide more hotel units for both. See the interview on KITV4 here. See more from Hannemann and Hawaiʻi Lodging & Tourism Association.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE LOST WAGES ASSISTANCE PROGRAM will soon add another $300 a week to unemployment during the pandemic. Gov. David Ige announced on Saturday that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has approved the state's application to participate in the unemployment insurance plus up program. "We pursued the additional funds because we know the added $300 per week will help many in our community who are struggling. I have directed the department to implement the program as quickly as possible while maintaining the program’s integrity."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Red Flag Warning covers all of Kaʻū, except for some mauka areas,
through Monday at 6 p.m. Map from National Weather Service.
ALL OF KAʻŪ IS UNDER A RED FLAG WARNING FOR FIRES. The conditions making fire risk extremely high are gusty winds and low humidity. The National Weather Service reports, "Provided the lack of any significant rainfall through the summer months, fuels have become very dry across portions of the state. These dry conditions combined with breezy trades and relative humidities" dipping below 45 percent to as low as 35 percent "through the afternoon hours will support extreme fire behavior through Monday." The Red Flag Warning remains in effect until 6 p.m. Monday with trade winds expected at 20 to 25 mph with gusts up to 30 mph. "Any fires that develop will likely spread rapidly. Outdoor burning is not recommended.
     "A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are either occurring now or will shortly. A combination of strong winds, low relative humidity, and warm temperatures can contribute to extreme fire behavior." On Maui, a wildfire on Sunday required evacuation of homes before it was contained.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HMAS Hobart became the first of the Hobart-class guided-missile destroyers to conduct live-fire during RIMPAC,
making it the most sophisticated and lethal warship ever operated by the Royal Australian Navy. RIMPAC war
games are ongoing in Hawaiian waters. Photo by Shaun Donnelly, Royal Australian Navy 
RIMPAC IS WAR-GAMING HAWAIIAN WATERS after sailing in with 22 surface ships, one submarine, multiple aircraft, and approximately 5,300 personnel from 21 nations. The Rim of the Pacific biannual event can be followed in videos, stories, and photos on its own website and social media through Facebook, Twitter,Instagram, Flickr, and the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service. It runs through tomorrow.
     The logo for RIMPAC 2020 states a theme of Capable, Adaptive, and with Partners. The theme continues, "To enhance the interoperability of the combined RIMPAC forces across the full spectrum of military operations improve individual warfighting competencies."
     Its Facebook says RIMPAC is "the world's largest multi-national marine exercise and occurs every two years." Its website gives the news, with photos and stories of achievements, such as the Australian military frigate HMAS Arunta firing Surface-to-Air Missilesalongside U.S. and Canadian military ships to test upgraded radar and other warfare systems. "These sorts of complex warfighting exercises with multinational partners demonstrate that the Royal Australian Navy is able to operate seamlessly with other highly-advanced navies in our region," said the Arunta's Commander Troy Duggan.
Guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) launches an SM-2 missile in Hawaiian waters during the ongoing
biannual RIMPAC exercises. Image from video by U.S. Navy Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Devin M. Langer
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI POLICE DEPARTMENT'S 92ND POLICE RECRUIT CLASS RECOGNITION CEREMONY was held in August at the Public Safety Building in Hilo. In accordance with social distancing restrictions, it was private, limited to police personnel and guest speakers. Friends, family, and the public were able to view it live by visiting the Hawaiʻi Police Department's Facebook page. Watch the recording here.

     The 92nd Police Recruit Class began their training on Feb. 18, 2020. The announcement from HPD says, "They started off as 27 strangers who had come together from as far away as New York and Arizona, from all over the Big Island, and even some from Oʻahu. In the end, after six months of intensive training, 21 police recruits remained and graduated."

     Class Officers are President Joshua "Kaipo" Stender, Vice President Rickielee "Pauahi" Kamakau, and Treasurer Laura Torres. Other class members are Krimsen Abilla, Charles Caldwell-Kaai, Dylan Chaves, Cody Correia, Craig Derasin, Joseph DiNapoli, Malik Durden, Bailey Langsner, Andrew Love Jr., Keanu Lumwon, Devon Manuel, Greg Matias, Axtan Mattos, Dustin Medeiros, Victoria Rios, Manuel Soares IV, Dayn Suguitan, and Ekahi Travaso.

Hawaiʻi Police Department's 92nd Recruit Class. Photo from HPD
     Recognition went to recruits who achieved outstanding performance. Officer DiNapoli won the Academic Award. He attained and upheld the highest grade point average on weekly and certification examinations. Officer Matias won the Firearms Award for his interest and proficiency and highest rating in firearms training. The Police Department's Training Room will display their names on a perpetual plaque.
     Officer Kamakau won the Physical Fitness Award for excelling and maintaining conditioning. Officer Stender received the Overall Outstanding Recruit Award for motivational and leadership qualities while serving as the Class President.
     The newly-graduated officers will undergo four months of on-the-job field training with veteran police officers to qualify to work alone.



To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

POLICE HAVE CHARGED THE MAN ARRESTED FOR LAST TUESDAY'S MURDER on North Kulani Road near Highway 11. Dwayne Cory Wallace, 29, arrested in Orchidland, is charged with second-degree murder, methamphetamine possession, carrying a loaded firearm on a public road, and possession of a firearm. His bail is $1.9 million. Wallace allegedly used a shotgun to kill 26-year-old Peter Cyrus Grammer, of Mountain View, and left him in the middle of the road. Wallace was carrying a rifle when police arrested him, running from his vehicle.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ken Love, Executive Director of Hawaiʻi Tropical Fruit Growers,
will be the featured speaker at the Hawaiʻi Farmers Union
United Meeting on Wednesday, through Zoom, at 6:30 p.m.
KEN LOVE, HAWAIʻI TROPICAL FRUIT GROWERS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR will be the speaker at the Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United zoom meeting this Wednesday, Sept. 2 at 6:30 p.m.
     The event will also provide entertainment with Mike Love's message-based Reggae and Rastafari music. He currently creates music with his band The Full Circle.
     The event features a fundraiser, with Slow Money providing a donation for every Zoom participant who toasts an Ola Brewing beverage.
     The Wednesday, Sept. 16 virtual meeting at 6:30 p.m. will feature ʻUlu expert and author Dr. Noa Lincoln and musician Makana. Zoom in to join the meeting.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MERGING GALAXIES DISCOVERED AT THREE MAUNAKEA TELESCOPES are getting international attention in the scientific community. A statement from the collaborative team at the telescopes describes the find as a "cosmic dance between two merging galaxies, each one containing a supermassive black hole that’s rapidly feeding on so much material it creates a phenomenon known as a quasar."
      Astronomers have discovered several pairs of such merging galaxies, or luminous "dual" quasars, using Subaru Telescope, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Dual quasars are so rare, a research team led by the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe at the University of Tokyo estimates only 0.3 percent of all known quasars have two supermassive black holes that are on a collision course with each other. The study published in the August 26, 2020 issue of The Astrophysical Journal.
     "In spite of their rarity, they represent an important stage in the evolution of galaxies, where the central giant is awakened, gaining mass, and potentially impacting the growth of its host galaxy," said Shenli Tang, a graduate student at the University of Tokyo and co-author of the study.
One of three rare dual quasars discovered by teams from three Muanakea
Observatories. Image from John Silverman and crew
     Quasars are one of the most luminous, energetic objects known in the universe, powered by supermassive black holes that are millions to billions of times more massive than our Sun. As material swirls around a black hole at the center of a galaxy, it is heated to high temperatures, releasing so much light that the quasar can outshine its host galaxy. This makes a merging pair of galaxies with quasar activity hard to detect; it is difficult to separate the light from the two quasars because they are in such close proximity to each other. Also, observing a wide enough area of the sky to catch these rare events in sufficient numbers is a challenge.
     To overcome these obstacles, the team took advantage of a sensitive wide survey of the sky using the Hyper Suprime-Cam camera on the Subaru Telescope.
     "To make our job easier, we started by looking at the 34,476 known quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with HSC imaging to identify those having two (or more) distinct centers," said lead author John Silverman of the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe. "Honestly, we didn't start out looking for dual quasars. We were examining images of these luminous quasars to determine which type of galaxies they preferred to reside in when we started to see cases with two optical sources in their centers where we only expected one."
     The team identified 421 promising cases. However, there was still the chance many of these were not bonafide dual quasars but rather chance projections such as starlight from our own galaxy. Confirmation required detailed analysis of the light from the candidates to search for definitive signs of two distinct quasars.
     Using Keck Observatory's Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) and Gemini Observatory’s Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer, Silverman and his team identified three dual quasars, two of which were previously unknown. Each object in the pair showed the signature of gas moving at thousands of kilometers per second under the influence of a supermassive black hole.
One of three rare dual quasars discovered by teams from three Muanakea Observatories.
Image from John Silverman and crew
     SDSS J141637.44+003352.2, a dual quasar at a distance for which the light reaching this planet was emitted 4.6 billion years ago. The two quasars are 13,000 light-years apart on the sky, placing them near the center of a single massive galaxy that appears to be part of a group, as shown by the neighboring galaxies in the left panel. In the lower panels, optical spectroscopy has revealed broad emission lines associated with each of the two quasars, indicating that the gas is moving at thousands of kilometers per second in the vicinity of two distinct supermassive black holes. The two quasars are different colors, due to different amounts of dust in front of them. Credit: Silverman et al.
     The statement from the astronomers says, "The newly-discovered dual quasars demonstrate the promise of wide-area imaging combined with high-resolution spectroscopic observations to reveal these elusive objects, which are key to better understanding the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes." See more at keckobservatory.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light

orange is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to

150 cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

THE WORLDWIDE COVID-19 CASE COUNT EXCEEDED 25 MILLION today. The death toll is more than 844,695. COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 5,994,624 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 183,039 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths.

     Hawaiʻi Island reports 22 new cases today. There is at least one active case in the last 28 days in Kaʻū zip codes 96772 and 96777, and Volcano zip code 96785. Hawaiʻi Island reported 340 cases since the pandemic began. Since the pandemic began, one person died from the virus on this island. Their death, reported today, is the only one for the state.

     Lt. Gov. Josh Green said today there are 5,757 active cases statewide, 272 of them hospitalized with COVID-19. With 196,719 people tested since the pandemic began, the state positivity rate is 4.2 percent. However, recent testing positivity, from the last 2,784 people to be tested, is 7.2 percent. He said that the positivity rate lowering is a good sign.

     Statewide, 200 new cases are reported today, with four in MauiCounty and 174 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 8,339. Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 7,584 cases, Maui County 334, and Kauaʻi 57. Twenty-four victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places.

     Statewide, 482 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,520 have been released from isolation.
     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c
Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Lowe's Project Heroes volunteers, some paint-spattered after some hard work sprucing up Pāhala Preschool 
last Summer. Photo from Kathy Andrade

Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
Ebby, the Lowe's employee who spearheaded the project. 
Photo from Kathy Andrade

Last Summer, Lowe's Heroes Project volunteers spruced up Pāhala Preschool. The preschool has served Kaʻū for over 25 years, under the direction of the Andrade family, beginning with Judy Andrade and currently operated by her daughter, Kathy Andrade.
     The school, where staff teach their students "the core values of being a Christian along with development and preparedness for entrance into kindergarten," has welcomed more than 750 keiki for early training in the classrooms and grounds. The school is in session now, despite the pandemic.

     Over the last quarter-century, on grounds owned by the MethodistChurch, the building has withstood numerous hurricanes, earthquakes, and high winds, and was in need of several repairs. Last year, through Lowe's Heroes Project, Pāhala Preschool "has been blessed with a makeover," said Andrade.

Rolling and edging, it took many hands last Summer to transform Pāhala 
Preschool into its newly painted, colorful self. Photo from Kathy Andrade

     Lowe's Heroes Project encourages Lowe's employees to volunteer and positively impact their communities. The program is designed to motivate employees to adopt a volunteer project with a local nonprofit organization or school, and make a difference.

     Said Andrade, "This momentum of blessings has made a positive improvement to Pāhala Preschool. Lowe's employees have come to Pāhala Preschool as volunteers and have left as family."

     Donations from Lowe's helped volunteers transform the school. Colorful new paint covers the interior and exterior, including the children's tables and cubbies. New fixtures, lights, and rugs replaced worn versions. New swings for playtime were placed outside, along with two new table and bench sets, used for snack time, lunch, activities, and fellowship.


    Andrade said the Lowe's Heroes Project volunteers donated "hours of hard work, sweat, love, and friendship, as they rejuvenate Pāhala Preschool, to serve children of the Kaʻū district in the future."

Pāhala Preschool's classroom, became shiny with bright colors through a makeover last year this time, with 
help from Lowe's Heroes Project and volunteers. The building and grounds have served Pāhala's 
pre-Kindergarten keiki for over half a century through the efforts of the Andrade family. 
Photo from Kathy Andrade

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a month, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.

Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from  to  volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING
St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, August 31, 2020

0
0
Hawaiian Airlines will become a smaller company with fewer employees and flights as it sets out to
survive the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo from Hawaiian Airlines
HAWAIIAN AIRLINES sent out letters of intent today to lay off 2,004 employees. More than 800 are flight attendants and more than 300 are pilots. The others work in ground support, marketing, and administration. Some employees have taken voluntary separation packages. The layoffs will be over time, said CEO Peter Ingraham. With the sharp decrease in travel worldwide, Hawaiʻi's largest airline is planning to become a smaller company in order to survive, according to Ingraham.
     The layoffs at Hawaiian Air led state and university economists to reduce expectations in economic recovery in the near future.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ALAN WONG, THE RENOWN CHEF WHO SERVES AND PROMOTES KAʻŪ COFFEE, announced today that he suspended service at his Asian Fusion restaurant on King Street in Honolulu on Sunday evening. He told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser that he is putting a pause on his restaurant until the COVID-19 pandemic settles down and restaurants can be open without concern for shutting down again, and with confidence in the safety of staff and guests.
Alan Wong, with his own brand of
Kaʻū Coffee.
Alan Wong with Kaʻū Coffee farmer
Lorie Obra, whose Rusty's brand became
a favorite in his restaurants.
     Among the Kaʻū Coffees he served and promoted over the years are those from Rusty's, Will & Grace, Bull Kailiawa, and Wally Young. Wong also created his own Kaʻū Coffee label.
     A coffee tasting for Alan Wong was held at Pāhala Plantation House years ago where he met many of the Kaʻū Coffee farmers.
     Wong also promoted Kaʻū Coffee on cruise ships and to many other restaurants.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE "OBSESSION WITH THE 'BORDER' AT THE AIRPORT distracted us from building the public health awareness and infrastructure that will help us to get through" the COVID-19 pandemic, said Brian Schatz in an op-ed this week. "We seemed, all of us, from the media to the politicians to the citizens who elected them, more interested in whether or not an individual scofflaw from the mainland was violating the quarantine than whether or not we were doing what was necessary to be ready for this onslaught."
     The U.S. Senator pointed out that COVD-19, more than coming from travelers, "is spreading among us because of us, not because of tourism. We cannot fix this with a border, not when there's more disease in Honolulu than New York City."
Marshallese language education about COVID-19 and working on coffee farms.
Sen. Brian Schatz says more education about the disease is needed in the
Pacific Islander community, which is hard-hit by the virus.
Poster from Hawaiʻi County Department of Research & Development
     Schatz recommended the following to stop the surge of the virus:
     "Focus on vulnerable communities with language and cultural competency, and do it immediately. There is a rolling catastrophe in our Pacific Islander community, with eight to 10 times higher COVID-19 rates than the rest of Hawaiʻi. We need targeted outreach in Pacific island languages with Pacific island leaders. We also need to continue to address this disparity by alleviating overcrowded housing.
     "Ramp-up contact tracing and testing, something that has inexplicably not yet been done. I thought this was under control when we helped launch a training program for 400 contact tracers at the University of Hawaiʻi. It was a shock to learn that the Department of Health chose not to hire many of these individuals, and went back to their 'contact tracing isn't a panacea' talking point. Nothing is a panacea — which is why we have to do everything, and that includes contact tracing.
     "Spend the CARES Act money designated for fighting the disease. We still have most of our testing money unspent, and several other categories of the $7 billion in danger of having to go back to the U.S. Treasury by year's end if we don't get our act together.
     "Have a statewide, universal mask mandate. We still have significant noncompliance, and we need to reinforce that masks are not optional. Lawyers will correctly point out that everyone is covered under individual county orders, but everything to emphasize and enforce the importance of masks should be done.
U.S. Sen Brian Schatz lays out a plan to recover from
the COVID-19 health and economic disaster.
     "Move carefully forward with the Safe Travels Hawaiʻi Program, understanding that a negative test as a barrier to entry in Hawaiʻi is not foolproof, but it's better than the current quarantine that is increasingly absurd (many originating destinations have lower infection rates than us) and difficult to enforce.
     "Allow people to exercise outdoors. Whatever happens in the coming weeks, this is going to take a while, and helping people remain mentally and physically healthy is a priority. HPD may be hesitant to enforce rules around gatherings, but that's no reason to force everyone onto narrow sidewalks, or stay at home completely."
     Schatz said that communications about COVID-19 "need to be more clear, concise, and focused on what people should do, rather than fixating on disagreements among politicians. This isn't a matter of PR consultants giving our leaders the right words to say. But it would be a good start to not have simultaneous and competing press conferences, and to have clear instructions. The deluge of information has caused some to want to ignore the orders, instead of heed them.
     "Finally, our actions should reflect not just science but our values. We cannot open bars before schools. We cannot force people to pay a gym for exercise or say that the only way you can visit with family is to pay for dinner at an indoor restaurant. We cannot bicker. We have to stay disciplined and do the things that we have seen work around the world. We are all in the same canoe, and if we don't paddle in unison, we will continue to go in circles."
     This Op-Ed was originally carried in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. See it here. Also see Shatz'Facebook and Twitter.

Dr. Libby Char, MD, is an emergency
medicine physician with experience in
management of first responders.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A CHANGE AT THE HELM OF THE HAWAIʻI HEALTH DEPARTMENT will take place Sept. 15, with the retirement of state DOH Director Bruce Anderson.
     Gov. David Ige made the announcement today, praising Anderson's work as a public health and environmental management professional over the last 35 years in Hawaiʻi. The new acting and likely permanent director will be a physician, Dr. Libby Char.
     Char is an Emergency Room physician and graduate of the University of Hawaiʻi, John A. Burns School of Medicine. After completing residency training in California, she returned to Hawaiʻi to the clinical practice of emergency medicine at The Queen's Medical Center. She provided administrative oversight for the City and County of Honolulu EMS system for many years.
     Char has most recently focused on developing systems of care, training, protocols, and emergency response, and best practices in the pre-hospital environment. She provides medical direction for several EMS, Fire, and Ocean Safety agencies across the state of Hawaiʻi, and is the current chair of the State of Hawaiʻi EMS Advisory Committee.
     Ige said, "Dr. Char brings experience in medicine and administration to the department during a time of great stress on the state's healthcare system. I'm confident that she will step into the role with energy and passion for ensuring the health of Hawaiʻi's people."
Dr. Bruce Anderson will retire as director of
the state Department of Health.
     Char said, "I am honored to fill the position of Director of Health for the State of Hawaiʻi. We are in a difficult position, with a heavy burden of COVID-19 affecting the health, well-being, and livelihood of so many of us. We must move forward together, through collaborative efforts, caring for each other with a shared sense of purpose. In doing so, we will regain the health of our communities and our state."
     Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD, also praised Anderson for his dedication and work and said he looks forward to the new leadership, particularly in pushing forward contact tracing to help Hawaiʻi open up the economy while protecting the public.
     Anderson said, "It has been an honor and pleasure to serve as Director under Gov. Ige, with Nolan and my other fellow cabinet members. In my retirement, I look forward to doing a lot more fishing and horseback riding with my wife."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A CHANGE AT THE HELM OF THE STATE PRISON SYSTEM will take place Oct. 1, with the retirement of the state Director of Public Safety Nolan Espinda. Gov. David Ige announced today that Maria Cook, deputy director for administration will be temporarily assigned and has been granted signatory authority while Espinda is on 
Nolan Espinda, chief of Hawaiʻi's prison
system, will retire. 
personal leave through September. The deputy directors for law enforcement and corrections will continue in their capacities to oversee their division operations. Espinda will be available to provide advice remotely in the interim should the need arise, said the statement from the governor. Ige is expected to make an interim appointment to lead the department in the coming weeks. 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE NUMBER OF COVID-19 CASES AT YUKIO OKUTSA STATE VETERANS HOME in Hilo has reached 38, with ten of them employees. The 28 residents include three who died, the only COVID-19 deaths on this island, all happening in the past few days. Retesting of all residents and staff was set for today.
     The Veterans Home, managed by Avalon Health Care Group, is one of Hawaiʻi Health System's facilities, which include Hilo Medical Center and Kaʻū Hospital.
     Three of the Veterans Home victims are hospitalized, none on ventilators. The statewide death toll from COVID-19 was, seven statewide, the highest since pandemic began. See more COVID statistics below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

APPOINTMENTS ARE REQUIRED FOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION AND LICENSING as of Tuesday, Sept. 1. County of Hawai‘i Department of Finance announced, "Due to the recent surge in COVID-19 cases on Hawai‘i Island and in an effort to maintain shorter lines and discourage gatherings of more than 10 people, the Vehicle Registration and Licensing office will only service customers by appointment. To offset the loss of walk-in service, additional appointments will be offered at each of our locations."

     All customers must wear face coverings and six-foot social distancing must be observed "at all times. Only those customers receiving services will be allowed inside the lobby, and minors or those needing additional assistance may have one additional person accompany them."

     Anyone who has traveled off-island within the past 14 days, has a fever of 100.4 degrees or higher, is feeling sick, or has taken a COVID-19 test without receiving the results, is asked to "not attempt to visit our offices for services or schedule an appointment in-person."
     Schedule appointments at https://vehicleregistrationlicensing.as.me.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MAINTAIN SOCIAL DISTANCING FROM MAIL CARRIERS, requests the U.S. Postal Service. Mayor Harry Kim put out the word over social media today: "The Postal Service requests that BigIsland residents maintain a safe, six-foot distance between themselves and their mail carriers while those carriers are delivering mail. Customers – especially children – should not approach their mail carriers to get their mail and packages."
     Kim said, for both customer and carrier safety, customers "should allow their carriers to completely depart their mailbox areas before collecting their deliveries." For deliveries that require a signature, carriers will knock on the customers' door, back away to a safe distance and, instead of asking for customers signatures on their mobile devices, they will ask for a name. The carriers will then leave the mail or packages in a safe place for retrieval by the customer.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FILL OUT 2020 CENSUS QUESTIONNAIRES is the message from Mayor Harry Kim today. In two social media posts, the mayor asked Hawaiʻi County residents to submit census information if not already pau. "10 minutes of your time shapes how your community is funded for 10 years. Respond Now to the #2020Censusonline, by phone via the paper questionnaire with unique ID mailed, or sent to your home. www.2020CENSUS.GOV."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TWO NEW DEATHS ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND are reported today. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense says both victims were residents of the Yukio Okutsu Veteran's Home in Hilo. Civil Defense reports 165 active cases for the island, with 17 hospitalized. Five more people died on other islands today, bringing the state death toll to 70.

     The state reports Hawaiʻi Island has 24 new cases today. There is at least one active case in the last 28 days in Kaʻū zip codes for Nāʻālehu 96772, Pāhala 96777, and Volcano zip code 96785. Hawaiʻi Island reported 364 cases since the pandemic began. Since the pandemic began, three people died from the virus on this island.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light

orange is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to

150 cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

     In his daily update, Lt. Gov. Josh Green, MD, said there are 5,825 active cases statewide, 292 of them hospitalized with COVID-19. With 198,182 people tested since the pandemic began, the state positivity rate is 4.3 percent. However, recent testing positivity, from the last 1,463 people to be tested, is 9.1 percent. He calls the mask mandate "critical."

     Statewide, 133 new cases are reported today, with one in MauiCounty, one a resident out-of-state, and 107 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 8,472. Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 7,691 cases, Maui County 335, and Kauaʻi 57. Twenty-five victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places.

     Statewide, 508 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,578 have been released from isolation.
     Civil Defense says there will be testing in Puna District this week, with schedule to be announced. "The purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the virus. For a complete list of testing facilities go to the list on the Civil Defense website." See hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense.
     Civil Defense reminds the public that Hawaiʻi Police Department is increasing their patrols and enforcement of the preventive policies of wearing face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. "We need everybody to be responsible and follow these measures to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. With your help, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep Hawaiʻi safe."

     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 6,027,111 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 183,499 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 25.34 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 848,394.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a week on Tuesdays, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.


Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from  to  volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.


ONGOING

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.



Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.


Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, September 1, 2020

0
0
The National Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary invites the public to join its meeting in September, virtually. It also
provides a film on the sanctuary, showing whales and many species, like the honu above, protected.  See story below.
Photo from NOAA
THE STATE LAUNCHED ITS SAFE TRAVELS APPLICATION for all incoming travelers today. A message from state government says this new digital application "collects the required health and travel information and is critical to protecting the health of our residents and visitors alike." It is seen as the first step in opening up trans-Pacific travel to Hawaiʻi without a 14-day quarantine for those with negative COVID-1 tests, as early as Oct. 1.
     Safe Travels is one part of a multi-layered screening process which includes arrival temperature checks and secondary screening for those with symptoms or temperatures of 100.4 degrees or higher. The application can be found at https://travel.hawaii.gov. Read more at https://ets.hawaii.gov/new-online-safe-travels-application-mandatory-on-sept-1/.


See the Safe Travels explanation and forms for those
entering the Hawaiian Islands. Image from DOT
WITH TRAVEL INTO HAWAIʻI THROUGH PRE-ARRIVAL TESTING moved to at least Oct. 1, the state Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism adjusted its economic outlooks. DBEDT predicts that Hawaiʻi's economy will contract by 12.3 percent. If the economy had opened today for trans-Pacific travel, there would have been a smaller contraction of the economy, reported DBEDT.
     The largest contraction is in the visitor industry, with arrivals free-falling by 98.8 percent from April through July, says the DBEDT report released last Friday. Food and drink serving businesses lost 35,400 jobs. Accommodations lost 25,800 jobs. Transportation, warehousing, and utilities lost 8,500 jobs, and retail lost 7,300 jobs.
     State government lost 11,700 jobs, while county government lost 400 jobs. General Excise taxes, which help to fund state and county government, decreased by $722.6 million, while Transient Accommodations Taxes on hotel rooms, B&B's, and vacation rentals, another source of income for government, declined by $103.3 million.
     DBEDT predicts that overall for 2020, the average annual unemployment rate will be at 10.9 percent, then decrease to 7.2 percent in 2021, 6.6 percent in 2022, and 6.3 percent in 2023. These rates are much higher than the average Hawaiʻi unemployment rate of 2.5 percent 2017 to 2019.
     Nominal personal income is expected to decrease by 12.1 percent in 2020, then will increase by 5.3 percent in 2021 and 3.9 percent in 2022. Nominal personal income growth rate will be at 3.0 percent in 2023. See DBEDT reports: State Economic Recovery Draft Plan, COVID-19 and Hawaiʻi's Economy, along with programs to sell Hawaiʻi-made products and more.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MEASURES PASSED BY THE 2020 HAWAIʻI LEGISLATURE are on Gov. David Ige's veto list,   released yesterday with explanations:
     HB1523 RELATING TO THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BUDGET. Provides funding to the Department of Education using Coronavirus Air, Relief, and Economic Security Act money to purchase devices for schools with student populations of fifty percent or greater on reduced-price lunch, for the period from July 1, 2020 to December 30, 2020.
     Veto Rationale: This measure is not necessary as the Department of Education has received funds via the Governor's discretionary funding for this purpose, which does not limit the schools that are eligible.
     HB1846 RELATING TO ENERGY EFFICIENCY. Mandates that all state facilities with an area of ten thousand square feet or more (not including Aloha Stadium) implement all cost-effective energy efficiency measures by Jan. 1, 2024; that the State Energy Office be tasked with collecting all utility bill and energy usage data for state-owned facilities monthly, and making such information available in a publicly accessible format; and that beginning July 1, 2020, if feasible and cost-effective, designs for all new state building construction must maximize energy and water efficiency, energy generation potential, and use of building materials that reduce the project's carbon footprint.
     Veto Rationale: The State is already in the process of implementing the energy efficiency changes that the bill addresses. The bill does not clearly define energy efficiency and the word "all" creates a possibly unrealistic expectation that could open the state to lawsuits. Additionally, there are concerns that contractors employed under this legislation will be able to benefit from both the contract paid for by tax-payer dollars as well as tax credits associated with the kind of work done, with no assurance that the overall cost of the project will be adjusted appropriately.
     HB2124 RELATING TO THE CODE OF ETHICS. Amends State Ethics Code to prohibit Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and other high-level government officials from representing any person or business for a fee or other compensation regarding any legislative or administrative action for 12 months after termination from respective positions.
     Veto Rationale: The additional restrictions put on volunteer boards and commissions members who fulfill an important role in protecting the community through their service will make it significantly more challenging to recruit for already difficult-to-fill positions.
     SB2206 RELATING TO HOMELESSNESS. Authorizes Board of Land & Natural Resources to issue revocable month-to-month temporary permits for the emergency sheltering of homeless persons on state lands up until 90 days after the emergency relief period specified in the Governor's final Supplementary Proclamation relating to the COVID-19 emergency, irrespective of any separate proclamation terminating the disaster emergency relief period in the Governor's final Supplementary Proclamation relating to the COVID-19 emergency.
     Veto Rationale: Under emergency proclamation, the Governor already has the ability to take the necessary actions to implement the purpose of this bill. As written, this bill exposes the state to liability.
     SB2523 RELATING TO PUBLIC SAFETY. Requires Department of Public Safety to expand certain appropriated funds during fiscal year 2020-2021 for the community-based work furlough program for female inmates.
     Veto Rationale: The measure is not required because the Department of Public Safety is already in the process of awarding a contract to a community-based furlough program. Furthermore, enacting this measure would jeopardize public safety as it restricted the department from expending payroll and operating costs.
     SB2638 RELATING TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE. Establishes a five-year pilot program to strengthen government response to domestic violence and increase offender accountability; amends the offense of abuse of family or household members to provide for a petty misdemeanor offense; allows a deferred acceptance of guilty or no contest plea in cases involving petty misdemeanor or misdemeanor abuse offenses; requires the court to revoke the defendant's probation or set aside the defendant's deferred acceptance of guilty plea and enter an adjudication of guilt in specific instances outlined.
     Veto Rationale: Currently, any person convicted of an abuse offense is prohibited from owning or possessing any firearm. Of grave concern with this bill is that abusers who are granted and complete a term of deferral would not be subject to the firearm prohibition because a deferral is not a conviction. This would allow abusers to own and possess a firearm.
     ITEMS VETOED FROM CARES ACT SPENDING PLAN: Of the $321,000,000 struck from the bill the governor intends to use for funding for the state's share of disaster response, as required by law; expanded supplies of personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies for entities that were not identified in the bill; public health education; personnel, testing, and tracing related to the pandemic response; expanded capabilities of public safety facilities and personnel to include, but not limited to, treatment and quarantine facilities, medical staff, and enhanced cleaning activities; additional support to counties for programs supporting residents and businesses; and payback to the unemployment trust fund to help reduce the burden to businesses.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Humpback mother and calf in the Marine Sanctuary, which invites the public to join in its advisory
council meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 15.Photo from NOAA
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS HUMPBACK WHALE National Marine Sanctuary advisory council meeting virtually on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Presentations will include acoustic research, a proposal for voluntary speed regulations for ocean-going vessels in the sanctuary.
     The sanctuary is administered by a partnership of NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawaiʻi, through the Division of Aquatic Resources. The sanctuary works to protect humpback whales through research, education, conservation, and stewardship.
     The virtual meeting will be held using GoToWebinar. Register in advance here.
     During the meeting, the advisory council will address questions from members and the public. For a copy of the meeting agenda, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov. Public comment will be taken at approximately 10:50 a.m. Those who would like to comment during the virtual meeting can sign up in advance by selecting "yes" when registering. Order of comments will be based on date and time of registration. No public comments will be audio or video recorded. Comments can also be sent to cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov.
     See the sanctuary on Facebook and on the web at http://hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov.
See NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries at http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov and State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources at https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar/.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI RANKS TENTH OVERALL HARDEST-WORKING STATE in the U.S., according to a recent WalletHub report. Hawaiʻi ranks tenth in share of workers with multiple jobs and tenth in average commute time. Hawaiʻi ranks 22nd in average hours worked per week.


     The Aloha State ranks 4th-highest in average leisure time per worker. The highest is Alabama, followed by South DakotaVermont, Hawaiʻi, and MississippiWyomingMontanaOklahomaNew HampshireKansas, and Nebraska have the least leisure time.
     WalletHub compared the 50 states across ten key metrics to gauge where the hardest-working people live. The data set ranges from average workweek hours to share of workers with multiple jobs to annual volunteer hours per resident.
     WalletHub says Americans were working an average of almost 1,800 hours per year prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, but fewer people have jobs this year. See the report, 2020's Hardest-Working States in America.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SIGN UP FOR SOLID WASTE OPERATIONS ALERTS at https://member.everbridge.net/index/482552460607505#/signup. Department of Environmental Management, Solid Waste Division, will communicate site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

     The Solid Waste Mass Notification System will automatically send alerts to subscribers via phone or email. Subscribers may request alerts be limited to specific transfer stations.

     This alert system is separate from the county Civil Defense Agency alerts, which can be found at www.hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense. The community is encouraged to immediately register by using the link found at hawaiizerowaste.org.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A RECENT UPTICK IN MAIL THEFT sparked a message from Hawaiʻi Island police today, who have seen an increase in theft from both incoming and outgoing residential mailboxes. Police urge residents to install locked mailboxes at their residences to deter theft of incoming mail and to drop off outgoing mail at a secure United States Postal Service drop box or post office.
     Anyone that witnesses suspicious activity or may have been a victim of mail theft is urged to call non-emergency, (808) 935-3311.
     Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.


Wild sheep and other ungulates on Mauna Loa can cause damage
to the native environment. NPS photo
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A SURVEY OF UNGULATES, such as wild she and , in Kahuku, between 4,000-and 6,500-ft. elevation.

     Also on Thursday, Sept. 3, between and , transport fence materials from the ‘Ōla‘a Unit between 4,000- and 3,500-ft. elevation.

     More Park overflight information will be announced in future Kaʻū News Briefs.

     In addition, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation. The Park regrets any noise impact to residents and Park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather.
     Management of the Park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KAʻŪ ZIP CODE 96737 REPORTS ITS FIRST CASE since the pandemic began. Kaʻū zip codes 96772 and 96777, and Volcano zip code 96785, have also had active cases within the last 28 days. The last Kaʻū zip code, 96718, covers Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, and reports a population of 129.

     Four new deaths in the state, one on Hawaiʻi Island, are reported today. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense says this island's victim, a man over 80 years of age, was a resident of the Yukio Okutsu Veteran's Home in Hilo. The other three victims were Oʻahu residents, two men and one woman, all 70 years of age or older. The state death toll is 74.

     Civil Defense reports 180 active cases for Hawaiʻi Island today, with 11 hospitalized.

     The state reports Hawaiʻi Island has 19 new cases today. Hawaiʻi Island reported 383 cases since the pandemic began. Since the pandemic began, four people died from the virus on this island.

     In his daily update, Lt. Gov. Josh Green said there are 5,945 active cases statewide, 288 of them hospitalized with COVID-19. With 202,116 people tested since the pandemic began, the state positivity rate is 4.3 percent. Recent testing positivity, from the last 4,004 people to be tested, is 4.5 percent. He asks everyone to make sure to wear a mask.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light

orange is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange is 51 to

150 cases. Red (not pictured) is 151+ cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

     Statewide, 181 new cases are reported today, with five in MauiCounty and 157 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 8,653. Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 7,848 cases, Maui County 340, and Kauaʻi 57. Twenty-five victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places.

     Statewide, 532 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,634 have been released from isolation.

     Civil Defense says Premier Medical Group will provide free drive-thru COVID-19 testing tomorrow, Wednesday, Sept. 2 at PāhoaRegionalPark from to No copay; no insurance necessary, but bring insurance card if have; wear a face covering at all times; and observe social distancing. "Increased testing will continue throughout the island. Remember the purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the virus as well as to provide early treatment." See hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense.

     Civil Defense reminds the public that Hawaiʻi Police Department "continues their enforcement of preventive policies" and that officials are reviewing "to address the problem areas of gatherings that contribute to the spread of the virus… We need everybody to be responsible and follow the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. With your help, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. Thank you for listening and take care."

     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.

     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 6,073,121 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 184,644 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 25.66 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 855,542.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and a Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a month, the second Tuesday of the month, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.

Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet of social distancing are required in common areas. Open to authorized patrons, Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING
St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, September 2, 2020

0
0
World War II veteran Iwao Yonemitsu, of the famed 442nd Division that fought in Europe, remembers the 75th
anniversary of the end of World War II, which ended 75 years ago. Above, he and wife Alice attend the 2018
dedication of a new lectern they sponsored at Nāʻālehu School. It is made of koa and other local
woods, by local artist Thomas King. See more below. Photo by Nalani Parlin
THE ACE HARDWARE IN OCEAN VIEW IS CLOSED TODAY. A post from HouseMart Ace Hardware says, "Last night, Sept. 1, we were informed that one of our employees at our Rancho Ace Hardware location in Oceanview tested positive for COVID-19. The employee last worked in the store on Sunday, Aug. 30. The store will be closed for today and will be professionally cleaned. All of our employees at Rancho Ace Hardware are being tested for COVID-19 as a precautionary measure and will need to submit a negative test result prior to returning to work. We anticipate reopening our store tomorrow, Sept. 3. We appreciated your patience and continued support during this pandemic."
     Nāʻālehu Ace remains open and staff said that no one at Nāʻālehu also works at the Ocean View store. The COVID zip code map shows at least one case in Ocean View. See more on the COVID count below, which also shows Hilo going red with COVID-19 for the first time. See below for Miloliʻi COVID cases.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A CLUSTER OF TEN COVID-19 CASES AT MILOLIʻI has been made public by state Sen. Kai Kahele, whose family roots are in the village known for fishing and canoe paddling. Kahele and all fellow members of Hawaiʻi Island's delegation to the state legislature wrote to Mayor Harry Kim:
     "We are requesting the immediate closure of the Miloliʻi Fishing Village in South Kona in light of the recent outbreak of COVID-19. It is our understanding there are at least 10 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the village and with the upcoming Labor Day weekend, we strongly believe an entry
control point be immediately established so that village access is limited to residents only.
Sen. Kai Kahele has called for isolation of the Hawaiian fishing
and canoe village of Miloliʻi, due to an outbreak of COVID-19.
Photo from Miloliʻi Canoe Club
     "The Miloliʻi Fishing Village community of approximately 300 residents has many multigenerational households and because they do not have anywhere else to go, COVID-19 has the potential to spread rapidly to other members in the home. We are also requesting the immediate testing of the entire Miloliʻi Fishing Village by the County of Hawai‘i and/or the Department of Health. In addition, we are requesting that each household be provided adequate personal protective equipment as available by the County of Hawaiʻi. Finally, we recommend educational outreach in the village so that the community realizes the seriousness of the pandemic and the importance of following social distancing and mask-wearing rules.
     "We ask that you implement the closure of Miloliʻi Fishing Village immediately. Your prompt actions will help to contain and control the spread of COVID-19 outbreak within this community, especially with the upcoming Labor Day weekend. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us." See more on the COVID-19 case count below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A SHUT DOWN OF ALL COUNTY AND STATE BEACH PARKS AND COASTAL PROPERTIES THROUGH SATURDAY, SEPT. 19, starts Friday, Sept. 4, as Labor Day weekend begins. Mayor Harry Kim asked the governor for permission yesterday. While the beach parks and coastal lands will be off-limits for resting and gathering, swimmers, surfers, boaters, fishers, and other food gatherers will be able to cross public property to enter the water from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. Restrooms and showers will remain open, according to an announcement this morning from Civil Defense.
Yukio Okustu Veteran's Home in Hilo yesterday received drinks and
 snacks from ʻO Kaʻū Kākou and its president, Viet Nam War veteran
 Wayne Kawachi. Photo from OKK
     "Hawaiʻi County Police Department will continue its enforcement of the preventative polices. We need everybody to be responsible and follow the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. With your help, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe," said the Civil Defense message.
     In Kaʻū, locations covered by the partial closure are Punaluʻu Beach Park, Kāwā, Honuʻapo, and Whittington Beach Park. It is unclear if Green Sands beach is included in the order for no social gatherings.
     See more on the growing COVID-19 case count, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU DONATED DRINKS AND SNACKS to the staff and nurses of Yukio Okustu Veteran's Home in Hilo yesterday. OKK President Wayne Kawachi, a Viet Nam War veteran, delivered the items. The first three Hawaiʻi Island deaths from COVID-19 were reported within the week as residents of the veterans home. See more on the COVID-19 count below.

Iwao Yonemitsu (left) and the late Tokuichi Nagano at a Kīlauea Military Camp event.
Photo by Julia Neal
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A KAʻŪ VET REMEMBERS THE END OF WORLD WAR II today on the 75th anniversary of the treaty signed between the United States and the Empire of Japan, Sept. 2, 1945.     Ninety-seven-year-old Iwao Yonemitsu, of Nāʻālehu, said this morning that it was a big relief for him and his friend, the late Tokuichi Nagano. "It was a relief because so many people died (75 to 85 million worldwide)."
    Yonemitsu noted that World War II also cost the United States "so much money." Both Yonemitsu and Nagano are considered members of The Greatest Generation.
     After the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Yonemitsu and Nagano, as Japanese Americans, signed up for the U.S. military to show their allegiance to this country, as many other Japanese across the country were taken from their homes and jobs to detainment camps in a climate of fear of potential loyalty to Japan.
     At Nāʻālehu Hongwanji, Shigeo Kikuchi, wife of Rev. Chikyoku Kikuchi, became responsible for the Buddhist temple when he was interred. In Volcano, Kīlauea Military Camp became an internment camp for Japanese Americans.

World War II vet Iwao Yonemitsu (center) with Minako Yamazaki (left),
 of Tokyo and Pāhala, along with another attendee at Hongwanji Bon
dance last year. Photo by Julia Neal
     Yonemitsu and Nagano told The Kaʻū Calendar during the years they volunteered for this newspaper, that there was no question during WWII that they were solid American citizens. They chose to fight for the U.S. in Europe as members of the esteemed "Go for Broke" 442nd Regimental Combat Team. It was comprised of American soldiers of Japanese ancestry, the most decorated unit during the conflict when the Allies defeated the Nazis who were taking over Europe. Others from Hawaiʻi included Daniel Inouye and Dan Akaka, who later became U.S. Senators, as well as the late father of Gov. David Ige, Tokio Ige.
     The governor said today, at ceremonies held at Pearl Harbor, that veterans of WWII turned their experience into living their lives at home every day in a way that protects Democracy. "That is vigilance. That is resilience. That is courage," said the governor.
     Yonemitsu said that after serving in Europe, he returned to the U.S. on a military ship from Marseilles, France to North Carolina. On his way back to Hawaiʻi, he spent time in New York City, Washington, DC, Chicago, Denver, and Oakland, traveling on the railroad. He returned to Hawaiʻi after sailing across the Pacific on the Matsonia.
Carrying out his civic duties, WWII vet Iwao Yonemitsu, now 97, comments
 on the wastewater treatment plan for Nāʻālehu at a public meeting.
  Photo by Julia Neal
     On this day, 75 years ago, Yonemitsu was back in Hawaiʻi. He resumed his work with the sugar company, where he became well known for his knowledge of crop production, land use, and management.
     Yonemitsu is also known for his documentation of Kaʻū's agricultural history and has made many presentations at schools and community events, including Kaʻū Plantation Days. Yonemitsu has served as President of Nāʻālehu Hongwanji and advisor to the Young Buddhist Association.
     Yonemitsu and his wife, Alice, live in Nāʻālehu. A retired school teacher, she has served as treasurer of Nāʻālehu Hongwanji and has also been an advisor to the Young Buddhist Association.
     The Yonemitsus continue to sponsor good works in the community, including the recent creation of a lectern for Nāʻālehu Elementary School made of koa and other local woods, made by artist Thomas King, of Honuʻapo. They also participate in community meetings for planning the future of Nāʻālehu and Kaʻū.
     Yonemitsu said he is writing his memoirs.
Iwao Yonemitsu assists an attendee at an Interfaith Service at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji. Photo by Carol Tsunezumi
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE COCKFIGHTING TRADE IS THE TARGET OF A FORMER HAWAIʻI ATTORNEY GENERAL and Animal Wellness Action, after investigating sales to Guam. Margery Bronster, the former AG, held a press conference in Honolulu on Tuesday and called for federal attorneys to use Guam research that links fighting cock sales from Hawaiʻi to Guam. Research shows that more chickens are shipped to Guam from Hawaiʻi than from any other state. Most of the chickens are roosters, even though there is no egg production, nor chicken farms to make food on Guam.  
A former Hawaiʻi Attorney General and the Animal
Wellness Action group are asking the federal government
to bring felony charges against those who sell fighting
 cocks. Photo from Animal Wellness Action
     The conclusion of Animal Welfare Action and Bronster is that with prices as much as $3,000 and few hens in the transactions, roosters sent to Guam are for cockfighting and for breeding fighting chickens.
     The group released a detailed report entitled Hawaiʻi: The Hub for Pacific Rim Cockfighting Trade. It includes names and photos of alleged fighting chicken breeders and their farms, including some on this island from Keaʻau to Pāhoa, Mountain View, Holualoa, and Kamuela.
     The researchers note that Guam, Hawaiʻi, and seven states prosecute cockfighting as a misdemeanor. In 42 states it is a felony. Cockfighting is also illegal, federally, with much heavier penalties  However, it is legal to send livestock through the U.S. Post Office, if shipped in containers that keep animals alive and healthy. Illegal is to claim they are for breeding stock for egg laying hens and chickens to be slaughtered for consumption, when they are actually to be used for cockfighting.
     A statement issued from Animal Wellness Action on Tuesday called Hawaiʻi "the center of the cockfighting trade in the Pacific Rim, with the state acting as a hub-and-spoke model for animal fighting activities in Asia, in the Pacific islands, and in the United States." Wayne Pacelle, president of Animal Wellness Action, said,"Hawaiʻi cockfighters are breeding fighting animals to be hacked up in fighting pits within the state and throughout the world." The statement says more about the cockfighting trade in Hawaiʻi, and names alleged participants. Read the Animal Wellness press release here.
     Animal Wellness announced that it tracked down participants in the fighting cock trade through government records. "Through public records requests to the Guam Department of Agriculture, AWF and Animal Wellness Action obtained nearly 2,500 pages of avian shipping records dated November 2017 to September 2019. These 
These Live Birds containers are for fighting chicken sales,
according to Animal Wellness Action.
Photo from AWA
records detail approximately 750 shipments of birds by 71 individuals from more than a dozen states to Guam, where more than 130 individuals purchased the birds for fights in the U.S. territory. These shipping records revealed that Hawaiʻi had more shippers of fighting birds to Guam than any other state and sold, after Oklahoma and California, the third-largest volume of birds to this long-time hotbed of cockfighting."
     Drew Edmondson, four-time Oklahoma Attorney General and co-chair of National Law Enforcement Council for Animal Wellness Action and Animal Wellness Foundation, said, "Possessing and shipping birds for cockfighting have been banned under federal law since 2002 and felony offenses since 2007. Possessing and transporting birds for fighting are serious federal felonies, and the people involved are taking enormous risks to participate in this kind of cruelty to animals."
     Bronster said, "Hawaiʻi has one of the nation's weakest anti-cockfighting laws, and the presence of that anemic law has given false comfort to the people involved in the industry. The federal law, however, is as strong as it can be, and it’s my hope that the U.S. Attorney for the District of Hawaii takes a serious look into the evidence that’s been amassed in this investigation."
     Download the detailed report entitled Hawaiʻi: The hub for Pacific Rim Cockfighting Trade.

chooselovemovement.org/choose-love-home
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CHOOSE ALOHA for Home is available to families, to provide "a healthy way to grow together," announces Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary. The site for the program, chooselovemovement.org/choose-love-home, says "Using neuroscience and positive psychology, children and parents alike can learn to better understand themselves and each other."

     The program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics," to teach families "how to manage their emotions, communicate in healthier ways, and create a nurturing environment focused on the things that matter most."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

OCEAN VIEW MOBILE LEARNING LAB operates weekdays from to at St. Jude's lower parking lot. It is open to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HILO ZIP CODE 96720 HAS MORE THAN 150 NEW CASES reported in the last 28 days, the first time that any area of the island is shown red on the state COVID-19 map.

     Ocean View, zip code 96737, reported its first new case of COVID-19 yesterday. Kaʻū zip codes 96772 – Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, DiscoveryHarbour– and 96777 – Pāhala, Punaluʻu, Wood Valley – and VolcanoVillage, zip code 96785, reported active cases within the last 28 days. Zip code 96718 covers Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, with a population of 129, and has no reported cases since the pandemic began.

     Today's new case count on Hawaiʻi Island is 35 and brings its total to 418 since the pandemic began. The only deaths are three people who died in the last week, all residents of Yukio Okutsu Veteran's Home in Hilo. Civil Defense reports 192 active cases for Hawaiʻi Island today, with 11 hospitalized.
     One new death is reported in the state today, on Oʻahu. The state death toll is 75.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light orange

is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 51 to 150 
cases. Red is 151+ cases. Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     In his daily update, Lt. Gov. Josh Green said there are 6,227 active cases statewide, 272 of them hospitalized with COVID-19. With 204,406 people tested since the pandemic began, the state positivity rate is 4.3 percent. Recent testing positivity, from the last 5,220 people to be tested, is 6.5 percent. Green asks everyone to make sure to wear a mask.

     Statewide, 339 new cases are reported today, with two in MauiCounty and 302 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 8,991. Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 8,149 cases, Hawaiʻi County 418, Maui County 342, and Kauaʻi 57. Twenty-five victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places.

     Statewide, 530 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,689 have been released from isolation.

     Civil Defense says Premier Medical Group will provide free drive-thru COVID-19 testing from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 3 at Kea‘au High School; Friday, Sept. 4 at Pāhoa Regional Park; and Saturday, Sept. 5 at Prince Kuhio Shopping Center's Ohuohu Street parking lot (across from Macy's Menswear Department) in Hilo. No copay; no insurance necessary, but bring insurance card if have; wear a face covering at all times; and observe social distancing. "Increased testing will continue throughout the island. Remember the purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the virus as well as to provide early treatment. Turn-out and the patience of the public has been very good. Thank you!" See hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense.

     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 6,111,485 – about 24 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 185,669 – about 22 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 25.92 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 859,478.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a month, the second Tuesday of the month, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington
 D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.

Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts at https://member.everbridge.net/index/48255246
0607505#/signup. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=
YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, September 3, 2020

0
0
Shut down of county beach parks for two weeks begins Friday, to control COVID-19. Allowed are water activities like 
surfing, fishing, paddling, and snorkeling. The most popular beach in Kaʻū is Punaluʻu. Photo by Julia Neal

MAYOR HARRY KIM SENT OUT A MESSAGE ON CLOSING BEACH PARKS FOR TWO WEEKS, beginning tomorrow, Friday, Sept. 4. He said on Wednesday that "AllCountyand StateBeachParks on Hawai‘i will be closed for two weeks, from Sept. 4 through Sept. 18, amid a spike in COVID-19 cases. The intent of the closures is to prevent the further spread of the virus by limiting gatherings at the beaches.

     "Department of Health contact tracing has shown that large gatherings are a key source of the virus's spread, with several clusters being linked to social gatherings.

     "We are at a critical stage, and we must stop the spread of the virus. Beach parks can only be used to access the ocean (for) exercising, fishing and gathering food, and using the bathrooms and shower facilities. Everybody has kuleana to end the spread of COVID-19 on Hawai‘i Island, and by rallying as a community we can beat this."

     Beach parks and coastal parks may be used for direct access to and from the ocean in order to engage in exercise, fishing, and gathering food. Park restrooms and showers will be open from to daily.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

REFRAIN FROM TRAVELING HERE TO GATHER TOGETHER AND CAMP ALONG THE KAʻŪ COAST during Labor Day weekend. That's the message released today by the board of Ka ʻOhana O Honuʻapo, following weekends of large groups coming into the area to set up camps along the remote coastline for recreation. Much of the Kaʻū Coast is in public ownership, preserved for natural, archaeological, and cultural sites as well as fishing and other food gathering.
     The board of Ka ʻOhana O Honuʻapo is comprised of John Replogle, Kalāhoʻohie Mossman, Ken Sugai, Daniel Dierking, Nohea Kaʻawa, and Megan Lamson. The message says:
     "The people of Kaʻū and the caretakers of this special coastline humbly ask for your attention. As our mayor has already closed down public beach access on Hawaiʻi Island from this Friday for two weeks, we are requesting that you do NOT come camp and gather along our shorelines to recreate. The Kaʻū community is strong, fierce, and diverse, and we have fought many battles here together... but this Coronavirus crisis is something new. Please respect Kaʻū people and the very limited hospital capacity in Pāhala. We humbly ask you to please stay home over this holiday weekend. Please mālama our place, our winds, our rains, and the many natural and cultural resources that exist here and feed our people both spiritually and physically. We ask you to please let our rugged wilderness and coastal habitats rest. We have experienced undue traffic along our coastlines from Kāwā to Kaʻaluʻalu, from Ka Lae to Pōhue, since March. 

     "Please consider us when you are making your decisions as to where to holoholo this weekend, and maybe opt to stay a little closer to home for a time... at least until this pandemic settles down, to gather your own subsistence resources from your own ahupuaʻa, from your own special places that you are pili to. And if you do choose to come to Kaʻū please be prepared to give back more than you take and practice aloha ʻāina wherever you roam. Help set the example to fish, gather, and camppono(no take more than you need, don't leave ʻōpala and doodoo paper all over the place!) and to keep your gatherings small and for ʻohana and close family networks only. Mahalo for listening and sharing this post widely."

     Learn more about Ka ʻOhana O Honuʻapo at honuapopark.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A FACEBOOK GROUP called Kiʻekiʻe Kaʻū promises to call public authorities and have people removed from the Kaʻū Coast, should they illegally camp and gather in large groups this weekend. The group's poster says, "In an attempt to prevent the further spread of COVID-19 in Kaʻū and in the most humble way possible, our Kaʻū Community is kindly asking that if you are not from Kaʻū and have no important function to be in our Moku (district), please do not come!
     "If you decide to come to Kaʻū and camp at any area along our coastline, enforcement will be called and you will be removed! Just as tourists impact the lifestyle of many, outsiders have the same effect. Let our Kaʻū people be free in our own Moku to relax and heal from this pandemic. We are not comfortable sharing our space with unfamiliar faces that could further expose any more of our community members to COVID-29.
     "Please spread this message and know that we are thankful for your understanding. We honor the wishes of your community if you feel the same for your moku." See more about the issue and other Kaʻū concerns at https://www.facebook.com/KiekieKau/posts/2381261972183332.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


Meals provided Wednesday afternoon to support the frontline workers at 
Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home. Right to left: Stacy Sakuma, home Activities
Director; Deb Lewis, Veterans of Foreign Wars Pos
t 3830; and 
Doug Adams, Boys & Girls Club Board Member. BGCBI photo

YUKIO OKUSTU STATE VETERAN'S HOME is receiving help from Boys & Girls Club of the BigIsland. Chad Cabral, Chief Executive Officer, told The Kaʻū Calendar hot evening meals are being provided on weekdays to those who "continue to selflessly risk their own health during this pandemic… so that they can continue to focus on the level of care that is now required. All meals provided are free, as our way to show our community support, gratitude, and to thank those that care for our treasured Hawaiʻi Island Veterans. Our community Veterans mean a lot to us as they have served and sacrificed so much to ensure our freedoms. Thank you, frontline professionals and the Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home for everything that you are providing during these challenging times."

     Cabral said 40 to 50 hot meals will be provided each day through Boys & Girls Club Hilo kitchen facilities and transported up to the Veterans Home by the Board of Director volunteers. The first day of delivery was Wednesday.
     See more on the veteran's home, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


Hilo's Yukio Okutsu State Veteran's Home saw another
death related to COVID-19 yesterday.
A FIFTH DEATH at Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home occurred Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 and was not included in yesterday's update, reports HiloMedicalCenter. All five victims of COVID-19-related deaths on this island were residents of the home, and all had "significant, underlying health issues. We offer our sincerest condolences to the family and loved ones of these veterans who served our country," says HMC.

     The state reports 46 residents and 15 employees of the home have tested positive for COVID-19.

     Today, HiloMedical Center reported nine COVID-19 patients are hospitalized, four in ICU.

     See COVID statistics, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

STOP U.S.POST OFFICE SERVICE DELAYS IN HAWAIʻI. That is the message from Senators Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz, and Representatives Tulsi Gabbard and Ed Case, who wrote to Postmaster General Louis DeJoy this week, requesting reversal in changes that led to service delays for Hawaiʻi mail. Hawaiʻi's congressional delegation also calls for DeJoy to suspend further changes to U.S. Postal Service operations until there is no longer a nationally declared public health emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

     They also express concern that DeJoy is considering price increases for service in Hawaiʻi, Alaska, and U.S.territories. The letter emphasizes that, as an island state, Hawaiʻi is dependent on the Postal Service for prompt, reliable deliveries of food, medicines, and other goods, and residents lack the option to drive to another state for these services.

     "We are especially alarmed that proposed additional changes may increase mail delivery costs for Hawaiʻi in particular," wrote the lawmakers. "These service delays have the potential of affecting the 120,000 veterans in Hawaiʻi, especially the 50,000 who receive their medication through the mail from the Veteran's Health Administration. Hawaiʻi's small business owners, who have already been impacted by COVID-19, are now having to work around delayed supplies or deal with late deliveries to customers. We have also heard from several constituents who were not able to cast their ballot and vote in Hawaiʻi's primary election on August 8, 2020, as some ballots took weeks to reach the voter or did not arrive at all." The letter can be found here.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


HAWAIʻI FIRE DEPARTMENT is warning that the western half of the County of Hawai‘i is receiving frequent National Weather Service Red Flag Warnings. A Red Flag Warning means that conditions pose a high risk for catastrophic wildfires to occur.

     These conditions include low relative humidity, strong winds, dry fuels, and possible dry weather lightning strikes. All mauka areas on the western half of the Islandare experiencing hazardous fuel loads of dry brush conducive to wildfires.

     Fire Chief Darren Rosario is asking the public's assistance in minimizing wildfire risk in all areas. Keep vehicles on paved roadways, do not start campfires, do not smoke, and do not use spark-producing equipment in these high-risk areas. 


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


A FORM LETTER IN SUPPORT OF THE HŪ HONUA BIOFUEL PLANT on the HāmākauCoasthas come into question by the Public Utilities Commission, the agency responsible for permission for the factory to burn eucalyptus and other fuels to make electricity.

     PUC reported Wednesday that it received emails showing the same letter was sent from seven persons who contend that they never sent the email nor gave permission to use their email addresses. The PUC statement says, "The Commission is gravely concerned about this matter, as: it impacts and risks violating the privacy of those who have had their email accounts used to file public comments they did not authorize; and calls into question the credibility and legality of other public comments filed in this docket, which the Commission notes number in the thousands."
     In response to the situation, PUC attorney Mark Kaetsu wrote that "in the interest of protecting the privacy of those whose emails may have been compromised, the Commission will redact from public view the public comments filed in this proceeding from Sept. 1, 2020, going forward, unless or until such time that a reliable and practical means of verifying the authenticity of the public comments can be implemented."

Eucalyptus from two years of harvesting tree farms above Pāhala on KamehamehaSchoollands remains piled 
for shipping to the new biofuels plant. Photo by Julia Neal

     The form letter says, "I am resident of Hawaii and a strong supporter of renewable energy and goodpaying jobs. I strongly support the Honua Ola project. If the project is unable to move forward, many good-paying jobs will be at risk. Many of my family and friends are unemployed right now and are struggling to find quality employment. Please consider the thousands of people who need good-paying jobs now.

     "As you know, we are in one of the worst economic periods since the Great Depression. Unemployment is at historic highs and hundreds of thousands of workers are struggling to find jobs and make ends meet. Simply put, this is a difficult and challenging time with an uncertain and likely turbulent future ahead.

     "Honua Ola will provide that boost and will help diversify the economy and provide good-paying jobs to hundreds of workers on the island of Hawaii. To be clear, Honua Ola will not fix our economy by itself, but it is projects like Honua Ola that will move us in a positive direction both environmentally and economically.

     "Our State still relies too heavily on fossil-fuels that are harmful to our planet. Hawaiihas a commendable clean energy goal to be 100 percent clean energy by the year 2045. To accomplish this goal, Hawaiineeds a diverse clean energy portfolio. Honua Ola along with other projects will help Hawaii achieve its goal.

     "It would be a travesty to see a project that has spent hundreds of millions of dollars and is 99 percent complete only to be told their operation cannot move forward. More workers will be sent to the unemployment line and investors may reconsider investing in Hawaii. Our economy will be less diversified, and more workers will struggle to make ends meet.

     "We cannot allow that to happen. As such, I hope you reconsider the power purchase agreement. Good-paying jobs are in jeopardy. Sincerely, Honua Ola Supporter"

     The PUC has asked Honua Ola to compete with other lower priced sources of renewable energy, even though some $350 million has already been invested into building the plant. The rejection of the contract to sell electricity to Hawaiian Electric from the biofuel plant came after a state Supreme Court ruling that the project is not the best option at this time for affordable energy.

     Read more details on the issue in the July 9July 21, and July 26Kaʻū News Briefs, where Hū Honua asks for community support to preserve jobs and open its biofuel operation, and Sen. Russell Ruderman responds. Also read Life of the Land's response to Hū Honua, asking the PUC to reconsider rejection of their contract. See lifeoftheland.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


ʻOHANA HELP DESK offers online How-To Guides for Chromebooks and iPads given out to distance learning students enrolled in Kaʻū public schools. The website is open to the public here. ʻOhana Help Desk is also available to students and parents by phone, Mondays through Fridays, , and on Sundays from to It is closed on Saturdays and state holidays.
     ʻOhana Help Desk is sponsored by the state Department of Education, through a contract with Hawaiian Telcom.

     ʻOhana Help Desk began its services on Aug. 4 and is expanding. Services promised include phone and chat support in multiple languages to include English, Hawaiian, Ilocano, Tagalog, Chuukese, and Marshallese. Available support is connectivity related issues such as network and wifi connectivity; access and security
issues; device, applications and software updates, general IT; and assisting with connection to schools and offices for specific support and troubleshooting.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Learn to write for inner exploration

at VolcanoArtCenter's Niʻaulani

Campus in a workshop with Tom

Peek this Saturday. 

WRITING FOR INNER EXPLORATION AND LIFE REFLECTION is the workshop by author Tom Peek to be held this Saturday, Sept. 5 from to 4 p.m at Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. The aim of the workshop is to "help discover ways to stimulate the creative regions of the mind and unearth the meatiest memories, highest aspirations, zaniest ideas, and most incandescent insights." No previous writing experience is necessary, just the desire to explore. Cost is $80 for the general public and $70 for Volcano Art Center members. Register at VAC.


Tom Peek

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU HAS RELEASED A FOOD GIVEAWAY SCHEDULE FOR SEPTEMBER.

     Ingredients for a hamburger steak dinner for four will consist of 2 lbs. of ground beef, gravy mix (just add 1 cup of water), onion, and rice to be distributed in: Pāhala – Saturday, Sept. 5 at 10 a.m. Pick-up will be at the back store; Ocean View – Saturday, Sept. 12 at 10 a.m. Pick-up will be at the Park and Ride parking lot; and Nāʻālehu – Friday, Sept.18 at 10 a.m. Pick-up will be at the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market location.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


KAʻŪ WOMEN'S HEALTH COLLECTIVE ANNOUNCES TWO PROGRAMS. Its director Tara Compehos, a midwife, explains them: 

     Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. This year, the Piko program is mobilizing to distribute sterilized prenatal care kits to the doorsteps of pregnant people, with an instructional video, Zoom classes, and access to midwifery support and childbirth education. Piko is funded, in part, by Papa Ola Lokahi, Hawaiʻi People's fund, and the Groundswell fun.

     Pilina: This intergenerational community capacity building and empowerment program aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. "The directions of our long term efforts will ultimately be led by this community," said Compehos. Funding for Pilina comes, in part, from Papa Ola Lokahi and Hawaiʻi People's Fund.

     Kaʻū Womenʻs Health Collective was started in 2019 by a group of moms to address reproductive justice issues impacting health; from teen pregnancy to childbirth trauma to high rates of cancer and diabetes. Compehos said, "Our mission is empowering the women of Kaʻū to improve our health and that of our community by holding space for active listening, knowledge exchange, and collective action."

     Kaʻū Women's Health Collective meetings will be held on Sundays at on Sept. 13, Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13. Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

WAIʻŌHINU'S KAUAHAʻAO CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH WILL CONTINUE DRIVE-IN SERVICES. Kahu Debbie Wong Yuen wrote, "The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled churches to look at alternate means to provide a safe way for individuals and families to gather and worship, and to hear God's Word." She says the drive-in services follow all CDC and state safety guidelines. In consideration of folks with health concerns, including those unable to wear face coverings, and those uncomfortable gathering for public worship in a sanctuary, Kauahaʻao provides its Drive-In/Outdoor Worship Service every Sunday. It is open to anyone.
Kahu Debbie Wong Yuen invites all to a Drive-In church 
service at Kauahaʻao Congregational Church in Waiʻōhinu.

Photo from Facebook

     Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at The only time a face covering is needed is when the usher comes to the vehicle to pass out the worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give.

     During the service, face coverings are not required, except when leaving vehicles for the restroom. The church recommends bringing bottled water for those in the vehicle. The church provides paper fans to stay cool.

     Wong Yuen said, "This is not a new idea on how to Worship and hear God's Word. In the 1950s, Drive-in-Worship was the way to worship. People drove up to the place of outdoor worship, stayed in their vehicles, and listened to the Word and message, honking their horns to say, 'Amen.'"

     "The people are the Church, not a building, so we don't need to be in a building to have worship service. We can worship God anywhere. God is with us no matter where we are, and, where two or three are gathered together in His name, He will be in our midst. Churches are learning the meaning of 'home church' since COVID-19 altered our lives. But we are not alone in this pandemic… we are all in this together, and God is with us."

A Praise Jam runs from
on Sundays, on Zoom.
     Kauahaʻao Church live streams the Worship Service at on the Church's Facebook page: Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Like the church on Facebook for reminders. Also live on Facebook is a Praise Jam which runs from to

     The worship service is also recorded on Zoom and emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing Kahu Wong Yuen at atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com to be added to the list or call her at 928-8039 or 937-2155.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI ISLAND HAS 227 ACTIVE COVID-19 CASES according to Department of Health. Today's new on-island case count of 17 brings the Hawaiʻi Island total to 435 since the pandemic began.

     DOH said, "All individuals associated with a gathering at Miloliʻi have been identified and contacted by the Department of Health. All positive cases from this cluster are now isolated and being monitored by the Department of Health. The investigation of this cluster is ongoing."

     One new death on-island yesterday brings the island death toll to five, all residents of Yukio Okutsu State Veteran's Home in Hilo. See article, above. The state death toll is 80, with the passing of four more O‘ahu residents, two men and two women. All had underlying health conditions. One of the men and one of the women were older than 80. Another man was in the 60 to 69-year-old age group, and the other woman was in the 70 to 79-year old age group.

     In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; 96737 with Ocean View; 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, DiscoveryHarbour, and South Point; 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, WoodValley; and 96785 with VolcanoVillage. Zip code 96718, covers Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, reports a population of 129, and has no reported cases.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code.

White is zero cases. Yellow is one to 25 cases. Light orange

is 26 to 50 cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 51 to 150 cases. 

Red is 151+ cases. Hawaiʻi Department of Health map

     In his daily update, Lt. Gov. Josh Green said there are 6,227 active cases statewide, 272 of them hospitalized with COVID-19. With 213,722 people tested since the pandemic began, the state positivity rate is 4.3 percent. Recent testing positivity, from the last 6,291 people to be tested, is 3.35 percent. Green asks everyone to make sure to wear a mask over their nose and mouth.

     Statewide, 211 new cases are reported today, with four in MauiCounty and 190 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 9,202. Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 8,339 cases, Maui County 346, and Kauaʻi 57. Twenty-five victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places.

     Statewide, 573 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,778 have been released from isolation, a 30 percent recovery rate.

     Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense said the Police Department will continue their enforcement of preventative polices. "We need everybody to be responsible and follow the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. With your help, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe."

     Civil Defense says Premier Medical Group will provide free drive-thru COVID-19 testing from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 4 at Pāhoa Regional Park; and Saturday, Sept. 5 at Prince Kuhio Shopping Center's Ohuohu Street parking lot (across from Macy's Menswear Department). No copay; no insurance necessary, but bring insurance card if have; wear a face covering at all times; and observe social distancing. "Increased testing will continue throughout the island. Remember the purpose of testing is to identify positive cases as early as possible and in this way help stop the spread of the virus as well as to provide early treatment. Turn-out and the patience of the public has been very good. Thank you!" See hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense.

     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at
https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S.is more than 6,149,265 – about 23 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 186,785 – about 21 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 26.2 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 867,219.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a month, the second Tuesday of the month, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.

Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts at https://member.everbridge.net/index/482552460607505#/signup. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.






Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, September 4, 2020

0
0
A baby petrel outside its burrow. On this island, petrels make their nests high on Mauna Loa and will be surveyed
with overflights by Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park next Wednesday. See more below.
Photo by Andre Raine, American Bird Conservancy
CARAVANS OF CAMPERS ARE OVERWHELMING THE KAʻŪ COAST this weekend, according to a message from the Kaʻū Hawaiian Home Lands Association, which is asking for the County of Hawaiʻi and DHHL to shut down South Point Road to everyone except those who live there. Nohea Kaʻawa, a member of the Hawaiian Home Lands Association, released this statement this evening:
     "I am writing on behalf of the Kaʻū DHHL Association along with the concerns of many Community members of our Kaʻū District. The current Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense proclamation that has prohibited camping at all beach parks and shoreline parks has placed a massive amount of pressure on our Kaʻū coastline in the areas that do not fall within the Hawaiʻi County jurisdiction.
     "Ka Lae, Kaʻaluʻalu, Kamilo all the way to Manukā, is being overwhelmed by campers. Today, several Kaʻū Families have set up on South Point Road to get people to turn away and it is promised that tomorrow, many more families have committed to joining that effort. A total of 122 Vehicles with camping gear was counted today from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., going down to Ka Lae. A total of 40 vehicles who respected the message that was shared, turned away and went elsewhere. Numerous went down just for the day but still in large groups.
Campers setting up for Labor Day weekend on the Hiloside of Kaʻaluʻalu Bay today, with more 
trucks heading over to Kamilo. The Hawaiian Homes Association is asking the county and 
DHHL to shut down South Point Road to keep the Kaʻū Coast 
from being overwhelmed. Photo by Joe Velez

     "Our resources, our cultural and burial sites, are being disrespected, ocean is being overharvested, and our land is suffering from off-road vehicles more than we can bear to witness. With lobster season opening, illegal aquarium fishing, and a long weekend ahead, We are asking you to step in and help!
     "You have the support of our Kaʻū community, what we need is your support, we need enforcement, and we need protection. During this time of COVID-19, along with Kaʻū being in the red zone for fire hazard, we are in a 'state of emergency.' Ka Lae should be added to the proclamation and DHHL, along with the County, should shut down access to the area. Our Community is on standby and will be awaiting your response."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
A UNITY BETWEEN MAYORAL CANDIDATES MITCH ROTH AND IKAIKA MARZO was on display yesterday evening in a discussion on Insights On PBS Hawaiʻi. As the two agreed on many issues and said several times that they are friends, moderator Daryl Hugg said in a joking way that he would try to divide them. His mission was to show their differences to help Hawaiʻi Islanders choose a new Mayor.
     Concerning the economic collapse caving in on the COVID crisis, Huff asked candidates to prioritize "Public safety or economy." Roth responded, "Without your life, you don't have a livelihood." He also mentioned that without work, people face hardships that can lead to depression and heart attacks. He said the approach is to go back to work in a safe manner. He said he is working on a recovery plan.
     Marzo talked about the number of businesses shut down in hard-hit Hilo and said the county needs to be more proactive, "not reactive." He said it is hard for businesses to recover once they close. He mentioned during the interview that he can empathize with small businesses since he is a small business person himself, operating fishing and tour boats, and other enterprises.
Streamlining building permits is on the agendas of both 
mayoral candidates. Photo from Hawaiʻi County

     Marzo talked about the construction industry being a solid provider of income for households. He said that, in many families, the father goes to work in construction and the mother, who used to work in tourism, is now staying home taking care of keiki. He said that permits for construction should be streamlined, including Capital Improvement Projects to improve local infrastructure. "We cannot go back to tourism," said Marzo.
     Regarding building permits, Roth advocated for streamlining, particularly for construction of houses. He said that house building shouldn't be delayed by waiting for inspections, making corrections, and then waiting again as new corrections are required. He said a system should be developed to make the process simpler, with fewer delays, as every delay costs workers time on the job. As a prosecutor, Roth said, "It shouldn't take longer to build a house than prosecute a murder case."
     Roth also predicted that tourism will return, with proper COVID-19 testing to reduce and eliminate quarantine time for those with negative results. He said the need is to put businesses back to work so people can put food on the table and live in a safe manner.
     Concerning the Two Percent Fund, that conserves special properties, particularly those along the Kaʻū Coast, Marzo said that no more open space land should be purchased at this time, with the financial crisis burdening the county.
Kāwā is one of the Kaʻū Coast lands preserved with Two Percent funds, which may be in jeopardy with
the county budget crisis during the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by Julia Neal
     Regarding short term vacation rental rules and laws, Roth said they are poorly written and need to be revamped. Marzo agreed. Neither said that vacation rentals should be eliminated when pressed by the commentator.
     Concerning the biomass plant, already built on the Hāmākua Coast, but without a Public Utilities Commission permit to operate, both candidates said they recently toured the facility. They both said they were impressed by the technology. Marzo called the burning of trees to make energy "firm power," distinguishing it from hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal. He said he wants to find out if the plant could also be used to make energy from waste, since the county's landfills are filling up. However, he said he needs to contact those who live the area surrounding the power plant to talk story with people who have concerns.
Mayoral candidate Mitch Roth delivers food to Pāhala, early in his campaign,
with help from a union that endorses him, the ILWU, which represents
retired sugar workers and macadamia workers. Photo by Julia Neal
     Roth noted that Hawaiʻi has vowed to be off fossil fuels by 2045 and that the biofuel would go a long way toward that goal. He noted that trees being used to burn for electricity were planted and that no native forest would be disturbed. Roth also said he needs to communicate with those with concerns about the facility.
     Regarding geothermal, Roth said it may be "a cleaner route than we have now" for getting off fossil fuel. He said geothermal could produce hydrogen to use for buses and other transportation, a fuel cleaner than oil. He called it "freer energy." Marzo said there should have been an Environmental Impact Statement required before allowing Puna Geothermal to rebuild and go back into operation. He said the land is totally changed with the lava flow that covered part of the geothermal site. A study would show its impacts and whether it is safe.
     Concerning the Thirty Meter Telescope, Roth said he thinks of education and economic opportunity. He said he also thinks of stewardship of Maunakea. He said people for and against building the Thirty Meter Telescope should come together. Both candidates said the mayor is not in the position to make decisions on whether TMT is constructed. Marzo said people can agree to disagree on the issue and hope to move the ball forward. He also said he believed that Hawaiians had the right to occupy the road to protest TMT and that the road belongs to them. He said, "I am pro-business and pro-Mauna."
Mayoral candidate Ikaika Marzo, left, early in his campaign, with former
County Council member Guy Enriques and a group of teachers,
specializing in agriculture and gardening. Photo by Julia Neal
     Regarding schools, Marzo said they should be taken outdoors. Outdoor Learning Centers could bring people back together for education. He noted that during the 1918 pandemic, schools were taken outdoors to protect students from the Spanish flu, even in places where the weather was cold.
     Roth noted that many teachers are fearful of schools opening back on campus, where COVID-could spread. He also talked about working with children at home, a situation faced by many
families. He mentioned technology improving in homes to assist with online education.
     PBS describes the candidates as follows: "The top vote-getter in the Primary was Mitch Roth, who is completing his second term as Hawaiʻi County's elected prosecutor. The former teacher was a high school dropout before earning a bachelor's degree from the University of Hawaiʻi and a law degree from Whittier College in California.
     "The second-place finisher was Hawaiʻi Island native Ikaika Marzo, an entrepreneur and slack key guitarist. His childhood home in Kalapana was destroyed by lava in the 1990s. As an adult, he organized a grassroots effort to help those displaced by lava during the months-long eruption of Kīlauea Volcano in Puna, through the summer of 2018."
     The program will be available online at https://www.pbshawaii.org/programs/insights-on-pbs-hawaii/.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
A CENTRAL COMMAND POST TO COMBAT THE SPREAD OF COVID-19 was announced by Mayor Harry Kim on Thursday. The purpose of the umbrella organization, under the Mayor's Office, is to better coordinate programs of County, State, and Federal agencies, and private sector entities to
respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.
     Aunty Sally Kaleohano's Luʻau Hale is being converted into an emergency operation center, which will house staff from County and State agencies tasked with, but not limited to: Public education, enforcement, contact tracing, monitoring of incoming passengers, quarantine/isolation facilities,
hospitalization, and care facilities.
     Said Kim, "The Governor's Office and the State Department of Health, along with County and other State agencies, will be part of the Command Center. We will all be working as a team on the same goal: to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in our community and to keep our people safe."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
THE NEW KUPU ʻĀINA & INNOVATION WORKFORCE HAWAIʻI PROGRAM will provide temporary employment for those who are interested in exploring environmental and sustainability-related work. The Kupu ʻĀina Corps program will run from Sept. 14 through Dec. 15. Applications will remain open until all positions are filled. Visit the program website for more information and to apply.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

STAY SAFE DURING LABOR DAY WEEKEND is the message from Hawaiʻi County Police: "Labor Day, the first Monday in September, constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country."
     HPD urges the public to follow health and safety guidelines, and to not drive after consuming "any substance that could impair your ability to operate a motor vehicle safely." Officers will conduct DUI Saturation Patrols in several areas islandwide, searching for impaired drivers.
     HPD says, "The goal is to prevent drivers from injuring or killing themselves or others. In Hawaiʻi County we should all be proud and celebrate the work we do to make our community a better place. This is especially true in the trying times of 2020… be careful over the Labor Day weekend and take care of your friends and family. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Keauhou Trail, in red, from Chain of Craters Road to
the Coast, will be the site of flights to survey and control
guinea grass next Wednesday, Sept. 9.
HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK WILL CONDUCT FLIGHTS next Thursday, Sept. 10 to monitor Hawaiian petrels, the ʻuaʻu. The seabirds nest for four months in burrows at high elevations, with the males and females taking turns guarding the young and going out to sea to fish for food. The petrel flights will be from the summit of Kilauea to Mauna Loa between the 8,000 and 9,000 ft. elevation, between 7 a.m. and noon.
     Survey and control of guinea grass will be along Keauhou Trial from the coast to the 2,000 ft. elevation between 8 a.m. and noon on Wednesday, Sept. 9. Also that day, at noon, the Park will conduct trail maintenance at Nāpau between 3,000 and 4,000 ft. elevation.
     These flights will be followed by invasive banana poka survey and control on the Mauna Loa Strip between 5,000 and 6,400 ft. elevation, between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 10.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HOLUMUA HAWAIʻI'S SMALL BUSINESS RELIEF & RECOVERY FUND is open for applications. The program of the County of Hawaiʻi will distribute up to $22 million in Hawaiʻi County's CARES Act funding in the form of one-time reimbursement grants up to $10,000 to local businesses and nonprofits. Holomua Hawaiʻi is a reimbursement program for costs incurred from business interruption during the COVID-19 Emergency Proclamation period that began on March 23, for the time period when the applicant was impacted. Click here for details.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

DEADLINE TO APPLY FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Coronavirus Food Assistance Program is next Friday, Sept. 11. Farmers are encouraged to apply, as funding is still available for many specialty crops and livestock produced in Hawaiʻi. Visit farmers.gov/cfap for more information and to submit an application.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ESSENTIAL SUPPORT TO FARMERS, RANCHES, AND FOOD PRODUCERS is available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Marketing Service. Its resource website aims to enhance existing efforts of educational institutions, technical assistance centers, and community-based organizations. Visit the website to access the resource library and join the listserv.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE LOST WAGES ASSISTANCE PROGRAM of the federal government will be extended for Hawaiʻi for one week. It adds another week of a $300 plus-up for various unemployment benefits on top of the three weeks initially approved by FEMA on Aug. 29.
     Gov. Davide Ige said, "This will bring an extra week of relief to many who are still unemployed due to the impact of the coronavirus on our economy. I'm taking this action to maximize all available federal funds to help people in Hawaiʻi who are unemployed because of COVID-19."
     Acting Department of Labor & Industrial Relations Director Anne Perreira-Eustaqio said, "The DLIR is working to build a new program within the unemployment computer system to implement and pay LWA benefits. In conjunction with FEMA and the U.S. Department of Labor concerning program administration, the state will work diligently to complete this process as quickly as possible."
     To qualify for the $300 benefit, recipients must be eligible for at least $100 in weekly benefit and must certify that they are unemployed or partially unemployed due to the disruptions caused by COVID-19. Payments would be retroactive to Aug. 1, 2020. Claimants will be notified by email and through a news release on how and when to file their self-certification.
     Unlike the FPUC program that ended in July, LWA is a grant with a finite amount of funding. When FEMA exhausts its grant funding, it will no longer have the resources to provide LWA payments and the program will end. If the federal program does not exhaust the LWA grant funding, payments will end on Dec. 26, 2020.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE ENERGY RELIEF GRANT PROGRAM FROM HAWAIʻI ENERGY will award $1 million in funding for energy efficiency improvements for small businesses, nonprofits, and other qualifying organizations experiencing economic loss due to COVID-19. Eligible applicants may apply for up to $25,000 to cover eligible expenses on pre-approved energy efficiency projects. Visit hawaiienergy.com/grant or refer to the press release for more information.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FREE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT is available through funding approved by the 2020 Hawaiʻi Legislature. Eligible applicants include private or independent medical and dental practices; small hospitals; child, adult, or foster care facilities; small businesses; and nonprofit organizations in the state of Hawaiʻi. Locally available supplies will be distributed quickly, although it might take up to three months to receive A full order. Visit the program website for more information and to submit a request.

Christina Harper will discuss Creating a Communication
System at Home for those who work there. Register
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

WHEN WHERE YOU PLAY BECOMES WHERE YOU WORK is the title of a talk on zoom with Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center on Thursday, Sept. 17 as part of the Finding Solutions, Growing Peace Brown Bag Lunch Series. Talks are third Thursdays from noon to 1 p.m. This month's speaker is Christina Harper will talk about work and Creating a Communication System at Home.
     "What happens when where you relax and play must now transform into where you work and learn?" says Harper. "While there were previously clear distinctions between work, school, and home life, now many people have to combine them under one roof... In this talk, learn better communication habits to create essential peace at home and help protect your professional and personal relationships."
     Christina Harper is owner of TRY Communication, which provides coaching services in the areas of relationships and communication. She graduated with a B.A. in Communications from the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo and utilizes her degree in community mentoring and marital coaching. She said she hopes to bring a well-rounded perspective for maintaining healthy connections. Harper is a professionally trained mediator at Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center.
     Ku‘ikahi's Brown Bag Lunch Series is free and open to the public. Attendees are encouraged to enjoy an informal and educational talk-story session and connect with others interested in Finding Solutions, Growing Peace. To get the Zoom link, register online at https://freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com.
     For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org, or visit www.hawaiimediation.org.
     This lunch-and-learn series is made possible thanks in part to funding from the County of Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i Island United Way.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI ISLAND HAS 263 ACTIVE COVID-19 CASES according to Department of Health. Today's new on-island case count of 34 brings the Hawaiʻi Island total to 469 since the pandemic began.

     One new death on-island reported today brings the island death toll to six, all residents of Yukio Okutsu State Veteran's Home in Hilo. The state death toll is 81.
     In the last 28 days, active cases have been reported in zip codes 96704 with Miloliʻi; 96737 with Ocean View; 96772 with Nāʻālehu, Waiʻōhinu, Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and South Point; 96777 with Pāhala, Punaluʻu, Wood Valley; and 9678 with Volcano Village. Zip code 96718 is Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, which has few residents and no cases to date. Other areas shaded gray have no or very little population and no cases.
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. Gray 
areas have zero or few residential addresses. White is zero cases.
 Yellow is one to 
30 cases. Pale orange (not pictured) is 31 to 50
cases. Medium orange 
is 51 to 130 cases. Dark orange is 131 to
 210 cases. Bright red (not 
pictured) is 211 to 520 cases. Dark red
 (not pictured) is 521 to 950 cases. Department of Health map
     In his daily update, Lt. Gov. Josh Green said there are 6,537 active cases statewide, 265 of them hospitalized with COVID-19. With 221,391 people tested since the pandemic began, the state positivity rate is 4.3 percent. Recent testing positivity, from the last 7,669 people to be tested, is 3.5 percent. Green asks everyone to make sure to wear a mask over their nose and mouth.

     Statewide, 271 new cases are reported today, with one in Maui County and 236 on Oʻahu. That brings the total cases since the pandemic began to 9,473. Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 8,575 cases, Maui County 347, and Kauaʻi 57. Twenty-five victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places.

     Statewide, 583 people have been hospitalized since the pandemic began, and 2,855 have been released from isolation, a 30 percent recovery rate.

     Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense said, effective today, Sept. 4 through 19, all beach and shoreline parks are closed. The activities of exercising, fishing, food gathering, use of restroom, shower facilities, and access to the ocean will continue to be allowed. Hawaiʻi Island Police will continue their enforcement of the preventative polices of face coverings, distancing, and gatherings. "Know that these policies are mandated and will be enforced," says Civil Defense.

     Premier Medical Group will provide free drive-thru COVID-19 testing from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 5 in Hilo at Prince Kuhio Shopping Center's Ohuohu Street parking lot (across from Macy's Menswear Department). No copay; no insurance necessary, but bring insurance card if have; wear a face covering at all times; and observe social distancing. "With your help, we can stop the spread of the virus to keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe. Thank you for listening and have a safe Labor Day Weekend." See hawaiicounty.gov/departments/civil-defense.

     See the Hawai‘i County COVID-19 webpage at

https://coronavirus-response-county-of-hawaii-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/. Request travel exemptions for critical infrastructure and medical travel at https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/e2f4ce19aa854964a8fd60bec7fbe78c. Report violators of COVID-19 safety protocols or quarantine to non-emergency at 935-3311.
     COVID-19 case count in the U.S. is more than 6,198,996 – about 23 percent of worldwide cases. The death toll is more than 187,696 – about 21 percent of worldwide deaths. Worldwide, there are more than 26.49 million COVID-19 cases. The death toll is more than 872,250.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Food Giveaway: Ingredients for a hamburger steak dinner for four will consist of 2 lbs. of ground beef, gravy mix (just add 1 cup of water), onion, and rice to be distributed in: Pāhala – Saturday, Sept. 5 at 10 a.m. Pick-up will be at the back store; Ocean View – Saturday, Sept. 12 at 10 a.m. Pick-up will be at the Park and Ride parking lot; and Nāʻālehu – Friday, Sept.18 at 10 a.m. Pick-up will be at the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market location.

Writing for Inner Exploration and Life Reflection Workshopby author Tom Peek, Saturday, Sept. 5 at VolcanoArtCenter's Niʻaulani Campus in VolcanoVillage. No previous writing experience is necessary, just the desire to explore. Cost is $80 for the general public and $70 for Volcano Art Center members. Register at VAC.


Hui Mālama Free Online Home Gardening Class, Tuesdays, Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mala 101 is sponsored by Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi and Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The announcement says, "Learn to garden at home! Whether you have a large backyard or a few pots to grow in, anyone can learn to grow some of their own food at home! In this introductory series, learn the basics of selecting plants to grow, building healthy soil, and growing on a budget." Receive several plants and A Grow Your Own Laʻau guidebook for participation. The class will meet four times, once a month, the second Tuesday of the month, from Sept. 8 through Dec. 8. Sign up at hmono.org/services.

Give Input on Proposed Improvements to Miloliʻi Beach Park through Tuesday, Sept. 8. A draft Environmental Assessment is released by County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation, which would update the park to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines; make improvements to the parking lot, boat ramp, walkways, playground, and basketball/volleyball courts; and replace the restrooms, water system, and hālau.

PETFIX Spay and Neuter Clinic for Cats will be held Wednesday, Sept. 9 in Ocean View. For information and to register, call 808-990-3548 or email petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Introduction to Papermaking Workshop with Mary Milelzcik on Saturday, Sept. 12, from  to  This papermaking workshop, using a household blender, will introduce papermaking using recycled papers with various additives, including cotton linters, and local plant materials. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Exhibition Hawaiʻi Nei Invitational: Nā ʻAumākua, runs through Saturday, Sept. 12. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition is a group exhibition will present works focusing on the theme of Nā ʻAumākua, family gods. VAC will not hold an opening reception on August 8th. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and
 Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round. Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13. See schatz.senate.gov/services.


Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Virtual Advisory Council Meeting, Tuesday, Sept. 15, Presentations will include acoustic research, a proposal for voluntary speed regulations for ocean-going vessels in the sanctuary. Register in advance here.


Catalyst Abstract Watercolor Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson on Saturday, Sept. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Dine In or Order To Go Oktoberfest Meals from Crater Rim Café in Kīlauea Military Camp on Saturday, Sept. 19 from  to 8 p.m. Menu offers Bratwurst, Knockwurst, Bockwurst, German Potato Salad, Sauerkraut, Tossed Salad, and German Chocolate Cake. $14.95 per person. Call 967-8356 to book a reservation for dine-in or place a grab-and-go order. Face coverings and 6 feet social distancing are required in common areas. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees may apply.

Design the 2021 Ocean Count T-Shirt for Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary by Sept. 30. Designs highlighting humpback whales in Hawaiian waters must be entirely the artist's own creation. To ensure the design looks its best when printed, submit as a high definition PDF, .AI, .EPS or PNG with a quality of at least 1500px x 1500px and 300 DPI (dots per inch) with dimensions no greater than 11.5 inches by 14 inches. Top finalists' designs will appear on oceancount.org, the winner's design on the back of the shirt. The winner will also receive $500. Email the design and completed registration form to oceancount@marinesancutary.org.

ONGOING

Sign Up for Solid Waste Operations Alerts at https://member.everbridge.net/index/
482552460607505#/signup. Receive notice via phone or email of site closures, availability of services, hours of operation, special conditions affecting solid waste service (such as road closures, flooding, fires), or special events, such as household hazardous waste collections.


Attend Sunday Drive-In Worship Service at Waiʻōhinu's Kauahaʻao Congregational Church. Parking on the lawn begins at , with Worship Service starting at  The only time a face covering is needed is when the usher comes to the vehicle to pass out the worship bulletin and other materials, and at the same time, collect any offering or gifts the individual(s) would like to give, or when leaving vehicles for the restroom. Church provides paper fans to stay cool. Bring water. Catch the live streamed service at  and Praise Jam, which runs from  to  Service is emailed Sunday afternoon to anyone on the email list. Sign up by emailing atdwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com or call 928-8039 or 937-2155.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church services and worship are posted online at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays, us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1
owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha. Weekly hot meals, hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended.

One-Time Emergency Food for people is available through Big Island Giving Tree. Emergency food for pets is available through KARES. Call David or Barbara Breskin at 319-8333.

The Food Basket, last Tuesday of the month, Sept. 29, provides food at St. Jude's to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry, Cooper Center, weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries, open for pick-up services. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges, at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open. Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names kept anonymous, results shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

ʻOhana Help Desk offers online How-To Guides for Chromebooks and iPads given out to distance learning students enrolled in Kaʻū public schools. The website is open to the public here. ʻOhana Help Desk is also available to students and parents by phone, Mondays through Fridays, , and on Sundays from  to  It is closed on Saturdays and state holidays.


Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues, through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Sign Up for Two Women's Health Programs from Kaʻū Women's Collective. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Meetings held Sundays on Sept. 13, Oct. 11, Nov. 8, and Dec. 13, at  Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers urged to use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register: ams.usda.gov/local-food-directories/onfarm.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance, for small businesses affected by COVID-19. Owners can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Choose Aloha for Home is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together at chooselovemovement.org/choose-love-home, using neuroscience and positive psychology, children and parents alike can learn to better understand themselves and each other. The program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics," to teach families "how to manage their emotions, communicate in healthier ways, and create a nurturing environment focused on the things that matter most." Sign up at https://chooselovemovement.org/choose-love-home/.


Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers, at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming, from two free modules of a virtual training program by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. See https://kohalacenter.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=54bdd67c601f0c0d3ea430053&id=9e1691c22d&e=0e3fe20c1f.

Volcano Art Center, Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. 

volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Health and Fitness Website for Kūpuna808b-fit.com, contains videos for kūpuna to play and move along with. There are videos for stretching, tai chi, yoga, dancing, dance fitness, bon dance, hula, chair dancing, and chair yoga.

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Mobile Learning Lab operates weekdays from  to  at St. Jude's lower parking lot. It is open to students of Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, to connect to internet for distance learning. Questions? See khpes.org or call 313-4100.


Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet reopens Sept. 5 at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

Ocean View Community Market, open Saturdays and Wednesdays (starting next Wednesday, Aug. 12), , on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. New market location for vendors of the recently closed Ocean View Swap Meet. Managed by Mark Cocucci. Masks are mandatory. Limit of people is 100. Social distancing is required. Gate will be unlocked for vendors at  Vendors can show up without a reservation for now, with $15 dollars. Parking is in the upper lot; parking on the side of the road is prohibited. All vendors must provide their own sanitizer. All food vendors must have the permits required for the items that you are selling. Vendors and attendees are encouraged to carpool.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market, in Nāʻālehu, open Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday,  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.