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Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, May 5, 2020

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KUPU's Environmental Stewardship Program, which trains and puts youth to work in Kaʻū and other wilderness places,
receives $2.29 million through AmeriCorps. Photo from KUPU
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

RETAIL STORES AND A HOST OF OTHER BUSINESSES received permission today from the state to open for business this Thursday, May 7, contingent on their business practicing social distancing, sanitation, and promising to follow workplace safety guidelines.
     Restaurants and visitor industry activities, including tours and accommodations, will remain shut down. Shopping malls could reopen approved businesses. Gov. David Ige announced his Seventh Supplemental Emergency Proclamation to allow the following to open: nonfood agriculture, including, landscape, floral, and ornament; astronomical observatories and support facilities; car washes; pet grooming services; health care and social assistance, including elective surgery and non-emergency services; nonprofit organizations previously considered non-essential; retail business and services, including apparel and electronics; shopping malls; and wholesale and warehousing operations.
Gov. David Ige announcing his 7th Supplemental
Emergency Proclamation for the pandemic.
Photo from khon.com
     Already approved are florists, certain real estate services, car dealerships, automated and mobile service providers, services provided on a one-on-one basis, and golf courses.
     To stay open requires social distancing, sanitation, and compliance with workplace safety guidelines, as outlined in the governor's emergency guidelines proclamation.
     Places of businesses, including malls, will be responsible to prevent people from gathering, and enforcing other required health standards, such as wearing face coverings, the governor said.
     Read the proclamation here.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SOME ISLAND NATIONS ARE PLANNING A TRAVEL BUBBLE after largely conquering the COVID-19 challenge. They propose safe visitation and economic recovery through tourism in their travel bubble. Travel from places with any significant COVID-19 would be banned.
     A story from National Geographic on Tuesday says, "New Zealand's success in moving toward eliminating the coronavirus is a bright light in a dark season."National Geographic author Aaron Gulley writes, "While governments worldwide have vacillated on how to respond and ensuing cases of the virus have soared, New Zealand has set an uncompromising, science-driven example."  New Zealand "used strict lockdowns and austerity measures to bring COVID-19 to heel."
     The story quotes New Zealand's 39-year old Prime Minister, Jacinda Arden: "We have the opportunity to do something no other country has achieved: elimination of the virus."
Will New Zealand and Australia create a safe Travel Bubble? Will
Hawaiian Islands do the same? Will they share?
     The story turns to travel and reports that "Cooperative plans for economic recovery will play another part in creating our post-COVID world. New reports that New Zealand and Australia are discussing the possibility of creating a 'travel bubble' between the two nations (separated by 1,243 miles of sea) offer a promising proposal for leveraging tourism dollars to support communities in need. This plan might especially benefit Kiwis, as tourism is the country's biggest export industry. It will be interesting to see what other recovery plans emerge."
     The story also quotes Winston Churchill who said: "I am an optimist. It does not seem too much use being anything else."
     West Kaʻū's state Rep. Richard Creagan said on Tuesday that East Kaʻū's state Sen. Russell Ruderman is a leader in supporting interisland travel without 14 days of quarantine, while leaving the quarantine in place for all those coming from outside of the state. Creagan said he is also supportive of a Travel Bubble for Hawaiʻi, given credible testing and continued COVID-19 tracing. The local community could enjoy the visitor accommodations to themselves. The host could provide discounted rates, and hard-hit visitor industry employees could get some work, according to the two legislators. Creagan said that with success, perhaps Australia and New Zealand could accept Hawaiʻi as part of their Travel Bubble.
     The population of Australia and New Zealand combined is about 30 million, about the same as a combined Southern California and Oregon. The Australia-New Zealand Travel Bubble could provide a potentially sound travel exchange opportunity for the Hawaiʻi Islands and their southern sister island nations.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

James Koshiba, of Hui Aloha, predicts
more homeless people with sustained
unemployment.
MORE PEOPLE MAY BECOME HOMELESS after losing their jobs during the pandemic. James Koshiba, co-founder of the volunteer homeless support group Hui Aloha, spoke to the state House of Representatives Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness on Monday. He said he expects a wave of additional homeless people in the near future due to unemployment caused by the pandemic.
     Koshiba said people who cannot pay their rent now because they are unemployed, but have temporary state protection from eviction, could become homeless when that aid expires at the end of July. He said most homeless programs target chronic homeless people rather than the recently unemployed families who could soon find themselves on the streets. He submitted a working document to the committee detailing some of the issues, opportunities, and possible priorities that can help prevent a housing crisis in the coming months.
     Koshiba suggested that government and private sector groups leverage their resources now to limit the number of people soon to become homeless by building up social service staffing to help people find much-needed support programs and by using federal funds to build low-cost permanent affordable housing.

Sheryl Matsuoka, of Hawaiʻi Restaurant Association
presents a blueprint for reopening.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE HAWAIʻI RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION addressed the state House of Representatives Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness on Monday. Sheryl Matsuoka, Executive Director of the Hawaiʻi Restaurant Association, said the health and safety of staff and customers is the organization's top priority, and referred the committee to the National Restaurant Association's reopening guidance document as a blueprint for Hawaiʻi businesses.
     Matsuoka said the national guidance can be adjusted for local businesses, but the basic rules include food safety, cleaning and sanitizing, employee health monitoring and personal hygiene, and physical distancing.
     Matsuoka said many restaurants have been functioning as take-out only and are ready to reopen as soon as possible. They have moved tables at least six feet apart in their dining rooms, sanitized their spaces, and are ready to bring back staff. "We want to be ready to go when we get the green light," Matsuoka said.

Tina Yamaki, President of Retail Merchants
of Hawaiʻi, said guidelines for retail
operations should be available this week.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

RETAIL MERCHANTS OF HAWAIʻI took guidelines before the Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness on Monday. Tina Yamaki, President of Retail Merchants of Hawaiʻi, said her members are working on finalizing guidelines for retail operations this week. Yamaki said grocery stores, pharmacies, clothing shops, and kiosks all have very different requirements. She said the National Retail Federation has created guidelines on reopening retail stores called Operation Open Doors.
     Yamaki said merchants don't expect a flood of shoppers to return to stores quickly, returning only when they feel safe. Merchants are considering starting with curbside pickups, online ordering, limiting physical contact, and reduced store occupancy. She said association members are also concerned about safety, with customers wearing masks, dark glasses, and hats while shopping. To prevent thefts, some stores are considering shorter business hours, new security measures, and limiting store access.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Dr. Mark Mugiishi, HMSA President & CEO, said
Hawaiʻi is at the orange level, supporting some opening
of businesses, with continuation of screening, testing,
tracking, and quarantine throughout the community.
THE PUBLIC HEALTH RECOVERY PLAN, developed by the Select Committee on COVID-19 Economic and Financial Preparedness, drew comments Monday from Hawaiʻi Medical Service
Association President & CEO Dr. Mark Mugiishi. He said that according to the four risk levels in the Public Health Recovery Plan developed by the House COVID-19 Task Force, Hawaiʻi is now in the second from highest, or orange alert level. The orange level is supportive of some businesses reopening while the state continues with its public health including screening, testing, tracking, and quarantine measures.
     For more information about the committee and to see related documents go to capitol.hawaii.gov/special
committee.aspx?comm=cov&year=2020.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KUPU ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP will be funded through AmeriCorps' receipt of $4 million for Hawaiʻi. Sen. Mazie Hirono made the announcement Tuesday, saying the AmeriCorps funding includes Kupu, Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi's Project Kaulike, and Hawaiʻi Commission for National and Community Service programs.
     Corporation for National and Community Service is the federal agency that manages AmeriCorps and other national service programs. It awarded $4,215,326 to Hawaiʻi. Kupu will receive approximately $2.29 million, Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi will receive $174,648, and the Hawaiʻi Commission on National and Community Service will receive $716,156 for its state competitive-funded programs and formula-funded programs. The funds will support more than 270 AmeriCorps members in Hawaiʻi.
KUPU will receive $2.29 million for its environmental job training
program, through AmeriCorps. Photo from KUPU 
     The Kupu Environmental Stewardship project will engage more than 250 AmeriCorps members to remove invasive species, plant native vegetation, and support streams and trails across the state on Hawaiʻi Island, as well as the islands of Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, and Maui.
     The Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi's Project Kaulike's 20 AmeriCorps members will assist Hawaiʻi's low-income residents in navigating the justice system and any civil legal issues they may face.
     "AmeriCorps members in Hawaiʻi support some of our state's critical programs. From keeping our treasured environment clean to assisting low- and moderate-income individuals with the justice system, I am grateful for the work that hundreds of AmeriCorps members do every year in our state."
     Earlier this year, Hirono cosponsored a resolution recognizing the contributions of AmeriCorps members and alumni to the United States. Additionally, she signed a letter requesting continued support for CNCS programs like AmeriCorps in Fiscal Year 2021. Last year, she signed a similar letter, requesting support for these programs in Fiscal Year 2020.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MOTHER'S DAY FRESH FOODS ON THE KAʻŪ CALENDAR FEATURE THREE LOCAL RESTAURANTS with special take-out menus.
     South Side Shaka Restaurant & Bar in Nāʻālehu is offering a Mother's Day take-out special of Prime Rib for $25.95, beginning at  on Sunday, May 10. Meals must be pre-ordered at 929-7404. Delivery is available for the Nāʻālehu, Green Sands, and Discovery Harbour areas. Check for delivery elsewhere for large family orders.
     Daily, the restaurant offers a full takeout menu from  to , with bar service on the lanai only. The restaurant also offers delivery in Nāʻālehu, Green Sands, and Discovery Harbour. See more at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar. Call 929-7404.

     Kīlauea Lodge at 19-3948 on Old Volcano Hwy, is open for take out by calling 808-967-7366. Call for the special Mother's Day menu. A 15 percent discount from prices on the standard menu is offered. Take out breakfast from  to , and lunch and dinner from  to  Special family meal offers are posted on the Kīlauea Lodge Facebook, along with a menu link. Wine is available by the bottle and beer is available by the bottle and can. See more at 

Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.
     Lava Rock Café will have special offerings for Mother's Day breakfast. The restaurant is open for take-out by calling the adjacent Kīlauea General Store at 967-7555. Hours for pick-up are , daily. Alcohol is available in Kīlauea General Store. See lavarock.cafe. See more at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.
     See a directory of fresh food available in Kaʻū and Volcano – a list of farmers and ranchers, restaurateurs, food and pharmacy retailers at Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Full course meals and a card were gifted to Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic staff by the Kekoa ʻohana. Photo from Merilyn Harris
DONNA KEKOA'S FAMILY SURPRISED Kaʻū Hospital and Rural Health Clinic staff with full course meals recently. Kekoa told The Kaʻū Calendar that she was moved by her family's gift of cards and food for the staff, since her children and grandchildren no longer live in Kaʻū, but wanted to honor the community where they grew up.
Full course meals and a card were gifted to Kaʻū Hospital
staff by the Kekoa ʻohana. Photo from Merilyn Harris
     Merilyn Harris, Administrator at Kaʻū Hospital and Rural Health Clinic, told The Kaʻū Calendar, "We had a wonderful surprise at Kaʻū Hospital and Rural Health clinic last week when Donna Kekoa's daughters and their families presented both the clinic (and) hospital with two lovely thank you cards for their service to the community and full course meals for the entire staff! It was incredibly thoughtful and brought tears to her proud mother's eyes."
     Harris asked The Kaʻū Calendar"to share our heartfelt thanks to such a thoughtful family."
     One card is inscribed, "Mahalo Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic for continuing to service our community. You are recognized and greatly appreciated. Thank You! Blessings to you all, Shulen Hashimoto, Tiffany Rosenthal, Camilyn Javar, and our ʻOhana." Donna Kekoa is a staff member of Kaʻū Rural Health Clinic.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
FOUR NEW CASES OF COVID-19 were reported in the state today, bringing the total to 625. All four were on Oʻahu. No new cases were reported for Hawaiʻi Island, where the count remains at 74.
     So far, 63 victims on this island have been released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by Department of Health. No one is hospitalized and no one died on this island.

     In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno said, "The people of Hawaiʻi Island and the State of Hawaiʻiare doing very well in minimizing the spread and impact of COVID-19. It is so important to follow these policies of distancing, gatherings, face coverings, cleanliness, and physical and emotional care. Your help is needed to follow the policies to stop this coronavirus from affecting the beautiful lifestyle of Hawaiʻi. Thank you for listening and have a good day. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

     Statewide, the death toll is 17. Five hundred fifty-one of the 625 victims are released from isolation.

     In the United States, more than 1.23 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 164,000. The death toll is over 71,912.
     Worldwide, more than 3.65 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 1.19 million. The death toll is over 256,894.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Protesters against discrimination and hate crimes focused
on Asians. Photo from Asian America Commission
ENDING CORONAVIRUS-RELATED ANTI-ASIAN DISCRIMINATION AND HATE CRIMES is the goal of Sen. Mazie Hirono and colleagues. In a letter, Hirono, Senators Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Amy Klobuchar and 11 other Senators urged the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division to "take concrete steps to address the surge in discrimination and hate crimes" against Asian American and Pacific Islander individuals. The recommendations are similar to those DOJ has taken in the past, to address jumps in discrimination and hate crimes against a particular community. They include: a plan to address coronavirus-related hate crimes and discrimination; designation of an official to coordinate an interagency response and a review of these incidents; monthly updates to Congress; public outreach and engagement with Asian American and Pacific Islander community leaders; and distribution of materials about civil rights protections in diverse languages.
     Hirono's office says the senators sent this letter after Asian American organizations collected nearly 1,500 incidents of anti-Asian harassment and discrimination, in the last month alone.
     The senators called the federal response to "these racist and xenophobic attacks,""inadequate… a sharp break from the efforts of past administrations, Republican and Democratic alike.

     "There are more than 20 million Americans of Asian descent, and 2 million AAPI individuals are working on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, as health care workers, law enforcement agents, first responders, and other essential service providers. It is critical that the Civil Rights Division ensure that the civil and constitutional rights of all Americans are protected during this pandemic." Read the letter here.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     Beginning tomorrow, Wednesday, May 6, a testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

     The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
     The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

     The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
     The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
     Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
     Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
     Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.


Register for Volcano's ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash by Wednesday, July 22. The second annual event will be held on Saturday, July 25. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to University of Hawaiʻi for furthering research of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. See webscorer.com to register.
     Half Marathon registration is $70 through May 24, $80 May 25 through July 22, and $90 for late registration. Registration for the 10K is $50 through May 24, $55 May 25 through Jul 22, and $60 for late registration. Registration for the 5K is $35 through May 24, $40 May 25 through July 22, and $45 for late registration. Keiki Dash registration is $10. All registrations are non-transferable and non-refundable.
     Late registration is only available at packet pickup or race day morning. Shirts are not guaranteed for late registration.  Race Shirts will be included for Half Marathon and 10K participants only. For all other participants, shirts are available to purchase online.
     Packet pick-up is scheduled for Thursday, July 23 in Hilo; Friday, July 26 in Volcano; and Saturday, July 27,  at the race start.
     Half Marathon will start at  Other distances follow shortly after. Keiki Dash will begin at  on VSAS grounds, with the option of one or two laps – about 300 meters or 600 meters. Race cut-off time for the Half Marathon is four hours. The races will begin and end in Volcano Village at VSAS.
     See ohialehuahalf.com.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.





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