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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, July 6, 2020

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PK1, the first main Hawaiian Islands Hawaiian monk seal pup of 2020, born on the island of Kaua‘i. See more below.
 Photo from NOAA Fisheries

See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

REGISTER FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION by Thursday, July 9 at  Register or confirm mailing address at olvr.hawaii.gov, or mail in registration with postmark by the deadline. Same-day voter registration is available at Voter Service Centers in Kona and Hilo. Ballots can be expected for delivery around Tuesday, July 21, and must be postmarked by Aug. 3. Election Day for counting the votes is Saturday, Aug. 8. Those who believe their ballot will not make the deadline can take them to Nāʻālehu Police Station 24 hours a day, July 27 through Aug. 7, and on Election Day, Aug. 8, through  See elections.hawaii.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Punaluʻu Beach on Fourth of July, where most people declined to wear masks in the open air and hot sun.
Photo by Julia Neal
TRY WEARING A VENTILATOR IF IRRITATED BY WEARING A MASK is the message from physician and Lt. Gov. Josh Green today in a briefing about the uptick in COVID cases. Though Hawaiʻi has the lowest COVID-19 case counts and deaths in the nation, per 100,000 population, the scenario can change quickly. In recent days the statewide total breached 1,000 cases. Gov. David Ige, state Director of Health Bruce Anderson and Green encouraged Hawaiʻi residents to stiffen their guard by becoming more mindful of wearing face masks when in contact with others, wash hands often, and refrain from gathering in close groups of people.
Visitors to Punaluʻu Beach attempt to approach
retailers without wearing masks.
Photo by Julia Neal
     Anderson gave examples of people slipping from these practices and spreading the disease in Hawaiʻi. He said a group of office workers wore masks at work but ate lunch together without masks and gave it to each other. He pointed to a Hawaiian Airlines employee training program to protect passengers and workers. The disease spread among 12 taking the classes.
     The health director said that much of the increase in cases is traced to family gatherings without masks, birthday and beach parties, card games, and funerals, "even Fathers Day parties." Working out at gyms can also be risky, he said, with heavy breathing in an enclosed space.
     He warned that the health care system could be overwhelmed if people don't take care to protect one another.
     Sherry Bracken, of KWXX Radio in Hilo, brought up a Hawaiʻi Island case of a traveler returning home from out of state, infecting a household member who works at a restaurant. Now the Hawaiʻi Island restaurant is closed and its employees out of work and quarantined.
     The health director recommended that those quarantining at home use exclusive bathrooms and bedrooms. He said quarantining people in COVID hotels could be an option to keep them better isolated, but the number of cases would have to justify setting up such a system.
     The governor recommended that people living here stay in the islands and refrain from traveling to the mainland, where there are so many cases. Enjoy staycations in Hawaiʻi, without transpacific travel, he suggested.
     When asked by reporters at the press conference if wearing a mask will be enforced statewide, Ige said he and the mayors talked about it today.
     See more about local business and community practices to keep COVID-19 out of Kaʻū in Tuesday's Kaʻū News Briefs. Also read about suggestions for incoming travelers to be tested within 48 hours of arrival, rather than the 72 hours proposed for the opening of transpacific travel Aug. 1.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE ANNUAL CULTURAL FESTIVAL FOR HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK went virtual yesterday on Facebook with the opening conch blowing ceremony called ‘Oli Komo. Sounding the pū were Aukai McDaniel, Kamelenani McDaniel, and Kupuno McDaniel.
Wendy Scott-Vance and Leilani Rodrigues participating in the Oli to
 open the first Virtual Cultural Festival in the nearly four decades
  of the annual July event at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
 See the opening ceremonies online.
     The festival, held for nearly four decades, annually draws thousands of people to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes to take part in native Hawaiian cultural practices, listen to music, witness hula, and learn about the Park and its work in conserving native forests and endangered species found nowhere else on Earth. It also showcases work of USGS partners at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Over the years, Volcanoes, a World Heritage Site, has welcomed sister park representatives from as far away as La Reunion island in the Indian Ocean and volcanic national parks in China and Korea.
     Ranger Kekoa Rosehill narrated the virtual opening, saying, "Unfortunately due to the COVID-19 pandemic we are unable to gather in order to protect our community, as well as visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners. During these uncertain times, it is important that the learning continues, even if it can't happen in person."
Ranger Kekoa Rosenhill narrates the opening of the online cultural festival
 for Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Join the events online through Saturday
 See the opening ceremonies online.
     Opening ‘Oli Komo launched the festival on Sunday morning. Park staff and ‘ohana blew the pū (conch shell) and chanted ‘Oli Komo together, requesting permission to begin the Virtual Cultural Festival. ‘Oli Komo, expressing intent to learn and do good, was gifted to the park by Hawaiian language and cultural expert Kumu Kepā Maly. The words translated from Hawaiian are:

     Here we are before you,
     Friends of the land seeking good.
     Teach us what there is to be done.

     That land of Honuamea will have
     life. Let us all have life!

     Chanters are: Wendy Scott-Vance, Travis Delimont, Michael Newman, Leilani Rodrigues, Kupono McDaniel, Keoni Kunolo`a`a, Koeko Rosehill, Jay Robinson, and Anne Farahi. At the close of the video, Ka`u native Moses Espaniola provides ukulele music. See the opening ceremonies online.
Sounding the pū were Aukai McDaniel, Kamelenani McDaniel, 
and Kupuno McDaniel. See the ceremony.
     This morning and afternoon, mo‘olelo (stories) of Pele the volcano goddess, Kamapua‘a the pig demigod, and others were posted on the Park's new Moʻolelo web page. This afternoon, the Park launched the new Places page, which shares mana‘o (knowledge) about the wahi pana (sacred places) protected within Hawai‘i VolcanoesNational Park, including Uēkahuna, the sacred bluff near Jaggar Museum.
     Here is the schedule through Saturday:
     Learn to Make a Tī Leaf Lei on Tuesday, July 7 at , with Ranger Leilani Rodrigues of the Kahuku Unit. Learn how to select tī leaves, prepare them for lei making, and how to twist them into a beautiful and easy-to-make garland.
     Facebook Watch Party for the documentary, Saving ‘Ōhi‘a. At noon on Wednesday, July 8, grab lunch and join the virtual gathering for a free screening of the Emmy-award winning 28-minute documentary, Saving ‘Ōhi‘a. This 2018 film explains the significance of the ‘ōhi‘a tree to the people of Hawai‘i and environment, and the threat that the new disease called "Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death" poses to these values. Park ecologist David Benitez, park botanist Sierra McDaniel, and filmmaker Annie Sullivan will answer questions in real-time in the comments. The documentary was filmed partially in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     Hawaiian Lua (Martial Arts) with Ranger Michael Newman and Olivia Crabtree on Thursday, July 9 at  Bone-breaking maneuvers and war clubs encircled with tiger-shark teeth are probably not the first things to come to mind when one pictures the Hawaiian Islands. The Hawaiian fighting style of lua is a formidable art form that requires skill, specific movement, and a host of deadly weapons. The rangers demonstrate this traditional fighting style.

     Learn to Make a Pūlumi Nī‘au (Hawaiian Broom) with Ranger Dean Gallagher on Friday, July 10 at  Get swept up in gathering plant materials and learn to make a pūlumi nī‘au, or authentic Hawaiian broom.
     Closing ‘Oli Mahalo will close the Virtual Cultural Festival on Saturday, July 11 at 8:08 a.m. Park staff and ‘ohana will blow the pū (conch shell) and chant the ‘Oli Mahalo together, requesting departure to close the festival. Gifted to the park by Kepā Maly, the ‘Oli Mahalo expresses gratitude. Ranger Kekoa Rosehill narrates.

     Many areas in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that provide outdoor experiences like hiking trails, overlooks, and roads, are now open to the public, but services are limited. Visit the Current Conditions page on the park website for a complete list of what's open, and how to prepare for a safe trip to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, at nps.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Hawaiian monk seal RK48 and pup. NPS photo

ENDANGERED HAWAIIAN MONK SEALS' PUPPING SEASON IS UNDERWAY. Since the beginning of the year, 18 monk seals were born in the main Hawaiian Islands: five  on Oʻahu, 11 on Molokaʻi, and one each on Kaua‘i, and Hawaiʻi Island, reports National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. This follows a record-breaking pupping year in 2019, which saw 48 pups born in the main Hawaiian Islands, including Ni‘ihau.

     Monk seal pups can be born any time of year, with births peaking in spring and summer. Monk seals moms typically nurse their pups for five to seven weeks, feeding them milk rich in fat that will increase their weight from 30 pounds at birth to nearly 200 pounds. Mother loses a great amount of weight and will abruptly wean the pup before departing to sea to forage and regain her strength. The pup will live off of its body fat as it practices foraging. It will venture farther and farther from the sands of its birth beach, eventually departing to forage at sea. Most females return to the beaches on which they were born to birth their own pups.
Hawaiian monk seal RF34's pup was the first born on O‘ahu in 2020. 
Photo from NOAA Fisheries

     The endangered mammal had some setbacks earlier this year: on April 23, one of O‘ahu's most well-known Hawaiian monk seals, R5AY, aka Honey Girl, was found deceased on the windward side of O‘ahu. She was at least 23 years old – and perhaps much older – at the time of her death. On April 25, pregnant adult female R313 was found dead at Hāʻena Beach, Kauaʻi. Hawaiian monk seals are one of only two indigenous Hawaiian mammals. The other is the Hawaiian hoary bat.
     A report from NOAA Fisheries says pupping locations are "usually not disclosed" to "maintain a calm environment with as little disturbance as possible to mom-pup pairs." Monk seals aren't typically considered aggressive but a nursing mom can be very protective. For some mom-pup pairs, this year was quieter than usual, due to the closure of various beach parks between late March and mid-May. Despite a reduced monitoring presence, staff and volunteers continued to perform spot checks, and all pups born during this time weaned successfully, reports NOAA.
     NOAA requests that the public enjoying Hawai‘i shorelines view wildlife responsibly by viewing from a distance, using binoculars or camera zoom for a close-up; not disturbing seals sleeping on the beach; not touching, chasing, or feeding any wild animal; keeping dogs leashed; and to "maintain your distance from monk seals, especially moms and pups, for your safety and their protection." Call 888-256-9840 to report sightings of Hawaiian monk seals or injured marine mammals and sea turtles.

     See fisheries.noaa.gov/pacific-islands/endangered-species-conservation/hawaiian-monk-seal-updates for more.
A monk seal at Honuʻapo years ago. Photo by Julia Neal
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

JOIN A TELEPHONETOWN HALL with Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on Wednesday, July 8 at 4 p.m. The meeting – the 15th Gabbard has hosted since the pandemic began  – will be held to update Hawaiʻi residents about COVID-19. Gabbard will be joined by guests Dr. Scott Miscovich, who has been leading testing efforts across the state and has served as a senior adviser to Lt. Gov. Josh Green, and Darin Leong, an unemployment attorney who has worked with Hawaiʻi community leaders to raise awareness about relief programs available to employers and employees.

     Gabbard, Miscovich, and Leong will discuss the surge in COVID-19 cases, Hawaiʻi's testing and tracing capacity, and what can be done to help stop the spread of the virus. They will also discuss federal emergency assistance programs that are still available to help people during the ongoing crisis.
     Sign up on Gabbard's website to receive a phone call to join the event. Or listen online at gabbard.house.gov/live.


Volcano Rotary Club President Paul Field and Rotarian
Jay Robinson give out  Fourth of July food at 
VolcanoArtCenter.  Photo by Julia Neal
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FOOD FOR THE FOURTH went out during an Independence Day Community Barbecue drive-through at VolcanoArtCenter's Niʻaulani Campus on Saturday. Fourth of July decorations welcomed the folks, with hot dogs and hamburgers for free, and chicken and ribs plates sold as a fundraiser.

     Sponsors were VolcanoArtCenter, Volcano Rotary Club, CooperCenter, and Experience Volcano.

     Rotary traditionally sponsors a big food fundraiser at the end of the annual July 4 parade, with floats, classic vehicles, walking groups, and horses and riders. The parade is on pause this year during the pandemic. Learn more about VAC, Rotary, Cooper Center, and Experience Volcano.
     Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, , closed Monday and Tuesday. Both locations are operating under CDC guidelines and social distancing protocols; face masks are required for entry into buildings, tours, and classes.

     VAC's Niʻaulani Campus in VolcanoVillageoffers guided nature walks, yoga, in-person and online art classes, and more.

Rotary Club of Volcano held a fundraiser, selling chicken, hamburgers and
ribs plates at VAC, on Saturday. Left to right are Rotarians Mike Nelson,
Jay Robinson, Carol Hamilton, and VAC board member Jeff Davis.
 Photo by Julia Neal
     At the Gallery in the Park, exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby

and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Saturday, Aug. 8. Exhibitions are available online and in person during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. The third semi-annual quilt show, Quilts in the Forest – Winds of Change, opens on Friday, July 17 and continues through Aug. 8, Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Entrants of the quilt show are full-time and part-time residents of Hawai‘i Island, whether they are amateur or professional quilters.

     Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at VolcanoArtCenter locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.

     VAC also offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos.
Drive through 4th of July food at the Volcano Art Center's 
Niʻaulani Campus. Photo by Julia Neal

     Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more, and see the Events section, below, for more details.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

APPLY FOR INTERNSHIPS with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honoluluand WashingtonD.C.offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Matt Drayer
Kaʻū Chapter Interim President
Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United
KAʻŪ CHAPTER OF HAWAIʻI FARMERS UNION UNITED will next meet this Sunday, July 12 at Wood Valley Ranch mamaki tea farm at 96-02232 South Road. It begins at  and includes a pot luck and tour of the mamaki farm, which is the new home of interim President Matt Dreyer. Among the Kaʻū Farmers Union initiatives are a food hub for Kaʻū, with CSA, and an online store platform to sell locally grown food. 


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

DETAILING THE LIFE OF AN ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN is the focus of the latest  Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates:

     Tech talk part 2: Schematic diagram of one HVO technician's position

     Last week's Volcano Watch article introduced the role of "technician" at USGS HVO.
     This week, we present the introspective of Steven Fuke's life (schematic diagram) as an "electronics technician" at HVO through his experiences, starting with his introduction to HVO.

     I started working at HVO in the summer of 1994, as a student hire, under the former Minority Participation in Earth Sciences program, while pursuing an associate degree in Electronics Technology at Hawai‘i Community College. The MPES program allowed me and other community college and college students to experience working for a volcano science organization during the summers and winters. I worked for three years, graduated, and in 1997 I became a permanent HVO staff member.


HVO electronics technician Steven Fuke stands 
near a solar panel system that powers a 
volcano-monitoring station. USGS photo

     Within HVO's organizational structure, I'm part of the "Technician Group." There is a total of five technicians within the group, one of them being the supervisory technician. Our core mission is to support monitoring and research efforts, ensuring that data are provided to HVO staff so timely hazards information can be provided to the public. HVO's established volcanic monitoring network consists of over 200 instruments in the field. Sensor data from each remote site is telemetered to their respective collection server. In addition, we add new installations to the network, as determined by scientific and volcanic response needs, and participate in periodic scientific data collection surveys.
     The Technician Group priorities are established through weekly meetings attended by Scientist-in-Charge, Deputy Scientist-in-Charge, disciplinary leads, and the supervisory technician. Once priorities are established, we assemble the components and test the necessary equipment of a field station either to fix or deploy.

     At the onset of my career—having limited practical experience—I eventually faced the realities of field design: "sometimes it works" and "sometimes it doesn't,""nothing lasts forever," and "expect the unexpected." As an example of "nothing lasts forever," I never considered corrosion as a cause leading to the demise of a coaxial cable. This cable is essential for radio frequency transmissions.
     With a volcanic monitoring network of approximately 240 stations, I've learned how daunting of a task it is to help design and maintain the network.  One of my former colleagues coined it "The never-ending job," which became a truism and the mantra for years to follow. Learning about the network, the environmental conditions that surround the network, and the evolution of technology associated with volcanic monitoring instrumentation is a continuous learning process, synonymous to learning about yourself and others.

     Most of our stations rely on 12v battery/solar systems, while others rely on 48v battery/solar systems and a few on 120Vac power. Overall field station infrastructure depends on the type of sensors being installed, radio frequency function, and location of the station. Some stations are only accessible via helicopter while others are accessible by vehicle. Quite a few of our stations are hosted by gracious private entities, land- and homeowners... mahalo! Furthermore, we partner with County, State and Federal government groups to deploy our instruments on their lands to monitor the volcanoes on behalf of the public.
A GPS station that monitors ground deformation on Kīlauea Volcano, one 
of the approximately 240 volcano-monitoring stations that Steven Fuke, 
as part of the HVO Technician Group, designs, installs, 
and maintains. USGS photo

     Data outages are inevitable and can occur at any moment, so priorities can shift from day-to-day in order to bring the data streams back on-line. Problems can run the gamut, from power system failures, corrosion of electrical components and connections, relic or dated "sensors and instrumentation," lighting strikes, and inundation by lava.

     We have installed diagnostic software to monitor the operational status of each station; some of the parameters displayed are battery voltages, GPS status, data gaps, and RF signal strengths. Some stations require weed whacking, fence fixing, solar panel cleaning, and general maintenance that's done multiple times per year. And lastly, stations will eventually become obsolete and require remodeling and/or retrofitting due to sensor and electronic instrumentation upgrades and/or station degradation.
     What continues to impress me about this job is "how one job can offer so much variety" and most importantly, the inspiration that the observatory staff provides—with the implementation of the self-learning, continuous improvement process, done in earnest: "There's a PhD in all of us."

     Volcano Activity Updates

     Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

     Kīlauea monitoring data for the month of June show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html.

     Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.

     This past week, about 60 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper-elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths of less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). Global Positioning System measurements show long-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations and fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit remain stable. Webcams show no changes to the landscape. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

     There were 2 events with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian islands during the past week (prior to July 2): a magnitude-3.3 earthquake 15 km (9 mi) SE of Pāhala at 33 km (20 mi) depth on June, 27 at 11:09 p.m., and a magnitude-3.0 earthquake 9 km (5 mi) ENE of Pāhala at 32 km (19 mi) depth on June, 27 at 12:58 p.m.
     HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity.
     Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SEVEN NEW COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI are reported today. Hawaiʻi Isalnd reports one new case. There are seven active cases on-island, reports Department of Health. All active patients are being monitored by DOH. Of those, six cases are travel-related, says a statement from DOH. The origin of today's case is not yet released.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 
zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 
is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 
Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases. DOH map.
     Oʻahu reported 6 new cases today. The state's new case total is 394 in 31 days.

     Hawaiʻi Island recorded its seven active cases over the last two weeks. All other 87 confirmed COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were three hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 750 cases, Kauaʻi 40, and Maui County 128. Eighteen victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 1,030 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Nineteen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says "The majority of states in our country continue to see an increase of people being infected by the Coronavirus. Hawaiʻi Island remains in a good place and know how important it is for everyone to continue, and even get better, in following the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. This is a community issue and your help is needed to keep Hawaiʻi safe. Wear your face coverings to keep you and others safe. The CountyTask Force on prevention remains available, so do call Civil Defense if help is needed. The County's Task Force on disinfection also continues its seven-day-a-week schedule. Thank you for listening and thank you for doing your part in keeping yourself, your family, your friends, and your community safe. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."

     In the United States, more than 2,922,000 cases have been confirmed – an increase of about 48,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 130,248.
     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 11.58 million. The death toll is more than 536,658.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., starting July 7. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's Outreach College Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Little Kids Tales. July 7, Participation Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 8Jack & Evil Mountain SpiritOld Rink Rank. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 9PanuiJuly 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."



Talk Story on Living with Serious Illness, Friday, July 10 from  to  Virtual event, hosted by Hawaiʻi Care Choices, will feature personal insights on "why accessing healthcare early can boost the quality of life" from former Hawaiʻi County Mayor Billy Kenoi, and Rodney Powell, a licensed clinical social worker and service coordination manager with Hawaiian Helathcare. Host Lani Weigert, Community Manager of Hawaiʻi Care Choices will share how to get help, relief, and support for serious illness through Kupu Palliative Care, Hospice, and Bereavement Care. Register for this Zoom event before Friday, July 10 by emailing LFukushima@hawaiicarechoices.org. See hawaiicarechoices.org, call 808-969-1733, or email care@hawaiicarechoices.org for more.


After-School All-Stars Free Virtual Summer Program runs through Friday, July 17 - register before July 10. For students going into 6th, 7th, or 8th grade. Classes offered are cooking, baking, fitness, arts & crafts, sports, gardening, and more. Every activity earns one entry in a prize drawing. All materials provided; pick up on Monday mornings, 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., in Volcano, Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, or Ocean View. Register at tinyurl.com/KauSummer2020. For more info, contact Chrysa Dacalio, kau@asashawaii.org, 808-561-3710.


Apply for Small Grants to improve access to healthy foods in underserved areas, create and preserve quality jobs, and revitalize low-income communities through the Healthy Food Financing Initiative, urges The Kohala Center. Deadline to submit a letter of interest is Friday, July 10. Visit the program website or refer to this fact sheet for more information.

Zentangle with Lydia Meneses, Saturday, July 11 at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about  To provide comment, sign up in advance, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov or type a comment into the Question box. Register in advance at attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5189333551313546256. Learn more on Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov; NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, sanctuaries.noaa.gov; State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources, dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar.



Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at  The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 
65-1259 Kawaihae Road
 on Wednesday, July 8 between  and  Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace to , Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts their Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.


Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.

Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Nāʻālehu's final ʻOhana Food Drop is Wednesday, July 8 from  until pau – supplies run out – at Nāʻālehu Shopping Center. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See



Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.


Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.



Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Friday – from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     A wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more are offered on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374, for more and to apply to vend.

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, July 7, 2020

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Hawaiʻi County's Highway Division Cheif, Neil Azevedo, is running for Mayor of Hawaiʻi County. Read more, below.
Photo from friendsofneilazavedo.com
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

REGISTER TO VOTE. DEADLINE FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION is this Thursday, July 9 at 4:30 p.m. Register or confirm mailing address at olvr.hawaii.gov, or mail in registration with postmark by the deadline. Same-day voter registration is available at Voter Service Centers in Kona and Hilo. Ballots can be expected for delivery around Tuesday, July 21, and must be postmarked by Aug. 3. Election Day for counting the votes is Saturday, Aug. 8. Those who believe their ballot will not make the deadline can take them to Nāʻālehu Police Station 24 hours a day, July 27 through Aug. 7, and on Election Day, Aug. 8, through 7 p.m. See elections.hawaii.gov.

A NEW EMPLOYEE TESTED POSITIVE FOR COVID-19 AT KAʻŪ HOSPITAL'S RURAL HEALTH CLINIC on Monday. The health care provider had worked there for two days. Kaʻū Hospital's administrator Merilyn Harris said the employee is isolated at home. "All the clinic patients seen by the provider were notified immediately and their names given to the Department of Health for follow-up. Both employee and patients were wearing masks as required by the Centers for Disease Control so the risk to patients of exposure is considered to be low."
A new employee at Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic tested positive for COVID-19. 
     Other clinic staff members "have all been tested as an extra precaution and the clinic has been thoroughly cleaned. We hope to have test results available tomorrow. The clinic will be closed for patient visits until Thursday, July 9 to allow time for the test results to be obtained. Meanwhile, clinic staff are on-site to handle prescription refills and telephone consultations.
     "We know this event has caused worry for some and we want to reassure the community that we are following all guidance from the Department of Health and that our hospital and clinic remain safe places for patients and staff. It's important to note that the employee did not have contact with hospitalized patients.
     "Because of the number of kūpuna that live in our hospital, we will be continuing the no visitor policy for their protection. We will also continue with our practice of screening all people entering the building for temperature and respiratory symptoms, hand sanitizing, and require that everyone wear a mask," said the hospital and clinic administrator.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FORTY-ONE NEW COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI are reported today. Hawaiʻi Island reports one new case. There are eight active cases on-island, reports Department of Health. All active patients are monitored by DOH. All eight cases are travel-related, says a statement from DOH, which "emphasizes the importance of caution of travel."
     At a news briefing today, Gov. David Ige said the 41 new COVID-19 cases reported by DOH mark "the highest we've had, and it is concerning. However, as we re-opened our economy, we expected this. We are tracking this very closely and it is manageable right now. We have the ability to test people we need to test, and DOH has significantly increased the number of people available to trace the contacts of positive cases." Ige also said he is "in daily discussions with DOH, the county mayors, and other leaders. As we have done in the past, we will continue to make decisions based on the best available science and facts. We have not made any decisions yet and will let you know as soon as any changes are necessary."
     DOH officials remind the public that Hawaiʻi could continue to see a spike in the number of COVID-19 cases as levels of activity increase within the state. DOH Director Dr. Bruce Anderson said, "Now more than ever it is critically important for everyone to wear a cloth face mask whenever outside of their home. Many of the clusters we have been investigating are associated with situations where a mask has not been worn or physical distancing was not exercised. These are new infections that are not associated with known cases and investigations... We have an opportunity now to turn around these numbers before opening travel and safely resuming school and work. Let's take this opportunity to all wear masks and do our part to prevent COVID-19."
     State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park said, "This latest report shows COVID-19 is widely circulating in our community. The numbers today will likely continue, at least at this level, if people continue to disregard using their masks and physical distancing. While we have an increased number of staff at DOH and are in the process of hiring newly trained contact tracers, the community must adhere to safe practices - as no amount of contact tracing and testing will combat a respiratory pathogen alone."
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White is 

zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange (not pictured) 

is six to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 cases. 

Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.

Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     DOH continues to monitor several clusters, including one associated with Hawaiian Airlines which now involves 15 cases; 13 staff and two close contacts of those employees. Nine cases are associated with a gym in Honolulu that had poor ventilation and insufficient physical distancing. Other clusters include seven cases at a food distribution company, four cases involving a hardware distributor, and a cluster of 17 cases on Kaua‘i. Community outreach and testing activities continue.
     Oʻahu reported 33 new cases today, Kauaʻi two. The state's new case total is 435 in 32 days.

     Hawaiʻi Island recorded its eight active cases over the last two weeks. All other 87 confirmed COVID-19 victims on Hawaiʻi Island recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were three hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 788 cases, Kauaʻi 42, and Maui County 128. Eighteen victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 1,071 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Nineteen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "To keep Hawaiʻi in a good place know how important it is for everyone to continue, and even get better, in following the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. This is a community issue and your help is needed to keep Hawaiʻi safe. Wear your face coverings to keep you and others safe. Thank you for listening and thank you for doing your part in keeping yourself, your family, your friends, and your community safe.This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."

     In the United States, more than 2,922,000 cases have been confirmed – an increase of nearly 60,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 131,248.
     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 11.7 million. The death toll is more than 540,582.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Kīlauea Military Camp is open, along with its six-lane bowling alley. Photo by Julia Neal 
CRATER RIM CAFÉ, LAVA LOUNGE, AND BOWLING HAVE REOPENED AT KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP inside Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, with management enforcing wearing masks and distancing.
     At the bowling alley and its 10-Pin Grill snack bar, signs are posted and staff members said they will tell everyone to wear masks when bowling or picking up food and drinks from the counter. Those who refuse will be escorted out by a National Park Ranger. Masks can be removed for eating and drinking, when distanced from groups of people who are not in the same party.
     Bowling is open, by appointment, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. On Saturday, a senior league played before the public opening. To reserve bowling times, call KMC at 967-8350. The 10-Pin Grill offers everything from burgers to pizza, dinner specials, hot and cold sandwiches, as well as beer.
KMC's bowling alley is open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., with requirements to wear masks and socially
distance when playing and retrieving food from the adjacent 10-Pin Grill. Photo by Julia Neal
     After successful Father's Day and July 4 dining-in events, Crater Rim Café at KMC opens Fridays for dinner from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays for breakfast 6:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. and dinner from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.; and Sundays for breakfast from 6:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
     Lava Lounge bar opens from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Food can be ordered and delivered to the bar from Crater Rim Café or 10-Pin Grill.
     See kilaueamilitarycamp.com. Call 967-8333.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI REMAINS ONE OF THE MOST RESTRICTIVE PLACES in the U.S. regarding COVID-19 precautions, according to a recent report from WalletHub. Since May 5, WalletHub has reviewed restrictions in place to mitigate spread of the novel coronavirus. Hawaiʻi consistently ranks in the top six of most restrictive states. On May 5, Hawaiʻi ranked first; May 19, sixth; June 9, fourth; June 23, fourth; July 7, third.
     As of July 7, only California and Colorado have more restrictions in place than Hawaiʻi. New Jersey and New Mexico rank fourth and fifth. The least restrictive states as of July 7 are South Dakota, Wisconsin, Utah, Wyoming, and Oklahoma.
     All states have at least partially reopened after keeping non-essential businesses closed for months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some states recently chose to pause reopening processes due to spikes in cases. WalletHub's key metrics take into account whether the state requires face masks in public, civilian and military travel restrictions, restrictions on large gatherings, school closures, if restaurants and bars are open and if they have customer screening in place, reopening of non-essential businesses, if there is legislation on business immunity from COVID-19 claims, if workplaces conduct temperature screenings, if childcare is reopened, how strict "shelter in place" orders are, enforcement or penalties for non-compliance of COVID-19 rules, if the state is part of a multi-state agreement on reopening, suspension or postponement of legislative and/or court sessions, state guidance on non-essential medical procedures, and state guidance for assisted living facilities.

NOAA map
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TROPICAL STORM CHRISTINA is set to develop into a Category One hurricane in 24 hours but devolve back into a storm by Sunday, still about 2,000 miles from Hawaiʻi.
     An unnamed disturbance 1,000 miles southwest of Hawaiʻi, has a ten percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone by the weekend.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A MAGNITUDE 3.5 QUAKE ROCKED PĀHALA at 11:45 a.m. The temblor's epicenter was 8 km east of Pāhala and was felt in Discovery Harbour and beyond. The depth was 19.8 miles.
USGS map of today's M3.5 quake.
     Other recent area quakes include a M4.3 near Fern Forest on July 3 and a M4.6 in the same area on July 2, and a 3.6 on June 20 near Pāhala.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI COUNTY HIGHWAYS DIVISION CHIEF NEIL AZEVEDO IS RUNNING FOR MAYOR. Azevedo is a kamaʻāina of Hilo; a father, grandfather, coach, and experienced leader. He grew up in Waiākea Uka as the youngest of 11 siblings in a blue-collar family. He was taught "community and ‘ohana are one and the same, that together, amazing things can happen," says his campaign website 

friendsofneilazevedo.com.
     In late May and June, Azevedo's campaign fed 1,300 people, in partnership with L&L Barbecue in Ocean View and Captain Cook, Big Island Grill in Kona, Blaine's Drive Inn in Keaʻau, Cronie's in Hilo, Convenience Plus in Honokaʻa, and Earl's in Waimea.

     In the private construction sector, Azevedo worked for over 30 years to build infrastructure and facilities such as Keaʻau High School, UH Hilo Athletic Complex, and Issac Hale Beach Park.
Hawaiʻi County Mayoral candidate Neil Azevedo.
Photo from friendsofneilazevedo.com
     As Highways Division Chief since 2015, Azevedo leads a team that delivered public roads and facilities improvements, like paving Hoʻolulu Complex parking, widening shoulders on Waikoloa Road, and the Queen's Lei multi-modal path alongside Ane Keohokālole Highway.

     After hurricanes, earthquakes and lava flows, Azevedo's leadership "was critical in disaster response and recovery, working side by side with federal, state, and county emergency management under two mayoral administrations. Neil worked to build evacuation routes and close access to unsafe areas, and even went door-to-door to ensure everyone evacuated safely," reports the campaign website.

     An athlete since his days at Waiākea High School and Portland State University, Azevedo has coached youth sports for more than three decades, serving as a teacher and role model for generations of young athletes in our community.

     "As a dedicated father of five and a proud grandfather of one, Neil knows that the decisions we make to build a healthy and thriving Hawaiʻi Island community is not just for us – it's for future generations," says his site.

     In a large field of 15 mayoral candidates, Azevedo's candidacy is based on three principles: keep it simple, spend wisely, and get the job done. On his website, he says county government "exists to serve the people, so it should be simple enough for people to understand and navigate." He recommends a "common-sense" approach to building permits, including timeliness so people can work, have homes built, and fill county coffers with property tax revenues. He says the island mass transit system needs to be working island-wide, and suggests investment in bike-share, park-and-ride facilities, and trails.
Neil Azevedo, at work. 
Photo from friendsofneilazevedo.com
     Azevedo says county government should be "accessible to everyone on our island." He wants a cabinet that represents the whole island, and he would "spend time in Hilo and Kona offices, and having consistent relationships in all communities."

     In a recent interview with KITV 4, Azevedo said, "As a team, we will make changes, with the first being a common-sense approach to the building permitting process and focus on our core values with public health and safety. Our team will work on how to improve transportation connectivity on Hawaiʻi Island. We will engage the non-profits and interfaith community as true partners. We will work closely with businesses towards the economic recovery and regrowth post-COVID. These are just a few changes we will bring to Hawai‘i County."
     Learn more about Azevedo at friendsofneilazevedo.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Watch the video of Matsonia's christening: matson.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Matsonia-christening-highlights.mp4.
THE MATSONIA WAS CHRISTENED at the General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. in San Diego on Thursday. Matsonia joins Lurlineas Matson's second Kanaloa Class container/roll-on, roll-off vessel. Matson is the main ocean cargo shipping line between the Hawaiian Islands and the mainland. The new class of ships honors native Hawaiian ocean deity Kanaloa.

     At 870 feet long, 114 feet wide, with a draft of 38 feet and weighing in at over 50,000 metric tons, Matsonia and Lurline are the largest vessels in Matson's fleet and the largest con-ros ever built in the United States. The two ships cost Matson $500 million and are among four new vessels that Matson put into service since 2018.

Assembly block at NASSCO in San Diegoon April 18, 2019
Photo from Matson

     Each Kanaloa Class vessel has an enclosed garage with room for about 500 vehicles, plus ample space for rolling stock and breakbulk cargo. They also feature state-of-the-art green technology, including a fuel-efficient hull design, environmentally safe double hull fuel tanks, freshwater ballast systems, and the first Tier 3 dual-fuel engines to be deployed in containerships regularly serving West Coast ports.

     Under the latest International Maritime Organization requirements for engine manufacturers, Tier 3 engines reduce the levels of particulate emissions by 40 percent and nitrogen oxide emissions by 20 percent, as compared to Tier 2 standards. Matson's deployment of Tier 3 engines in both Kanaloa Class vessels is supported by California Climate Investments, a statewide initiative that puts billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy and improving public health and the environment – particularly in disadvantaged communities.

PeggyForest, wife of Matson president RonForest
christens Matsonia on Thursday, July 2. 
Photo from Matson

     A statement from Matson says that Matsoniaand Lurline are two of the most environmentally friendly vessels in its fleet. They are also among the fastest, with top speed of 23 knots, helping ensure on-time deliveries to Hawaiʻi from Matson's three West Coast terminals in Seattle, Oakland, and Long Beach.

     Matt Cox, Matson's chairman and chief executive officer, said, "Matson is already benefitting from the speed, capacity and improved environmental profile of the three new ships we've put into service since 2018. Matsonia will be our fourth new ship, completing a three-year fleet renewal program that positions us well to serve the needs of our communities in Hawaiʻi for many years to come. As a proud U.S.company and Jones Act carrier, our investment in this new ship is about much more than maintaining a high level of service to Hawaiʻi. It also helps drive substantial economic benefits in and opportunities in communities around the Pacific, where this vessel will operate."

     Dave Carver, President of General Dynamics NASSCO, said, "The Matsonia is a reflection of the highest standards of shipbuilding and we are proud to celebrate her launching. This extraordinary vessel is a testament to the hard work, unity, and strength of our thousands of dedicated shipbuilders who made this possible."

     The first Matson ship named Matsonia was built by Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. Launched on August 16, 1912, it was in service for three years before being commandeered by the U.S. Shipping Board to serve as a Navy Transport in the Atlanticduring WWI. As a passenger liner, the original Matsonia could accommodate 242 passengers in addition to 10,000 tons of cargo. This Matsoniais the fifth ship to bear the name.

     PeggyForest, wife of Matson's PresidentRonForest, officially christened the vessel by breaking a ceremonial bottle of champagne against its hull. Immediately after the bottle was broken, the vessel was released from its build ways and slid backward into San DiegoBay. Matsoniawas then docked at NASSCO's nearby testing and trials berth, where the final stages of construction will be completed prior to delivery scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2020.
Matsonia at NASSCO Shipyard on May 22, 2020. Photo from Matson

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DEEP DISCOUNTS TO ATTEND THE 27th ANNUAL HAWAIʻI CONSERVATION CONFERENCE from Tuesday, Sept. 1 to Thursday, Sept. 3, are available at hawaiiconservation.org. Registrants of this year's three-day virtual event, Ola Ka ʻĀina Momona: Managing for Abundance, will have access to all virtual conference sessions, the exhibit hall, and conference materials. Students, emerging professionals, and staff of small non-profit organizations are eligible for special registration discounts. The registration system is expected to be open next week.

     Ola Ka ʻĀina Momona, The Abundant Land Thrives, expands on the idea that land and sea ecosystems maintain their abundant biocultural diversity and thrive, through our efforts to achieve sustainability and enhance the viability of all life on Earth, says the conference website.

     "People across the world depend on the resources and services that nature provides. However, increasing regional and global pressures on our biocultural resources are threatening the sustainability and viability of interdependent natural and social systems. We need to improve our understanding of these systems, ways to enhance their viability, and foster more reciprocal and symbiotic relationships between people and their places.

     "In ʻŌiwi (indigenous Hawaiian) culture, the concept of ʻāina momona describes places of biocultural resource abundance, such as lush riverine valleys, fresh water springs, estuaries, healthy nearshore reefs, rich agricultural complexes, and profoundly productive nearshore fishponds, which resulted in a rich ‘Ōiwi society. ʻĀina momona is not absent of human presence, but rather, reflects an active and symbiotic relationship between people and their place.  This conference invites presenters and attendees to apply the concept of ʻāina momona to explore the study and practice of conservation, restoration, and stewardship of the landscapes.

     Conference highlights include presentations from "impactful speakers;" opportunities to learn about different technologies, methods, and approaches to conservation; field activities; and new and strengthened partnerships among the conservation community.

     Hawaiʻi Conservation Conference allows a diverse group of scientists, policymakers, conservation practitioners, educators, students and community members from Hawaiʻi and the Pacific to converge and discuss conservation. The website says, "It's a time to connect, share, and inspire, all with the common goal of caring for our natural resources. Thank you for your ongoing support and all the hard work you do to care for our biocultural resources. Be well, take care of yourselves and your families, and don't hesitate to contact us if you have questions about this year's conference at conference@hawaiiconservation.org.


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How to use this map: Hold this map over your head so that the northern horizon points toward the north on the Earth. 
For best results, use a red flashlight to illuminate the map. If you are looking east, hold it in front of you so that east is 
on the bottom. For south views, south at the bottom, and for west, west at the bottom. Use this map at the times shown 
on in its upper left corner. Keep this page handy and show it to your keiki next month. They probably have bedtimes 
before the time of the chart shown here.

The constellations are presented with their 3-letter abbreviations, with their common names shown in the margins. This 
is done to take advantage of the truly dark skies Ka‘ū is blessed with when there is no bright moon and the skies are clear 
of vog. The star charts are produced from a sky Atlas program written by Jerry Hudson, who has given us permission 
to publish it. Thank you, Jerry.

STARS OVER KAʻŪ – July 2020, by Lew and Donna Cook

     The Sun and Planets

     Some of you no doubt have heard of the SpaceX launch of two astronauts to the International Space Station. The rocket was launched in late May from Cape Canaveral, FL. It arrived safely and docked with ISS on May 31. We have a friend in northern Californiawho took a picture of the ISS crossing the face of the sun.
Four successive frames from Dale Hasselfeld's CAMERA has a lens zoomed
to 600 mm at 8 frames per second. The shot was captured from Livermore,
CA
on June 6, 2020. The filter Dale used was equivalent to an
arc welder's helmet. Credit: Dale Hasselfeld
     He put a special filter over his camera's lens to reduce the brightness of the sun and save his camera from damage. Four images were combined here (see photo). There are two sunspots visible, which suggests the next solar cycle may have begun.

     ISS passes over Hawaiʻi several times per week. You can see it during its twilight passes by signing up to be notified at: spotthestation.nasa.gov.
     Jupiter and Saturn are up at chart time, on the 15th. Mars will rise around and Venus is the morning star, appearing in Taurus rising around
     Constellations and Deep Sky Objects

     This time of year is the time for globular clusters, which reside in large elliptical orbits around the galactic center. Excellent examples are M13 in Hercules, and NGC 6441, which the Hubble Space Telescope imaged and is shown here. These are very dense and compact bunches of tens of thousands of stars, and are among the oldest stars grouped together. Scorpius, Sagittarius, and Ophiuchus have many bright globular clusters. In fact, most of the globular clusters in our galaxy can be found here.

Lots and lots of stars! This Hubble Space Telescope image 
shows just how crowded the stars can be in an average 
globular cluster. Until recently, ground-based telescopes 
could not separate the stars in the center of most globular 
clusters. CREDIT: ESA, Hubble, NASA, G. Piotto
     Local Attractions

     The ‘Imiloa Planetarium in Hilo may continue its closure through July but there is a wealth of information at ʻimiloa@home. See imiloahawaii.org/imiloaathome for great information.

     Moon Phases

     Date                  Moonrise     Moonset

     Full Moon

     July 4, 2020      **

     Last Quarter

     July

     New Moon

     July 20               

     First Quarter

     July 27              **

     *day prior      **next morning

     Fridays Sunrise and Sunset times

     Date                  Sunrise      Sunset

     July 3, 2020      

     July

     July 17

     July 24              5:56 am     7:01 pm
     July 31              5:59 am     6:58 pm


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Virtual Cultural Festival runs through July 11 on social media. Hawaiian culture is shared with a wide audience free of charge. Instead of gathering the community and visitors together in person, the Park shares short videos and other mana‘o (knowledge) about Hawaiian culture virtually. #FindYourVirtualPark. Go to facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoesnps/.
     All virtual events since Saturday are posted and available to review. Upcoming are:
     Facebook Watch Party for the documentary,  Saving ‘Ōhi‘a. At noon on Wednesday, July 8, grab lunch and join the virtual gathering for a free screening of the Emmy-award winning 28-minute documentary, Saving ‘Ōhi‘a. This 2018 film explains the significance of the ‘ōhi‘a tree to the people of Hawai‘i and environment, and the threat that the new disease called "Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death" poses to these values. Park ecologist David Benitez, park botanist Sierra McDaniel, and filmmaker Annie Sullivan will answer questions in real time in the comments. The documentary was filmed partially in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

     Hawaiian Lua (Martial Arts) with Ranger Michael Newman and Olivia Crabtree on Thursday, July 9 at  Bone-breaking maneuvers and war clubs encircled with tiger-shark teeth are probably not the first things to come to mind when one pictures the Hawaiian Islands. The Hawaiian fighting style of lua is a formidable art form that requires skill, specific movement, and a host of deadly weapons. The rangers demonstrate this traditional fighting style.

     Learn to Make a Pūlumi Nī‘au (Hawaiian Broom) with Ranger Dean Gallagher on Friday, July 10 at  Get swept up in gathering plant materials and learn to make a pūlumi nī‘au, or authentic Hawaiian broom.
     Closing ‘Oli Mahalo will close the Virtual Cultural Festival on Saturday, July 11 at 8:08 a.m. Park staff and ‘ohana will blow the pū (conch shell) and chant the ‘Oli Mahalo together, requesting departure to close the festival. Gifted to the park by Kepā Maly, the ‘Oli Mahalo expresses gratitude. Ranger Kekoa Rosehill narrates. 

     Many areas in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that provide outdoor experiences like hiking trails, overlooks, and roads, are now open to the public, but services are limited. Visit the Current Conditions page on the park website for a complete list of what's open, and how to prepare for a safe trip to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, at nps.gov.

Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's Outreach College Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Little Kids Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 8Jack & Evil Mountain SpiritOld Rink Rank. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 9PanuiJuly 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."



Join a TelephoneTown Hall with Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on Wednesday, July 8 at The meeting – the 15th Gabbard has hosted since the pandemic began  – will be held to update Hawaiʻi residents about COVID-19. Gabbard will be joined by guests Dr. Scott Miscovich, who has been leading testing efforts across the state and has served as a senior adviser to Lt. Gov. Josh Green, and Darin Leong, an unemployment attorney who has worked with Hawaiʻi community leaders to raise awareness about relief programs available to employers and employees.

     Gabbard, Miscovich, and Leong will discuss the surge in COVID-19 cases, Hawaiʻi's testing and tracing capacity, and what can be done to help stop the spread of the virus. They will also discuss federal emergency assistance programs that are still available to help people during the ongoing crisis.
     Sign up on Gabbard's website to receive a phone call to join the event. Or listen online at gabbard.house.gov/live.


Talk Story on Living with Serious Illness, Friday, July 10 from  to  Virtual event, hosted by Hawaiʻi Care Choices, will feature personal insights on "why accessing healthcare early can boost the quality of life" from former Hawaiʻi County Mayor Billy Kenoi, and Rodney Powell, a licensed clinical social worker and service coordina

tion manager with Hawaiian Helathcare. Host Lani Weigert, Community Manager of Hawaiʻi Care Choices will share how to get help, relief, and support for serious illness through Kupu Palliative Care, Hospice, and Bereavement Care. Register for this Zoom event before Friday, July 10 by emailing LFukushima@hawaiicarechoices.org. See hawaiicarechoices.org, call 808-969-1733, or email care@hawaiicarechoices.org for more.

After-School All-Stars Free Virtual Summer Program runs through Friday, July 17 - register before July 10. For students going into 6th, 7th, or 8th grade. Classes offered are cooking, baking, fitness, arts & crafts, sports, gardening, and more. Every activity earns one entry in a prize drawing. All materials provided; pick up on Monday mornings, 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., in Volcano, Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, or Ocean View. Register at tinyurl.com/KauSummer2020. For more info, contact Chrysa Dacalio, kau@asashawaii.org, 808-561-3710.

Apply for Small Grants to improve access to healthy foods in underserved areas, create and preserve quality jobs, and revitalize low-income communities through the Healthy Food Financing Initiative, urges The Kohala Center. Deadline to submit a letter of interest is Friday, July 10. Visit the program website or refer to this fact sheet for more information.


Zentangle with Lydia Meneses, Saturday, July 11 at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Kaʻū Chapter of Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United meets this Sunday, July 12 at Wood Valley Ranch mamaki tea farm at 96-02232 South Road. It begins at and includes a pot luck and tour of the mamaki farm, which is the new home of interim President Matt Dreyer. Among the Kaʻū Farmers Union initiatives are a food hub for Kaʻū, with CSA, and an online store platform to sell locally grown food. 


Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about  To provide comment, sign up in advance, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov or type a comment into the Question box. Register in advance at attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5189333551313546256. Learn more on Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov; NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, sanctuaries.noaa.gov; State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources, dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar.



Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at  The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 
65-1259 Kawaihae Road
 on Wednesday, July 8 between  and  Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace to , Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts their Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.


Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.


Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and WashingtonD.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Nāʻālehu's final ʻOhana Food Drop is Wednesday, July 8 from  until pau – supplies run out – at Nāʻālehu Shopping Center. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.


Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.



Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.

     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 

     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.

     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 


     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, July 8, 2020

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Uēkahuna Bluff above Jaggar Museum at moonrise. See below the schedule of events remaining during Hawaiʻi
Volcanoes National Park's virtual Cultural Festival, which continues through Saturday. NPS photo/ Janice Wei
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

REGISTER TO VOTE BY THURSDAY AND SEE A SAMPLE BALLOT. Deadline to register for the Primary election is tomorrow, Thursday, July 9 at  Register or confirm mailing address and see a sample ballot of all choices at olvr.hawaii.gov. Paper registration applications can also be mailed in with postmark by the deadline. Same-day voter registration is available at Voter Service Centers in Kona and Hilo. Ballots can be expected for delivery around Tuesday, July 21, and must be postmarked by Aug. 3. Election Day for counting the votes is Saturday, Aug. 8. Those who believe their ballot will not make the deadline can take them to Nāʻālehu Police Station 24 hours a day, July 27 through Aug. 7, and on Election Day, Aug. 8, through  See elections.hawaii.gov.

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KAʻŪ HOSPITAL CLINIC STAFF TESTED NEGATIVE FOR COVID-19, results coming in this morning, says its administrator Merilyn Harris. Testing followed a new health care provider coming up positive on Monday after seeing patients for two days in Kaʻū Hospital Rural Health Clinic.
     Harris writes, "I'm happy to report that we tested all the clinic staff and all were negative. Clinic will re-open for patients tomorrow. I understand the concerns expressed by people who have been asking: 'How can this happen?'
A tent outside Kaʻū Hospital and Clinic screens incoming patients before
allowing entry. Photo by Lora Botanova
     "The state travel exemption for healthcare providers does not require a negative COVID-19 test. In this case, we recommended it, and unfortunately, it was not done. We are reviewing our protocols regarding new employees and pre-employment testing requirements, to make sure that in future anyone coming to work here starts with a negative COVID-19 test."
     The health care provider came from out of state and is isolated at accommodations away from the hospital campus. According to Harris masks were worn by all patients and the health care provider during their time at the clinic.


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A NEAR DROWNING OF A FIVE-YEAR-OLD BOY AT KĀWĀ is reported by the Hawaiʻi Fire Department. According to today's report, Company 11 from Pāhala Fire Station and Nāʻālehu responded to the scene with Hawaiʻi Police Department.
     Police and Fire employed an off-road vehicle to access the beach area from Highway 11. They found a pulseless and unresponsive five-year-old male on the beach with CPR being performed by a family member. HFD personnel took over resuscitation efforts and extricated the patient from Kāwā beach to the Medic unit using an off-road vehicle.
     Medics initiated advanced life support treatment and Transported the patient to Kaʻū Hospital by HFD Medic 11.
     The patient was stabilized and transported to HiloMedicalCenterin critical condition.

     The fire department reported the location of the incident as a sandy, rocky beach area with surrounding, low-lying cliffs, with gated access off of Highway 11, a half a mile off road to beach area. At the beach they found rough surf with choppy conditions.


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DELAY REOPENING TRANSPACIFIC TRAVEL, says the doctor who has co-sponsored numerous drive through CIVOD-19 testing in Kaʻū and around this island. Dr. Scott Miscovich, President and founder of Premier Medical Group Hawaiʻi, told Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald writer John Burnett that he just visited Arizona. "I've just been to the future… and it's terrifying. You look at Arizona right now and Texas — it's just horrific what's going on there," Miscovich said.
Dr. Scott Miscovich, founder of Premier Medical Group,
which conducts drive up testing for COVID-19, warns
Hawaiʻi to hold back travelers from the mainland.
     "We are definitely going in the wrong direction as a state," Miscovich told the Tribune Herald in a story published today. "This is very, very concerning to me, at this point. The most concerning part is the randomness of the number of positives. We've gone from having definable clusters that we could track and understand where the positives came from and why they could be tracked down to just a few individuals scattered throughout. Now, we are seeing positives throughout, especially Oʻahu." Miscovich said that randomness makes it more difficult to conduct contact tracing and testing of contacts.
     Miscovich told the Tribune Herald, "I was on the phone this morning calling five positives, and every one of them was different. Every one of them was random… in that, they really didn't know where they got it. That's problematic. There's about 40 percent asymptomatic positives, and those people will be spreading."
     He told the reporter that another alarming trend is the rate of infections in younger people, ages 20-35. "That is the largest demographic in the entire United States that's expanding. It's also the largest group that's showing a burst of hospitalizations, as well as deaths… You see these group gatherings in bars and restaurants and… half of them don't have masks on. And indoor gatherings that are so large that, even though they might be spread out, that closed environment is where this respiratory virus spreads.
     "The biggest takeaway is individual people must take personal responsibility for stopping this crisis. Governments can only do so much. It has to come down to every one of us understanding that social distancing is important, as well as wearing your masks." See more at Hawaiʻi Tribune Herald.

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WITH JALPAK DELAYING BOOKING VISITORS FROM JAPAN, the travel industry is taking another blow this week, as Hawaiʻi plans to open up Aug. 1 to U.S. visitors with a negative COVID test so they can avoid a 14-day quarantine.
     Ideas of a travel bubble between low-COVID Hawaiʻi and other low-COVD-19 populations like Japan, Korea, New Zealand are out of the conversation.
     With visitors coming from the mainland, with  one of the highest numbers of COVID-19 in the world, travelers from places with little COVID-19 are hesitant to book a trip to the Hawaiian Islands. Many countries, including those in the European Union, have banned travel from the U.S.
     JALPAK, a division of Japan Airlines, is one of the largest booking agencies for Japanese travelers' flights and accommodations for Hawaiʻi. The company announced that it will see how the August influx of visitors to Hawaiʻi affects the COVID-19 count before determining when to book visitors from Japan to Hawaiʻi again. Japan visitors have accounted for a steady and large segment of tourism in Hawaiʻi for more than half a century.

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KAʻŪ OFFERS TWO COVID-19 TESTING LOCATIONS:
     Bay Clinic at 95-5583 Mamālahoa Highway in Nāʻālehu is open  Appointment required. No drive-thru; stay in vehicle. Patients are seen regardless of ability to pay. There is a fee for the COVID-19 test. Call 808-333-3600.

Bay Clinic in Nāʻālehu is open for COVID-19 testing 
     Kaʻū Hospital at 1 Kamani Street in Pāhala is open Monday through Friday Bring ID and insurance card. Pre-operative and Emergency Room patients only. Screening conducted outside, in a tent. There is a fee for the COVID-19 test. Call 808-932-4200.
     Free screening and testing is offered in Kona at Aliʻi Health Center, 808-747-8321, or Aloha Kona Urgent Care, 808-365-2297 or 808-854-3566; and in various locations around the island through Premier Medical Group, 808-213-6444.
     Other island locations that offer testing are Kona Community Hospital, 808-322-9311; North Hawaiʻi Community Hospital in Kohala, 808-885-4444; Hale Hoʻola Hamakua, 808-932-4116; Clinical Labs of Hawaiʻi in Hilo, 808-935-4814; Hilo Urgent Care, 808-969-3051; Keaʻau Urgent Care, 808-966-7942; Puna Community Medical Center, 808-930-6001; and Bay Clinic locations in Hilo, Keaʻau, and Puna – call 808-333-3600.


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THE U.S. REACHED A GRIM MILESTONE OF OVER THREE MILLION CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES today. The United States confirmed cases increased by more than 124,000 in about 24 hours – more than double yesterday's increase. The death toll is over 132,195.

     Hawaiʻi reports 23 news cases today. Oʻahu reported 20 new cases, Maui two, Hawaiʻi one. The state's new case total is 458 in 33 days.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     There are nine active cases on-island, reports Department of Health. One zip code on the west side has between six and ten active cases. All active patients are being monitored by DOH. Eight cases are travel-related, says a statement from DOH. Details of the ninth case have not yet been released. This island's other 87 confirmed COVID-19 victims recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were three hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 808 cases, Kauaʻi 42, and Maui County 130. Eighteen victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 1,094 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Nineteen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The United States continues to see a large increase of infected people occurring. Hawaiʻi State has also recorded the highest single-day increase in the past day. The Department of Health reports that 38 of this increase occurred on Oahu. DOH indicates that the major cause of the increases, especially over the past week, is due to people not following policies of face coverings and distancing. Do be reminded that it is mandatory to wear a face covering on Hawaiʻi Island.

     "Hawaiʻi County remains in a good place, but know how important it is to continue, and even get better, in following the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. Thank you for doing your part to keep your loved ones and the community safe. Thank you for listening and take care of yourself. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is nearly 12 million. The death toll is more than 547,931.

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Jeanné Kapela campaigns to represent West Kaʻū in
the state House of Representatives.
Photo from Kapela's campaign
JEANNÉ KAPELA, MISS HAWAIʻI 2015, IS RUNNING FOR STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES for the second time. She would represent District 5 from Honuʻapo, though Nāʻālehu, Ocean View, and Miloliʻi, into Kona. According to a campaign statement sent to The Kaʻū Calendar, she is the Prevention Education Coordinator for IMUAlliance. The statement says the organization is "one of Hawaiʻi's largest victim service providers for survivors of sex trafficking."

     According to the statement, she also serves West Hawaiʻi as a member of the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Board of Directors and as Operations Coordinator for the Kona Historical Society. She is a Lions Club of Kona member, communications chair of KonawaenaHigh School's 100th Anniversary Committee, and Director of the Miss Kona Coffee Scholarship Competition.

     She was previously on the board of Kona Coffee Farmers Association. The statement says she served as Executive Director of UNITE Hawaiʻi, an organization devoted to ending sexual exploitation through education. Kapela worked two sessions in the Hawaiʻi legislature, for Rep. Nadine Nakamura in 2017 and for Rep. Amy Perruso in 2019. Her statement says worked on increasing public education funding, banning use of pesticide glyphosate on public school campuses, and addressing the climate crisis.

     Kapela, 25, was born in Kona and raised on a small coffee farm in Captain Cook. She graduated from KonawaenaHigh School in 2012. She wrote to The Kaʻū Calendar that she grew up in poverty, and "understands the importance of putting people before profit." Her campaign information says she is running "to protect our iconic agricultural and coffee industries, champion the needs of working families, deliver the schools our keiki deserve, and defend the environment from a worsening climate crisis. I am committed to advancing the common good for the community in which I was born and raised… I am dedicated to strengthening West Hawaiʻithrough the spirit of public service.

     "It's time to guarantee that the workers who drive our economy are able to thrive financially, give our children a world-class education system, make the islands affordable for all who call Hawaiʻi home, and protect our ʻāina for generations to come.
Jeanné Kapela with the LEO-Lions Club support group.
Photo from Kapela's campaign
     "Our community deserves leadership with aloha. Two years ago, my campaign started a movement to bring hope to those who need it most. Today, faced with a soaring cost of living, crumbling schools, and climate change, that movement is more urgent than ever."

     Kapela's campaign promises to raise the minimum wage to at least $17/hour, establish statewide paid family leave and sick pay programs, raise teacher pay, eliminate the gender pay gap, defend women's rights to access reproductive care, advocate for additional resources for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence, educate children about the dangers of sexual exploitation, and increase the availability of rehabilitative care for survivors of sex trafficking.

     Her statement says she would work to eliminate cash bail, which criminalizes economically disadvantaged people; sponsor restorative justice initiatives, including the legalization and taxation of recreational marijuana use; introduce legislation to ban private prisons in Hawaiʻi; and support police reform and accountability measures.

     Her platform includes measures to fully fund schools, reduce standardized testing, create community schools that provide "wraparound services for vulnerable children," create affordable housing, support a single-payer healthcare insurance program, and ensure access to protective equipment, testing capacity, bed space, and essential medicine.

     It also includes initiatives to fund research on eliminating agricultural infestations, increase funding for Hawaiʻi's conservation and sustainability programs, support measures for a managed retreat from Hawaiʻi's coastlines, advocate for a carbon tax, create a Green New Deal for the islands that "uplifts workers' prosperity and our ʻāina for generations to come."
Jeanné Kapela campaigns with supporters. Photo from Kapela's campaign
     The statement from her campaign says that, as a Native Hawaiian woman, she is committed to preserving Hawaiian culture and supporting legislation to increase Hawaiians' share of public land revenue. Kapela wrote that she will work to ensure Hawaiian families are given access to homestead lands, defend Hawaiʻi's land and water resources from commodification, and empower indigenous voices in political decision-making. 

     Kapela is endorsed by International Longshore and Warehouse Union, Hawaiʻi State American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, Hawaiʻi State Teachers Association, Pono Initiative Hawaiʻi, 350 Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Government Employees Association Local 152, Planned Parenthood, Patsy T. Mink PAC, Hawaiʻi Children's Action Network, Our Revolution Hawaiʻi, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, and Hawaiʻi Teamsters and Allied Workers Local 996.
     See Kapela's campaign website jeannekapela.com.


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SOCIAL SECURITY SERVICES ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE AND BY PHONE. Social Security Administration Public Affairs Specialist Jane Burigsay wrote to The Kaʻū Calendar, "Social Security remains committed to providing uninterrupted benefits and vital services the public relies on… Most business with SSA can be done online but we know that many people still rely on phone or in-person help. That's why we want people to know they can still count on us by phone."

     Speak with a representative at the Hilo office by calling 855-572-4860 (800-325-0778 for TTY), or call the national number at 800-772-1213.
     Social Security offices are not providing service for walk-in visitors. However, an appointment for limited, critical issues if help by phone isn't sufficient may be possible.

     Hawaiʻi residents are encouraged to call or take advantage of SSA's secure online services to apply for retirementdisability, and Medicare benefits; see status of an application or appeal; request a replacement Social Security card, print a benefit verification letter; and more.
     Burigsay wrote, "We know that getting medical and other documentation can be difficult due to the pandemic. We continue to extend deadlines wherever possible."


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KAʻŪ FOOD PRODUCERS can stay in touch with food manufacturers around the state much easier now with virtual meetings of Hawaiʻi Food Manufacturers Association. Attend an "HFMA COVID-19 Crisis Meeting" held in conjunction with Hawaiʻi Technology Development Corporation and Innovate Hawaiʻi on Tuesday, July 14 at 2 p.m.
     The meeting will feature three Hawaiʻi Food Manufacturers Association members. They will share the top three concerns their companies have regarding the COVID-19 crisis: Paul Uyehara of Aloha Tofu, Ryan Sung of Honolulu Cookie Co., and Erin Uehara of Choco Lea. That will be followed by discussion and sharing from the audience.
     The goal, says the statement from HFMA, is to "come away with three topics, for three subsequent sessions, to help HFMA members through this pandemic."
     Join the virtual meeting through Zoom: us02web.zoom.us/j/
82116384790pwd=c3hndVhFTzEzOVBVa0xsTEtWdGZ1Zz09, Meeting ID: 821 1638 4790, Password: 071420.

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POLITICAL SIGNS ARE PROHIBITED in the County right of way along roads and all county facility properties, per CountyCode, says a statement from Hawaiʻi County officials. "Encroachments in County right of ways have the potential to impair vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian sight distances."
     Political signs are allowed on private property.

     Section 22-2.6 of the Hawaiʻi County Code reads: "no person shall construct, place, leave, deposit, erect, or install any privately owned signs, handbills, posters or other related advertising material on or above any County street. Private signs and other advertising materials are prohibited and shall be subject to immediate removal by the Department of Public Works."

      Crews from the Department of Public Works Highways Division will remove any non-compliant signs in County right of ways and/or at county facility properties and store them at district baseyards until Nov. 3 (Election Day). Removed signs can be reclaimed at the respective DPW Highways baseyard in the district where the signs were located. DPW Highways baseyards are open Monday through Friday,
     Direct questions or concerns to Rana Rodillas, Highways Division Administration office, 961-8349.


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Virtual Cultural Festival runs through Saturday, July 11 on social media. Hawaiian culture is shared with a wide audience free of charge. Instead of gathering the community and visitors together in person, the Park will share short videos and other mana‘o (knowledge) about Hawaiian culture virtually. #FindYourVirtualPark. Go to facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoesnps/.
     All virtual events are posted, as scheduled, the content available any time afterwards. See the Opening ‘Oli Komo, new Mo‘olelo and Places pages, Learn to Make a Tī Leaf Lei,  and  read comments from the Facebook Watch Party and watch the documentary, Saving ‘Ōhi‘a.
     Here is the schedule for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday:
     Hawaiian Lua (Martial Arts) with Ranger Michael Newman and Olivia Crabtree on Thursday, July 9 at  Bone-breaking maneuvers and war clubs encircled with tiger-shark teeth are probably not the first things to come to mind when one pictures the Hawaiian Islands. The Hawaiian fighting style of lua is a formidable art form that requires skill, specific movement, and a host of deadly weapons. The rangers demonstrate this traditional fighting style.
     Learn to Make a Pūlumi Nī‘au (Hawaiian Broom) with Ranger Dean Gallagher on Friday, July 10 at  Get swept up in gathering plant materials and learn to make a pūlumi nī‘au, or authentic Hawaiian broom.
     Closing ‘Oli Mahalo will close the Virtual Cultural Festival on Saturday, July 11 at 8:08 a.m. Park staff and ‘ohana will blow the pū (conch shell) and chant the ‘Oli Mahalo together, requesting departure to close the festival. Gifted to the park by Kepā Maly, the ‘Oli Mahalo expresses gratitude. Ranger Kekoa Rosehill narrates.
     Many areas in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that provide outdoor experiences like hiking trails, overlooks, and roads, are now open to the public, but services are limited. Visit the Current Conditions page on the park website for a complete list of what's open, and how to prepare for a safe trip to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, at nps.gov.

Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's Outreach College Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.


     Tuesdays: Participation Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 9PanuiJuly 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."



Talk Story on Living with Serious Illness, Friday, July 10 from  to  Virtual event, hosted by Hawaiʻi Care Choices, will feature personal insights on "why accessing healthcare early can boost the quality of life" from former Hawaiʻi County Mayor Billy Kenoi, and Rodney Powell, a licensed clinical social worker and service coordination manager with Hawaiian Helathcare. Host Lani Weigert, Community Manager of Hawaiʻi Care Choices will share how to get help, relief, and support for serious illness through Kupu Palliative Care, Hospice, and Bereavement Care. Register for this Zoom event before Friday, July 10 by emailing LFukushima@hawaiicarechoices.org. See hawaiicarechoices.org, call 808-969-1733, or email care@hawaiicarechoices.org for more.



After-School All-Stars Free Virtual Summer Program runs through Friday, July 17 - register before July 10. For students going into 6th, 7th, or 8th grade. Classes offered are cooking, baking, fitness, arts & crafts, sports, gardening, and more. Every activity earns one entry in a prize drawing. All materials provided; pick up on Monday mornings, 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., in Volcano, Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, or Ocean View. Register at tinyurl.com/KauSummer2020. For more info, contact Chrysa Dacalio, kau@asashawaii.org, 808-561-3710.


Apply for Small Grants to improve access to healthy foods in underserved areas, create and preserve quality jobs, and revitalize low-income communities through the Healthy Food Financing Initiative, urges The Kohala Center. Deadline to submit a letter of interest is Friday, July 10. Visit the program website or refer to this fact sheet for more information.

Zentangle with Lydia Meneses, Saturday, July 11 at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Kaʻū Chapter of Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United meets this Sunday, July 12 at Wood Valley Ranch mamaki tea farm at 96-02232 South Road. It begins at  and includes a pot luck and tour of the mamaki farm, which is the new home of interim President Matt Dreyer. Among the Kaʻū Farmers Union initiatives are a food hub for Kaʻū, with CSA, and an online store platform to sell locally grown food.


Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about  To provide comment, sign up in advance, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov or type a comment into the Question box. Register in advance at attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5189333551313546256. Learn more on Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov; NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, sanctuaries.noaa.gov; State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources, dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar.



Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at  The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 
65-1259 Kawaihae Road
 on Wednesday, July 8 between  and  Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace to , Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts its Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.

Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by  HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.


Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services and worship are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays,
us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.

Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.

Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.

Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.

     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 

     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.

     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 


     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, July 9, 2020

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Enjoy photos like this one of a humpback whale breaching, videos, science, and more at Hawaiian Islands
Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary's new website. Details below. NOAA photo


THE COUNTY OF HAWAIʻI WILL RECEIVE $80 MILLION ON FEDERAL CORONAVIRUS AID, Relief, and Economic Security Act funding. The County announced today it is moving quickly "to get these critical dollars into our community to provide financial assistance during the COVID-19 emergency." To help manage financial recovery programs, the County will release a Request for Proposals this Sunday, July 12 at hawaiicounty.gov/cares.
     To answer potential applicant questions, the County will hold a webinar on Monday, July 13 from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. To sign up for the webinar, or to submit questions in advance, visit hawaiicounty.gov/cares.
     Non-profits, financial institutions, and other management organizations with the ability to deliver direct services or sub-awards to communities, businesses, and individuals are invited to apply. Applicants can be non-profit or for-profit entities with the capacity to receive grant awards starting from $250,000 to more than $2 million. Funds must be distributed to the community no later than
Dec. 30, 2020. Contractors must comply with all federal and state CARES Act guidelines.
So far, Boys and Girls Club Big Island handed out more than 52,000
hot meals during the pandemic. Photo from BGCBI
     Individuals and individual businesses are ineligible if seeking to address only their own needs. Assistance being sought for this purpose will be addressed through the selected non-profits, financial institutions, or other management organizations awarded contracts through this RFP. Programs addressed in the RFP include:
     Food Assistance - Grants to nonprofits to purchase local farm produce, distribute to restaurants for meal preparation and delivery of meals to vulnerable families and other food need allocations. $3,992,000
     Childcare - Grants to licensed childcare providers to support expansion of operations and incentives for new childcare providers; supplies including sanitation, disinfecting supplies, foggers, UV lights, and temperature scanners. $2,500,000
     Community and Family Resilience – Grants to support new and existing social-related, health and wellness programs that build resilient communities through building capacity, supporting the creation and strengthening of relationships that build social capital and foster cooperation and trust. $4,000,000
     Connectivity Enhancement - Grants for micro-transmitters and tablets to support remote telework, businesses, and education. $1,000,000
     Business and Nonprofit Assistance - Grants to support financial obligations including but not limited to rent, leases, mortgage, vehicle leases, master supply agreements, and non-governmental utilities and reopening costs. $22,000,000
     Individual Grants to Prevent Housing Displacement – Grants to provide unduplicated monetary assistance for rent, leases, mortgages, and non-governmental utilities to households directly impacted by COVID-19. $10,000,000
     For more details on these programs, visit hawaiicounty.gov/cares. Applications for the RFP are due by Tuesday, July 21 at 4:30 p.m. by electronic submission.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

The Hū Honua bioenergy plant is nearly complete, but the PUC ruled that it must compete for a permit
with other renewable energy proposals. Photo from Hū Honua
THE PUC TODAY REJECTED HŪ HONUA'S AGREEMENT TO SELL ELECTRICITY TO HAWAIIAN ELECTRIC. The bioenergy company proposed to create up to 21.5 megawatts that could provide about 14.5 percent of the electrical needs for Hawaiʻi Island and displace some 250,000 barrels of imported oil per year. Its proposal proclaimed many benefits to the environment while opponents objected to burning wood for energy and claimed possible pollution of the ocean.
     In its oceanfront Hāmākua energy plant, Hū Honua would burn wood chips from eucalyptus grown on Kamehameha Schools land around Pāhala and other tree farms around the island. The state Public Utilities Commission ruled that, instead of accepting the Hawaiian Electric contract, it would allow Hū Honua to compete with other proposed renewable energy projects.
     Hū Honua attorneys Dean and Wil Yamamoto responded to the PUC ruling, saying that further delay in opening the biofuel plant threatens more than 50 jobs on this island. "Hū Honua has invested well over $350 million to develop the Project, and the monthly carrying costs are approximately $2.6 million. Accordingly, each month of Project delay results in additional cost impacts and further jeopardizes existing jobs, project financing, and all of Hū Honua's investments."
     The PUC issued Order No. 37205 today that denies Hawaiian Electric's request for a Waiver from Competitive Bidding for the Hū Honua Biomass Project, making its Power Purchase Agreement with Hū Honua void. In its decision, the PUC noted "recent developments," including 30 MW projects with lower prices for renewable energy – from $0.08 per kilowatt hour to $0.12/kWh. Hū Honua pricing for 21.5 MW is estimated at $0.221/kWh.
     Instead of the Hū Honua proposal, the PUC recently approved Hawaiʻi Island projects AES Waikoloa Solar, LLC at $0.08/kWh and Hale Kuawehi Solar, LLC at $0.09/kWh.
     The PUC stated that the main reason Hawaiian Electric requested the Hū Honua competitive bidding waiver was to prevent further delay that would affect receiving a federal Investment Tax Credit, that would make the Hū Honua project "cost effective." The original deadline for the project to produce energy in order to receive the tax credit was in 2018.
 Honua proposed biomass, including eucalyptus grown around Pāhala,
 as one of the renewable energy sources for Hawaiʻi Island. The PUC
 ruled today that it must compete with wind, solar, and
others for permit approvals. Photo from  Honua
     Hū Honua has faced other delays, including the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court vacating the PUC's approval of a purchase agreement with Hawaiian Electric in May of 2019. The case was brought to the court by Life of the Land, and its executive director, which contended that the PUC failed to consider greenhouse gas emissions in determining whether to approve the agreement. Today's PUC ruling, however, stated that the PUC does not make conclusions on the impacts of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the project, but whether the project is the best option at this time for affordable energy.
     The PUC said that biomass resources could have a place in Hawaiʻi's renewable energy portfolio. "The Commission is aware that biomass resources offer different considerations than other renewable resources, such as solar and wind, but believes that these distinctions are better weighed and addressed in the context of the Competitive Bidding Framework."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

EXTEND THE 14-DAY QUARANTINE FOR ALL TRAVELERS, says U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. She released a statement this morning asking Mayor Harry Kim, the other three mayors, and Gov. David Ige to stand down from the Aug. 1 tourism launch, which allows visitors to come into the state with only a certificate showing a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours of arrival.

     Gabbard wrote, "I strongly urge the governor and mayors of Hawaiʻi counties to continue the 14-day quarantine for trans-Pacific travelers because of the surge of COVID-19 infections occurring across the country, with many states experiencing a higher number of positive COVID-19 cases now than at any point during this pandemic. In addition, we are facing an extreme shortage in testing reagents, personal protective equipment, and medical supplies. We must put the health and lives of the people of Hawaiʻi first and take necessary actions to contain and defeat this virus in our state.

Rule until Aug. 1
     "The travel quarantine must remain in place for the time being as we focus on containing and defeating the virus, massively increasing our testing and tracing capacity, and securing our medical supply chains. These steps are essential to get to a place where the people of Hawaiican be confident that travelers coming to our state will not bring greater risk and COVID-19 infections with them."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE POSSIBLE DELAY IN OPENING TRANS-PACIFIC TRAVEL to Hawaiʻi, without COVID-19 testing but no quarantine in Hawaiʻi, is on the minds of Mayor Harry Kim, Gov. David Ige, and other Hawaiʻi mayors. The governor issued a statement Thursday, saying, "The mayors and I met yesterday and are meeting again today to assess the current situation and discuss what it might mean for the state, including the planned pre-travel testing program. We are getting input from community leaders as we carefully consider the health and safety of our residents and the financial health of our communities because we know they are interconnected."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FOOD SAFETY RED PLACARDS for COVID-19 violations for food establishments that do not take physical distancing and other guidance seriously are in place. Dept. of Health's Food Safety Branch announced Thursday it will begin to temporarily suspend the operations of restaurants, bars, and other food establishments that don't comply with physical distancing, wearing cloth face masks, and other required guidance. Under existing state law, DOH inspectors can temporarily shut down a food establishment if its practices pose a danger to public health by spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.
     Using the familiar color-coded placard system, DOH will issue red placards to these food establishments. DOH Director Dr. Bruce Anderson said, "The department is taking these steps now to enforce preventive measures that are known to be effective in preventing the transmission of the disease, especially as we have seen a recent increase in the number of COVID cases and evidence of community spread. Most food establishments in Hawaiʻi are conscientious and trying their best to comply with health guidance. Nevertheless, we feel these steps are necessary to assure all restaurants and other food establishments are doing everything they can to protect the health of the public and their employees."
     DOH's Food Safety Branch Chief Peter Oshiro said, "As Hawaiʻi reopens and moves toward economic recovery, no one wants to see a restaurant temporarily close and miss out on opportunities to serve customers. We recognize many Hawaiʻi food establishment operators are doing their best to protect the health of their employees and customers, and we need all operators to comply with the guidance and take it seriously. This is a critical time for food establishments to tighten their practices instead of becoming lax."
     If a business is found to not be in compliance with physical distancing and mask requirements, it'll first be issued a written warning. If the business is caught violating the rules a second time, it'll be issued a red placard and will have to temporarily close. The food establishment may request a follow-up inspection in order to reopen their business.

The Hawaiian Islands received federal designation as one of  Ameria's Marine Highways in 2018, which could open
up financial support for Young Brothers interisland shipping, according to the Hawaiʻi County Council.
Map from America's Marine Highways
HELP FOR YOUNG BROTHERS COULD COME FROM AMERICA'S MARINE HIGHWAYS PROGRAM, which provides funding for marine transportation the way national programs provide money for highways, roads and bridges. The program entered the discussion Wednesday when the County Council approved a resolution, co-sponsored by  Sue Lee loy and Tim Richards, to support financially strapped Young Brothers by looking to federal resources.

     In July 2018, waters between the Hawaiian Islands were designated the Daniel K. Akaka Marine Highway. Young Bros. suffering a steep declined in revenue during the pandemic, cut its schedule putting "critical" shipping between the islands at risk. Other places that receive funding from the Marine Highways Program include coastal and island communities in southern Alaskaand state and communities along the shores of the Great Lakes. Most waters near the coast of the U.S., including the Mississippi and Gulf of Mexico are included.
Hawaiʻi County Council passed a resolution Wednesday, asking the
PUC and Young Brothers to seek a wide range of assistance to
help keep the interisland cargo service in operation.
Photo from Young Brothers
Washington

     The resolution addresses Public Utilities Commission's May decision, which allowed Young Bros. to cut expenses by reducing weekly sailings to Hawaiʻi Island and other Neighbor Island harbors. The resolution indirectly refers to the recent event, where 21 containers went overboard just outside of HiloHarbor, saying fewer sailings "increases the potential for service interruptions due to incidents arising from improper container loads."

     The resolution encourages the Public Utilities Commission and Young Brothers to work with a broad range of possibilities for funding to help the company through the pandemic, which has cut its cargo bookings, and reduced  opportunities for farmers and ranches shipping interisland and for schools, businesses, and non-profits receiving food and other goods.
     Council Chair Aaron Chung said, "The one thing I know for sure is this: we cannot lose Young Brothers. If they ever, by any way, go out of business, we are – no pun intended – sunk."


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

RETIRED MT. VIEW ELEMENTARY TEACHER SUSAN HUGHES is the sole Republican running for the District 3 state House of Representatives office, which represents East Kaʻū– Punaluʻu, Pāhala, WoodValley– and Volcano, into Hilo.
     Hughes, a resident of Volcano for over 50 years, says she knows the people and the island "inside and out." Her campaign information says she "honors our past and present war heroes, our law enforcement, our medics, and leaders who swore to uphold the Constitution and the laws of the United Stated of America."
     She is married to Robert Hughes, has three children and four grandchildren. She attends New Hope Volcano church.

Susan Hughes is running as the Republican candidate for
state House of Representatives, for East Kaʻū, through
Volcano, into Hilo. Photo from choosesusanhughes.com
     Hughes has a Bachelor of Education from UH Mānoa, 1971 and a Masters from CaliforniaStateUniversity, Long Beach, 1997. She taught at Mt.ViewElementary Schoolfor 23 years. She also launched and maintained several small businesses in the community.
     She is Chairperson of District 3 East Hawaiʻi County Republican Party for 2016-2020, an elected position. She has a lifetime membership with the NRA, and belongs to Hawaiʻi Island Bed and Breakfast Association, Concerned Women of America, Hawaiʻi Federation of Republican Women, and East Hawaiʻi County Republican Party. She volunteers with Pāhoa Food Basket, and won Best Cook for Earth Watch in 1981-83.

     A "staunch believer in the Constitution of the United States, Hughes is "retired and actively seeking political engagement." Hughes' campaign info says she "means business and wants to see a 'balanced' legislature." She wants to "bring vision and balance into" government. She "believes in providing a two-party system that gives voice to those wishing for the traditional values and founding principles. Her campaign site says she "has the ability, the skill sets, the political rigor and stamina required to jump into congress on day one and hit the road running."

     Her campaign information says her focuses include:
     The Economy, Jobs, and Quality of Life: "Democrats have been unable to bring back good-paying jobs to this island since the sugar mills closed in 1994. The current 30-50 percent unemployment is completely unsustainable. The Hawaiʻi State Legislature just voted a 15 percent pay raise to government employees while the whole state is suffering with massive unemployment and businesses which may never reopen. State, country, and federal workers are not feeling your pain. They are still getting paid – at almost /twice as much as non-government workers like you! Is that fair?"
Susan Hughes is running to represent the area of Hawaii Island shown
in green. Map from choosesusanhughes.com
     First Amendment Rights (Freedom of Assembly):"In neither the U.S.nor the Hawaiian Constitution does it explicitly state the prohibition of peaceful assembly. Yet this was enacted, without legislation, during an election year and should never have happened."

     Education: "Under their democrat rule our schools have declined to the point where only one in five students have reached minimally successful standards. As a former teacher of [23] years at MVS I am appalled. This has resulted in only in 1:5 University of Hawaiʻifreshmen getting any kind of a degree. We can't move forward into a future of better jobs with these kinds of results! If we don't change this, we might as well teach our kids one phrase: 'Do you want fries with that?'"

     Community Needs:"Families need Dads back inside. the. home. period. Children need balance. The Homeless problem is not a monolithic problem. It's complicated one and needs an intensive, multifaceted approach."
     See more at choosesuehughes.com.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LEARN HOW TO JOIN WITH OTHER COMPANIES TO TAKE ON LARGER GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS at a Teaming Agreements and Subcontracts webinar Thursday, July 16 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Register at eventbrite.com/e/dos-and-donts-for-teaming-agreements-subcontracting-webinar-registration-108906253536.

Attend a webinar to learn how to join forces with other businesses to bid on government contracts. Image from Norcal PTAC
     Organized by Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center, Hawaiʻi Procurement Technical Assistance Center, NorcalProcurementTechnicalAssistanceCenter, learn a step-by-step process for successfully teaming for a government contract and "take your business to the next level." The webinar will cover: What is a teaming agreement?; Benefits of teaming; Factors to consider when selecting a teaming partner; Considerations when negotiating agreements; 8(a) and Small Business considerations; Introduction to the Mentor-Protégé Program; Differences between subcontracting, teaming, and joint venturing; Tips for success; and Contracting with the US Army Corps of Engineers.

     Christina Jones, Norcal PTAC Sr./Lead Procurement Specialist, will speak during the event. She is an expert business consultant and facilitator with over 20 years of experience in developing process improvement and training programs to position small businesses for government sales. She specializes in 8(a) certification, contract vehicles to include General Services Administration, and proposal writing. "Christina has a proven track record in increasing economic impact through calculated one-on-one counseling of small to medium-sized businesses," says the announcement.
     Monique M. Holmes, Deputy for Small Business Programs with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Honolulu District, will also speak. She was welcomed to USACE as the Small Business Program Analyst representing the Honolulu District on Feb. 18. She brings 30 years of private and public sector experience. As the Small Business Program Analyst, Monique utilizes her skillsets to expand USACE Honolulu Districts small business base through increasing opportunities for small businesses as well as reducing hardships and eliminating restrictive barriers faced by the small business communities most vulnerable categories.



A humpback in Hawaiian waters.
NOAA photo
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NEW WEBSITE FOR HAWAIIAN ISLANDS HUMPBACK WHALE NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY launched this week. An announcement from the organization says hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov sports photos, videos, and stories about "one of the world's most important humpback habitats." The website offers science and research, while protection, educational programs, Hawaiian heritage, management of the Sanctuary, how to visit and get involved, information on the Sanctuary Advisory Council, and more. See hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov.

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ON ONE FLIGHT, 130 PEOPLE ARRIVED IN KONA from out-of-state on Tuesday, with 13 people relocating to Hawaiʻi Island, 58 residents returning, 51 visitors, one in-transit, and seven crew. Statewide, 2,685 crew, in-transit, relocators, visitors, and residents arrived, on a total of 24 out-of-state flights.

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THIRTY-SIX NEW COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI are reported today, with one new case on Hawaiʻi Island. There are nine active cases on-island. The patients are being monitored by Department of Health.

     Oʻahu reported 34 new cases today and Kauaʻi one. The state's new case total has increased by nearly 200 in less than ten days.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     There are nine active cases on-island, reports DOH. It has been 28 days since a case was recorded for a Kaʻū zip code. One zip code on the west side has between six and ten active cases. This island's other 88 confirmed COVID-19 victims recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were three hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 842 cases, Kauaʻi 43, and Maui County 130. Eighteen victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 1,130 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Nineteen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The majority of states in our Country continue to see an increase of people being infected by the Coronavirus. Hawaiʻi State remains in a good place, as noted by JohnsHopkinsUniversityas the best in the country, having the lowest number of people infected by the virus. This is mainly due to your following the preventive policies of wearing face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. As we go forward, do take care in protecting yourself, your family, your friends, and your community to keep Hawaiʻi safe. Thank you for listening and thank you for your help. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."

     In the United States, more than 3,105,315 cases have been confirmed – an increase of nearly 59,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 132,934, almost 1,700 in 24 hours.
     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 12.1 million. The death toll is more than 552,043.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Virtual Cultural Festival runs through July 11 on social media. Hawaiian culture is shared with a wide audience free of charge. Instead of gathering the community and visitors together in person, the Park will share short videos and other mana‘o (knowledge) about Hawaiian culture virtually. #FindYourVirtualPark. Go to facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoesnps/.
     All virtual events will be posted at the listed time, but the content will be available any time afterwards. See the Opening ‘Oli Komo, new Mo‘olelo and Places pages, Learn to Make a Tī Leaf Lei, read comments from the Facebook Watch Party and watch the documentary, Saving ‘Ōhi‘a, or watch a demonstration of Hawaiian Lua (Martial Arts).

LINK!

     Here is the schedule for Friday and Saturday:
     Learn to Make a Pūlumi Nī‘au (Hawaiian Broom) with Ranger Dean Gallagher on Friday, July 10 at  Get swept up in gathering plant materials and learn to make a pūlumi nī‘au, or authentic Hawaiian broom.
     Closing ‘Oli Mahalo will close the Virtual Cultural Festival on Saturday, July 11 at 8:08 a.m. Park staff and ‘ohana will blow the pū (conch shell) and chant the ‘Oli Mahalo together, requesting departure to close the festival. Gifted to the park by Kepā Maly, the ‘Oli Mahalo expresses gratitude. Ranger Kekoa Rosehill narrates. 
     Many areas in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that provide outdoor experiences like hiking trails, overlooks, and roads, are now open to the public, but services are limited. Visit the Current Conditions page on the park website for a complete list of what's open, and how to prepare for a safe trip to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, at nps.gov.

Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's Outreach College Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Participation Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."



Talk Story on Living with Serious Illness, Friday, July 10 from  to  Virtual event, hosted by Hawaiʻi Care Choices, will feature personal insights on "why accessing healthcare early can boost the quality of life" from former Hawaiʻi County Mayor Billy Kenoi, and Rodney Powell, a licensed clinical social worker and service coordination manager with Hawaiian Helathcare. Host Lani Weigert, Community Manager of Hawaiʻi Care Choices will share how to get help, relief, and support for serious illness through Kupu Palliative Care, Hospice, and Bereavement Care. Register for this Zoom event before Friday, July 10 by emailing LFukushima@hawaiicarechoices.org. See hawaiicarechoices.org, call 808-969-1733, or email care@hawaiicarechoices.org for more.



After-School All-Stars Free Virtual Summer Program runs through Friday, July 17 - register before July 10. For students going into 6th, 7th, or 8th grade. Classes offered are cooking, baking, fitness, arts & crafts, sports, gardening, and more. Every activity earns one entry in a prize drawing. All materials provided; pick up on Monday mornings, 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., in Volcano, Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, or Ocean View. Register at tinyurl.com/KauSummer2020. For more info, contact Chrysa Dacalio, kau@asashawaii.org, 808-561-3710.


Apply for Small Grants to improve access to healthy foods in underserved areas, create and preserve quality jobs, and revitalize low-income communities through the Healthy Food Financing Initiative, urges The Kohala Center. Deadline to submit a letter of interest is Friday, July 10. Visit the program website or refer to this fact sheet for more information.

Zentangle with Lydia Meneses, Saturday, July 11 at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Kaʻū Chapter of Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United meets this Sunday, July 12 at Wood Valley Ranch mamaki tea farm at 96-02232 South Road. It begins at  and includes a pot luck and tour of the mamaki farm, which is the new home of interim President Matt Dreyer. Among the Kaʻū Farmers Union initiatives are a food hub for Kaʻū, with CSA, and an online store platform to sell locally grown food.

Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about  To provide comment, sign up in advance, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov or type a comment into the Question box. Register in advance at attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5189333551313546256. Learn more on Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov; NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, sanctuaries.noaa.gov; State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources, dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar.



Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at  The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 
65-1259 Kawaihae Road
 on Wednesday, July 8 between  and  Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace to , Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts its Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.


Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by  HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.

Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services and worship are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays,
us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.



Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.


Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.


Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.

     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 

     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.

     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 


     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, July 10, 2020

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Coral head swarming with sea life at Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the northern Hawaiian Islands. See the story
below concerning an algae that threatens the reefs of  Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.
NOAA photo

A KAʻŪ COVID 19 UPDATE will be held this Monday, July 13 at Pāhala Community Center at 5 p.m., with  Lt. Gov. Josh Green who began his medical career in Hawaiʻi at Kaʻū Hospital and heads the state Coronavirus Taskforce. Also speaking will be Mayor Harry Kim and Dr. Mike Moscowich, founder of Premier Medical Group, which sponsors COVID-19 testing around this island. Kaʻū Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris; Dan Brinkman, CEO of East Hawaiʻi for Hawaiʻi Health Services Corp, which manages Kaʻū Hospital; and Eric Honda, interim Director for the Department of Health Hawaiʻi Island District, will also be on hand.
     The informational and educational event is sponsored by Kaʻū Rural Helth Community Association and its founder Jessie Marques who announced the meeting today saying, "Come join us and talk story with the health care leaders." Registration is at 4:30 p .m. and the meeting runs from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
     She said that wearing of masks and social distancing will be required. "To remain in compliance to Hawaiʻi State Covid-19 mandates, seating is limited, attendance is based on first-come, first serve."
     Participation via Zoom is also available. Email krhcai@yahoo.com or call Kaʻū Resource & Distance Learning Center at 928-0101 for connectivity info.
     "Mahalo for everyone supporting Kaʻū community concerns," said Marques.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UNSUPPORTIVE OF TRAVELERS COMING into Hawaiʻi without quarantine, unless COVID testing assurances improve, is Mayor Harry Kim. He  told Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald  
on Thursday that he is in long discussions with other mayors and Gov. David Ige. The new rule beginning Aug. 1 could substantially increase Hawaiʻi arrivals into the open arms of its hard-hit visitor industry. It requires inbound travelers to show up with a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of arrival.
     Kim told the Tribune-Herald, for a story published today: "What is being presented is not acceptable as is."Tribune-Herald writer Michael Brestovansky reports, "The mayor also said travelers would ideally present their negative COVID-19 tests before entering the plane to Hawaiʻi, rather than upon arrival in Hawaiʻi, as Ige's plan currently states.
     "While the number of COVID-19 cases in Hawaiʻi is the lowest among all 50 states, Kim pointed out that the primary departure point for all domestic flights to Hawaiʻi is California, which has had the second-highest number of cases in the nation after New York. With states such as California and Arizona recording tens of thousands of new cases each week, allowing thousands of travelers from those states into Hawaiʻi, which has only had 1,130 cases in five months, would present an intolerable health risk, Kim said."
     According to the Tribune-Herald,"Kim specified that the plan needs a more comprehensive and responsive quarantine-monitoring system, among other things, before he can support it. A real-time tracking system to monitor quarantining travelers and ensure they are not flouting quarantine will be essential when the number of arriving flights balloons exponentially in August, he said."
     Kim also said the mayors of Kauaʻi, Maui, and Honolulu express the same concerns. In an interview with Hawai`i News Now today, he called the mayors "Boots on the Ground."
     In a new statement, Hawaiʻi County Councilman Matt Kaneali‘i-Kleinfelder asks the governor to rescind the Aug. 1 opening of trans-Pacific travel and to maintain the quarantine policy. He called testing visitors 72 hours before arrival "inadequate," and wrote, "We must remain proactive; the virus does not move unless we move. It is imperative that we all continue to follow proper social distancing measures for the safety of our community."
     A letter to public officials from state Director of Health Bruce Anderson says a COVID-19 testing shortage on the mainland would make it hard for visitors to receive timely results for tests taken within 72 hours of arrival. Testing labs are overwhelmed with results taking a week or longer to process as the number of cases rises sharply around the country. Anderson also wrote that the health department is unable to certify whether test results come from approved labs outside weals reported. Contents of the letter were published by Hawaiʻi News Now. See more at Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald.

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REGARDING REOPENING TRANS-PACIFIC TRAVEL to Hawaiʻi with safety precautions in place, Gov. David Ige said today, "The mayors and I have had productive meetings this week about the pre-travel testing program. We are assessing the current situation in Hawaiʻi and on the mainland, and we'll make an announcement when we are satisfied that the plans will protect the health and safety of our residents and guests."

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THREE FEET VERSUS SIX FEET distancing between public school desks and no mandate for wearing masks led the state school board yesterday to defer its vote to reopen schools. The Board of Education received more than 3,000 pages of testimony for Thursday's virtual meeting. Testimony came from teachers, parents, and the public, with concern for health and safety with schools set to open Tuesday, Aug. 4 during the COVID-19 pandemic.
     At issue is that the teachers union - Hawaiʻi State Teachers Association - signed an agreement with the Department of Education for six feet distancing between desks. However, DOE recently announced that three feet would be sufficient with desks facing the same direction. The desk arrangement aims to reduce time that students talk and breath toward each other.
     Robin O'Hara, Kealakehe Intermediate teacher, testified virtually at yesterday's Board of Education meeting: "Protect us or we will not be around to teach if we are sick or dead." She contended that the three-feet rule is "much less safe than the six-foot social distancing requirements at businesses, restaurants, offices, and government buildings throughout the country and state." She noted that "Kids in other countries are wearing masks and back in school and embracing it. It's the right thing to do to protect each other."
     The teachers union agreement with Department of Education states that masks should be worn inside schools unless medically impossible. Said O'Hara, "What's being asked of us is a life-or-death decision, and you need to understand that. If we don't have the minimum protection of masks and six-feet distancing, you're putting people's lives at unnecessary risk."
     The state school superintendent said after the meeting that she will meet with the teachers union to review the policies.

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UNHERO AND CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE IN HAWAIʻI have launched a second survey on the business impact of COVID-19. The first survey in April found that 25 percent of businesses statewide expected to fail without additional aid, and that some 220,000 people lost their jobs as businesses closed and shrank during the pandemic.
     Business owners can participate here. Sherry Menor-McNamara, president & CEO of the Chamber of Commerce Hawaiʻi, said, "Social media and word-of-mouth only tell part of the story. Participating in this survey will help us advocate for further assistance for local businesses."
     The survey will attempt to record changes in business operations, including employment, wages, monthly revenue, sources of revenue, the  state of business operations, plans to open tourism, impact of Paycheck Protection, and the business owners' expectations for the future.
     University of Hawaiʻi Economic  Research Organization's Executive Director Carl Bonham said in a statement, "The PPP program was expanded and modified, the kamaaina economy has re-opened, and tourism is expected to begin a gradual reopening next month. This survey will provide invaluable information about what businesses are experiencing on the ground and how the changing environment is affecting their expectations."Read UHERO insights and reports on the economy.

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YOUNG BROTHERS IS ASKING FOR A RATE INCREASE TO HELP KEEP IT AFLOAT. The interisland shipping company, which has lost business during the pandemic and cut one of its cargo shipping days to the Port of Hilo, sent out this statement this week:
     "In 2019, Young Brothers' filed a request with the Public Utilities Commission to increase its rates to offset rising operating costs and pre-COVID estimated losses of approximately $13 million. The emergency request asks the PUC to accelerate the process and temporarily authorize an increase in revenue of approximately $30 million, which represents the amount Young Brothers has forecasted will be required to break-even offering the covered services."
Jay Ana, President of Young Brothers, asks for a temporary rate increase to
help the company continue ocean shipping between the islands.
Photo from Young Bros.
     Jay Ana, President of Young Brothers, said, "If approved, this temporary rate increase will provide critical revenue we need to maintain current levels of service and continue operations, and we will only be able to recover part of the $30 million we are projecting to lose this year. I want to be clear that this proposed rate increase would only allow the company to break even in 2020 if the rates were in place for a full year – we are not seeking an allowed rate of return or any sort of profit as part of this request."
   In addition to the pandemic, Young Brothers attributed projected losses to "decline in the intrastate cargo volumes" as well as "higher operating expenses due primarily to the increase in labor and labor-related costs."
     The Young Brothers President said, "We know our customers and small businesses across Hawai‘i are struggling to cope with the unprecedented challenges brought on by COVID-19. That's why we pursued all available avenues of relief before making the difficult decision to accelerate our request for higher rates, but this request is vital for Young Brothers to stay in business and continue connecting our island economies."

International students celebrate United Nations Day at University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo in 2019.
Photo by Raiatea Arcuri
DON'T SEND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS HOME, urges U.S. Congressman Ed Case, who sent a letter to the Trump Administration this week. He and colleagues ask Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf to abandon proposed changes to the Student and Exchange Visitor Program that would require international students to return to their home countries if their U.S. universities and colleges are only offering online courses in the Fall 2020 semester as a result of COVID-19.
     University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo has a long history of welcoming international students to its campus with a strong International Student Services program
     The letter cites the critical role international students play in this country "by supporting cutting-edge research, enriching campus life, and helping the United States maintain its leadership role in higher education. International students both enrich the higher education experience for all students and are a key part of the higher education ecosystem. The modifications to the Student and Exchange Visitor Program are needlessly punitive and fundamentally threaten a cornerstone of our nation's higher education system. With this mind, we urge you to rescind these changes to the Student and Exchange Visitor Program."


The International Student Services program at UH-Hilo helps students with enrollment and immigration
 to study here. Photo from International Student Services
     Case said the proposal "arises from the same seriously misguided goal of forcing schools to reopen nationally regardless of local public health conditions." He said it will "actually harm public health by offering colleges and universities dependent on international student income no choice but to physically open or risk closing altogether." He said Hawaiʻi "will be especially impacted not just by the public health consequences but by the loss of a significant portion of our economy. Both our public and private institutions of higher learning have developed significant capability and reputation in educating international students. These students contribute not only to the success of those institutions but, because the students attend personally, to our local economy.

     "The latest estimates by the National Association for Foreign Student Affairs are that there are more than four thousand international students taking classes at colleges, universities, and English-language programs in Hawai‘i, with an estimated contribution of some $121 million annually to the State of Hawai‘i, $93 million alone in urban Honolulu. Nationally, international students contribute nearly $41 billion to our economy and support more than 458,000 jobs. International education is the fifth-largest U.S. service sector export."

     Case said there is "no serious public health reason" to exclude all international students, and that "any real public health concern" can be addressed through specific public health requirements, such as testing.

     When international students return home to their countries, said Case, "they serve as ambassadors" for Hawaiʻi and the entire U.S. "Sending them home under such flimsy reasons would send the message that America is not interested in engaging with these countries and is willing to expel individuals not for a public health reason but because of xenophobia."

     Case – who served for a semester as Adjunct Professor at Hawaiʻi Pacific University, a major educator of international students – says he saw "firsthand the contribution of international students not only to our economy but to the enhancement of our position as the center of the Pacific."
     He said the proposed policy "sends the wrong message at a time when new international student enrollment in the United States has been on the decline for three consecutive years of this Administration." He said the U.S. is competing with countries like CanadaChina, and Australia, that are "actively competing to attract more international students to their universities. We are losing that race, making our students and our economy less competitive in a global market and ceding an important space where American values and ideas can be freely exchanged and spread."

     Case shared two notes from his constituents. The first noted: "As you know, cases in Hawaiʻi are spiking; it will only get worse in the fall, particularly if our schools are forced to mandate face-to-face classes. Those universities that refuse to buckle to this mandate will face another problem: international students, to be blunt, are a major moneymaker for American schools, particularly public universities. They represent a major portion of our budget, which is already under strain."

     A second constituent shared with Case: "At a time when COVID cases continue to rise across the U.S., many students who are possibly at risk of deportation if they cannot comply, may not be able to travel to their country of origin given travel restrictions put in place by many countries for travelers from the U.S., so where does this leave them? The suggestion that students just 'transfer to another school that can offer in-person teaching' just a few weeks before Fall semesters are due to begin, is not only a logistical and financial nightmare for current students, but it may put their lives in danger, and risks further spreading of COVID cases."
     Read the whole letter here: case.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=331.



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ALOHA ʻĀINA PARTY MEMBER CITLALLI JOHANNA DECKER is running to represent State House District 5, which includes Honuʻapo, though Nāʻālehu, Ocean View, and Miloliʻi, into Kona. According to a campaign statement sent to The Kaʻū Calendar, Decker lives and works as a house caretaker with her husband near Nāʻālehu, and as a technician installing surveillance systems for local businesses like Wiki Wiki 76, Mehe's Bar & Grill, and South Point Suds.
Citlalli Johanna Decker, Aloha ʻĀina Party candidate
for West Kaʻū into Kona. Photo from Decker
     Born and raised in El PasoTexas, Decker graduated top ten percent of her class in 2009. She is also an alumnus of the International Thespian Society and of Full Sail University. She has traveled through most of the United States by working as a low voltage technician and picking up other side jobs along the way. She moved to Nāʻālehu with her husband, who was raised there.
     Her campaign information says Decker wants to "troubleshoot our current system of government through legislation, Jo is a fierce advocate for truth, justice and fair pay for fair work.

     "I have seen and suffered the injustices of the current economic and judicial systems, and it is time for an upgrade of our current system of government. There are so many new technologies we could use to directly interact with our representatives efficiently and make their actions and discussions transparent, which would ultimately make it much easier to hold corrupt officials accountable and ensure good legislation is written before laws are passed."

     To learn more, go to citlallijohannadecker.com/moreinfo.

     The recently recognized Aloha ʻĀina Party "celebrates and embraces diversity
in gender, age, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, range of physical abilities, sexual orientation, financial means, education, and political perspectives," says website votealoha.org. "We Recognize The Divine, Aloha The People, Mālama The ʻĀina, Demand Government Accountability and Transparency, and Advocate For Hoʻoponopono. Voting is your kuleana. Your voice and your vote, matters. Make a change by voting Aloha!"

     Website alohaainaparty.com says, "Together we rise. Now is the Time for a New and Better Way. The AlohaʻĀina Party. Not Simply A Political Party. A Movement Powered by Aloha Are you tired of the corruption, lies, and broken promises? Are you tired of politics that values special interest and development (money) over the People, ʻĀina, and Culture? Are you tired of decision making void of true community input? Do you feel it is time for a new and better Way? Do you deserve better, for yourself, ʻohana, and future generations? Are you ready to make a difference for change?"
     Aloha ʻĀina Party, says the website, was founded by three Native Hawaiians, Don Kaulia, Pua Ishibshi, and Desmon Haumea, all members of the Royal Order of Kamehameha I. Aloha ʻĀina, says the site, "adheres to and promotes traditional Hawaiian values such as living Aloha and being Pono. The Party advocates for Hoʻoponopono as it relates to the Overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in 1893, "that is, to restore what was taken and lost." Aloha ʻĀina is also advised by a Kūpuna Council "that ensures that the AAP remains culture-based and culturally competent. In this context, the AAP may be considered a Hawaiian political party. The first Hawaiian Political Party in 108 years. However, the AAP is not only for Hawaiians and is not limited to Hawaiian issues. The AAP is inclusive and welcomes all, and address the needs and concerns of all the People of Hawaiʻi."


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Kahu Debbie Wong Yuen introduces drive-in worship services on Sunday, July 19.
Photo from Kauahaʻao Congregational Church Facebook
DRIVE-IN WORSHIP SERVICE will be held at Kauahaʻao Congregational Church in Waiʻōhinu starting Sunday, July 19 at , with a  parking time. Kahu Debbie Wong Yuen told The Kaʻū Calendar, "The COVID-19 pandemic shut the doors of places of worship and gatherings to hear God's Word.  Now that churches are allowed to open following all the CDC and State of Hawaiʻi safety guidelines, the pandemic, and it's continued concerns, comes with a call to think outside the box, as we try to avoid the 3 Cs: Closed spaces with poor ventilation, Crowded places with many people nearby, Close-Contact settings.
     "Also – with concern for folks who have health concerns and are not able to wear face coverings, and/or may feel uncomfortable to 'gather' for public worship gathering in a sanctuary to worship and hear God's Word – Kauahaʻao Congregational Church decided to do 'Drive-in Worship Service,' which is open to anyone."

     Wong Yuen says this way of having worship service "is not a new idea. In the 1950s, 'Drive-in-Worship' was the way to worship. Congregations across the country are now reviving this way to gather and worship, to comply with restrictions put in place to slow the spread of the coronavirus, without getting physically close to people. They stay in their vehicles, and listen to the Word and message, and honk their horns for their Amen.

     "And too… We are the Church, not the building, so we don't need to be 'in a building' to have worship service, we can worship God anywhere, He is with us no matter where we are, and, where two or three are gathered together in His name, He will be in our midst. We are not alone… we are all in this together, and God is with us."

     Wong Yuen says vehicles will park in the lawn area on the Church campus facing the building, either facing forward, or, if the vehicle has a hatchback to open and sit in the back, the vehicle can reverse into the spot. An usher will be there to guide the vehicles. Once parked, the usher (wearing face covering) will bring a basket with the service bulletin and a bowl to collect the offering/tithes/contributions. Each vehicle will also receive a folder to keep in the vehicle with the songs/hymns for the service, and a paper fan for each person in the vehicle. On Communion Sundays, attendants may bring their own elements (bread or cracker and juice or water), or be given a sealed Communion cup from the basket.
     Wong Yuen asks congregants to "please put on a face covering when the usher comes to your vehicle door. During the service, face coverings are not required, only if a person needs to leave their vehicle to go to the restroom. It's recommended you bring bottled water for those in your vehicle.

     "We invite anyone to come join us as Kauahaʻao Congregational Church gathers in person to relive the 1950s for Drive-in Worship Services. Come and be blessed!"
     Call Wong Yuen at 928-8039 or 937-2155 with questions. See Kauahaʻao Congregational Church facebook for recorded services and other messages.

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A FAST GROWING ALGAE IS A MAJOR THREAT TO CORAL REEFS, reports University of Hawaiʻi. The newly discovered algae was discovered in PapahānaumokuākeaMarineNational Monument by a team of researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi, Western Australian Herbarium, College of Charlestonand National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
     Named Chondria tumulosa by UH researchers, UH reports it has no known origin and has been observed smothering entire reefs and the corals, native algae and other organisms that live in one of the northern atolls. It also has a "tumbleweed-like" growth and appears to easily detach and spread, reports UH.

     Lead researcher on the project, UH Mānoa College of Natural Sciences Interim Associate Dean and Professor Alison Sherwood, said, "I think this is a warning of the kinds of changes that are to come for the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. We have, not until now, seen a major issue like this where we have a nuisance species that's come in and made such profound changes over a short period of time to the reefs."

     The algae was not widespread when first detected by NOAA divers in 2016 but a 2019 visit to the same area revealed that it is now covering up to several thousand square meters at the Pearl and Hermes Atoll.

     Randall Kosaki, NOAA research coordinator at Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, said, "Until we understand whether it is native or introduced, and until we better understand what is driving this outbreak, it is critically important that research divers and research ships do not inadvertently transport this species to other islands. Thus, all of our dive gear was soaked in bleach, and all of our dive boats were sprayed down with bleach prior to returning to Honolulu."

     Although Chondria tumulosa displays invasive characteristics, researchers are calling it a "nuisance alga" because they have not identified it as being introduced from another region.

"Before" area near Pearland Hermes Atoll. 
NOAA/National Marine Sanctuaries photo

     Sherwood said, "The main Hawaiian Islands are impacted by several well-known invasive seaweeds, but reports of nuisance algae in PapahānaumokuākeaMarineNational Monumentare far fewer, and none have been present at the level of abundance seen in this new alga."

     Researchers will conduct mapping and molecular analyses, and will develop mitigation strategies to assist in the development of appropriate management actions.
     College of Charleston Assistant Professor Heather Spaldingsaid, "This is a highly destructive seaweed with the potential to overgrow entire reefs. We need to figure out where it's currently found, and what we can do to manage it. This type of research needs trained divers in the water as quickly as possible. The sooner we can get back to PapahānaumokuākeaMarineNational Monument, the better."


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FARMERS MAY RECEIVE RELIEF THROUGH THE CORONAVIRUS FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAM for losses when growing coconuts, guava, passion fruit, pineapple, fresh sugarcane, and many more foods. U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue made the announcement on Thursday. To receive funds, qualified farmers and ranchers must have seen a price reduction or increased marketing costs due to the pandemic. Applications will be accepted Monday, July 13 through Aug. 28 at farmers.gov/cfap. Additional eligible commodities will be announced in the coming weeks.
     Hawaiʻi Coffee Association has been urging the USDA to add coffee to the list of qualified crops.
See Kaʻū News Briefs story from June 8.
Hawaiʻi Coffee Association is asking for support in adding coffee to the list of crops eligible for assistance.
     Commodities recently added to CFAP are: alfalfa sprouts, anise, arugula, basil, bean sprouts, beets, blackberries, Brussels sprouts, celeriac (celery root), chives, cilantro, coconuts, collard greens, dandelion greens, greens (others not listed separately), guava, kale greens, lettuce – including Boston, green leaf, Lolla Rossa, oak leaf green, oak leaf red, and red leaf – marjoram, mint, mustard, okra, oregano, parsnips, passion fruit, peas (green), pineapple, pistachios, radicchio, rosemary, sage, savory, sorrel, fresh sugarcane, Swiss chard, thyme and turnip top greens.
     CFAP is expanding assistance for seven eligible commodities – apples, blueberries, garlic, potatoes, raspberries, tangerines, and taro –after finding that they suffered a 5 percent or greater price decline between mid-January and mid-April as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Originally, these commodities were only eligible for marketing adjustments.
     Peaches and rhubarb no longer qualify for payment under the CARES Act sales loss category.

     CFAP is correcting payment rates for apples, artichokes, asparagus, blueberries, cantaloupes, cucumbers, garlic, kiwifruit, mushrooms, papaya, peaches, potatoes, raspberries, rhubarb, tangerines, and taro.
     Find additional details in the Federal Register in the Notice of Funding Availability and Final Rule Correction and at farmers.gov/cfap.

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TWENTY-EIGHT NEW COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI are reported today, with one new case on Hawaiʻi Island. There are seven active cases on-island. One person is hospitalized. The patients are being monitored by Department of Health.

Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     Oʻahu reported 25 new cases today, MauiCounty one, and one resident was diagnosed out-of-state. The state's new case total has increased by 159 in seven days.

     It has been more than 28 days since a case was recorded for a Kaʻū zip code. One zip code on the west side has between six and ten active cases. This island's other 91 confirmed COVID-19 victims recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died here. There were three other hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 867 cases, Kauaʻi 43, and MauiCounty131. Nineteen victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Statewide, 1,158 people were confirmed positive for the virus. Nineteen people died.

     The daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says, "The majority of states continue to see an increase of people being infected by the Coronavirus. Hawaiʻi State remains in a good place as the best in the country with the lowest number of people infected by the virus. Know how important it is for everyone to continue to follow the preventive measures of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. As a reminder, wearing of face coverings is mandatory on Hawaiʻi Island. Thank you for listening and for doing your part in keeping Hawaiʻi safe."

     In the United States, more than 3,184,573 cases have been confirmed – an increase of about 79,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 134,092, almost 1,700 in 24 hours.

     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 12.46 million. The death toll is more than 559,653.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
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Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Virtual Cultural Festival runs through tomorrow, July 11 on social media. Hawaiian culture is shared with a wide audience free of charge. Instead of gathering the community and visitors together in person, the Park will share short videos and other mana‘o (knowledge) about Hawaiian culture virtually. #FindYourVirtualPark. Go to facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoesnps/.
     All virtual events will be posted at the listed time, but the content will be available any time afterwards. See the Opening ‘Oli Komo, new Mo‘olelo and Places pages, Learn to Make a Tī Leaf Lei, read comments from the Facebook Watch Party and watch the documentary, Saving ‘Ōhi‘a, watch a demonstration of Hawaiian Lua (Martial Arts), or Learn to Make a Pūlumi Nī‘au (Hawaiian Broom).
     Here is the schedule for the final day:
     Closing ‘Oli Mahalo will close the Virtual Cultural Festival on Saturday, July 11 at 8:08 a.m. Park staff and ‘ohana will blow the pū (conch shell) and chant the ‘Oli Mahalo together, requesting departure to close the festival. Gifted to the park by Kepā Maly, the ‘Oli Mahalo expresses gratitude. Ranger Kekoa Rosehill narrates. 
     Many areas in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that provide outdoor experiences like hiking trails, overlooks, and roads, are now open to the public, but services are limited. Visit the Current Conditions page on the park website for a complete list of what's open, and how to prepare for a safe trip to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, at nps.gov.

Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's Outreach College Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Participation Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."



Talk Story on Living with Serious Illness, Friday, July 10 from  to  Virtual event, hosted by Hawaiʻi Care Choices, will feature personal insights on "why accessing healthcare early can boost the quality of life" from former Hawaiʻi County Mayor Billy Kenoi, and Rodney Powell, a licensed clinical social worker and service coordination manager with Hawaiian Healthcare. Host Lani Weigert, Community Manager of Hawaiʻi Care Choices will share how to get help, relief, and support for serious illness through Kupu Palliative Care, Hospice, and Bereavement Care. Register for this Zoom event before Friday, July 10 by emailing LFukushima@hawaiicarechoices.org. See hawaiicarechoices.org, call 808-969-1733, or email care@hawaiicarechoices.org for more.


After-School All-Stars Free Virtual Summer Program runs through Friday, July 17 - register before July 10. For students going into 6th, 7th, or 8th grade. Classes offered are cooking, baking, fitness, arts & crafts, sports, gardening, and more. Every activity earns one entry in a prize drawing. All materials provided; pick up on Monday mornings, 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., in Volcano, Pāhala, Nāʻālehu, or Ocean View. Register at tinyurl.com/KauSummer2020. For more info, contact Chrysa Dacalio, kau@asashawaii.org, 808-561-3710.


Apply for Small Grants to improve access to healthy foods in underserved areas, create and preserve quality jobs, and revitalize low-income communities through the Healthy Food Financing Initiative, urges The Kohala Center. Deadline to submit a letter of interest is Friday, July 10. Visit the program website or refer to this fact sheet for more information.

Zentangle with Lydia Meneses, Saturday, July 11 at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Kaʻū Chapter of Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United meets this Sunday, July 12 at Wood Valley Ranch mamaki tea farm at 96-02232 South Road. It begins at  and includes a pot luck and tour of the mamaki farm, which is the new home of interim President Matt Dreyer. Among the Kaʻū Farmers Union initiatives are a food hub for Kaʻū, with CSA, and an online store platform to sell locally grown food.

Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about  To provide comment, sign up in advance, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov or type a comment into the Question box. Register in advance at attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5189333551313546256. Learn more on Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov; NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, sanctuaries.noaa.gov; State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources, dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar.



Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at  The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 
65-1259 Kawaihae Road
 on Wednesday, July 8 between  and  Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace to , Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts its Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.


Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222


Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by  HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.


Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services and worship are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays,
us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.



Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.


Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.


Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.

     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 

     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.

     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 


     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, July 11, 2020

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Pāhala Swimming Pool reopens Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for lane swimming only. Read the rules
for protecting the lap swimmers from COVID-19, below. Photo by Julia Neal
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno says
wearing masks on Hawaiʻi Island is mandatory.
"WEARING OF FACE COVERINGS IS MANDATORY ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND," Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno reminds the public. This morning, he thanked everyone "for doing your part in keeping yourself, your family, your friends, and our community the safest place in the United States. It is important to know that the majority of states on the mainland continue to see an increase of people being infected by the coronavirus. Hawaiʻi State remains in a good place of low numbers but know how important it is for everyone to continue following the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness," said the Civil Defense Director.
     The reminder of mandatory face coverings comes as Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association plans Monday's Kaʻū COVID-19 Update and talk story with Lt. Gov. Josh Green; Mayor Harry Kim; Kaʻū Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris; Dr. Scott Moscowich of Premiere Medical Group; Dan Brinkman, CEO of East Hawaiʻi for Hawaiʻi Health Services Corp; and Eric Honda, interim Director for the Department of Health Hawaiʻi Island District. The talk story will be held at Pāhala Community Center with registration at 4:30 p.m. and the meeting from 5 p.m. to 6:30 pm.
     The number of people inside the building will be limited to adhere to social distancing. The meeting is also available by zoom. Contact krhcai@yahoo.com or call 928-0101.
Lt. Gov. and physician Josh Green, right, will come to
Pāhala Monday for a Kaʻū COVID-19 Update talk story.
Photo from HHSC
     Today, Hawaiʻi reported its highest one-day new COVID-19 case count. The 42 new cases bring the total to 1,200 since the pandemic began. The Lt. Gov. pointed to July 4 group gatherings and stressed that numbers can grow quickly if people refuse to wear masks and ignore social distancing. He warned that if the COVID case numbers grow from 40 to 70 to 130, "then it’s gone. If things get out of control, you’re going to see very draconian requests to clamp it down in our state.”
     Hawaiʻi Island has two new cases, making eight active cases on-island. One person is hospitalized. The patients are monitored by Department of Health. The new case is being reviewed by DOH, which says the case "is isolated."
     Oʻahu reported 38 new cases today and Maui County two. The state's cumulative case count has risen by 177 in seven days.
     It has been more than 28 days since a case was recorded for a Kaʻū zip code. One zip code in orange on the map below has between six and ten cases within the last 28 days. Zip codes in light yellow have between one and five cases.
    Ninety-three confirmed COVID-19 victims on this island have recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died of COVID-19 here. Of the four hospitalizations on-island, three have been released.
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 905 cases, Kauaʻi 43, and Maui County 133. Nineteen victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Nineteen people died.
     In the United States, more than 3,245,925 cases have been confirmed – an increase of about 70,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 134,777.


     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 12.71 million. The death toll is more than 565,138.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PĀHALA SWIMMING POOL REOPENS FOR LAPS ONLY next Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. New rules are set to protect the public from COVID-19.
     The only public pool in Kaʻū will offer 45-minute time slots for individual lap swimming at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m. on a first-come, first-served basis. There will be no recreational swimming until further notice and swimmers are prohibited from sitting or lying around the pool or in the stands. Shower rooms are closed. A restroom can be used, with permission from the lifeguard. Swimmers arrive in their suits, use an outdoor shower, as directed, and leave immediately after completing their laps.
     The COVID-19 Modified Pool Rules will be posted at each facility. 
     Other pools opening around the island with the same time slots will be: Charles "Sparky" Kawamoto Swim Stadium [961-8698] on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; Pāhoa Community Aquatic Center [965-2700] on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays; Kona Community Aquatic Center [327-3500] on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; Konawaena Swimming Pool [323-3252] on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; and Kohala Swimming Pool [889-6933] on Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays.
     A statement from the county says it "will continue to evaluate sanitization procedures as well as the adherence to modified pool rules to ensure the safety of staff and swimmers. Available days/hours may be expanded in the coming weeks provided COVID-19 public health conditions and other variables are amenable."
     For more information contact the Department of Parks and Recreation Aquatics Section at 961-8740.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


MILOLIʻI LAWAIʻA ʻOHANA CAMP ADDS VIRTUAL CLASSES for its tenth annual event Monday, July 13 through Monday, July 20. The event will feature in-person classes for a limited number of students, and offer classes via Zoom. Register for virtual classes here. Register for in-person attendance here. Contact organizer Kaimi Kaupiko at 937-1310 or kkaupiko@gmail.com with questions.
     Kaupiko told The Kaʻū Calendar, "Ten years ago, we started with our first camp and ten years later we are still here, sharing and passing the knowledge of our kūpuna to our next generation. With ten years we celebrate a milestone for our program, for education, and for the future. Our proverb He puko ‘a kani ‘aina was a way that our kūpuna would pass by many coral heads which the navigators would mark in their memories and pass on to their apprentices. Eventually they would notice that these small coral heads would grow into full islands and so comes the advice that we can't expect to be full-blown successes right away, often we start small and over time, like a coral head, we will mature and be successful."
     Sponsors include Kalanihale, Paʻa Pono Miloliʻi, Kua O Ka Lā, Conservation International, Alu Like Inc, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, and Hawaiʻi Marine Education and Research Center.
     See facebook.com/kalanihaleMilolii for more.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A MODERATE DEMOCRAT is the term Fred Fogel uses to describe himself. The first of three Democrat candidates to file for the District 3 state House of Representatives seat, Fogel, 70, will face incumbent Richard Onishi and challenger Shannon Matson (see Saturday, May 30 Kaʻū News Briefs) in the primary, with ballots coming in the mail starting July 21. The winner will go on to face Republican Susan Hughes (see Thursday, July 8 Kaʻū News Briefs) to represent Punaluʻu, Pāhala, Wood Valley, and Volcano, into Hilo.

     Fogel told The Kaʻū Calendar that his platform aligns with Moderate Democrats: "The voters in the middle. As the old saying goes, you always have your 10 percent. In politics, it's 20 percent. Ten on the far left and ten on the far right. My focus is on the 80 percent in the middle."

State House of Representatives District 3 candidate
Freed Fogel. Photo from Fogel
     He moved to Hawaiʻi in 1973, as an aviator in the F-4 Phantom jet with the USMC. Fogel said he "fell in love with the islands and its people, married a local lady (half Samoan, half Puerto Rican) and helped raise two daughters." After a career in civil service and the military on Oʻahu, he moved to Hawaiʻi Island in 2005, and entered politics "to pay back the people." He said his main goal is to improve the way government functions to better serve the people. He said his schooling and job experience as an advisor to a State Department Head in the areas of Process Improvement, Quality, and Strategic Planning provide the foundation to "get government out of your face as much as possible, and let you be all that you can be."

     To give back to the community he has volunteered with ʻO Kaʻū Kākou, Volcano's Community Emergency Response Team, and Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park; served as a board member of Friends of Puna's Future; and was president of his residential Community Association.

     Fogel has run for various offices since 2008, when he ran for County Council. He said his general philosophy is, "If government was smaller and less intrusive in peoples' lives, people could better pursue their dreams. People should have the freedom to do as they please – as long as their actions don't impact another person's freedom. Politics should not be considered a career opportunity. Everyone should have term limits, and voters should approve salary increases for politicians."

     His website proclaims, "My main goal is to improve the way government operates and supports the people. My allegiance is to the people represented, never to the power base of any political party, nor any special interest group. I do not take campaign donations from anyone and owe only you."

Candidate Fred Fogel and his Main Coon, Big Boy.
Photo from Fogel
     His campaign information says he supports adding term limits; adding on-line voting to mail-in while continuing to make a limited number of voting places available during the general election; extending the state legislative session from five months to ten months; rescinding "gut and replace" and removing add-ons, riders, and special interest provisions from all bills; encouraging use of private contractors rather than public employees; and implementing new laws only after reviewing economic impact; reducing overall cost of government; fully funding governmental retirement and health obligations; and pushing governmental functions down to the county level whenever possible.
     His platform would work toward legalizing possession and cultivation of cannabis; increasing minimum sentences for sale, distribution, and manufacture of meth or crack; focusing on rehabilitation rather than incarceration; releasing all people in prison solely for the consumption of illegal drugs; and reimplementing capital punishment.
     Fogal's website says he would work on eliminating mandatory building codes or requirements other than safety for neighbors for owner-occupied, private residences; issuing concealed carry firearm permits for law-abiding citizens; protecting local product names like "Kaʻū Coffee" by requiring a bag so labeled to contain 100% Kaʻū coffee; implementing point-of-origin labeling for produce; devoting more resources to the interdiction and eradication of invasive animals and plants; embracing alternate energy and decoupling electricity generation from the distribution system; paying good teachers more and instituting a "360 degree" teacher performance evaluation system that has input from parents, principals, teachers, and students; dissolving the state school board and creating county boards comprised of principals – public, charter, and private; making the state personal income tax a flat percentage for everything earned above the poverty level; eliminating sales tax on medicine and food; eliminating inheritance tax; and taxing land used for agriculture at the lowest tax rate.
     Learn more about his platform, beliefs, and goals if elected at ffogel.net.
     Watch the Democratic candidates for Hawaiʻi County on ​Nā Leo TV at  on Saturday, July 18.
Candidate Fred Fogel and his "mini-me" supporters. Photo from Fogel

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES adjourned the 2020 legislative session sine die on Friday. A statement from the House says it was a very intense session of maneuvering through obstacles related to the coronavirus pandemic. Members were tasked with addressing immediate needs of residents struggling with economic and public health concerns while working towards goals set back in January to provide support for working families.
     House Speaker Scott Saiki said, "At the start of session, we crafted a holistic package of bills in collaboration with the Senate, the Governor, community stakeholders, and business leaders to address the big issues of income inequality -- from affordable housing to early child care. While our state has gone through tremendous changes since January, we've had a continued focus on relieving the economic burdens for working families, particularly through accessibility to early learning and child care." 
     Two of the original bills from the Legislature's majority package moved to the Governor for review. HB 2543 HD1 SD2 will provide all of Hawaiʻi's three- to four-year-old children with access to early learning by the year 2030, and appropriates funds to support pre-kindergarten Hawaiian language immersion programs. SB 3103 SD2 HD2 establishes a school facilities agency in the Department of Education to coordinate all public school development, planning, and construction allowing the department to focus on teaching the children.
     In March, the session was suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Legislature reconvened in June and passed SB 126 SD1 HD1 CD1, a comprehensive plan to spend $635 million in federal CARES Act funds to provide immediate relief for working families, address public health and pandemic needs, and rebuild and move the economy forward. The bill also appropriates $149 million within the state budget for a range of social safety net programs and services including hospital operations, mental health and substance abuse programs, homeless support services, and rent assistance.
State House Speaker Scott Saiki
     House Majority Leader Della Au Belatti said, "We've seen this pandemic affect our most vulnerable communities. I'm proud, not only of the CARES Act funding we put towards mental health and homeless support services but the bills we passed to reform the way our mental health and criminal justice systems coexist and support one another. " She pointed to HB 1620 HD2 SD2 and HB 1661 HD3 SD2, saying they "work hand in hand to provide individuals with non-violent, minor charges, the opportunity to receive help and treatment, rather than get stuck in the cycle of jail time, and additionally streamline and standardize the emergent response to behavioral health crises."  
     Bills that passed include:
     SB 2638 SD2 HD3 Relating to Domestic Violence: Part I establishes a petty misdemeanor offense of abuse of family or household members; clarifies penalties for violations and allows a deferred acceptance of guilty plea for misdemeanor and petty misdemeanor abuse of family or household members offenses. It establishes a probationary period for abuse of family or household members. Part II makes consistent the types of documents accepted as proof of domestic or sexual violence victim status. Part III: Requires the judiciary to submit annual reports on the number and outcome of abuse cases.
     HB 361 HD1 SD2 Relating to Emoluments: It prohibits the governor and each county mayor, while holding those offices, to maintain any other employment, maintain a controlling interest in a business, or receive any emolument, beginning on the sixty-first calendar day after their election or appointment to office.
     HB 285 HD1 SD2 CD1 Relating to Public Safety: It requires county police departments to disclose to the Legislature the identity of an officer upon an officer's suspension or discharge. Amends the Uniform Information Practices Act to allow for public access to information about suspended officers. Authorizes the law enforcement standards board to revoke certifications and requires the board to review and recommend statewide policies and procedures relating to law enforcement, including the use of force.
     SB 2523 SD1 HD2 Relating to Public Safety: It restores funding for the YWCA Fernhurst Women's Program, which is a community-based work furlough program for women.
 House Majority Leader Della Au Belatti
     HB 1819 HD2 SD3 Relating to Hemp: It legalizes the growth of hemp in the State of Hawaiʻi through the United States Department of Agriculture hemp production program and allows the processing and sale of hemp products in the State through State licensing. It expedites the substitution of the USDA hemp production program for the existing industrial hemp pilot program as required by federal law.
     HB 2744 HD1 SD2 Relating to Gun Violence Prevention. It establishes the gun violence and violent crimes commission and requires reports to the Legislature. It makes it a class C felony to purchase, manufacture, or otherwise obtain firearm parts for the purpose of assembling a firearm having no serial number.
     SB2629 SD2 HD1 Relating to the Environment: It prohibits, after June 30, 2020 the approval of a new or renewed power purchase agreement for electricity generated from coal, as well as the modification of a coal power purchase agreement that proposes to extend the term or increase the amount of generation that is allowed to be produced under the existing agreement. The bill also prohibits, after Dec. 31, 2022, the issuance or renewal or covered source air permits for coal-burning electricity generation facilities.
     HB 2148 HD1 SD1 Relating to Family Leave: It extends Hawai'i family leave to include care for employees' grandchildren.
    HB1346 HD2 SD2 Relating to Early Childhood Education: It prohibits the suspension or expulsion of children participating in the Executive Office on Early Learning's Public Prekindergarten Program, except under limited circumstances.
     HB1676 HD1 SD2 Relating to Highway Safety: It establishes the Photo Red Light Imaging Detector Systems Program (Program) with a two-year pilot program in the City and County of Honolulu. It authorizes the State and counties to administer the Program. Requires proceeds of fines to be expended in the county from which they were collected for operation of the Program.
     For a list of all bills passed during the 2020 session, click here. 

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AN OPINION ON THE ADJOURNMENT OF THE STATE LEGISLATURE yesterday comes from Keliʻi Akina, Ph.D., President and CEO of Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi:

     "Hawaiʻi's 2020 legislative session adjourned yesterday, and thank goodness for that.

It was a session interrupted in March by the COVID-19 crisis, then reconvened for four hectic weeks in June and July. When the session began in January, we had been prepared to fend off new taxes and budget-busting government projects. Now that it's over, we can celebrate the lack of any tax increases, but the budget issues remain.
Keliʻi Akina, Ph.D., President and CEO 
of Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi
     "The Legislature's highest priority upon reconvening was to amend the budget to reflect Hawaiʻi's post-COVID reality: widespread business closures, massive unemployment, looming budget deficits, and evaporating tax revenues.
     "The Grassroot Institute of Hawaiʻi was adamant about belt-tightening and spending cuts. We even created a budget balancing tool to demonstrate how it could be done.
     "Our state lawmakers went for a different approach, donning rose-colored glasses and approaching the budget shortfall as a temporary setback. Not only did they use up the entirety of the state's rainy day fund, they also approved legislation allowing them to breach the state's legal debt limit. Over the next several years, the state will be able to issue up to $7 billion in general obligation bonds, thereby increasing the state's liabilities and debt burden that will be borne by Hawaiʻi taxpayers. They also approved salary increases for some public employees.
     "Overall, those who had hoped the Legislature would address the economic fallout of the pandemic-inspired state and countylockdownswere disappointed. Very few of the bills considered in the reconvened session attempted to ease the pain of the state's businesses or unemployed workers.

     "One Senate resolution stands as the perfect metaphor for the Legislature's approach to addressing Hawaiʻi's current economic woes: SR78, adopted on July 8, pledges to create 100,000 permanent jobs in Hawaiʻi by 2022. How? The resolution doesn't say. It only asks the state Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism to help by submitting recommendations before the 2021 session.

     "If it's so easy to create jobs, why stop at 100,000? Why not resolve to create 150,000 jobs? Or 200,000?

     "For the DBEDT employees now searching for ways to help the Legislature meet its goal, may I suggest a little light reading? Please check out the institute's Road map to prosperity, which we released in late May to provide exactly the kinds of recommendations Hawaiʻi needs to get its economy moving again. 

     "I'm not saying the Legislature's lack of fiscal restraint means it ignored the effects of the lockdowns entirely. On the contrary, the Senate chose to respond to public dissatisfaction with the lockdowns and the governor's exercise of emergency powers by... expanding the state's emergency powers. 

     "A House bill that had made it to the Senate was gutted and replaced with a proposal that would give the state health director, with the consent of the governor, broad powers to declare public health emergencies, close businesses and schools, mandate quarantines, and do anything else deemed allegedly necessary to address the danger.

     "The bill was met with broad public opposition, and hundreds of people submitted testimony opposing it. Nonetheless, our senators approved HB2502, and only the House's refusal to accept the new version stopped it. This was one of the bright spots of this year's session.

     "Another bright spot was a resolution creating a task force to make government operations more cost-effective. True, this was just a small step, but if it leads to laws that will make it easier to engage private contractors or create public-private partnerships, it's a step in the right direction.

     "Also deserving praise was the Legislature's approval of HB285, which, pending approval by the governor, will make it easier for lawmakers and the public to learn the details of police misconduct. More sunlight is always a good approach when it comes to increasing the public's trust in government, and lawmakers should be commended for their work on this bill.

     "Despite these bright spots, however, the fact remains that little was done to address Hawaiʻi's genuinely horrifying economic devastation, and it looks like we'll have to wait until next year — at the state level, at least — to make any progress.
     "The good news is that this gives us more time to promote economic freedom as the key to helping Hawaiʻi recover and even excel after the coronavirus lockdowns. I know I am already making up my wish list for the next legislative session."


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LEARN HOW TO JOIN WITH OTHER COMPANIES TO TAKE ON LARGER GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS at a Teaming Agreements and Subcontracts webinar Thursday, July 16 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Register at eventbrite.com/e/dos-and-donts-for-teaming-agreements-subcontracting-webinar-registration-108906253536.


     Organized by Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center, Hawaiʻi Procurement Technical Assistance Center, Norcal Procurement Technical Assistance Center, learn a step-by-step process for successfully teaming for a government contract and "take your business to the next level." The webinar will cover: What is a teaming agreement?; Benefits of teaming; Factors to consider when selecting a teaming partner; Considerations when negotiating agreements; 8(a) and Small Business considerations; Introduction to the Mentor-Protégé Program; Differences between subcontracting, teaming, and joint venturing; Tips for success; and Contracting with the US Army Corps of Engineers.
Attend a webinar to learn how to join forces with other businesses to bid on government contracts. 
Image from Norcal PTAC
     Christina Jones, Norcal PTAC Sr./Lead Procurement Specialist, will speak during the event. She is an expert business consultant and facilitator with over 20 years of experience in developing process improvement and training programs to position small businesses for government sales. She specializes in 8(a) certification, contract vehicles to include General Services Administration, and proposal writing. "Christina has a proven track record in increasing economic impact through calculated one-on-one counseling of small to medium-sized businesses," says the announcement.
     Monique M. Holmes, Deputy for Small Business Programs with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Honolulu District, will also speak. She was welcomed to USACE as the Small Business Program Analyst representing the Honolulu District on Feb. 18. She brings 30 years of private and public sector experience. As the Small Business Program Analyst, Monique utilizes her skillsets to expand USACE Honolulu Districts small business base through increasing opportunities for small businesses as well as reducing hardships and eliminating restrictive barriers faced by the small business communities most vulnerable categories.



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FLIGHT PLANS for Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park for July are:

     Tuesday, July 14 and Friday, July 17, between 6 a.m. and , for Hawaiian petrel monitoring on Mauna Loa between 6,500- and 9,000-ft. elevation.

     Thursday, July 23 between  and , for fountain grass control and mapping from the Park's west boundary to Keauhou, between sea level and 4,000 feet. 

     Tuesday, July 28 between  and , for ungulate control in Kahuku Unit between 3,500- to 5,000-ft. elevation.

     Tuesday, July 28 between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m., to survey for Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death in the ‘Ōla‘a Rainforest Unit between 3,000- and 4,000-ft. elevation.  

     Wednesday, July 29 between  and , to survey for ROD in the Kahuku Unit between 2,000- and 4,000-ft. elevation. 

     Thursday, July 29 and Friday, July 30 between  and , to monitor Hawaiian petrels in the Kahuku Unit between 4,800- and 6,800-ft. elevation.  

     U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation.
     The Park regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather. Management of the park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Native plant seeds, including ʻōhiʻa, were handed out at last year's Cultural Festival at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National 
Park, Kahuku Unit. Photo by Manu Yahna

Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
     This time last year, the Annual Hawaiian Cultural Festival was held in-person at Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, offering island visitors and the local community a chance to connect to Hawaiian cultural practices through hands-on crafts and demonstrations, hula and Hawaiian music, and food. The festival's theme was E Ho‘omau: To Continue; the 2018 festival was canceled due to the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. The 2020 festival was held virtually; see facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoesnpsfor video of the events.

     Last year's free five-hour celebration offered entertainment from two hālau hula and three local bands from Hawai‘i Island: Debbie Ryder and Hālau O Leionalani; Russell Mauga and Da Kahuku Mauka Boyz; Mamo Brown and Hālau Ulumamo O Hilo Palikū; Demetrius Oliviera and Gene Beck of Keaiwa; and Brandon Nakano and the Keawe Trio.

Park rangers make ti leaf lei with cultural fest-goers. See video of this year's 
ti leaf lei making demonstration at 
Photo by Manu Yahna

     The Ka‘ū Multicultural Society shared their popular paniolo photography exhibit, a glimpse into Kahuku Ranch's not-so-distant past.

     Capt. Kiko Johnston-Kitazawa exhibited his authentic Hawaiian sailing canoe.

     The National Park Service and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association staff demonstrated ‘oli, chant, and showed attendees how to make ti leaf leis, how to weave lau hala, and ‘ohe kapala, bamboo stamping.

     Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death education and outreach handed out native plant seeds. One seed type, ʻōhiʻa, is suffering a devastating fungal epidemic on several Hawaiian islands.

     The ‘Alalā Project, ‘Imi Pono no ka ‘Āina, and NPS Natural Resources Management educated on how to protect native species and about their latest conservation efforts.

     Food from Volcano House, shave ice from the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and Ka‘ū coffee from Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association were available for purchase. Attendees were also encouraged to bring a picnic lunch.
     The event was co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano House, and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. The Park's official social media has video, festival photos, and more. See facebook.com/hawaiivolcanoesnps.
The discovery of this island was by canoe, as honored in this hula during last year's Cultural Festival at Kahuku Unit. 
Photo by Manu Yahna


directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's OutreachCollege Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at 9:30 a.m., csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Participation Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."
Kaʻū Chapter of Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United meets this Sunday, July 12 at Wood Valley Ranch mamaki tea farm at 96-02232 South Road. It begins at  and includes a pot luck and tour of the mamaki farm, which is the new home of interim President Matt Dreyer. Among the Kaʻū Farmers Union initiatives are a food hub for Kaʻū, with CSA, and an online store platform to sell locally grown food.


Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about 


Kaʻū Food Producers, attend a Hawaiʻi Food Manufacturers Association COVID-19 Crisis Meeting, in conjunction with Hawaiʻi Technology Development Corporation and Innovate Hawaiʻi on Tuesday, July 14 at Speakers are Paul Uyehara of Aloha Tofu, Ryan Sung of Honolulu Cookie Co., and Erin Uehara of Choco Lea. They will be followed by discussion and sharing from the audience. Join the virtual meeting through Zoom: us02web.zoom.us/j/82116384790?pwd=c3hndVhFTzEzOVBVa0xsTEtWdGZ1Zz09, Meeting ID: 821 1638 4790, Password: 071420.


Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at  The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 
65-1259 Kawaihae Road
 on Wednesday, July 8 between  and  Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace to , Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts its Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.


Teaming Agreements and Subcontracts Webinar Thursday, July 16 from to Register at eventbrite.com/e/dos-and-donts-for-teaming-agreements-subcontracting-webinar-registration-108906253536. Organized by Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center, Hawaiʻi Procurement Technical Assistance Center, and NorcalProcurementTechnicalAssistanceCenter, learn a step-by-step process for successfully teaming for a government contract and "take your business to the next level."



Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by  HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.


Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services and worship are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays,
us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha.

Drive-In Worship Service at Kauahaʻao Congregational Church in Waiʻōhinu start Sunday, July 19 at , with a parking time. Kahu (Pastor) Debbie Wong Yuen says the service is "open to anyone" and that this way of having worship service "is not a new idea. In the 1950s, 'Drive-in-Worship' was the way to worship… without getting physically close to people. They stay in their vehicles, and listen to the Word and message, and honk their horns for their Amen. We are the Church, not the building, so we don't need to be 'in a building' to have worship service, we can worship God anywhere, He is with us no matter where we are, and, where two or three are gathered together in His name, He will be in our midst. We are not alone… we are all in this together, and God is with us."

     Yuen says vehicles will park in the lawn area on the Church campus facing the building, either facing forward or, if the vehicle has a hatchback to open and sit in the back, the vehicle can reverse into the spot. An usher will be there to guide the vehicles. Once parked, the usher (wearing face covering) will bring a basket with the service bulletin and a bowl to collect the offering/tithes/contributions. Each vehicle will also receive a folder to keep in the vehicle with the songs/hymns for the service, and a paper fan for each person in the vehicle. On Communion Sundays, attendants may bring their own elements (bread or cracker and juice or water), or be given a sealed Communion cup from the basket.

     Yuen asks congregants to "please put on a face covering when the usher comes to your vehicle door. During the service, face coverings are not required, only if a person needs to leave their vehicle to go to the restroom. It's recommended you bring bottled water for those in your vehicle.

     "We invite anyone to come join us as Kauahaʻao Congregational Church gathers in-person to relive the 1950s for Drive-in Worship Services. Come and be blessed!"


     Call Yuen at 928-8039 or 937-2155 with questions.


The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

COVID-19 Testing Locations in Kaʻū are: Bay Clinicat 95-5583 Mamālahoa Highwayin Nāʻālehu is open Appointment required. No drive-thru; stay in vehicle. Patients are seen regardless of ability to pay. There is a fee for the COVID-19 test. Call 808-333-3600. Kaʻū Hospital at 1 Kamani Streetin Pāhala is open Monday through Friday Bring ID and insurance card. Pre-operative and Emergency Room patients only. Screening conducted outside in a tent. There is a fee for the COVID-19 test. Call 808-932-4200.

     Free screening and testing is offered in Kona at Aliʻi Health Center, 808-747-8321, or Aloha Kona Urgent Care, 808-365-2297 or 808-854-3566; and in various locations around the island with Premier Medical Group, 808-213-6444.

     Other island locations that offer testing are Kona Community Hospital, 808-322-9311; North Hawaiʻi Community Hospital in Kohala, 808-885-4444; Hale Hoʻola Hamakua, 808-932-4116; Clinical Labs of Hawaiʻi in Hilo, 808-935-4814; Hilo Urgent Care, 808-969-3051; Keaʻau Urgent Care, 808-966-7942; Puna Community Medical Center, 808-930-6001; and Bay Clinic locations in Hilo, Keaʻau, and Puna – call 808-333-3600.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minority Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.



Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.


Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.

Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.

     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 

     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.

     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 
     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, July 12, 2020

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Boys & Girls Club CEO Chad Cabral came to Nāʻālehu Elementary on Friday to meet with school leadership and the
Department of Education's Homeless Concerns Liaisons. Photo from Boys & Girls Club

HELP FOR STUDENTS THROUGH THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB during the upcoming academic school year is offered. Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island's Chairman of the Board Doug Adams and CEO Chad Cabral, and team, are considering the uncertainty that surrounds the opening of schools on Hawaiʻi Island. Adams said they hope to assist with flexibility and adaptability "to help our kids wherever they may be studying -- at a club or at home."
Boys & Girls Club Big Island has plans to help keep
supporting those in need during the pandemic with
mobile educational assistance. BGCBI photo
     Cabral, Adams, and other Boys & Girls Club representatives are reaching out to the County of Hawaiʻi's administration and County Council, as well as school administrators to see if the organization can be of assistance. The initiative is called Mobile Youth Outreach Supplemental Educational Support Services, A COVID Mitigation Project.
     Cabral said, "If schools do open Aug. 4, it is highly likely they will only have kids physically on campus for two days and with shorter half-day daily schedules. The rest of the time children will be expected to complete academic lessons on their own while at home. With the rates of COVID going up, Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island may also not be able to host after-school, on-campus programming where we actually service kids physically on our site locations.
     "This is where I think an innovative mobile youth outreach program can be effective in the continuation of supporting struggling youth and families. The schools that I have physically met with to discuss the idea were very excited and wanted us to commit to their school."
     Anyone who wants to help, has ideas for the program, or knowledge of funding opportunities or possible donations toward this effort, contact Cabral at 808-961-5536. Email chad@bgcbi.org.
     Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island is also delivering food to isolated youth, kūpuna, and other hungry people in Kaʻū and other districts around the island, having served more than 62,000 meals during the pandemic.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ATTEND THE KAʻŪ COVID-19 UPDATE MEETING IN-PERSON OR VIA ZOOM tomorrow, Monday, July 13 at PāhalaCommunity Center at The "talk story with health care leaders" is sponsored by Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association. Registration is at p .m. and the meeting runs from to
     Speaking will be Gov. David Ige's healthcare liaison, Lt. Gov. Josh Green; Mayor Harry Kim; and Dr. Scott Moscowich, founder of Premier Medical Group, which sponsors COVID-19 testing around this island. Kaʻū Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris; Dan Brinkman, CEO of East Hawaiʻi for Hawaiʻi Health Services Corp, which manages Kaʻū Hospital; and Eric Honda, interim Director for the Department of Health Hawaiʻi Island District, will also be on hand.
Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
     Wearing masks and social distancing are required. Seating is limited, attendance is first-come, first served. Participation via Zoom is available. Email krhcai@yahoo.com or call Kaʻū Resource & Distance Learning Center at 928-0101 for connectivity info.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TWENTY-ONE NEW COVID-19 CASES ARE REPORTED IN HAWAIʻI today, bringing the total to 1,220. Hawaiʻi Island has one new case, making eight active cases on-island, all monitored by Department of Health. The new case is travel-related, according to DOH.

     Oʻahu reported 18 new cases today while its overall case count dropped by one due to new information. MauiCounty reported one new case. The state's case count has risen by 198 in seven days.

     It has been more than 28 days since a case was recorded for a Kaʻū zip code. One zip code on the west side has between six and ten active cases. This island's other 93 confirmed COVID-19 victims recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died of COVID-19 here. There were four hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 923 cases, Kauaʻi 43, and Maui County 134. Nineteen victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Nineteen people died. 

Civil Defense Director 
Talmadge Magno.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     In his daily message, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said, "You are reminded of the need for caution of travel. It is so very important that everyone continues to follow the preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. As a reminder, wearing of face coverings is mandatory on Hawaiʻi Island.

     "In moving forward, know that the Coronavirus threat remains and we need to get better in following the prevention measures to keep Hawaiʻi safe. All of these policies have one purpose – to help stop the spread of the Coronavirus. Thank you for listening and thank you for doing your part to keep Hawaiʻi safe. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."

     In the United States, more than 3,304,942 cases have been confirmed – an increase of over 59,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 136,205.

     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 12.91 million. The death toll is more than 569,128.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Kamehame, northeast of Punaluʻu, where a search continues
 by the family of a lost fisherman. Photo by David Rayne
"PLEASE HELP MY ʻOHANA" find husband, father, and grandfather Mark Lowery, pleads his son Alokoa Lowery. Mark Lowery, 47, vanished Friday, June 12 while fishing near Kamehame Beach, north of Punaluʻu, during a camping trip with friends. Hawaiʻi News Now reports the family "is not giving up."

     According to the Coast Guard, his companions said that six of the campers went to sleep, but Lowery kept fishing at night. The companions noticed his backpack and several fishing rods missing from the campsite in the morning. A Coast Guard helicopter was seen flying along the Ka‘ū Coast the next day. The Coast Guard called off the search after days of searching.

     Hawaiʻi News Now reports the family kept searching and recovered a few of his belongings near Kamehame Beach. They are asking anyone familiar with the area for help.

Mark Lowery, missing since June 12. 
Photo from the Lowery family
     Alokoa Lowery told Hawaiʻi News Now, "My family is never giving up until I find my dad. We humbly ask for any help possible. Anyone who has quads, dirt bikes, any fishermen, divers, hunters, anyone with drones, helicopter or airplane access, anyone who is native to the area of Kaʻū and Kamehame Beach, please help my ʻohana. My dad is a survivor," and became a grandfather in April. "All he wanted to see was his granddaughter. She was his strength and we all feel like he's out there fighting for her. This Father's Day was the worst for me. It was my first Father's Day and I didn't have my dad with me."
     Anyone willing to help in the search is urged to contact Alokoa Lowery at (808) 746-4472.


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FUNDING FOR HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY, ALA KAHAKAI TRAIL, and other programs in Volcano, Kaʻū, and beyond passed the U.S. House of Representatives Ways & Means Committee on Friday. Committee member Rep. Ed Case announced passage of the Interior-Environment bill to fund Department of the Interior, Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Forest Service, and related agencies.
     The bill includes $36.76 billion in regular appropriations, an increase of $771 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, and $5.11 billion over the President's 2021 request. It also includes $15 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations for investments in critical infrastructure.
     A statement from Case's office says, "The bill makes critical investments in environmental protection and land conservation, clean air and water to protect our communities' health, earthquake and volcano warning systems, protecting our public lands and endangered species, tribal communities, our territories, and climate change mitigation."
ʻIʻiwi and other endangered Hawaiian birds are supported
by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service budget for
State of the Birds Activities. Photo by Michael Walther
American Bird Conservancy
     It says that funding secured by Case will include Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, which monitors the active volcanoes in Hawai‘i, assesses their hazards, issues warnings, and advances scientific understanding to reduce impacts of volcanic eruptions. It budgets $15 million, an $800,000 increase, for the National Park Services' National Trails System. This includes the Ala Kahakai National Historical Trail on Hawai‘i Island.
     It includes $223.907 million for National Park Service construction, with $5.647 million for the Pearl Harbor National Memorial and $16.03 million for Kalaupapa National Historical Park and $3.5 million for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service State of the Birds Activities, a $250,000 increase. "These funds support efforts to recover our most endangered Hawaiian forest bird species."
     The funding includes $1.25 million for the NPS American Indian and Native Hawaiian Art and Culture Grants program, and $34 million in Department of Interior Compact Impact funds, which helps Hawai‘i and the Pacific territories offset the costs of Compact migration (such as Marshallese and other islanders moving here.) The bill would provide  $3.155 million for the NPS Japanese American Confinement Sites program, which funds the preservation and interpretation of U.S. confinement sites where Japanese Americans were detained during World War II, the Honouliuli Internment Camp and Sand Island Detention Camp on O‘ahu; and $30.695 million, a $429,000 increase, for the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program.
     Language in the bill directs NPS to implement the National Air Tour Management Plan Act of 2000, which requires the NPS and Federal Aviation Administration to promulgate air tour management plans for the nation's most impacted National Parks, including Hawai‘i Volcanoes and Haleakalā National Parks. Language also directs the Bureau of Land Management to execute the survey requirements of the Hawaiian Home Lands Recovery Act and consult with Homestead Beneficiary Associations on confirmation of the specific lands classified as Hawaiian Home Lands.
Ala Kahakai National Trail funding is in the bill passed Friday in the U.S. House of Representatives
Ways & Means Committee, advocated by Rep. Ed Case. Photo from Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail
     The bill's language supports the Smithsonian Institution's work with the Filipino Veterans Recognition and Education Project on the development of an educational website and accompanying resources to recognize Filipino and American WWII veterans. It would help to ensure that the NPS consider archaeological collections representing indigenous cultures and remote regions of the country for Save America’s Treasures grants, which provides grants to preserve nationally significant historic properties and collections.
     There is also $3.5 million for brown tree snake research and control.

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STATE SEN. DRU KANUHA, who represents West Kaʻū into Kona, sent out an end-of-the 2020 Hawaiʻi Legislature message. He emphasized COVID-19 precautions, a pandemic silver lining in virtual neighbor island access to the Capitol, and a report on Kaʻū-relevant bills coming from his office this week. 
     Kanuha wrote the 2020 Legislative Session coming to an end brings on "a great sense of duty, integrity, and grace mixed with restlessness and urgency as the State of Hawaiʻi endures new challenges caused by the global health pandemic of COVID-19. This Session has been inspiring as well as humbling as I witnessed the Hawaiʻi State Senate transition overnight from in-person meetings and briefings at the Capitol to online Zoom briefings, meetings via Microsoft Teams, virtual town halls, and bi-weekly teleconferences to stay updated in assisting our constituents.
Sen. Dru Kanuha, right front, at the Capitol during the last week of sessions for the state legislature. Photo from Facebook
     "Now, from our efforts to fully work remotely, the Senate is poised to provide capabilities for video-teleconference testimony and improve greater access to the Capitol for the neighbor islands. As we have experienced, being able to voice our concerns at the Capitol is critical and this feat will speak volumes and give a resounding voice for future generations to come in Kona and Kaʻū."
     Kanuha said his office will provide a legislative update this Wednesday, July 15, regarding bills and resolutions relevant to Kona and Kaʻū. "Although it goes without saying, there are never enough words to express my gratitude for you and your ʻohana's support, allowing me the opportunity to represent you, your ʻohana, and the values of our West Hawaiʻi community. Every day was a different challenge, a different weight to carry, but there was no deterring – I knew we could do it for there is no task too big when done together by all... a big mahalo to my staff on Oʻahu, Tonga Hopoi and Iokepa Command, for their dedication and commitment to you and your ʻohana in Senate District 3 – they are the staffers that every legislator wishes for and I am very thankful to have them."
     Kanuha recommended his constituency "remember to maintain general physical precautions – wear a mask when in public, maintain a healthy, social distance and sanitize high-use surfaces daily. Stay safe, connected, and prepared."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Coach Bob Fitzgerald
Hawaiʻi County Mayoral Candidate
COACH BOB FITZGERALD is running for Mayor of Hawaiʻi County under his motto One Island, One Heart. Appointed Director of Hawaiʻi County Department of Parks & Recreation in 2008 by Mayor Billy Kenoi, Fitzgerald has also been a small business owner, farmer, sales manager, special education teacher, and football coach. He helped to lead numerous championship sports teams to victory and led Hawaiʻi's first public school football coach to play outside the state -- in Alaska.
     Concerning his stint leading Parks & Rec, he said, "I have had the experience in cutting a budget but not losing services, or employees."     Fitzgerald graduated from LoyolaHigh School, Los Angeles, class 1970. He attended ColoradoStateon a football scholarship then transferred to San DiegoState, where he achieved a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Planning and Transportation in December of 1976. Fitzgerald moved to Kona in March 1977 to expand Leslies Flowers, a business his family started in 1923 in Los Angeles. Fitzgerald said he is happily married to Michaela Larson, and has two daughters, one son, and four grandchildren.

     Fitzgerald has been president of West Hawaiʻi Youth Council for 20 years. He said he also advocates for seniors, and is a Board Member of West Hawaiʻi Park Athletic Corporation, a non-profit dedicated to expanding youth, senior, and family recreation in West Hawaiʻi. He said he's also had a Hawaiʻi Real Estate License since 1982, and is currently in "Active Status."

     Fitzgerald told The Kaʻū Calendar his motivation is to "coach this Islandwith a winning system. Our local government is this large slow-moving defensive system usually saying 'no.' I want to bring in some offense and add special teams to say 'yes' and get the job done now. My motto – OneIsland, One Heart– comes from my many years of passion in trying to make this Island a better place. I will bridge communities together; my leadership will be with passion, integrity, and transparency. My dad once told me, 'Son, to make it in this world you have to relate to people from 3 to 93." I believe my experience, diversity of employment, and communication skills have allowed me to do this.

     "We are in uncharted waters – we need leadership to think outside the box in all areas of government. This will take a leader to work with our community's leaders, our experts in our private sector, and a leader that can motivate our entire county government staff. As I said I'm coach – a master of getting the most of my players. I make a promise of getting this job done."

Bob Fitzgerald, left, resident of Hawaiʻi Island since 1977, is running for
mayor of Hawaiʻi County. Photo from Fitzgerald
     He said his focuses, if elected, would be to revamp the building permit process; revamp the bus and transportation system; let the local Island Hopper come back; work with committed absentee owners to come back to their second homes; diversify Hawaiʻi's farmers with exports and maximizing what can be produced locally; and work with University of Hawaiʻi and other universities as partners in future employment necessities like nursing, medical tech, clean sciences, and oceanography;
       He also vowed to work with all sides of the Thirty Meter Telescope situation and be present at every meeting. Fitzgerald promised to give a voice to the voiceless by empowering communities in prioritizing which roads, parks, public housing projects, and other infrastructure or programs should receive taxpayer money; reinforce communities, deliver food to kūpuna, and identify additional hospital locations during the COVID-19 pandemic, using "leadership that prioritizes our safety over dollars" to "again make our island home a great place to live, work, and play in."
      The candidate said he would tackle crime and drug use by providing additional resources for education, job growth, and treatment options; expanding recreational opportunities; expanding the health and wellness industry for Hawaiʻi's aging population; be creative about affordable housing, being creative by considering more condos, apartments, and townhouses; addressing recycling and creating a waste-to-energy solution.

     Fitzgerlad said, "My mission is to bridge the gaps around our Island, and have many community forums in every area. Listen, assign my crossover departments to an A-Team for jobs that we can get done in two days to six months; a B-Team to get those jobs done during my administration term; and a C-Team of crossover departments that will leave issues and plans better for the next Mayor."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

NAME AGRICULTURE AND FOOD PRODUCTION SHOVEL-READY PROJECTS in a survey due next Wednesday, July 15 at https://tinyurl.com/y9zm63mw. The KohalaCentersays the Agriculture Response and Recovery Working Group is compiling information about "shovel-ready" projects in the food and agriculture sector across Hawaiʻi. Information will be used to encourage investment and inform decision making around federal stimulus, state/county, private, philanthropic, and other funding sources. The survey should take 5-10 minutes to complete.

     A statement from Ag Response & Recovery says, "We are using a framework that enables us to partner with other sectors, including the conservation sector, which created a similar sector-wide proposal/project list, and potentially the green development sector. Note that this information may be made available to relevant stakeholders and policymakers." Learn more here. With questions and comments, contact Christine Brammer, Executive and Program Director of Agricultural Leadership Foundation of Hawaiʻi at director@agleaderhi.org.

     The Ag Response & Recovery Working Group is a broad coalition of agricultural stakeholders and the state that has been convening since early April in response to the destabilization of the coronavirus pandemic, and to forge deeper connections between local agriculture, emergency food distribution, and long-term economic planning. Together, the group "has a plan to keep farmers and ranchers afloat, mobilize local food production to address immediate community feeding needs, contribute to Hawaiʻi's economic recovery, and build lasting food system capacity to grow a more resilient Hawaiʻi. This work to strengthen our food system is critical now, will ensure our readiness for future disasters, and fortify us for challenges posed by climate change. See the attached documents for more details about our efforts."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A year ago, the blockade of Maunakea Access Road began to stop the Thirty Meter Telescope. The protest led to
an encampment, then a gathering place. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
Kaʻū Life: The Way We Were Last Year
     This time last year, some Kaʻū residents headed up Maunakea for a peaceful vigil and nonviolent ceremony at Puʻu Huluhulu, near the intersection of Mauna Kea Access Road and Daniel K. Inouye Highway - the Saddle Road.
Protesters submit peacefully to arrest.
Photo from Puʻu Honua o Puʻu Huluhulu Maunakea Facebook
     Opponents of the Thirty Meter Telescope set up a place of refuge, a puʻuhonua. They aimed to occupy the place, block the access road, and stop construction of the $1.4 billion Thirty Meter Telescope near the summit of Maunakea. They called the summit sacred, mistreated, and deserving of protection from construction of the largest telescope on the planet.
     Work on TMT was to begin Monday, July 15, 2019, with movement of equipment and supplies up the access road. The Thirty Meter Telescope investors, managers, astronomers, and academic institutions aimed to launch a decade of construction.
     Many elders in the Maunakea Kiaʻi, Protectors of Maunakea, organization peacefully and successfully blocked the access road. On the third day of their protest, 33 Kiaʻi kūpuna submitted themselves to arrests. Some stood with canes. Some sat in wheelchairs. Some prostrated themselves on Maunakea Access Road.
The encampment at Maunakea offered outdoor classes to anyone who journeyed there. Photo by Julia Neal
     During the arrests, Pua Case, an opposition leader, urged some 1,000 people gathered along Daniel K. Inouye Highway and the access road to remain quiet during the non-violent protests and arrests. Some chanted and some sang as those taken into custody were given misdemeanor citations and released.
International students from island nations traveled to Maunakea to
join in the protests to protect the mauna. Photo by Julia Neal

     One of those arrested, Office of Hawaiian Affairs trustee Hulu Lindsey, of Waimea, called Mauna Kea her family's piko, belly button or place where life begins. "I love this mauna," she said. Also arrested were cultural practitioners Pua Kanakaole Kanahele and Noe Noe Wong Wilson.
     OHA trustee Dan Ahuna commented on the situation: "Our kūpuna are being arrested. Fellow OHA Trustee Hulu Lindsey was taken into custody. Our voices are being ignored. I implore the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to immediately file an injunction to halt any further efforts by the State of Hawaiʻi, UH, and the Thirty Meter Telescope until the matters in our lawsuit are resolved," he said.
     On Oʻahu, a group of Hawaiians, led by Kumu Hula Vickie Takamine Holt, visited the office of Suzanne Case, Chair of the state Board of Land & Natural Resources. Activists held ceremonies with chant and hula at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and outside Gov. David Ige's office.
State and county law enforcement costs mounted to more than $10 million,
with the protest and encampment activities remaining peaceful.
Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     After the arrests, the save Maunakea cause received support from cultural and environmental groups internationally. Celebrities and politicians traveled to the encampment to listen. Mayor Harry Kim, Gov. David Ige, and Lt. Gov. Josh Green were among them. Celebrities included The Rock and Jason Momoa.
     Dancers and chanters from Pacific Islands came to the summit to share culture at the encampment.
     Student protestors took University of Hawaiʻi classes virtually, from the mountain. Volunteers raised money and provided a food service for those who stayed there.
     During the protests, the governor issued emergency proclamations, giving the state broader authority to close roads, control crowds, and call in the National Guard, if necessary. Ige described the protests as illegal when they blocked access to scientists and technicians who work atop Maunakea on existing telescopes. State and county law enforcement officers directed traffic and helped to manage crowds of visitors and protestors who traveled to the encampment. Government costs mounted to more than $10 million.
While blocking the road to the construction site, kupuna shared stories, music
and chant with visitors. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     While the pandemic caused many people to leave the area and astronomers and crew are back to work on Maunakea, the Puʻuhonua o Puʻuhuluhulu Maunakea Facebook says the movement is still going strong, in virtual mode.
     Today, a posting says, "Despite the clear message that our movement has sent that the TMT cannot and will not win, law enforcement leaders, the Attorney General, University of Hawaiʻi, Ige, the DLNR, and the TMT are still pushing for the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope on Maunakea. They are still working to prosecute our kūpuna and deter our movement to protect Maunakea. While we remember the transformational impact that the stand to protect Maunakea has had on our lāhui, this issue is not over... We will not stop until the TMT packs its bags for good."
     During this anniversary week of blocking the Maunakea Access Road and setting up the encampment, the organizers plan #TMTshutdown activities. The schedule includes a daily talk at 4:30 p.m. on insights into the issues. At 6:30 p.m., in collaboration with filmmakers and a network of Hawaiian and aloha ʻāina platforms, films will be presented daily on the movement to protect the Mauna. See facebook.com/puuhuluhulu.
Many people visited Maunakea to meet the protestors, take classes, and join in spiritual services.
Photo from Puʻu Honua o Puʻu Huluhulu Maunakea Facebook
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LEARN ABOUT A LEGENDARY PART OF WAILUKU RIVER in this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. It is entitled, A Legendary Part of the Wailuku River is Again Revealed:

     The "Hawaiian Supʻpa Man," demi-god Maui, had several adventures on the Wailuku River in the legendary past. He rescued his mother, Hina, who lived in the cave behind Waiānuenue (Rainbow Falls), from Kuna, a threatening moʻo (legendary giant lizard), eventually killing him and leaving his body as a small island in the pool fronting Hina's cave.

     Signs of the battle between Maui and Kuna are found higher on the Wailuku River. Where Maui thrust his spear through rock to roust the moʻo, he left a hole near a waterfall named Pukamaui falls. But the moʻo escaped to another hiding place along the river only to be found and rousted by Maui over and over again.

View of the recently cleared Boiling Pots on the Wailuku River in Hilo. The pots, each about 15 m (50 ft) in
diameter, are eroded into a 10,000-year-old Mauna Loa lava flow. When the water is low, the river does
not flow over some of the pot rims but it continues to flow through them. USGS photo

     Finally, Kuna found deep water and hid in a series of pools a short distance above Waiānuenue. Maui searched up and down the river and finally discovered the moʻo but couldn't reach him with his spear. But he had an idea.

     Maui asked the volcano goddess for some hot stones. Pele granted his request, and Maui tossed them into the pools. The water started to boil, scalding the moʻo and forcing Kuna to surface. Maui continued the battle, finally killing Kuna and letting his body continue down the river over Waiānuenue to rest in the pool below.

     These locations are now within the Wailuku River State Park in two sections: Waiānuenue (Rainbow Falls), where Hina lived in the cave behind the falls, and Boiling Pots, the series of deep pools where Kuna tried to hide, a little farther up-river.

     Both locations display the results of a lava flow from Mauna Loa that entered the Wailuku River channel about 10,000 years ago. The lava apparently did not fill the channel fully, and water continued to flow over the flow as it cooled. This lava flow can be seen as the ledge at Waiānuenue (and also forms the roof of Hina's cave below).

     The same flow hosts several "potholes" in the Boiling Pots section of the park. For the last several years, the potholes have been blocked from view by growth of various invasive plant species. In early photographs of the Boiling Pots area, vegetation on the banks are low shrubs and grass but, in modern times, it is tall albezia trees on the north bank and many other types of trees on the south bank obscuring views of the river. But in the first few months of this year, the south bank was cleared near the park and, now, these pots can be seen again. At times when the river is high and fast, turbulent water forced through the pots appears to be "boiling" as water flows.

     Despite the name, the water is not normally hot. The only time in the modern history of the river that the water was heated was in 1855 and 1856 when a lava flow from Mauna Loa advanced across the Saddle between that volcano and Mauna Kea. Lava flowed into the Wailuku River channel, but did not cross it, about 6 km (4 mi) above the Boiling Pots.

     Even the cold water can be hazardous and swimmers have drowned in the Wailuku River. The river channel is relatively narrow and deep so that rain from upslope can cause the river to rise rapidly and become very turbulent. This can even happen when the weather is sunny at the Boiling Pots but dark and cloudy upslope. Local residents learn quickly that "if the mountain is black, turn back."
     Volcano Activity Updates


     Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html). Kīlauea updates are issued monthly.

     Kīlauea monitoring data for the past month show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018. The water lake at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen. For the most current information on the lake, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/summit_water_resources.html.
A view of Peʻepeʻe Falls upstream of Boiling Pots, on the right side of Wailuku RiverPhoto from InspiredImperfection.com
     Mauna Loa is not erupting and remains at Volcano Alert Level ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to eruption from current level of unrest is certain. Mauna Loa updates are issued weekly.

     This past week, about 56 small-magnitude earthquakes were recorded beneath the upper-elevations of Mauna Loa; most of these occurred at shallow depths of less than 8 kilometers (~5 miles). Global Positioning System measurements show long-term slowly increasing summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations and fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit remain stable. Webcams show no changes to the landscape. For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

     There were 4 events with 3 or more felt reports in the Hawaiian Islands during the past week: a magnitude-3.5 earthquake 8 km (4 mi) E of Pāhala at 31 km (19 mi) depth on July 7 at 11:45 a.m., a magnitude-3.0 earthquake 10 km (6 mi) E of Pāhala at 31 km (19 mi) depth on July 4 at 8:24 p.m., a magnitude-4.3 earthquake 13 km (8 mi) S of Fern Forest at 7 km (4 mi) depth on July 3 at 2:18 p.m., and a magnitude-4.6 earthquake 15 km (9 mi) S of Fern Forest at 7 km (4 mi) depth on July 2 at 11:20 p.m.

     HVO continues to closely monitor both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa for any signs of increased activity.
    Visit HVO's website for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.



To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.


Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS

Kaʻū COVID-19 Update Meeting tomorrow, Monday, July 13 at Pāhala Community Center at 5 p.m. Informational and educational "talk story with health care leaders" event sponsored by Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association. Registration is at 4:30 p .m. and the meeting runs from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Wearing of masks and social distancing will be required. Seating is limited, attendance is first-come, first served. Participation via Zoom is also available. Email krhcai@yahoo.com or call Kaʻū Resource & Distance Learning Center at 928-0101 for connectivity info.

Attend Miloliʻi Lawaiʻa ʻOhana Camp In-Person or Virtually starting Monday, July 13. The tenth annual event runs through Monday, July 20, feature in-person classes for a limited number of students, and offering classes via Zoom. Receive the knowledge of kūpuna. Sponsors include Kalanihale, Paʻa Pono Miloliʻi, Kua O Ka Lā, Conservation International, Alu Like Inc, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, and Hawaiʻi Marine Education and Research Center. See facebook.com/kalanihaleMilolii for more. Register for virtual classes here. Register for in-person attendance here. Contact organizer Kaimi Kaupiko at 937-1310 or kkaupiko@gmail.com with questions.

Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's OutreachCollege Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Participation Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."



Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about  To provide comment, sign up in advance, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov or type a comment into the Question box. Register in advance at attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5189333551313546256. Learn more on Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov; NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, sanctuaries.noaa.gov; State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources, dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar.

Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at 5 p.m. The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 65-1259 Kawaihae Road on Wednesday, July 8 between 1 p.m and 4 p.m. Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace, noon to 1 p.m., Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts its Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.

Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by  HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.


Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services and worship are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays,
us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.


Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.


Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.

Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.

     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 

     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.

     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 
     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, July 13, 2020

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Six feet apart. Kaʻū residents met at Pāhala Community Center today for the COVID-19 update from Mayor
Harry Kim, Lt. Gov. Josh Green, and health care officials. The meeting was organized by Jessie Marques and
Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association. Photo by Julia Neal
                      See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

THE KAʻŪ COVID-19 UPDATE DREW A FULL HOUSE, sitting in chairs distanced six feet apart, with everyone masked, from Lt. Gov. Josh Green and Mayor Harry Kim, to kūpuna looking for answers. The meeting today at Pāhala Community Center addressed a crack in the wall of regulations aimed to block the spread of COVID-19.
     That crack allowed a physician to arrive in the state and go on to Kaʻū Hospital. She was listed as an essential worker, untested for COVID, and under a quarantine that allowed her to go to work. After two days at Kaʻū Hospital Rural Health Clinic, seeing 11 patients, her COVID test came up positive. She retreated to isolation in her accommodations -- far from the hospital campus.
     Kaʻū Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris stood in front of the public to say that she called all the patients and any caregivers with them who saw the infected physician. She offered them free COVID tests and all came up negative. She attributed the negative results to the practices at the hospital. Every person is questioned about health before they enter, with temperatures taken. All patients, doctors and other staff wear masks.
      Harris noted that the infected physician did not enter the long-term wing of the hospital that is home to vulnerable residents. The entire hospital has been operating under a no-visitors policy for months. Harris said that every employee who came into contact with the doctor when she worked in the clinic tested negative. Regional hospital systems manager Dan Brinkman promised follow-up employee testing.
     For the future, Brinkman and Harris said, no new employees -- doctor, nurse, nor anyone else working at Kaʻū, Hilo, and other hospitals in their system -- will be hired without a COVID-19 negative test result. Brinkman also said he plans for testing to go beyond new employees, as he negotiates with the hospital workers union to require testing of employees who come back from out-of-state vacations.
Kaʻū Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris explains protection from COVID-19 at the hospital and clinic. At right
are Mayor Harry Kim and Lt. Gov. Josh Green. See more in Tuesday's Kaʻū News Briefs.
Photo by Julia Neal
     During the Kaʻū COVID-19 Update, Mayor Harry Kim talked about today's news, the governor's announcement to delay the Aug. 1 date to allow trans-Pacific travelers into the state with negative COVID-19 tests and a waiver for the 14-day quarantine. The mayor said he worked with the three other county mayors to urge Gov. David Ige to delay the influx of visitors until at least Sept. 1, when more reliable testing may be available to catch COVID-19 carriers before they reach here. Kim also pointed to the out-of-control surge in mainland cases and warned local people to think twice about going to the hot spots, and to exercise extreme caution when they travel.
     The mayor said he is proud of Hawaiʻi Island's record of low numbers of COVID-19 cases, without any deaths to date. He said success is only as good as people continuing safe practices and noted there will be setbacks, like the experience at Kaʻū Hospital. He also noted that two of the COVID patients on-island are three and two years of age. He told the public, "You are the best policemen to talk to your family and friends" about social distancing.
     Kim said he is proud that Hawaiʻi County helped initiate a statewide digital system, after the state tasked the county police department with ensuring that incoming visitors and returning residents remain in quarantine. He said initially it took days to receive information on where they were staying. Technology solved the problem. "With this pandemic, we learn every day," said the mayor.
     See more on the Kaʻū COVID-19 Update in Tuesday's Kaʻū News Briefs, including remarks and analysis from  Lt. Gov. Josh Green, physicians, health directors, and the public.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE HYBRID MODEL FOR TEACHING has been chosen by Nā‘ālehu Elementary, and Ka‘ū High & Pāhala Elementary. They are scheduled to launch classes Tuesday, Aug. 4.
     Volcano School of Arts and Sciences plans to open are not yet publicly announced. However, the website says VSAS "will be implementing a combination of remote and face-to-face learning that uses an A/B schedule for most students during moderate, minor, and minimal impact levels."
     In the hybrid model for the public schools, young elementary and vulnerable students will attend weekdays, in person. Upper elementary students will learn through a blended rotation model, with distance and classroom learning.
     Middle school at Ka‘ū High & Pāhala Elementary could operate a two-day rotation, alternating face-to-face and online learning, with students reporting to campus twice a week. Another choice for the middle school will be a combination rotation learning, with the school determining the number of days students report to campus for face-to-face education.
     Ka‘ū High School chose a hybrid model, with some students coming to campus for face-to-face instruction, while other students learn at distance. The plan is for very vulnerable students to come to school daily for in-person learning.
     Ka‘ū-Kea‘au-Pāhoa Complex Area Superintendent Chad Keone Farias said he is particularly concerned about students in the most rural areas, with limited access to internet and cell service, when it comes to distance learning.

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NO QUARANTINE-FREE TRANS-PACIFIC TRAVELERS will come into Hawaiʻi until at least Sept. 1, announced Gov. David Ige today. Lifting mandatory quarantine for travelers from out-of-state was scheduled for Aug. 1 for all those with negative COVID-19 test results. The governor said the delay in re-opening was  "not a very easy decision." He pointed to record numbers of new cases on Oʻahu and the anticipation of an uptick in cases when Hawaiʻi schools reopen on Aug. 4.
    He also pointed to uncontrolled outbreaks in mainland states and a shortage in testing supplies, which would make it difficult for visitors to receive their results before arriving here, within 72 hours after testing. "We don't believe that that situation would change significantly by Aug. 1, as we had hoped."
     Ige said that, in numerous meetings over the past week, he and county mayors pondered two difficult options. "On one hand we could continue to move forward and re-open the economy but face an uncontrolled surge in COVID-19 cases. On the other, we can delay the pre-travel testing and risk further damage to the economy."
Out-of-state travelers will still have to quarantine of 14 days through Sept. 1.
     He said the final decision to delay opening will make the state's economic recovery more challenging, and put even more pressure on small businesses, "but we do believe that it is time to continue to protect the health and safety of our community." He asked everyone to take personal responsibility to help win the battle against coronavirus.
     Chris Tatum, president and CEO of Hawai‘i Tourism Authority, said, "We want to welcome back our visitors once our state is ready to do so in a safe manner that will hopefully avoid the need to backtrack in the future."
     The governor said state officials still believe the pre-travel testing program will help Hawai‘i stay safe. Progress on the program will be announced in detail by Sept. 1. The program will require a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test at a certified Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment lab at the traveler's expense, within 72 hours before travel. Travelers would be exempt from mandatory 14-day quarantine if testing negative. If results are not available by time of arrival, quarantine would be necessary until test results are received. Ige says the pre-arrival test is one part of a multi-layered screening process which includes arrival temperature checks, completion of the State Travel and Health form, and secondary screening for those with symptoms or temperatures of 100.4 degrees or higher.
     An exception in the rules for August will allow out-of-state university students to return to a "modified bubble quarantine." Students with negative COVID-19 test prior to arrival can participate in the "bubble," attending university activities and otherwise remain in their residences. Students will submit to daily health checks, with questions about symptoms like fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. The modified bubble will last for 14 days, similar to the 14-day quarantine other out-of-state travelers will have to follow in August.


Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
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THREE NEW DEATHS FROM COVID-19 are reported today by state Department of Health. The first is an elderly Kaua‘i resident who died in Arizona, where he received months of treatment for underlying medical conditions. The second is a woman, who lived in a care home and died in a hospital Sunday morning. The third is an elderly O‘ahu man with underlying medical issues, who passed away Tuesday.
     Gov. David Ige expressed his condolences for their families: "We continue to have among the lowest fatality rates, but every death is a tragedy."
     State Health Director, Dr. Bruce Anderson, said, "We all extend our heartfelt sympathies to the family and friends of these three people. The best tribute to their lives and to the lives of all 22 people who've lost the fight against coronavirus, is getting everyone in Hawai‘i to take personal responsibility for their own health and the health of everyone around them. While the majority of Hawai‘i's residents are using safe practices, clearly there are some who are not, and frankly, unless everyone pays attention, we'll unfortunately continue to see illnesses and deaths associated with COVID-19."
    The governor also showcased the newly revised health dashboard, at https://recoverynavigator.hawaii.gov/.
   
Infographic from the Oregon governor's office.
 
 THE FIRST COVID-19 CASE IN VOLCANO is confirmed in the 96785 zip code. It is the only case reported today on this island. The only detail provided by the state Department of Health is designating it travel-related. Yesterday's case is also travel-related. All ten active cases on-island, as reported by the state, are monitored by DOH.

     Kona Community Hospital confirmed that on Friday, an employee tested positive for COVID-19. The hospital is in the process of contact tracing to identify anyone who may have been in contact with the staff member. No additional employees have tested positive.
     On Hawaiʻi Island, one zip code on the west side has between six and ten active cases. Since the pandemic began, Hawaiʻi Island reported 102 cases. This island's other 92 confirmed COVID-19 victims recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died of COVID-19 here. There were four hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.

     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 942 cases, Kauaʻi 43, and Maui County 135. Twenty-one victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Twenty-two people In the state died from COVID-19.

     According to a CNN article today, one in 100 people tested in the U.S.has come up positive for the novel coronavirus. Of all the states, Hawaiʻi has the fewest positive cases per capita, according to data gathered by the New York Times
Civil Defense Director 
Talmadge Magno.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     CNN's Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta described testing for COVID-19. A viral test -- from a swab of the throat or nose, or a saliva sample -- tells whether a person carried the virus at test time. A test Friday with negative results means the person was COVID-19-free on Friday, "but anything can happen after that." Gupta reported the CDC saying someone infected with COVID-19 "could test negative initially one day and then test positive later as the infection develops."
     In his daily message, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said, "It is so important that in traveling to the mainland, or hosting someone from the mainland, that you exercise caution. Know that the conditions in most of the mainland states continue to see a high rate of increases of people being infected by the virus.

     "In moving forward, know that the Coronavirus threat for Hawaiʻi remains and we need to follow preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. As a reminder wearing of face coverings is mandatory on Hawaiʻi Island. Thank you for listening and thank you for doing your part to help keep Hawaiʻi Island safe. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."

     In the United States, more than 3,364,547 cases have been confirmed – an increase of over 67,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 135,615.
     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 13.1 million. The death toll is more than 573,288.


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DR. TED SHANEYFELT is running for Mayor of Hawaiʻi Island in a "zero-dollar campaign:" he accepts no donations and spends no money on campaign items to become trash after the election, says his campaign information.
     Shaneyfelt grew up in Leilani Estates. He drives an electric vehicle powered by his own rooftop generated electricity and raises over 100 different kinds of fruits, nuts, spices, and other edible plants for his ʻohana. He told The Kaʻū Calendar he "gave up over $1 million in salary" to move from Honolulu to teach Computer Science and Engineering at University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo in 2000, where he still teaches. He has been known for sharing macadamia nuts, bananas, and other fruits with his students at UH-Hilo, where he was the first Computer Science graduate.
     While helping people evacuate during the eruption in Leilani Estates, he said he "saw that many people were prohibited by authorities for weeks from evacuating any of their items or even livestock and other animals – left to burn… this was depriving people of a fundamental constitutional right of security of houses and effects guaranteed by the fourth amendment." Shaneyfelt says Leilani Estates Community Association, where his family were active members in the 1970's and 1980's, had plans for evacuating if lava were to come, "and none of those plans included being prohibited from doing so by county leadership." As a result, he said he decided to run for mayor, "to be sworn in to protect, defend, and preserve the Constitution."
Dr. Ted Shaneyfelt, Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate.
     In addition to advanced degrees in engineering, Shaneyfelt says he learned much wisdom from his father, Robert "Bob" Shaneyfelt, who taught his son that this country "was founded at its inception on three basic God-given rights of life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness… that the order in which they are listed is important because one must be alive to have liberty, and they must be free to pursue happiness." He also taught his son that "people are individuals, not just members of classes or groups, and as such each should be understood and helped individually by individuals. Government should not get in the way of that."
     Shaneyfelt was told stories by his father about difficult economic times of the Great Depression and how to make wise investments with frugal spending. Shaneyfelt says he intends to combine the knowledge from his father with his degrees and professional training to "make our county more efficient and effective." He also wants to combine his engineering background with a close connection to the land and sustainable way of life. Shaneyfelt says the oath of office "is the most important part of any job. Our leaders must protect the constitutional rights of Hawaiʻi's families and clear away unnecessary regulatory burdens and wasteful government expenses that hinder them from pursuing happiness."
     According to his campaign info, Shaneyfelt advocates for rooftop solar, but opposes clearing land by the utility company for solar farms. He says there is enough rooftop solar, but Hawaiian Electric limits customers' ability to sell their excess power to the grid. "If that is the case, it makes no sense to strip clear valuable land that could be used for farming or kept natural for future generations." He does not advocate for wind power because of "a very short life with high maintenance costs" and because, while operating, "they are notorious for endangering and killing flying wildlife, as well as requiring land below them to be stripped and fenced off where keikis used to roam freely." He also says recycling the parts after they are no longer useful is problematic. Regarding geothermal, he recommends giving up fossil fuel-powered cars "before complaining about pentane used in geothermal operations because gas stations are full of the same chemical mixed with much worse chemicals that get burnt and release dangerous fumes into the air… a few geothermal plants could provide all of our island's electrical grid needs with minimal land use."
     Watch the June 25 mayoral candidate debates at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXE9Jby7yZA&feature=emb_logo for candidates Paul Bryant, Yumi Kawano, Lahi Verschuur, Mike Ruggles, Mikey Glendon, Ted Shaneyfelt, Robert Greenwell, and Wendell Ka‘ehu‘ae‘a, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqTWWn_kPZM&feature=emb_logo for candidates Stacy Higa, Neil Azevedo, Harry Kim, Ikaika Marzo, Tante Urban, Bob Fitzgerald, and Mitch Roth.

Christopher Yuen will continue to
represent Hawaiʻi Island on the state
Board of Land & Natural Resources.
Photo from dlnr.hawaii.gov
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FORMER HAWAIʻI COUNTY PLANNING DIRECTOR CHRISTOPHER YUEN IS REAPPOINTED as Hawaiʻi Island's member of the state Board of Land & Natural Resources. The Hawaiʻi Tribune-Herald story on Friday reports a 16-9 confirmation vote by the state Senate in favor of his reappointment. He has held the position for 14 years.
      East Kaʻū Sen. Russell Ruderman spoke in favor of Yuen, whom he said he has known for 30 years. According to the newspaper, Ruderman said: "There are places on the Big Island that have been preserved because of his efforts as a private citizen."

     Tribune-Herald reported Hawaiʻi Island Sen. Lorraine Inouye saying, "I respect my colleagues for their due diligence, but it seems they're holding Chris responsible for decisions made by the majority" and noted that Yuen's record shows several votes in favor of major conservation projects.
     The full Senate declined to follow the recommendation of the Senate Committee on Water & Land, with its Chair Kai Kahele the only Senator from Hawaiʻi Island to oppose the Yuen reappointment.

     According to the Tribune-Herald story, Kahele said, "We need -- we deserve -- a nominee who can bring all of us together, who respects his constitutional obligations, who can resolve conflicts. Mr. Yuen hasn't demonstrated this."
     The story quotes Sen. Kurt Fevella saying Yuen made decisions contrary to the rest of the board, without scientific basis. It reports Sen. Gil Riviere criticizing Yuen's "notorious habit of disregarding staff submittals," and Yuen ignoring or dismissing lengthy research in favor of quick decisions -- decisions which "always seemed to favor developers over residents."
     After Friday's vote, Yuen told the Tribune-Herald, "I've learned a lot now, and I can see where I need to be better in the future. I didn't take offense to anything that was said. I've probably had to vote on 100 controversial things in the last few years. I'm bound to make some people unhappy." He also told the publication he was gratified by the support of his colleagues and of constituents who sent letters supporting his nomination.

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HELP OVER THE PHONE WITH CRITICAL FINANCIAL ISSUES during the pandemic is available through a free Financial Navigators program, announced Mayor Harry Kim today. In partnership with national nonprofit organization the Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund, Financial Navigators are available as of today, July 13, to provide guidance over the phone to help residents access available programs and services to manage income disruptions and other financial concerns, providing assistance in navigating critical financial issues and making referrals to other appropriate social services and resources. County of Hawaiʻi offers these Financial Navigator services in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union.


     Residents can access these remote services by completing the webform at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator.
     Kim said, "Helping residents who are facing financial challenges due to COVID-19 is a critical part of the County's front-line response and recovery efforts. The County is proud to partner with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union in providing this free public service for all residents of the County."


     County of Hawaiʻi launched the Financial Navigators program in partnership with the Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund, which provided grant funding along with significant technical assistance and training to launch the program in Hawaiʻi County and other cities and counties across the nation.
     Jonathan Mintz, President and CEO of the Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund, said, "Financial distress is a primary part of the COVID-19 crisis, and we're pleased Mayor Kim and his team is making this a priority for Hawaiʻi Island residents. The Financial Navigators program will help Hawaiʻi Island residents assess and prioritize their financial concerns and get connected with the right resources."
     For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

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NURSERY, GREENHOUSE, AND CUT-FLOWER GROWERS are invited to participate in COVID-19 impact survey by Cornell Cooperative Extension. The survey may help them qualify for USDA CFAP financial assistance. Complete the survey online.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
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Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS

Survey on "Shovel-Read" Food and Ag Projectsis due by Wednesday, July 15 at https://tinyurl.com/y9zm63mw. Information will be used to encourage investment in the sector and inform decision making around federal stimulus, state/county, private, philanthropic, and other funding sources. The survey should take 5-10 minutes to complete. Learn more here. See http://plantofarm.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Agriculture-Response-and-Recovery-Plan-April-2-2020.pdf. Questions or comments, contact Christine Brammer, Executive and Program Director of Agricultural Leadership Foundation of Hawaiʻi at director@agleaderhi.org.

Attend Miloliʻi Lawaiʻa ʻOhana Camp In-Person or Virtually. The tenth annual event runs through Monday, July 20, feature in-person classes for a limited number of students, and offering classes via Zoom. Receive the knowledge of kūpuna. Sponsors include Kalanihale, Paʻa Pono Miloliʻi, Kua O Ka Lā, Conservation International, Alu Like Inc, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, and Hawaiʻi Marine Education and ResearchCenter. See facebook.com/kalanihaleMilolii for more. Register for virtual classes here. Register for in-person attendance here. Contact organizer Kaimi Kaupiko at 937-1310 or kkaupiko@gmail.com with questions.

Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's Outreach College Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Participation Tales. July 14, Silly N' Spooky Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 15Fooling the DevilKing & Goat HeadJuly 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."



Virtual 80th Meeting of Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, Tuesday, July 14 from  to  The public is invited to attend. The council will introduce new and returning members; have presentations on advisory council guidelines, sanctuary updates, and discussions on potential council action topics; and address questions from members and the public. Public comment begins about  To provide comment, sign up in advance, email cindy.among-serrao@noaa.gov or type a comment into the Question box. Register in advance at attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5189333551313546256. Learn more on Facebook; Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov; NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, sanctuaries.noaa.gov; State of Hawaiʻi Division of Aquatic Resources, dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar.


Bid on a Cottage with a covered lanai through a closed auction by Habitat for Humanity through July 15 at 5 p.m. The 780 square foot cottage was dismantled and donated to Habitat for Humanity Hawaiʻi Island. Starting bid is $15,000 and it will be sold "as is" and with no warranty. Stored in a container in Waimea, it includes lanai, exterior walls, subfloor, windows (missing one), front door, roofing, front stairs, and conceptual plans created by Habitat. To place a bid, send an email to info@habitathawaiiisland.org with name, phone number, and bid amount. Bids accepted in increments of $500. Winner will be contacted July 16. In the case of a tie, the person that submitted the winning bid first will be the winner. To view the dismantled cottage, visit the Waimea ReStore at 65-1259 Kawaihae Road on Wednesday, July 8 between 1 p.m and 4 p.m. Email info@habitathawaiiisland.org with questions.

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace, noon to 1 p.m., Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts its Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.

Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from  to  at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from  to . "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by  HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.


Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, , Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through  HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services and worship are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays,
us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.



Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.


Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.



Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.

Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, , closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mond

ays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are  Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is  Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from  to . The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.

     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 

     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.

     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 
     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.

     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, July 14, 2020

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Mayor Harry Kim, left, and Lt. Gov. Josh Green stand six feet apart before removing their masks outside Monday's
 Kaʻū COVID-19 Update meeting at Pāhala Community Center. See story below and yesterday's Kaʻū News Briefs.
Photo by Julia Neal
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

LT. GOV. JOSH GREEN said he "came home" to Kaʻū on Monday to address the community about the COVID-19 pandemic. The 49-year-old physician lived at Punaluʻu and worked here when starting his career with Bay Clinic and Kaʻū Hospital after medical school. He also began his legislative career on this island as a member of the state House of Representatives and state Senate, before running for Lt. Governor and becoming the governor's liaison to help control and end COVID-19 in Hawaiʻi.
     Kaʻū Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris says she remembers him then, with his companion, a giant dog. He now has two children and his wife, Jamie Ushiroda, who joined him on his trip to Pāhala.
     During the meeting at Pāhala Community Center, he emphasized the difficulty in balancing public and economic health. If the economy shrinks more, people could face food instability, which leads to illness. With less income, the economy and government would be less able to support schools, housing, health care, and other services. Green said he is working with the governor and the mayors to get the best testing and other measures, to open up the economy and keep the public safe.
     Regarding schools reopening on Tuesday, Aug. 4, he pointed to the planning for safety measures and acknowledged some risk to teachers in the classrooms and to families. However, children need school. "It's not going to be a perfect situation."
     Green and other health care officials talked about the possibility of people coming into the state, staying in hotels rather than homes and vacation rentals for the 14-day quarantine. One hotel in each county could cover it. There was also talk about isolating people who test positive in hotels, rather than their staying with families or friends.
Mayor Harry Kim and Lt. Gov. Josh Green address Monday's Kaʻū COVID-19 Update community meeting in Pāhala.
Photo by Julia Neal
     Eric Honda, the state's district health officer, said those who test positive and have no place to go can receive free housing and food from the state. He talked about his team of contact tracers, following every case and attempting to finding every person who interacted with the COVID-positive person.
     Green talked about the plan to get through 2020 safely and urged everyone to wear a mask and distance, pointing to his observations during weekends when "young people aren't listening." He urged safe practices so that 30 and 40 cases a day will not become the norm, and overwhelm the testing and tracing system in Hawaiʻi.
     A member of the public asked that Department of Land & Natural Resources and Department of Hawaiian Home Lands bring more enforcement to prevent large groups from gathering at South Point.
     Peter Serafin, of Volcano, asked that quarantine happen in hotels, rather than more remote places where it is easy to step out. When asked about the safety of interisland travel, public officials said that it will be monitored to see if the quarantine will have to resume.
     When asked about the expenditure on thermal scanning for temperatures of incoming people at the airports, Green said it can catch about 20 percent of those who are ill and is part of a layered approach needed to reduce the COVID-19,
     He said that with worldwide research in the scientific community there is progress and hope for a vaccine. "We are going to endure this year and next, and hope, as a planet, to beat it."
     See yesterday's Kaʻū News Briefs for more.

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Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate Stacy Higa will helm a
meeting in Punaluʻu Saturday to discuss plans for Kaʻū
with residents. Photo from Higa
MAYORAL CANDIDATE STACY HIGA announced today that he wants to meet with Ka‘ū residents this Saturday at the Dahlberg beach house at Punalu‘u from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. He also released his ideas for Ka‘ū:
   "My County-sponsored Agricultural Co-op could be beneficial in providing marketing and distribution logistics for farmers in the Kaʻū region. My County-sponsored Agricultural grant program would provide education and seed money for farmers to begin their ventures. The County would use partnerships with the University of Hawaiʻi College of Agriculture, the USDA, and Farm Loan programs."
     Higa proposed large landowner incentives through property tax breaks "if they provided acreage that can be used as part of our County Agricultural Program. I am interested in supporting a processing plant for beef, pork, chicken, and other livestock to provide a sustainable economy for our ranchers. These opportunities could offer a marketing boom for 'the Southernmost Beef in the United States,' grass-fed and raised in Kaʻū."
     "We would be accomplishing multiple objectives by providing industrial jobs and careers while creating a sustainable industry on our island. The Co-op could also help with Mac Nut and Coffee, which have already been proven to be cash crops for Kaʻū. I also envision re-establishing cultural sites that are important to all communities on our island."
     Higa said he wants to be the Mayor who will work with each community to identify and establish critical historical sites. Each community would determine what sites will be available for public interaction, and which should be kept strictly for religious and cultural traditions. "This will be done through a Kūpuna Council that I would like to create for each district.
One process mayoral candidate for Hawaiʻi County
Stacy Higa would like to "kick start," if elected, is
the Kaʻū Community Development Plan.
     "Once we can have this dialog and create a process for homegrown decision making, it will empower our communities into a call to action. Allowing our communities to decide what is best for them will hopefully kick start the Community Development Plan process again. Communities should decide what kind of tourism they might want to see in their respective areas -- modeled after Napa Valley, Fresno, Modesto, or Gilroy (Garlic capital of the world) Agricultural based tourism. Or maybe not, but the County will be there to facilitate what the community wants.
     "What differentiates and sets me apart from other candidates is how I can articulate and explain precisely how I intend to get things done," said Higa. "I have business, non-profit, and government experience that allows me to negotiate and make things happen. My experience will bring communities to the table where they will have a voice and a willing administration to walk the walk to make sure we achieve our intended goals. Past administrations all meant well in starting the process, but my leadership style actually will be a part and help lead the process." Higa said that his campaign mantra One Island, One Future, "is a very realistic vision that my administration will dedicate our entire term. It is not a dream, but a promise!"
    Higa's said he invites everyone to his talk story to "to get more details about how I intend to empower your community to decide your future. July 18 from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm at Jim Dahlberg's beach house, blacksandsbeach.com across from the lei stand in Punaluʻu."

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HAWAIʻI COUNTY PROPERTY TAXES ARE TWICE AS MUCH as Maui County, says Ikaika Marzo, 2020 Mayoral candidate for Hawaiʻi County. In a statement Monday, he said he is alarmed with affordability issues. Hawaiʻi County's Real Property Tax Rate for Homeowners is $6.15 -- 198 percent higher than in Maui County. Residential Rate is $6.15 -- 212 percent higher than in Maui County. The Maui Homeowner Rate is $2.90 in Maui. The Residential rate is $5.60 in Maui, said Marzo.
Ikaika Marzo, Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate,
shares his discovery that Hawaiʻi County
homeowners pay twice as much in property taxes
as Maui County. Photo from ikaikamazro.org
     Both counties have similar rural population levels, two major urban centers, and operate under the same state requirements, "making Maui a good reference for what Hawaiʻi County is doing," said the statement. Marzo said homeowners pay an average of $1,697 annually in Hawaiʻi County versus $1,070 in Maui, an increase of 159 percent, based on median home values.
     Marzo pointed out the people earn less money in Hawaiʻi County than in Maui County. "The affordability issue becomes clear when you see that Hawaiʻi County residents have median income that is 22 percent less than Maui." He said the last Hawaiʻi County survey on Housing Burden shows "an exceedingly high" 56 percent of residents pay in excess of 30 percent of their gross income to just have a home for their family. According to mauicounty.gov, 51 percent of Maui residents pay more than 30 percent of their gross income to have a home.
     Marzo said learning of this disparity "was shocking. Our residents have to get by with significantly less income than those in Maui yet they pay more in property taxes which is not fair. I would expect Hawaiʻi County to do much more to increase affordability with the surging revenues being collected. I am concerned how the 33,000 plus residents who have filed for unemployment benefits on our island will be able to afford to pay for their home."
     He said poverty disparity is also a factor, with people living in poverty in Hawaiʻi County at 17.4 percent versus Maui at 9.98 percent --174 percent higher.
     Marzo's statement said, "The overall impact appears to make paying property taxes unsustainable for the average resident, whether in a pandemic or not. Urgent action is needed by the county to provide a path to affordability for all residents."
     Read more here.

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PACIFIC ISLAND OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEM will receive $4,260,603 in federal funding from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to deploy buoys to forecast severe weather events, announced Sen. Brian Schatz on Monday. The System is a department of University of Hawai‘i, which will use the funds to deploy more ocean sensors to observe and monitor sea levels, tides, currents, waves, and temperatures in Hawai‘i and the U.S. Insular Pacific over the next five years.
Map of Hawai‘i and the U.S. Insular Pacific regions, where UH's Pacific Island Ocean Observing System will be used to
improve forecasts of severe weather events. NOAA map
     The data collected "will improve forecasts of severe weather events -- like king tides and hurricanes -- so that families, businesses, and communities can make resilience plans to stay safe and protect their livelihoods in the face of the changing climate," says a statement from his office. The data collected is freely available to all -- including elected officials, university researchers, and the private sector. By providing this data, UH's Pacific Island Ocean Observing System aims to support science-based decision-making to ensure a safe, clean, and productive ocean and resilient coastal zone for the U.S. Pacific Islands. As part of that effort, a portion of the federal funds will be used for public education and outreach.
     Schatz, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said, "As an island state, we're already fighting rapid sea-level rise. By improving our ability to track sea levels and forecast extreme weather events, we can better protect our coastal communities from these climate change impacts."

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One of Ocean View sculptor Gina Hartig Williams' three pieces displayed
in Hilo this week, Strain "was created with the intent to illustrate how
nature is forced to be the filter of the discards of our society, forever
living exquisitely entangled with the history of 
our disregard."Photo from the artist
GINA HARTIG WILLIAMS, a longtime Ocean View sculptor, was among the ten solo artists exhibiting their work at the Wailoa  Center in Hilo this week. Hartig Williams' work has been displayed extensively on Hawaiʻi Island during the past ten years, showed three pieces in a trendy "pop-up" exhibition. Hartig Williams explained to The Kaʻū Calendar why pop-up exhibitions are becoming increasingly popular:
     "Pop-up galleries are a new phenomenon," she said. "They can be created in a store or pretty much anywhere. It's a sign that artists are taking their art into their own hands. We can exhibit our work and show what we do and how we do it. Our pieces are priced, but there is no middle man -- the buyers can talk directly to the artists, one on one. This is great for contemporary artists like myself who don't 'fit' a commercial venue. My sculptures are whimsical. They are comparable with, say, poetry, which is also hard to sell. My sculptures are ideas, not a commodity for trading."
Ocean View sculptor Gina Hartig Williams' mixed media
sculpture Runoff, created partly with marine debris,
was inspired "by the need to care for
our oceans." Photo from the artist
     Each of the ten artists exhibiting at the Wailoa Center in Hilo was inspired by the unique experience of living and creating on Hawaiʻi Island. The artists were on-site at Wailoa Center for the duration of their exhibitions, giving tours of their work and presenting live demonstrations of their processes.
     Hartig Williams is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and has been a professional artist for most of her life, embracing part-time teaching at the age of 40. She says her whimsical sculpture "conveys a sense of impossibly buoyant energy poised at the brink of collapse. Pointing to the fragility and intrinsic resilience of nature," Hartig Williams invites viewers "to experience both impact and entropy with a sense of wonder, hope, and a lightness of being." She is known for her mixed media assemblages "that embody time, chance, change, balance, and flow."

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JOIN A FACEBOOK LIVE VIRTUAL TOWN HALL hosted by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on Wednesday, July 15 at 4 p.m., to update Hawaiʻi residents about COVID-19. This will be the 16th coronavirus-related virtual town hall event that Rep. Gabbard has hosted since the first COVID-19 cases appeared in Hawaiʻi. A Facebook account is not required to watch the event. Watch and participate on Gabbard's Facebook Page.

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LAHI MARLIN VERSCHUUR is running for Hawaiʻi County mayor with an eye toward "a world of liberty; a world in which individuals are sovereign over their own lives and no one is forced to sacrifice his or her values for the sake of others."
Lahi Marlin Verschuur, Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate. 
Photo from Verschuur
     Verschuur holds a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Northwestern University and a Master of Science in psychology from the University of Phoenix. Her campaign information says she intends to earn a doctorate in Transpersonal Psychology from Sofia University and is "interested in writing a dissertation on how holotropic breathwork can cure illnesses such as bipolar and schizophrenia." She said her documentary film, Kihoʻalu Masters, won a regional Emmy in 1999 and that she formed production company ʻIkena Hoʻoulu Productions in 2001.
     Born in 1968 in Denver, Colorado, Verschuur campaign information says she moved to Honolulu in 1991 and served as a Surface Warfare Officer in the U.S. Navy, with West-Pac deployment to the Persian Gulf in 1993 for Desert Shield, then to support the Somalia conflict. She says she is "an advocate for the HawaiianKingdom and would like to find solutions for both sides to move forward."
     Verschuur's campaign information says she believes "respect for individual rights is the essential precondition for a free and prosperous world, that force and fraud must be banished from human relationships, and that only through freedom can peace and prosperity be realized. Consequently, we defend each person's right to engage in any activity that is peaceful and honest, and welcome the diversity that freedom brings. The world we seek to build is one where individuals are free to follow their own dreams in their own ways, without interference from any government or any authoritarian power."
Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate Lahi
Marlin Verschuur says she is "an advocate
for the 
Hawaiian Kingdom and would like
to find solutions for both sides to move 

forward." Photo from Verschuur
     Her campaign website platform focuses include enhancing personal property rights and moving regulations to voluntary, mutual agreements which government only enforces. She says the proper role of government is protection of rights from force and fraud. "Government should not become the forceful aggressor against these rights. Hawaiʻi's over-aggressive use of regulatory and zoning rules has increased the cost of living, lead to a serious homelessness problem, protected the wealthy at the expense of the poor, and done little to achieve community goals… I oppose government action that grants monopoly privileges to favored persons and commercial activities at the expense of freedom of competition in the marketplace."
     Verschuur says she also wants to focus on taxation: "As much as possible, essential government services should be provided by user fees and other voluntary payments;" education: "We wish to move education away from the costly and inefficient system created with the support of involuntary taxation to one governed by voluntary decisions of parents, students, and funders;" transportation: "The government should not create protective monopolies or subsidies. The free market not the government should operate transportation systems;" justice: "People should be free to make their own decisions regarding sex, drugs, gambling, and other activities, that do not infringe on the rights of others... People grow by taking full responsibility for their own actions;" and labor and employment: "People should be allowed to contract with each other for services at prices and conditions that are mutually acceptable, without the forceful intervention of governmental authorities."
     See lahimarlin.com.
     Watch the June 25 mayoral candidate debates at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXE9Jby7yZA&feature=emb_logo for candidates Paul Bryant, Yumi Kawano, Lahi Verschuur, Mike Ruggles, Mikey Glendon, Ted Shaneyfelt, Robert Greenwell, and Wendell Ka‘ehu‘ae‘a, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqTWWn_kPZM&feature=emb_logo for candidates Stacy Higa, Neil Azevedo, Harry Kim, Ikaika Marzo, Tante Urban, Bob Fitzgerald, and Mitch Roth.

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Visit Puʻuhonua o HōnaunauNationalHistoricPark, which reopens its VisitorCenter and other amenities on 
Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. NPS photo
HEADING NORTH FROM KAʻŪ OFFERS A DAY TRIP TO PUʻUHONUA O HONAUNAU NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK, says a statement from National Park Service. Following guidance from the White House, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state and local public health authorities, the Park is using a phased approach to reopening.
     On Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, the entrance station, including fee collections, is open. The Visitor Center parking lot is open 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visitors services at the Visitor Center are open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Top of the South Wall at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau.
NPS photo
     Open seven days a week are hiking trails, beach and shoreline areas for hiking, ocean recreation and fishing (following state regulations), with the exception of Keoneʻele cove at Hōnaunau which is closed to protect natural and cultural resources, restroom facilities at the Visitor Center, and Royal Grounds and Puʻuhonua.
     Closed areas and suspended services include Picnic Area, all ranger-led programs, and commercial use.
     While visiting, let wildlife be wild, and stay at least 20 feet away from any honu, turtles, on the beach.
     Visitors are urged to recreate responsibly by planning their visit in advance and acting with care while at the Puʻuhonua by social distancing – maintain at least six feet of distance between you and others; wear a face covering when social distancing cannot be maintained; wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer; cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing; avoiding touching eyes, nose, and mouth; if feeling sick, visiting another day.
     NPS is working with federal, state, and local public health authorities to closely monitor the COVID-19 pandemic and using a phased approach to increase access on a park-by-park basis. A statement from NPS says, "The health and safety of park users, employees, volunteers, and partners continue to be paramount. While these areas are accessible for the public to enjoy, a return to full operations will continue to be phased and services are limited. Park users should follow local area health orders from the Governor of Hawai‘i, practice Leave No Trace principles, and avoid crowding, and other high-risk outdoor activities.
Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau invites visitors to see historic Native Hawaiian
structures, enjoy hiking, and more, seven days a week. NPS photo
      "The CDC has offered guidance to help people recreating in parks and open spaces prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Park staff will continue to monitor all park functions to ensure that visitors adhere to CDC guidance for mitigating risks associated with the transmission of COVID-19 and will take any additional steps necessary to protect everyone's health."
     Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau NHP Acting Superintendent John Broward said, "Services are limited, and visitors should bring everything they might need for a safe visit including water, meals, and hand sanitizer.  Above all, visitors should be prepared for sudden changes with very little warning should public health concerns require a reversal in our plans."
     Details and updates on park operations will continue to be posted on the park website, nps.gov/puho, and social media channels. Updates about NPS operations will be posted on nps.gov/coronavirus.
     More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 419 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at nps.gov, and on FacebookInstagramTwitter, and YouTube.
Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historic Park. NPS photo

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SMALL BUSINESSES AFFECTED BY COVID-19 can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Helen Tien, College of Business and Economics, and her senior retail and distribution management course is offering 1-hour sessions dedicated to helping small business marketing needs. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

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Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
TWENTY-TWO NEW COVID-19 CASES IN HAWAIʻI are reported today. Hawaiʻi Island reports three new cases today, with one hospitalization. One new case is reported as interisland travel-related, and "again emphasizes the importance of care," says Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno. Details on the other two are not yet released. All active cases on-island are monitored by Department of Health.
     Oʻahu reported 19 new cases today while its overall case count dropped by one due to new information. The state's case count has risen by 193 in the last seven days. 
     On Hawaiʻi Island, Volcano, 96785 zip code, has one active case. Since the pandemic began, Hawaiʻi Island reported 105 cases. This island's other 95 confirmed COVID-19 victims recovered. Since the pandemic began, no one died of COVID-19 here. There were four other hospitalizations on-island; those patients have been released.
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 960 cases, Kauaʻi 43, and Maui County 135. Twenty-one victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. Twenty-two people in the state died from COVID-19. Hawaiʻi has reported a total of 1,264 cases since the pandemic began.
     In his daily message, Magno said, "A huge thank you to the Kaʻū Community for conducting an outstanding community informational meeting last night in Pāhala. Organizers followed all safety precautions which was very impressive. Mahalo.
     "In moving forward, know that the threat of the Coronavirus remains and we need to get better in following preventive policies of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness.  Do know that face coverings are mandatory on Hawaiʻi Island. Thank you for listening and be safe. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 3,429,072 cases have been confirmed -- an increase of over 65,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 136,440.
     The tally of cases worldwide has jumped by more than one million in the last five days. The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 13.28 million. The death toll is more than 577,954.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
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