Quantcast
Channel: The Kaʻū Calendar News Briefs, Hawaiʻi Island
Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 3173

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, May 6, 2020

0
0
Manuka State Park is open for hiking and walking in Kaʻū. Photo from Hawaiʻi Scenic Byways

MORE BUSINESSES WILL BE ABLE TO OPEN ON HAWAIʻI ISLAND, under Mayor Harry Kim's Emergency Rule NO. 4 issued Wednesday, May 6. It reopens private and public golf courses, with the announcement that Hilo Municipal on Monday, May 11, with modified rules for play and social distancing requirements, will open.
     Also able to open with restrictions and guidelines are: all real estate services; all florists, nurseries, and sales of plants; bicycle shops for sales and repairs; bookstores; jewelry shops for sales and repairs; pet grooming and boarding facilities; shops that sell walking and running shoes, apparel, and exercise equipment; shops that sell surf and swimming equipment; and automated service providers that don't involve human interaction, like car washes.
     A statement from the mayor says that "Anyone needing assistance in providing a safe and healthy business for employees and customers, contact the COVID task force on education and Prevention at 935-0031."
Suisan Drive Thru at Punaluʻu Bake Shop
Suisan Foodservice is bringing some of its wholesale foods
 to Nāʻālehu Bake Shop for sale in a drive-thru tomorrow,
Thursday, May 7, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., selling Aloha Packs
with pork back ribs, chicken, pork butt, New York steaks,
butter, and fries. Add-on items are pork loin, mayonnaise
gallons, pork link sausages, chicken nuggets, and
onion rings. Image from Suisan
     The new rule reminds folks that the "COVID-19 disease is easily transmitted, especially in group settings, and it is essential that the spread of the virus be slowed to protect the ability of public and private health care providers to handle an influx of new patients, and to safeguard public health and safety.
     "Because of the dangerous conditions caused by the risk of rapid spread of the disease and the need to protect the residents of this County, this rule requires all individuals anywhere in this County to stay at home or in their place of residence except for conducting permitted essential activities, performing permitted activities outside the home or place of residence, operation of an essential business or governmental operation, or other designated businesses and operations. Know the importance of staying mentally, physically, and socially healthy within these rules."
     Permitted Essential Activities include: Engaging in solitary outdoor exercise activity including walking, hiking, or running; obtaining necessary services or supplies for an individual or that individual's family or household members, such as getting food, pet food, and supplies necessary for staying at home; performing work related to operation of an essential business or essential government function; caring for a family member in another household; caring for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with a disability, or other vulnerable at-risk persons; and tasks related to maintaining health and safety, such as obtaining medicine or seeing a doctor.
     All businesses require the wearing of face coverings when interacting with employees and customers, and the six-foot distancing between everyone not living in the same household.
     Those failing to follow distancing and face mask-wearing rules, may be subject to a fine up to $5,000 or one year of imprisonment. 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

CHILD CARE SERVICES CAN REOPEN on Wednesday, with Gov. David Ige naming them essential. Child care providers will be required to maintain social distancing between children and for the children's families when bringing and retrieving them from the child care centers.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

NO RENTAL CARS FOR VISITORS FROM NEIGHBOR ISLANDS OR THE MAINLAND will be allowed until they finish their 14 days of quarantine at their accommodations. The effort is to make it more difficult for those from out of state to vacation here until the pandemic is over. It also aims to stop the visitors from sneaking away from their quarantine quarters.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SAFETY CHECK STATIONS will be allowed to operate, according to the state Department of Transportation. The waiver allowing safety check stickers expiring on or before May 31 will still remain valid until Aug. 31. There is no waiver for motor vehicle registrations and insurance.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

WAIʻŌHINU COUNTY PARK AND MANUKA STATE WAYSIDE, both in Kaʻū, are reopening, along with some of the other parks around the island. Manuka is available for hiking and walking along its Nature Trail through the 13.5 mile Manuka Natural Area Reserve, daily, from 7 a.m. to  4 p.m. Restrooms are open. Waiʻōhinu, with its large field, is open for exercising.



To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, FOOD BASKET, HAWAIʻI COUNTY ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL, AND HOPE SERVICES will receive funding for their relief services during the pandemic, with a $1.54 million grant to the County Office of Housing and Community Development. The money comes from the federal government in a Block Grant.
     Mayor Harry Kim said today, "These funds made available by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development are greatly appreciated, and will be such an asset to these programs that provide much-needed services during these hard times. It is noted that all of these funds will be allocated to those nonprofits to give direct services to those in need."
The Food Basket will receive a $643,000 grant from a County of Hawai`i federal block grant. The non-profit provides
14 days of food regularly to residents of Ka`u and the rest of the island, with drive thru service like this one
at Ka`u High & Pahala Elementary where O Ka`u Kakou also lends many hands. Photo by Julia Neal
     The Boys and Girls Club of the Big Island will receive $200,000 to support their food preparation and delivery program, which serves vulnerable populations (homeless, and poverty level elderly and families), as well as households residing in rural communities. The Food Basket will receive $643,000 to support their food distribution programs, including the ʻOhana Food Drop program, in which they partner with local farmers, organizations, and businesses to provide and distribute food and prepared meals to those in need.
     Hawaiʻi County Economic Opportunity Council (HCEOC) will receive $150,000 to support its food preparation and delivery program, serving the elderly and disabled population.
     Hope Services, in partnership with the County of Hawaiʻi, will utilize its $300,000 allocation to provide emergency rent and mortgage assistance payments to those impacted by COVID-19, who meet the income requirements.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


TODAY KICKS OFF NURSES' WEEK. "With nurses risking their lives every day to keep the U.S.safe from COVID-19 and National Nurses Week kicking off May 6," WalletHub yesterday released its report on 2020's Best & Worst States for Nurses.

     WalletHub says, "The U.S. has gained a profound appreciation for nurses during the coronavirus pandemic, as they risk their lives every day to minimize the spread of the disease. That situation is made even more difficult by critical shortages of respirators, surgical masks, gloves, gowns, and other necessary protective treatment. It's more important now than ever for states to step up and make sure that nurses are properly equipped to do their jobs and have the best work environment possible.

     "Despite the stresses of the occupation, nurses are generally well-rewarded for their life-saving work. Nursing occupations are some of the most lucrative careers, with a mean annual wage of over $75,000 and some of the lowest unemployment rates in the U.S.In fact, the industry is expected to grow at more than double the rate of the average occupation through 2028."
     In order to help new nursing graduates find the best markets for their profession, WalletHub compared the relative attractiveness of the 50 states across 22 key metrics. The data set ranges from monthly average starting salary for nurses to health-care facilities per capita to nursing-job openings per capita.
     Hawaiʻi ranked 48th, ahead of New York at 50th and Louisiana at 49th. Alabamaand Oklahoma ranked 47th and 46th. The best states for nurses are Oregon, Washington, New Mexico, Minnesota, and Nevada.
     Hawaiʻi ranks 50th in the number of Nursing-Job Openings. Here, 66.04 percent of nursing professionals do not work in nursing, making Hawaiʻi's rank 48th worst.
     The average starting salaries for nurses in Hawaiʻi is $1,912, the 45th lowest when adjusted for cost of living. The top-ranked states' nurses start closer to $2,000 or more per month. The average salary for nurses in Hawaiʻi is the 42nd lowest.
     Hawaiʻi has the 44th lowest number of health facilities per capita, and was not ranked in quality of nursing schools, as there are none in the state. There are 9.06 nurses per 1,000 residents, placing Hawaiʻi with the third lowest rank. The quality of the public hospital system in the state is ranked 45th, according to WalletHub
     The AlohaState also ranked 43rd in overall Opportunity & Competition, and 39th in overall Work Environment for nurses. Hawaiʻi hospitals ranked 33rd in Friendliness Toward Working Moms, 15th in average number of work hours, and 40th in average commute hours.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY URGES EVERYONE TO HELP SAVE THE U.S.POSTAL SERVICE, "one of the oldest and most vital public services in our nation." According to the message from the Democratic National Committee, USPS is "currently on track to run out of money in just a few months... It's absolutely urgent we come together now to save this vital public service. Add your name to demand the USPS be properly funded before it's too late by signing the petition at I'M IN."

     The statement says that dismantling the United States Postal Service would risk:

     "The livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of hardworking postal workers during a global health crisis when unemployment numbers continue to skyrocket. Postal workers continue to work on the front lines during this crisis, keeping our economy going by making sure folks like you and me get the resources we need;


     "Further disconnecting rural, poor, and native communities from their needs. The USPS delivers all mail at a flat rate regardless of distance -- ensuring that no matter where you live, you can get your medication, pay your bills, and stay connected at an affordable rate;
The motto of the U.S. Postal Service, inscribed in stone at the
James A. Farley post office building in New York City:
"Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stays these
couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds."
     "Accessible vote-by-mail. It has been in practice in many states and localities and is made possible by the USPS. Now, more than ever, we should be scaling up vote-by-mail capabilities to ensure a safe, secure general election."
     The message also notes that the "vital public service" is carried out by 600,000 postal workers, frontline workers. The U.S. Postal Service makes it possible for every postal address to receive the print version of The Kaʻū Calendar newspaper at no cost to the reader. Sign the petition here.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ATTEND A WEBINAR ON FUNDING FOR COMMERCIAL AG PRODUCERS on Friday, May 8, from 

     Agencies and organizations will speak at the webinar about how and where to apply for loans, grants, the Small Business Administration's programs, and more.

     Speaking at the event will be representatives from The Kohala Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency, Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture, Hawaiʻi Community Reinvestment Corp., Feed the Hunger Fund, American AgCredit, West Oʻahu Soil and Water Conservation District, GoFarm Hawaiʻi, and Hawaiʻi and Maui County Extensions of University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
     Agricultural producers can sign up at zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIude2sqDMoG9ZsN_wWcUtH5k88Vamj8NqG. Questions?
Contact Kylie Tavares at kylielw@hawaii.edu or Janel Yamamoto at janelnoy@hawaii.edu.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PAYING TRIBUTE TO ESSENTIAL WORKERS SHOULD INCLUDE ESSENTIAL PAY and benefits, is the message from Sen. Mazie Hirono today. In an email to her supporters, she said, "On May 1st, we observed May Day and paid tribute to workers and laborers, in honor of the hundreds of thousands of workers who fought together in a nationwide strike for an eight-hour workday in 1886. In the midst of a global pandemic, May Day bears a new significance.

     "I am so grateful for those working on the frontline of this pandemic who keep us safe. Millions of Americans work long hours and put their own health and safety at risk to provide the essential services and supplies we need. 
     "We rely on workers in grocery stores, pharmacies, delivery services, food service and healthcare like never before. While these workers have been deemed essential during this pandemic, they are not treated as such -- many are hourly minimum wage workers who cannot earn a living wage, and now they are forced to work in unsafe conditions and risk their own health.

Sen. Mazie Hirono
     "When we finally get through this difficult time -- and we will get through it -- we cannot return to business as usual. We must make drastic changes to the way we treat workers in our country -- with paid sick leave, child care, and a living wage. We must provide essential workers with hazard pay and safe working conditions. We cannot allow multi-national corporations to continue taking advantage of their workers, especially as we are dependent on them to get through the pandemic.

     "This crisis has exacerbated and shed a light on inequality in our country. It's important for us to remember that people are experiencing the pandemic very differently. We don't know what the future holds. We face uncertainty and unanswered questions each day as stay-at-home orders are being extended across the country. But there are things we can all do to ensure we emerge from this united and stronger than before."

     Hirono pointed out that all people should be wearing face coverings, continue social distancing, and follow health and safety guidelines from local and federal government and healthcare professionals. "We have seen these guidelines make a difference in the communities that have been impacted from the coronavirus."

     She also said that being kind and lending a helping hand to others is needed. She suggested offering to pick up groceries for seniors or someone with a preexisting condition who can't make it to the store, or making a contribution to local food banks or other local social service nonprofits helping those most affected by the pandemic. "We are all hearing and reading stories about the unprecedented increase of need and the hardship individuals and families are experiencing… We are all facing unprecedented challenges, and those challenges come with stress and anxiety. We are all adapting to a new normal, and from this experience we see the difference we can make by supporting each other.

     "We're all in this together. Be kind to yourself, your family, and to those around you. Take care of each other. Lend a helping hand -- so that we can pull out of this together, as one big ʻohana.

     "In Hawaiʻi we celebrate May Day as Lei Day. This May Day was designated a special 'Na Lei Koa Day,' a chance to display our aloha and to thank all essential workers by making and displaying lei. The coronavirus pandemic has not wavered the spirit of aloha -- it has only strengthened it and demonstrated our resilience.
     "Stay safe, stay healthy, be kind."


No COVID-19 cases so far in the zip code areas of Volcano, 
Pāhala, and Ocean View. White indicates zero cases, light 
yellow indicates one to five cases. The 96772 area in 
Kaʻū has one case recorded. Map from DOH
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ONE NEW CASE OF COVID-19 was reported in the state today, bringing the total to 626. No new cases were reported for Hawaiʻi Island, which remains at 74. So far, 66 victims have been released from isolation. The remainder are quarantined at home and monitored by Department of Health. No one is hospitalized and no one has died on this island.

     COVID-19 testing was conducted today in Kaʻū at St. Jude's by Aloha Critical Care from Kona and Pathways Telehealth. St. Jude's hosts testing every other Wednesday from to On other Wednesdays, the next being May 13, Nāʻālehu Community Center will offer free testing from Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group, and Pathways Telehealth. Free tests are also offered at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600. Wearing masks is required for everyone. See below for details on how to get pre-screened and for more safety guidelines.

     In the daily message from Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense, Director Talmadge Magno thanked the groups running testing and said, "The Island and State of Hawaiʻiare doing very well in minimizing the spread and the impact of COVID-19. It is so important to ramp up all the preventive measures so we can get Hawaiʻi better and keep Hawaiʻi Safe and stop this virus from affecting the beautiful lifestyle of Hawaiʻi. Thank you for listening and to all the nurses, thank you, thank you, and a grateful and happy National Nurses Day to you. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense."

Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno.
     Statewide, the death toll remains at 17. Five hundred fifty-eight people are released from isolation.

     In the United States, more than 1.25 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 167,000. The death toll is over 73,667, with over 2,400 new deaths since yesterday.
     Worldwide, more than 3.74 million cases have been confirmed. Recovery is about 1.24 million. The death toll is over 263,068. The US leads the world by more than double the number of deaths of any other country.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

VOLCANO'S ʻŌHIʻA LEHUA HALF MARATHON and other races are canceled. Scheduled for Saturday, July 25, the second annual event included a Half Marathon, 10K, 5K, and Keiki Dash. A portion of the proceeds was to be donated to University of Hawaiʻifor furthering research on Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death and to The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences.

     A message on social media from Hawaiʻi Island Racers says, "We have decided to cancel our 2020 Volcano's ʻŌhi'a Lehua Runs. With the continued threat of the pandemic and the safety of our island at stake, our HIR family feels that we are making the best decision for our community. We are still trying to determine what, if any, type of refund we can offer. Thank you for your continued patience."
     See ohialehuahalf.com.



To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

DONATIONS OF 500-PLUS UNUSED, REUSABLE OR PLASTIC BAGS are requested by The Farm Bureau and Hawaiʻi Food Banks. The "urgent need" will be used for food distribution programs. The message from Nicole Pfeffer of Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture said, "Top priority bags are reusable bags, but we will also accept plastic bags. If you have at least 500 bags that you are willing to donate, please contact Nicole Pfeffer – Nicole.y.pfeffer@hawaii.gov or 808-973-9573. We, unfortunately, are not able to accept previously used bags due to sanitization and food safety issues."

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com. However, all non-essential activities are canceled through the end of May.

MOST EVENTS ARE CANCELLED to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus. The state is under a stay-at-home order, with l4 days of quarantine required for anyone coming into the state. Interisland travel is restricted. Those in Hawaiʻi should stay at home unless needing to obtain food or medical care.

ONGOING
Free COVID-19 Screenings are at Bay Clinic during business hours, with appointment. Call 333-3600.
     A testing team from Aloha Critical Care in Kona will provide testing at St. Jude's every other Wednesday. The next date is May 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     The next drive-thru screening at Nāʻālehu Community Center will be held Wednesday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Screening will be carried out by Aliʻi Health, with support from County of Hawai‘i COVID-19 Task Force, Premier Medical Group and Pathways Telehealth.
     Wearing masks is required for everyone.
     To bypass the screening queue at community test sites, patients can call ahead to Pathways Telehealth, option 5 at 808-747-8321. The free clinic will also offer on-site screening to meet testing criteria. Physicians qualify those for testing, under the guidance of Center for Disease Control & Prevention and Hawaiʻi's COVID-19 Response Task Force.
     Those visiting screening clinics will be asked to show photo ID, and any health insurance cards – though health insurance is not required to be tested. They are also asked to bring their own pen to fill in forms.
     For further information, call Civil Defense at 935-0031.

Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary weekdays through May. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered to Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org.

The Food Basket Food Pantries Distribution, where families can receive 14 days of food per family:

     The Ocean View location for May is Kahuku Park on Monday, May 11, 10 a.m. to noon. Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
     The Nāʻālehu location Sacred Heart Church at 95-558 Mamālahoa Hwy, under their Loaves and Fishes program, on Thursday, May 28 from  to  Call 928-8208.

     The Pāhala location is Kaʻū District Gym at 96-1149 Kamani Street, distributed by the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Pantry, on Tuesday, May 26,  Call The Food Basket, 933-6030.
     The Volcano location is Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road Wednesday, May 27 from 10 a.m. to noon. Call Kehau at 443-4130.


On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 967-7800 to confirm.

The Next Learning Packet and Student Resource Distribution for Nāʻālehu Elementary School Students will be Monday, May 11. The packets are designed for learning at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be picked up every two weeks. One family member may pick up for several students in the same family. Students need not be present for the learning resources to be retrieved. Please note the grade of each child. Distribution times are organized by the first letter of the student's last name at the site closest to their home. Supplies will be given out simultaneously.
     Everyone is asked to observe social distancing rules, staying 6 feet away from others during pick-up. See the school website, naalehuel.hidoe.us, for more information and updates.
     Distribution at Nāʻālehu Elementary has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
     Distribution at Discovery Harbour Community Center has pick-up from 8 a.m - 8:20 a.m. for A-H;  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
     Distribution at Ocean View Mālama Market has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.

     Distribution at Ocean View Community Center has pick-up from  for A-H,  for I-P, and  for Q-Z.
     Those who come to campus to pick up free student breakfasts are encouraged to also pick up their packets at the same time.

Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium Closed for Renovation through June 30. The Park is closed until further notice due to COVID-19 spread mitigation. A popular seven-and-a-half minute 2018 eruption video will be shown on a television in the exhibits area, once the Park and center reopen, and is available online for free download.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.







Viewing all articles
Browse latest Browse all 3173

Latest Images

Trending Articles





Latest Images